Skip to main content

Full text of "Statistics of farmer cooperatives, 1962-63"

See other formats


Historic, archived document 

Do not assume content reflects current 
scientific knowledge, policies, or practices. 



u 







. z- 






STATISTICS OF 

FARMER 

COOPERATIVES 



by BRUCE L. SWANSON 



1962 - 1963 



FARMER COOPERATIVE SERVICE 
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 
GENERAL REPORT NO. 128 'JULY 1965 



FARMER COOPERATIVE SERVICE 

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE 

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20250 

Joseph G. Knapp, Administrator 



The Farmer Cooperative Service conducts research 
studies and service activities of assistance to farmers in 
connection with cooperatives engaged in marketing farm 
products, purchasing farm supplies, and supplying business 
services. The work of the Service relates to problems of 
management, organization, policies, merchandising, product 
quality, costs, efficiency, financing, and membership. 

The Service publishes the results of such studies; 
confers and advises with officials of farmer cooperatives; 
and works with educational agencies, cooperatives, and 
others in the dissemination of information relating to 
cooperative principles and practices. 



Acknowledgment is made to Anne L. Gessner, Chief, 
History and Statistics Branch, under whose authorship this 
publication has appeared in previous years, for general 
supervision and planning in this study; and to Jane H. Click, 
History and Statistics Branch, for her substantial contri- 
bution in the analysis of material necessary for the 
preparation of this report. 



CONTENTS 

Page 

List of tables ii 

Highlights v 

Cooperative business 1 

Local and regional volumes 5 

Geographic areas 6 

Supply volume 9 

Feed 10 

Petroleum products 12 

Fertilizer 14 

Seed 15 

Building materials 16 

Farm machinery and equipment 17 

Sprays and dusts 18 

Meats and groceries 19 

Containers and packaging supplies 20 

Miscellaneous supplies 21 

Marketing volume 23 

Dairy products 25 

Grain, soybeans, soybean meal and oil 25 

Livestock and livestock products 27 

Fruits and vegetables 30 

Special crops 30 

Sugar products 30 

Tobacco 30 

Rice 33 

Beans and peas (dry edible) 33 

Cotton and cotton products 34 

Poultry products 34 

Nuts 35 

Wool and mohair 38 

Miscellaneous 39 

Services 40 

Composition of farmer cooperatives 56 

Number 56 

Memberships 63 

Appendix 68 

Classification of cooperatives 68 

Cooperative participation 69 

Cooperatives furnishing information 70 

Procedures for obtaining information 70 



LIST OF TABLES 



Page 



1. Estimated business of marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 
1950-51 to 1962-63 3 

2. Estimated business in specified commodity and service groups of marketing, 

farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1962-63 4 

3. Estimated percentage of farmer cooperatives performing marketing, farm supply, 

or service activities in addition to major function, 1953-54 to 1962-63 5 

4. Estimated marketing business of local and regional cooperatives, by specified 
commodity groups, 1962-63 6 

5. Estimated supply business of local and regional cooperatives, by specified 
commodity groups, 1962-63 7 

6. States ranked according to percentage of total net business volume handled by 
cooperatives, 1962-63 8 

7. Estimated net value of farm supplies handled by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 11 

8. Estimated net value of feed handled by cooperatives in the 10 ranking States 

in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 12 

9. Estimated net value of petroleum products handled by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 14 

10. Estimated net value of fertilizer handled by cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 16 

11. Estimated net value of seed handled by cooperatives in the 10 ranking States in 
1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 17 

12. Estimated net value of building materials handled by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 18 

13. Estimated net value of farm machinery and equipment handled by cooperatives 

in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 19 

14. Estimated net value of sprays and dusts (farm chemicals) handled by cooperatives 

in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 20 

15. Estimated net value of meats and groceries handled by cooperatives in the 

10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 21 

16. Estimated net value of containers and packaging supplies handled by cooperatives 

in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 22 

17. Estimated net value of miscellaneous farm supplies handled by cooperatives in 

the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 23 

18. Estimated net value of farm products marketed by cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 24 

19. Estimated net value of dairy products marketed by cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 26 

20. Estimated net value of grain, soybeans, and soybean meal and oil marketed by 
cooperatives in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 28 

21. Estimated net value of livestock and livestock products marketed by cooperatives 

in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 29 

22. Estimated net value of fruits and vegetables marketed by cooperatives in the 

10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 31 

ii 



Page 

23. Estimated net value of sugar products marketed by cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 32 

24. Estimated net value of tobacco marketed by cooperatives in the 10 ranking States 

in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 33 

25. Estimated net value of rice marketed by cooperatives in the 5 ranking States in 
1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 34 

26. Estimated net value of dry beans and peas marketed by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 35 

27. Estimated net value of cotton and cotton products marketed by cooperatives in the 

10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 36 

28. Estimated net value of poultry products marketed by cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 37 

29. Estimated net value of nuts marketed by cooperatives in the 10 ranking States in 
1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 38 

30. Estimated net value of wool and mohair marketed by cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 39 

31. Estimated net value of miscellaneous farm products marketed by cooperatives in 

the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 40 

32. Estimated value of service receipts in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their 

rank in 1953-54 41 

33. Estimated value of farm supplies purchased and services furnished by cooperatives, 

by specified commodity groups, 1950-51 to 1962-63 „ 42 

34. Estimated value of farm products marketed by cooperatives, by specified commodity 
groups, 1950-51 to 1962-63 44 

35. Estimates of gross and net sales of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related 
service cooperatives by commodity groups, geographic divisions, and States, 
1962-63 46 

36. Number and percent of marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 
1950-51 to 1962-63 57 

37. Number and estimated memberships of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related 
service cooperatives, 1962-63 58 

38. Memberships in marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1950-51 

to 1962-63 63 

39. Number and estimated memberships of farmer marketing cooperatives, by specified 
commodity groups, 1962-63 64 

40. Number and estimated memberships of marketing, farm supply, and related service 
cooperatives, by specified commodity groups, for local and regional cooperatives, 
1962-63 65 

41. Number and estimated memberships of farmer marketing cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 66 

42. Number and estimated memberships of farm supply cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 66 



in 



Appendix 



Page 

1. Cooperatives furnishing information for survey, 1950-51 to 1962-63 70 

2. Number and percent of returns from 8,907 cooperatives, 1962-63 71 

3. Number, memberships, and dollar volume of marketing, farm supply, and related 
service cooperatives, by States, 1962-63 72 

4. Estimated business in specified commodity and service groups of marketing, farm 
supply, and related service cooperatives, 1961-62 73 

5. Number listed of marketing and farm supply cooperatives for specified periods, 

1913 to 1949-50 74 

6. Estimated membership of marketing and farm supply cooperatives for specified 
periods, 1915 to 1949-50 75 

7. Estimated business of marketing and farm supply cooperatives for specified periods, 

1913 to 1949-50 76 

8. Number of farmers' mutual fire insurance companies, insurance in force, and 
costs, 1914-61 77 

9. Major types, number, and memberships of farmer cooperatives 78 



IV 



HIGHLIGHTS 



Farm products marketed by cooperatives 
in 1962-63 had a gross value of almost 
$13.9 billion. This was about a 7-percent 
increase over the $13.0 billion in 1961-62. The 
net value of farm products marketed was more 
than $10.8 billion. The net figure reflects 
elimination of interassociation business and 
represents an increase of 6.6 percent over 
the comparable figure of almost $10.2 billion 
in the previous year. 

A gross value of $4.1 billion in farm 
supplies handled by farmer cooperatives in 
1962-63 compared with a gross supply volume 
of $3.9 billion for the previous period repre- 
sented an increase of 5.9 percent. After 
eliminating duplication resulting from busi- 
ness between cooperatives, net supply volume 
amounted to $2.7 billion, an increase of about 
5.6 percent over the almost $2.6 billion in net 
value of farm supplies for 1961-62. 

The $303.3 million in receipts for services 
related to handling farm supplies or marketing 
farm products represented a slight increase 
of 0.4 percent over 1961-62. 

For all farm products marketed, farm 
supplies handled, and services performed by 
cooperatives, the total gross value amounted 
to over $18.3 billion, an increase of almost 
6.6 percent when compared with the total 
gross figure of $17.2 billion for 1961-62. 
After excluding interassociation business, the 
total net volume amounted to more than $13.8 



billion, an increase of almost 6.3 percent 
over the previous year's total net volume of 
$13.0 billion. 

The three ranking States, California, Minne- 
sota, and Iowa, together accounted for 23.7 
percent of the total net business volume of 
farmer cooperatives. 

For several years the number of coopera- 
tives has continued to decline, reflecting the 
trend in reorganization involving mergers, 
consolidations, and acquisitions. The total 
number of cooperatives in the survey dropped 
from 9,039 in 1961-62 to 8,907 in 1962-63. 
This was a net decrease of 132 associa- 
tions. 

For the first time since 1958-59, when a 
temporary reversal 1 year in duration oc- 
curred, the downward trend in membership 
figures was reversed. In 1962-63, member- 
ships in cooperatives increased by 119,770 
and totaled 7,218,750. Periodic reversals are 
caused mainly by the increased participation 
of growers in cooperatives concerned with 
Government price supports. These infrequent 
upturns briefly interrupt the continuing down- 
ward trend in number of memberships which 
can be attributed principally to the steadily 
declining number of farmers in the United 
States. 

Of the 8,907 farmer cooperatives included 
in the 1962-63 survey, 94 percent provided 
information on their operations. 



STATISTICS OF FARMER 
COOPERATIVES 1962-63 



by Bruce L. Swanson 
History and Statistics Branch 
Management Services Division 

Every other year, beginning with the 1961-62 
statistical report, the annual survey of mem- 
berships and business volume of farmer co- 
operatives is presented in condensed format. 
The condensed reports, limited in size and 
scope, provide tabulations that are essential 
for maintaining continuity of data. During the 
alternate years, a complete statistical report 
is prepared containing a greater variety and 
detail of textual and tabular material. 

This 1962-63 survey is a complete report. 
Detailed information on the number of co- 
operatives and their memberships by State 
location and commodity and functional type is 



included. The report also contains information 
on the gross (includes intercooperative busi- 
ness) and net (excludes intercooperative busi- 
ness) dollar volumes of cooperatives classified 
by location and type. Gross and net dollar 
volumes of the major commodity groups 
handled by cooperatives are shown in a time 
series extending from 1950-51 to 1962-63. 
State rankings based on the net dollar volume 
of business handled in 1962-63 by the different 
types of cooperatives are compared with ranks 
held 10 years earlier — in 1953-54. 

All survey data in this report beginning with 
the year 1950-51 include information for 
Alaska and Hawaii, except as noted. 

The procedures and period of time required 
in obtaining and summarizing information in 
the survey are explained in the appendix, 
page 69. 



COOPERATIVE BUSINESS 



In 1962-63, the gross volume of business 
of 8,907 marketing, farm supply, and related 
service cooperatives amounted to over $18.3 
billion. This was an increase of 6.6 percent 
over the $17.2 billion reported in 1961-62. 

The net business amounted to more than 
$13.8 billion. Included in this amount were 
$10.83 billion for farm products marketed, 
$2.70 billion for farm supplies purchased, and 
$0.30 billion for services rendered to patrons 
(fig. 1). This net amount excludes business 
done between cooperatives, which in 1962-63 
was slightly over $4.5 billion. The net volume 
of $13.8 billion increased 6.3 percent when 
compared with the net business of $13.0 bil- 
lion in 1961-62. 



In this report, no adjustments were made 
for changes in the price indexes of farm 
products marketed or farm production supplies 
purchased by farmers in making comparisons 
of dollar volumes. 

Both gross and net amounts and percentages 
of the estimated total business represented by 
the three major functional groups for each 
survey year beginning with 1950-51 are shown 
in table 1. Total gross and net business 
volumes in 1962-63 exceeded comparable vol- 
umes reported in all previous surveys. 

Gross value of farm products marketed by 
cooperatives increased from almost $13.0 bil- 
lion in 1961-62 to almost $13.9 billion in 
1962-63, a percentage rise of about 7 percent. 



I 



FIG. 



Cooperative Business Volume 



BILLION DOLLARS 
FARM PRODUCTS 13.89 

FARM SUPPLIES 4.15 

SERVICES 0.30 



FARM PRODUCTS 10.83 

FARM SUPPLIES 2.70 

SERVICES 0.30 



Gross Value 




Net Value 




FISCAL YEAR, 1963 



The net value of farm products marketed 
amounted to more than $10.8 billion in 
1962-63, an increase of 6.6 percent from the 
$10.2 billion reported for the previous year. 
This rise in net value of farm products re- 
sulted primarily from increases in the dollar 
volumes reported for grain, tobacco, livestock, 
dairy products, cotton products, and fruits and 
vegetables. 

In 1962-63, the gross value of all farm sup- 
plies handled by cooperatives amounted to over 
$4.1 billion, a 5.9 percent increase over the 
$3.9 billion in 1961-62. The net value of these 
supplies amounted to $2.7 billion, a rise of 
almost 5.6 percent over the $2.6 billion re- 
ported in the previous year. Increases in net 
quantities of feed, fertilizer, seed, petroleum 
products, and miscellaneous supplies largely 
accounted for this rise. 



Table 2 shows the value of each major com- 
modity handled in 1962-63 by all types of coop- 
eratives. Net sales of poultry products, for ex- 
ample, totaled over $420 million. Of the 479 
cooperatives that sold these products, 97 spe- 
cialized in poultry and egg marketing and the 
rest marketed other farm products primarily, 
with poultry products only a sideline activity. 

The 1950-51 survey provided for the first 
time the value of sales of each major com- 
modity handled by cooperatives. Before this 
survey, data consisted of the total business 
volumes of only those cooperatives that 
specialized in a particular commodity. These 
data are not directly comparable with the data 
on dollar volume for 1950-51 and later years. 
Furthermore, these earlier figures on dollar 
volume were at a level somewhere between 
net and gross amounts as now published. 



Table 1. — Estimated business of marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1950-51 to 1962-63 



T^ 1 1 


Gross value 


: (includes intercooperative business) 


Net value 


(excludes intercooperative business) 


Period 


Farm 
products 


Farm 
supplies 


Services 


Total 


Farm 
products 


Farm 
supplies 


Services 


Total 






$1,000 






$1,000 




1950-51 


7,984,777 


2,437,521 


99,958 


10,522,256 


6,361,766 


1,685,413 


99,958 


8,147,137 


1951-52 


9,260,697 


2,762,095 


114,480 


12,137,272 


7,376,684 


1,918,723 


114,480 


9,409,887 


1952-53 


9,294,945 


2,866,908 


141,750 


12,303,603 


7,365,795 


2,013,768 


141,750 


9,521,313 


1953-54 


9,198,727 


2,841,727 


157,802 


12,198,256 


7,338,786 


1,978,052 


157,802 


9,474,640 


1954-55 


9,347,913 


2,921,859 


195,522 


12,465,294 


7,424,743 


2,021,617 


195,522 


9,641,882 


1955-56 


9,514,387 


2,972,696 


214,880 


12,701,963 


7,495,159 


2,046,086 


214,880 


9,756,125 


1956-57 


10,110,115 


3,152,985 


234,629 


13,497,729 


7,998,887 


2,145,939 


234,629 


10,379,455 


1957-58 


10,538,742 


3,269,400 


246,964 


14,055,106 


8,318,448 


2,137,490 


246,964 


10,752,902 


1958-59 


11,412,483 


3,549,922 


272,866 


15,235,271 


9,103,089 


2,371,061 


272,866 


11,747,016 


1959-60 


11,688,409 


3,659,969 


298,177 


15,646,555 


9,329,914 


2,408,157 


298,177 


12,036,248 


1960-61 


12,143,722 


3,744,711 


305,600 


16,194,033 


9,631,247 


2,472,286 


305,600 


12,409,133 


1961-62 


12,992,656 


3,914,849 


302,102 


17,209,607 


10,160,364 


2,561,338 


302,102 


13,023,804 


1962-63 2 


13,893,463 


4,145,263 


303,281 


18,342,007 


10,834,165 


2,704,400 


303,281 


13,841,846 






Percent 






Percent 




1950-51 


75.9 


23.2 


0.9 


100.0 


78.1 


20.7 


1.2 


100.0 


1951-52 


76.3 


22.8 


.9 


100.0 


78.4 


20.4 


1.2 


100.0 


1952-53 


75.5 


23.3 


1.2 


100.0 


77.4 


21.1 


1.5 


100.0 


1953-54 


75.4 


23.3 


1.3 


100.0 


77.4 


20.9 


1.7 


100.0 


1954-55 


75.0 


23.4 


1.6 


100.0 


77.0 


21.0 


2.0 


100.0 


1955-56 


74.9 


23.4 


1.7 


100.0 


76.8 


21.0 


2.2 


100.0 


1956-57 


74.9 


23.4 


1.7 


100.0 


77.0 


20.7 


2.3 


100.0 


1957-58 


75.0 


23.3 


1.7 


100.0 


77.4 


20.3 


2.3 


100.0 


1958-59 


74.9 


23.3 


1.8 


100.0 


77.5 


20.2 


2.3 


100.0 


1959-60 


74.7 


23.4 


1.9 


100.0 


77.5 


20.0 


2.5 


100.0 


1960-61 


75.0 


23.1 


1.9 


100.0 


77.6 


19.9 


2.5 


100.0 


1961-62 


75.5 


22.7 


1.8 


100.0 


78.0 


19.7 


2.3 


100.0 


1962-63 2 


75.7 


22.6 


1.7 


100.0 


78.3 


19.5 


2.2 


100.0 



1 For years prior to 1950-51, see appendix table 7. Data for prior years are not entirely comparable as the 
result of revisions made in statistical procedures in 1950-51. 

2 Preliminary. 



An estimated 70.7 percent of the 8,907 
cooperatives in the survey, or 6,295 coopera- 
tives, marketed all types of farm products in 
1962-63 (table 2). They were 5,481 cooperatives 
that primarily marketed farm products; 797 
cooperatives that primarily handled farm sup- 
plies for their patrons; and 17 service co- 
operatives that primarily performed the 
trucking, storage, or other services related to 
marketing farm products or purchasing farm 
supplies. Twenty-one marketing cooperatives 
that were either newly organized or tempo- 
rarily inactive are not included in this total. 



Farm supplies were handled by 6,921 co- 
operatives in 1962-63. These organizations 
represented 77.7 percent of the total number 
of cooperatives in the survey. They included 
3,209 associations that primarily handled farm 
supplies for their patrons and 3,633 marketing 
and 79 service associations that handled farm 
supplies as a sideline activity. This total 
does not include 2 farm supply cooperatives 
that were newly organized, but not yet in 
operation at the time of the survey. 

In 1962-63, a total of 5,412 cooperatives 
of all types, or 60.8 percent, performed one 



Table 2. - Estimated business in specified commodity and service groups of marketing, farm supply, and related 

service cooperatives, 1962-63 * 





Cooperatives 


Gross business 


Net business 




handling 


(includes intercooper- 


(excludes intercoop- 






ative business) 


erative business) 


Item 




Percent 
















of 












Number 


total 
coopera- 
tives 2 


Amount 


Percent 


Amount 


Percent 



Products marketed for patrons: 
Beans and peas (dry edible) 
Cotton and cotton products 
Dairy products 
Fruits and vegetables 
Grain, soybeans, and soybean 

meal and oil 
Livestock and livestock 

products 
Nuts 

Poultry products 
Rice 

Sugar products 
Tobacco 

Wool and mohair 
Miscellaneous 3 

Total farm products 

Supplies purchased for patrons: 
Building materials 
Containers and packaging 

supplies 
Farm machinery and 

equipment 
Feed 

Fertilizer 

Meats and groceries 
Petroleum products 
Seed 
Sprays and dusts 

(farm chemicals) 
Miscellaneous 

Total farm supplies 

Receipts for services: 
Trucking, cotton ginning, 
storage, grinding, 
locker plants, 
miscellaneous 

Total business 



$1,000 



$1,000 



69 


0.8 


40,200 


0.2 


29,578 


0.2 


560 


6.3 


811,062 


4.4 


700,604 


5.1 


1,490 


16.7 


4,524,833 


24.7 


3,498,652 


25.3 


640 


7.2 


1,472,308 


8.0 


1,054,609 


7.6 



2,647 



5,412 



29.7 



3,621,924 



60.8 



303,281 



19.8 



2,368,004 



1.7 



303,281 



17.1 



507 


5.7 


1,717,063 


9.4 


1,609,171 


11.6 


98 


1.1 


133,330 


.7 


122,850 


.9 


479 


5.4 


504,074 


2.8. 


420,120 


3.0 


60 


.7 


243,695 


1.3 


207,348 


1.5 


66 


.7 


425,695 


2.3 


425,695 


3.1 


30 


.3 


313,839 


1.7 


313,839 


2.3 


253 


2.8 


23,406 


.1 


23,182 


.2 


189 


2.1 


62,034 


.3 


60,513 


.4 


4 6,295 


70.7 


13,893,463 


75.7 


10,834,165 


78.3 


1,577 


17.7 


146,423 


.8 


99,485 


.7 


1,132 


12.7 


58,258 


.3 


31,050 


.2 


1,781 


20.0 


105,580 


.6 


75,923 


.5 


4,373 


49.1 


1,371,256 


7.5 


993,847 


7.2 


4,361 


49.0 


753,396 


4.1 


429,504 


3.1 


800 


9.0 


69,035 


.4 


54,807 


.4 


2,782 


31.2 


1,016,618 


5.5 


634,246 


4.6 


3,915 


44.0 


162,089 


.9 


112,635 


.8 


3,089 


34.7 


96,445 


.5 


64,714 


.5 


4,652 


52.2 


366,163 


2.0 


208,189 


1.5 


4 6,921 


77.7 


4,145,263 


22.6 


2,704,400 


19.5 



2.2 



4 8,907 



100.0 18,342,007 



100.0 13,841,846 



100.0 



1 Preliminary. 

Number of cooperatives handling each commodity group is computed as a percentage of the total number of 
8,907 cooperatives listed. 

3 Includes coffee, forest products, fur pelts, hay, hops, seed marketed for growers, nursery stock, tung oil, 
and other farm products not separately classified. 

4 Because many cooperatives do more than one type of business, these totals are less than the number that 
would be obtained by adding the number of cooperatives handling individual items or performing individual 
services. 

5 Charges for services in which no duplication occurs. 



or more services related to farm product 
marketing or farm supply purchasing. These 
cooperatives consisted of 194 cooperatives 
primarily performing service activities, such 
as trucking, storage, drying, and similar 
services; 1,648 farm supply cooperatives; and 
3,570 marketing cooperatives including cotton 
ginning, livestock trucking, and rice and fruit 
drying cooperatives. 

Sixty-six percent of all marketing coopera- 
tives handled one or more types of production 
supplies in 1962-63 and 65 percent furnished 
specialized services, such as cotton ginning 
and livestock trucking; or general services, 
such as storage, grinding, and trucking for 
their patrons (table 3). 

Farm products were marketed by 25 per- 
cent of the farm supply cooperatives and 51 
percent performed various services for their 
patrons. An estimated 9 percent of service 
cooperatives marketed farm products for their 
patrons and 41 percent handled farm supplies 
in 1962-63. 

Local and Regional Volumes 

Local cooperatives accounted for more than 
$4.7 billion of the net value of farm products 



marketed in 1962-63, or 43.7 percent of the 
total. Regional cooperatives accounted for 
more than $6.1 billion of the total net value, 
or 56.3 percent. Table 4 shows the estimated 
business of specified groups of farm prod- 
ucts marketed by regional and local coopera- 
tives. 

Local cooperatives accounted for a major 
portion of the total net volume in the following 
commodity groups: Fruits and vegetables, 
55.0 percent; grain, soybeans, and soybean 
products, 88.2 percent; and miscellaneous farm 
products, 92.1 percent. 

Of the total gross marketing volume of 
$13.9 billion, 22 percent, or almost $3.1 
billion, represented the value of marketing 
business done between cooperatives. 

A similar breakdown on the value of types 
of supplies handled by local and regional 
cooperatives is shown in table 5. Local co- 
operatives accounted for almost $2.1 billion, 
or 76.4 percent, of the total net supply volume. 
Regional cooperatives accounted for the re- 
maining 23.6 percent, or $637.7 million. 

Intercooperative supply business amounted 
to more than $1.4 billion, representing 34.8 
percent of the total gross supply volume of 
$4.1 billion. 



Table 3.— Estimated percentage of farmer cooperatives performing marketing, farm supply, or service activities 

in addition to major function, 1953-54 to 1962-63 



Type of 
cooperative 



1953-54 



1954-55 



1955-56 



1956-57 



1957-58 



1958-59 



1959-60 



1960-61 



1961-62 



1962-63 



Percent Marketing farm products 



Farm supply 


23 


22 


21 22 22 24 


25 


26 


25 


25 


Service 


9 


15 


10 7 8 6 
Percent handling farm supplies 


4 


5 


15 


9 


Marketing 


58 


60 


62 63 63 65 


65 


65 


66 


66 


Service 


39 


44 


41 45 45 45 
Percent Performing services 


43 


44 


44 


41 


Marketing 1 


49 


52 


57 59 62 62 


63 


64 


64 


65 


Farm supply 


32 


38 


40 42 44 49 


51 


53 


53 


51 



i Includes cotton ginning and livestock trucking cooperatives. 



Table 4. — Estimated marketing business of local and regional cooperatives, by specified commodity groups, 

1962-63 1 



Farm products marketed 
for patrons 



Local 



Regional 



Gross (includes 

intercooperative 

business) 



Net (excludes 

intercooperative 

business) 



Total 



Gross (includes 

intercooperative 

business) 



Net (excludes 

intercooperative 

business) 



$1,000 



Beans and peas (dry edible) 


13,605 


26,595 


15,973 


40,200 


29,578 


Cotton and cotton products 


213,778 


597,284 


486,826 


811,062 


700,604 


Dairy products 


1,318,923 


3,205,910 


2,179,729 


4,524,833 


3,498,652 


Fruits and vegetables 


579,942 


892,366 


474,667 


1,472,308 


1,054,609 


Grain, soybeans, and 
soybean meal and oil 


2,088,724 


1,533,200 


279,280 


3,621,924 


2,368,004 


Livestock and livestock 
products 


188,931 


1,528,132 


1,420,240 


1,717,063 


1,609,171 


Nuts 


12,109 


121,221 


110,741 


133,330 


122,850 


Poultry products 


194,021 


310,053 


226,099 


504,074 


420,120 


Rice 


60,311 


183,384 


147,037 


243,695 


207,348 


Sugar products 


- 


425,695 


425,695 


425,695 


425,695 


Tobacco 


- 


313,839 


313,839 


313,839 


313,839 


Wool and mohair 


5,499 


17,907 


17,683 


23,406 


23,182 


Miscellaneous 


55,735 


6,299 


4,778 


62,034 


60,513 


Total marketing 


4,731,578 


9,161,885 


6,102,587 


13,893,463 


10,834,165 



1 Preliminary,, 

Geographic Areas 

The amount and proportion of total net busi- 
ness volume handled by farmer cooperatives 
in each State in 1962-63 is shown in table 6. 
California remained in first place in the net 
value of the combined volume of farm prod- 
ucts marketed, farm supplies purchased, and 
services performed for patrons, with over 
$1.5 billion, representing 11.0 percent of total 
net business. 

Minnesota ranked second with a net business 
volume of $921.4 million, or 6.7 percent of 
the total. Iowa was in third place with a net 
business of $830.9 million, representing 6.0 
percent of the total. 



The 5 highest ranking States in net business 
volume handled, California, Minnesota, Iowa, 
Illinois, and Wisconsin, accounted for over a 
third of the total, or 34.5 percent. The top 10 
States in volume of net business which included 
in addition to those above, Texas, Ohio, 
New York, Kansas, and Indiana, handled 
over half the total net business, or 55.9 per- 
cent. 

Figure 2 shows the States arranged in 
geographic regions. The upper midsection of 
the United States dominates in the volume of 
total net business handled. The East North 
Central area accounted for 22 percent, and 
the West North Central area for 26 percent of 
the total. 



Table 5. — Estimated supply business of local and regional cooperatives, by specified commodity groups, 1962-63 l 





Local 


Regional 


Total 


Supplies purchased 
for patrons 


Gross (includes 


Net (excludes 


Gross 


(includes 


Net (excludes 






intercooperative 


intercooperative 


intercooperative 


intercooperative 






business) 


business) 


bu 


siness) 


business) 








$1,000 










Building materials 


68,443 


77,980 




31,042 




146,423 


99,485 


Containers and packaging 
















supplies 


24,711 


33,547 




6,339 




58,258 


31,050 


Farm machinery and equipment 


61,924 


43,656 




13,999 




105,580 


75,923 


Feed 


700,752 


670,504 




293,095 




1,371,256 


993,847 


Fertilizer 


313,399 


439,997 




116,105 




753,396 


429,504 


Meats and groceries 


51,708 


17,327 




3,099 




69,035 


54,807 


Petroleum products 


546,406 


470,212 




87,840 




1,016,618 


634,246 


Seed 


87,011 


75,078 




25,624 




162,089 


112,635 


Sprays and dusts (farm 
















chemicals) 


51,063 


45,382 




13,651 




96,445 


64,714 


Miscellaneous supplies 


161,288 


204,875 




46,901 




366,163 


208,189 


Total farm supplies 


2,066,705 


2,078,558 




637,695 




4,145,263 


2,704,400 



i Preliminary. 



I 



Fig. 



Proportion of Total Business Volume Originating 
in Each Geographic Division, 1962-63 



Based on Nef Business of $73.8 Billion 



NEW ENGLAND 




ALASKA (Less than 0.05%) % 

HAWAII 0.1% 



EXCLUDES INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS, 



Table 6. — States ranked according to percentage of total net business handled by 

cooperatives, 1962-63 1 







Net business 




Rank and State 


(excludes intercooperative business) 




Amount 


Percent 






$1,000 


1 


California 


17520,454 ll.O 


2 


Minnesota 


921,447 6.7 


3 


Iowa 


830,949 6.0 


4 


Illinois 


765,808 5.5 


5 


Wisconsin 


730,741 5.3 


6 


Texas 


655,228 4.7 


7 


Ohio 


648,540 4.7 


8 


New York 


645,927 4.7 


9 


Kansas 


513,232 3.7 


10 


Indiana 


496,311 3.6 


11 


Michigan 


397,887 2.9 


12 


Nebraska 


386,166 2.8 


13 


Washington 


376,732 2.7 


14 


Pennsylvania 


372,065 2.7 


15 


Missouri 


369,154 2.7 


16 


North Dakota 


359,542 2.6 


17 


Florida 


276,524 2.0 


18 


North Carolina 


272,445 2.0 


19 


Mississippi 


265,945 1.9 


20 


Oklahoma 


239,875 1.7 


21 


Oregon 


223,944 1.6 


22 


South Dakota 


220,117 1.6 


23 


Virginia 


219,023 1.6 


24 


Arkansas 


201,105 1.4 


25 


Colorado 


171,064 1.2 


26 


Georgia 


156,144 1.1 


27 


Idaho 


142,272 1.0 


28 


Kentucky 


140,504 1.0 


29 


Montana 


121,247 .9 


30 


Maryland 


117,142 .8 


31 


Tennessee 


113,554 .8 


32 


Arizona 


107,422 .8 


33 


Utah 


98,134 .7 


34 


New Jersey 


97,786 .7 


35 


Alabama 


91,492 .7 


36 


Vermont 


91,210 .7 


37 


Louisiana 


81,294 .6 


38 


Massachusetts 


72,544 .5 


39 


South Carolina 


59,813 .4 


40 


Connecticut 


56,407 .4 


41 


Maine 


50,774 .4 


42 


New Mexico 


37,759 .3 


43 


West Virginia 


37,129 .3 


44 


New Hampshire 


22,172 .2 


45 


Wyoming 


17,926 .1 


46 


Delaware 


15,273 .1 


47 


Hawaii 


12,684 .1 


48 


Rhode Island 


10,479 .1 


49 


Alaska 


5,300 ( 2 ) 


50 


Nevada 
Total 


5,160 (2) 




13,841,846 100.0 



1 States are listed in alphabetic order in appendix table 3. 2 Less than 0.05 percent. 



SUPPLY VOLUME 



Data were collected in 1962-63 on 10 major 
categories of farm supplies sold by farmer 
cooperatives. These categories were building 
materials, containers and packaging supplies, 
farm machinery and equipment, feed, fertil- 
izer, meats and groceries, petroleum products, 
seed, sprays and dusts (farm chemicals), 
and miscellaneous supplies. 

An estimated 6,921 cooperatives of all types 
handled one or more of these supplies in 
1962-63. Their gross sales amounted to more 
than $4.1 billion (tables 1, 2, and 35). These 
sales represented the value of supplies handled 
by local and regional cooperatives, including 
business done between cooperatives. 

Net value of supplies handled by farmer 
cooperatives amounted to $2.7 billion. This 
net volume, the amount remaining after dupli- 
cation arising from interassociation business 
was eliminated, did not include the value at 
manufacturing or wholesale level of supplies 
purchased by other cooperatives from regional 
associations. 

The net business of $2.7 billion, or 65.2 
percent of the gross volume, represented 
business done directly with individual patrons. 
The interassociation business of $1.4 billion 
accounted for 34.8 percent of the gross volume 
and represented the value at manufacturing or 
wholesale level of all types of supplies pur- 
chased by cooperatives from regional asso- 
ciations. 

In 1962-63, interassociation business of 
34.8 percent in farm supplies compared with 
22.0 percent for all farm products marketed. 
This business gave some indication of the 
extent to which local cooperatives have united 
in federated organizations to obtain more 
favorable prices and to control quality when 
purchasing their farm production supplies. 
While it reflected the effect of integration, it 
was not a measure of the extent of integration 
that has occurred within regional coopera- 
tives. It did, however, include the business 
volume of separate manufacturing federations 
organized by regional cooperatives to assist 
in providing the type and quality of production 
supplies required by farmer patrons. 



Operations of regional farm supply coopera- 
tives vary. The primary function of a few 
cooperatives is manufacturing supplies; many 
engage in both manufacturing and wholesaling; 
others, wholesaling and retailing; and some, 
distributing supplies through independent 
dealer agents and farmer order takers and 
direct to large producers. In some transac- 
tions the price level is neither strictly whole- 
sale nor retail. 

Because of the complexity in the operations 
of many of these regional cooperatives, it is 
not practical to present separate tabulations 
in this report on the manufacturing, whole- 
sale, or retail volume of the various supplies 
handled. 

Included in the total of 6,921 cooperatives 
handling farm supplies were 3,209 supply 
cooperatives, 3,633 marketing cooperatives, 
and 79 service cooperatives. 1 On a percent- 
age basis, this represented 66 percent of the 
marketing cooperativec and 41 percent of the 
service cooperatives. These percentages com- 
pared with 66 and 44 percent, respectively, 
in the previous year (table 3). 

The 3,209 supply cooperatives handled a 
gross volume of almost $3.3 billion in 1962-63. 
Their net supply business amounted to more 
than $2.0 billion, or 74.1 percent of the total 
net value of supplies handled by all types of 
farmer cooperatives. 

The major supply items, in net dollar vol- 
ume amounts, ranked as follows: Feed, $993.8 
million; petroleum products, $634.2 million; 
fertilizer, $429.5 million; seed, $112.6 mil- 
lion; building materials, $99.5 million; farm 
machinery and equipment, $75.9 million; 
sprays and dusts, $64.7 million; meats and 
groceries, $54.8 million; containers and pack- 
aging supplies, $31.1 million; and miscel- 
laneous supplies, $208.2 million. Figure 3 
shows the relative importance of these major 
categories of farm supplies. 

The gross value of all types of farm sup- 
plies handled by farmer cooperatives increased 



1 Does not include 2 newly organized supply coop- 
eratives. 



9 




Relative Importance of Major Farm Supplies 
Purchased by Cooperative Patrons, 1962-63 



CONTAINERS I 

SPRAYS and DUSTS- 
FARM MACHINERY 
and EQUIPMENT 

BUILDING MATERIALS 
SEED 

FERTILIZER 

PETROLEUM 

PRODUCTS 

FEED 

GENERAL 



% 




15.9% 



23.5% 



9.7% 



Based on net business of $2.7 billion. 



over the previous year by 5.9 percent and 
the net value by 5.6 percent. 

Iowa ranked first in net value of farm sup- 
plies handled by cooperatives in 1962-63 with 
$205.9 million, or 7.6 percent of the total 
(table 7). The 10 States leading in net value 
of farm supplies handled by cooperatives to- 
gether accounted for 52.7 percent of the total 
net business. 

Gross and net values of farm supplies by 
supply group are shown in tables 2 and 33. 
Table 2 presents gross and net amounts and 
proportions for 1962-63, with proportions com- 
puted as a percent of total net business volume 
(includes marketing, purchasing, and related 
service activities). Table 33 presents a time 
series of gross and net dollar volumes, 
grouped by supply type, for the period extend- 
ing from 1950-51 to 1962-63. A time series 
of total gross and net values of farm supplies 



purchased for patrons is shown for the same 
period in table 1. 

Classification by type of supply, regional 
area, and State in table 35 further refines 
the presentation of gross and net purchasing 
volumes. This table also indicates the number 
of cooperatives handling a particular supply 
item in each State. 



Feed 

Feed, including feed grains and hay, con- 
tinued to lead in dollar value of all supply 
items handled by cooperatives. It was handled 
by a total of 4,373 cooperatives and had a 
gross value of almost $1.4 billion. 

Purchases of feed made directly by indi- 
vidual patrons amounted to $993.8 million 
(fig. 4) in net value and accounted for 72.5 



10 



Table 7. — Estimated net value of farm supplies handled by cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 



State 


Farm supplies handled 2 


Rank 












Net value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








Iowa 


205,931 


7.6 


1 


3 


Minnesota 


168,628 


6.2 


2 


4 


New York 


166,559 


6.2 


3 


1 


Illinois 


154,985 


5.7 


4 


2 


Wisconsin 


142,079 


5.3 


5 


8 


Kansas 


125,432 


4.6 


6 


13 


Indiana 


119,848 


4.4 


7 


6 


Missouri 


118,502 


4.4 


8 


9 


California 


114,903 


4.3 


9 


10 


Ohio 


109,270 


4.0 


10 


5 


Others 


1,278,263 


47.3 


- 


- 


Total 


2,704,400 


100.0 


- 


- 


1 Excludes intercooperative business. 








2 Preliminary. 












I/O 




400 
200 




< 1,000 



§ 800 

| 600 

i 400 

200 





INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS 



I I I I I I I I I 



NET BUSINESS * 



i I i 
i i I 

■ I I 



■ 1 1 



1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 

♦ Excludes intercooperative business 






11 



percent of the gross volume. The interasso- 
ciation business, representing the value at 
manufacturing or wholesale level of feed 
purchased by other cooperatives from regional 
cooperatives, amounted to $337.4 million, or 
27.5 percent of the gross volume. 

The gross value of feed handled by farmer 
cooperatives increased 7.0 percent and net 
value 6.2 percent compared with the previous 
year. 

A total of 1,958 farm supply cooperatives 
had gross sales of $1.0 billion. Net sales, 
after duplication resulting from interassocia- 
tion business was eliminated, amounted to 
$711.8 million and accounted for 71.6 percent 
of the net value of feed handled by all coop- 
eratives in 1962-63. 

Other types of cooperatives handled feed 
as a sideline. These cooperatives, ranked 
according to their net feed sales were: 1,739 
grain associations with net sales of almost 
$209.5 million; 426 dairy associations with 
net sales of $36.2 million; 168 cotton associa- 
tions with net sales of $12.1 million; 25 
poultry associations with net sales of $8.6 
million; 4 miscellaneous marketing associa- 
tions with net sales of $7.3 million; and 27 
livestock associations with net sales of $6.6 
million. 



The remaining sales, amounting in net value 
to almost $1.8 million, were made by 6 dry 
bean and pea associations, 11 fruit and vege- 
table associations, 1 nut association, 4 rice 
associations, 2 tobacco associations, 1 wool 
association, and 1 service association. 

New York, California, and Iowa, the three 
leading States in net value of feed handled by 
cooperatives, together accounted for slightly 
more than a fourth, or 25.2 percent, of the 
total net feed volume in 1962-63 (table 8). 
The 10 leading States in 1962-63 handled more 
than half, or 56.8 percent, of the total. Com- 
parison of the ranks held by the 10 leading 
States in 1962-63 with those held 10 years 
previous, in 1953-54, shows a noticeable up- 
ranking among several States concentrated in 
the North Central area of the United States. 
Kansas moved from 18th to 10th position 
during the 10-year period, Wisconsin moved 
from 11th to 8th, Minnesota moved from 10th 
to 6th, and Iowa moved from 7th to 3d posi- 
tion. 



Petroleum Products 

Gross value of petroleum products handled 
by 2,782 cooperatives in 1962-63 totaled more 



Table 8. — Estimated net value of feed handled by cooperatives in the 10 ranking States in 

1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 
Preliminary. 





Net sales 2 


Rank 


State 










Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








New York 


103,276 


10.4 


1 


1 


California 


76,982 


7.7 


2 


2 


Iowa 


71,005 


7.1 


3 


7 


Pennsylvania 


54,275 


5.5 


4 


3 


Missouri 


51,258 


5.2 


5 


4 


Minnesota 


50,208 


5.1 


6 


10 


Illinois 


43,574 


4.4 


7 


6 


Wisconsin 


41,203 


4.1 


8 


11 


Ohio 


36,377 


3.7 


9 


8 


Kansas 


36,188 


3.6 


10 


18 


Others 


429,501 


43.2 


- 


- 


Total 


993,847 


100.0 


- 


- 



12 



than $1.0 billion (tables 2, 33, 35). These 
products were the second most important 
types of supplies handled by cooperatives. 

After duplication resulting from inter- 
association business was eliminated, the net 
value of petroleum products handled by co- 
operatives amounted to more than $634.2 
million, representing 62.4 percent of the 
gross value (fig. 5). The remaining 37.6 per- 
cent, or $382.4 million, of the gross value 
represented interassociation business, the 
value at manufacturing or wholesale level of 
petroleum products purchased by other coop- 
eratives from regional associations. 

Gross value of petroleum products handled 
by farmer cooperatives increased 2.0 percent 
and net value 1.5 percent, compared with a 
year earlier. 

A total of 2,053 farm supply cooperatives 
had gross sales of petroleum products of 



almost $908.8 million. Net sales amounted to 
$544.4 million and represented 85.8 percent 
of the total net sales of these products handled 
by all cooperatives. 

Among other types of cooperatives handling 
petroleum products as a sideline, grain coop- 
eratives continued as most important with 
net petroleum sales of 570 associations 
valued at $81.3 million. Fifty-five dairy 
cooperatives had net sales of almost 
$3.9 million; 6 livestock associations 
of almost $1.6 million; and 66 cotton as- 
sociations of almost $1.5 million. 

The remaining sales, amounting to almost 
$1.6 million, were made by 3 dry bean and 
pea associations, 24 fruit and vegetable asso- 
ciations, 3 poultry associations, 1 rice asso- 
ciation, and 1 sugar products association. 

The 3 leading States in net value of petroleum 
products handled by cooperatives, Iowa, 



FIG. 
5 



Petroleum Products 



Ct£. 

< 

o 



600 

400 

200 


800 

600 

400 

200 





INTERC00PERATIVE BUSINESS 



I I I I I I I I I 



NET BUSINESS* 



I I I 

I I I I I I I I I 
I I I I I I I I I 



1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 

# Excludes intercooperative business. 



13 



Minnesota, and Illinois, together accounted 
for more than a fourth, or 27.9 percent, of 
the total net volume in 1962-63 (table 9). The 
10 leading States accounted for more than 
two- thirds, or 68.7 percent, of the total. Of 
the 10 leading States in sales of petroleum 
products in 1962-63, 9 had ranked among the 
top 10 in 1953-54. New York moved up from 
12th place in 1953-54 to 10th place 10 years 
later. 



Fertilizer 

Fertilizer handled by 4,361 cooperatives in 
1962-63 included anhydrous ammonia, rock 
phosphate, basic slag, and lime. It had a gross 
value of almost $753.4 million and ranked 
third in the value of farm supplies handled by 
cooperatives (tables 2, 33, 35). The net vol- 
ume, excluding intercooperative business, 
amounted to $429.5 million (fig. 6). Net busi- 
ness, representing that done directly with 
individual patrons, amounted to 57.0 percent 
of the total gross value. Interassociation 
business, the value at manufacturing or whole- 
sale level of fertilizer purchased by other 
cooperatives from regional associations, ac- 



counted for the remaining 43.0 percent, or 
$323.9 million. 

Compared with 1961-62, gross value of 
fertilizer handled by farmer cooperatives 
increased 10.4 percent, and net value 10.9 
percent. 

Gross sales of fertilizer handled by 2,276 
farm supply cooperatives in 1962-63 totaled 
$602.1 million. Net sales, after business done 
between cooperatives was eliminated, 
amounted to $305.0 million. This net volume 
represented 71.0 percent of the total net value 
of fertilizer handled by all cooperatives in 
1962-63. 

Cooperatives handling fertilizer as a side- 
line activity included 1,450 grain associations 
with a net volume of $93.8 million; 195 fruit 
and vegetable associations with a net volume 
of $9.5 million; 147 cotton associations with 
a net volume of $8.7 million; and 214 dairy 
associations with a net volume of almost 
$5 e 2 million. 

The remaining fertilizer sales amounted to 
$7.3 million. These sales were made by 6 dry 
bean and pea associations, 20 livestock asso- 
ciations, 8 nut associations, 7 poultry associa- 
tions, 16 rice associations, 4 sugar products 
associations, 2 tobacco associations, 11 



Table 9. — Estimated net value of petroleum products handled by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 
* Preliminary. 



State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








Iowa 


63,492 


10.0 


1 


3 


Minnesota 


58,660 


9.3 


2 


2 


Illinois 


54,739 


8.6 


3 


1 


Kansas 


46,840 


7.4 


4 


7 


Wisconsin 


46,543 


7.3 


5 


5 


Nebraska 


41,333 


6.5 


6 


6 


Indiana 


39,410 


6.2 


7 


4 


South Dakota 


31,067 


4.9 


8 


9 


North Dakota 


28,036 


4.4 


9 


8 


New York 


25,835 


4.1 


10 


12 


Others 


198,291 


31.3 


- 


- 


Total 


634,246 


100.0 


- 


- 



14 







■1 FIG. 
Hi 6 


Fertilizer 






400 
onn 


INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS 


_^ 


_ 






< 

— J r» 




■ ■III 


o 
Q Ann 




ouu 
o 
— ! a f\n 


NET BUSINESS * 




s 
?nn 




m m 




■ 


■ 










1 1 1 1 1 










1 


U 


1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 

♦ Excludes intercooperative business. 





miscellaneous marketing associations, and 5 
service associations. 

Illinois lead all other States in net value of 
fertilizer handled by cooperatives in 1962-63. 
Mississippi and Iowa followed closely (table 
10). States that made substantial gains in the 
rankings were Kansas, moving from 22d 
position in 1953-54 to 6th position 10 years 
later; and Nebraska, moving from 29th to 9th 
position during the same period. 

Seed 

In 1962-63, gross sales of seed for 3,915 
cooperatives amounted to almost $162.1 mil- 
lion (tables 2, 33, and 35). Seed ranked fourth 
in value of major supplies handled by coop- 
eratives. Net sales, after interassociation 
business was deducted, totaled $112.6 million. 



These net sales, representing direct purchases 
by individual patrons, accounted for 69.5 per- 
cent of gross sales. Interassociation business 
accounted for the remaining 30.5 percent, or 
almost $49.5 million. 

Compared with 1961-62, gross value of seed 
handled by farmer cooperatives increased 
13.3 percent and net value, 11.6 percent. 

A total of 1,829 farm supply cooperatives 
handled seed in 1962-63. Their gross sales 
totaled almost $118.5 million. Net sales of 
these cooperatives amounted to $74.3 million 
and represented 66.0 percent of the net value 
of seed handled by all types of cooperatives. 

Among other types of cooperatives handling 
seed as a sideline, grain cooperatives were 
most important. Net sales of 1,479 grain 
associations were almost $28.6 million. A 
total of 292 cotton associations had net sales 
of seed amounting to $4.4 million; 187 dairy 



15 



Table 10. — Estimated net value of fertilizer handled by cooperatives in the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 l 



1 Excludes intercooperative business, 

2 Preliminary. 





Net s 


ales 2 


Rank 


State 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








Illinois 


31,797 


7.4 


1 


1 


Mississippi 


31,671 


7.4 


2 


3 


Iowa 


31,246 


7.3 


3 


4 


Minnesota 


20,789 


4.8 


4 


9 


Indiana 


20,439 


4.8 


5 


2 


Kansas 


18,687 


4.3 


6 


22 


Missouri 


18,570 


4.3 


7 


7 


Ohio 


17,473 


4.1 


8 


5 


Nebraska 


16,492 


3.8 


9 


29 


California 


14,922 


3.5 


10 


15 


Others 


207,418 


48.3 


- 


- 


Total 


429,504 


100.0 


- 


- 



associations had net sales of almost $1.7 
million; and 73 fruit and vegetable associa- 
tions had net sales of $1.5 million. 

The remaining net sales of $2.1 million 
were made by 7 dry bean and pea associations, 
20 livestock associations, 2 nut associations, 
6 poultry associations, 5 rice associations, 2 
tobacco associations, 8 miscellaneous market- 
ing associations, and 5 service associations. 

Illinois, Iowa, and Ohio ranked as the 3 
leading States in the net value of seed handled 
by cooperatives in 1962-63 (table 11). The 10 
ranking States accounted for 51.1 percent of 
the total net volume of seed. Tennessee and 
Texas made considerable gain in net sales of 
seed. Tennessee moved from 13th position in 
1953-54 to 7th position in 1962-63, and Texas 
moved from 17th to 8th position during the 
same period. 

Building Materials 

A total of 1,577 cooperatives handled build- 
ing materials in 1962-63. Their gross sales 
amounted to $146.4 million (tables 2, 33, and 
35). Net sales, after deducting interassociation 
business, amounted to $99.5 million and ac- 
counted for 67.9 percent of gross value. 



Interassociation business, or the value at 
manufacturing or wholesale level of building 
materials purchased by other cooperatives 
from regional associations, amounted to $46.9 
million, or 32.1 percent of the gross value. 

From 1961-62 to 1962-63, gross value of 
building materials handled by cooperatives 
increased 2.2 percent and net value increased 
4.2 percent. 

Building materials handled by 1,046 farm 
supply cooperatives had a gross value of 
$109.6 million. Their net volume amounted to 
$69.9 million. This represented 70.3 percent 
of the net value of these materials handled by 
all cooperatives. 

Other types of farmer cooperatives also 
handled building materials. A total of 478 
grain cooperatives had net sales of almost 
$26.6 million; 11 livestock associations, $1.4 
million; and 18 dairy associations, almost 
$930,000. The remaining net sales of building 
materials of almost $624,000 were made by 

1 dry bean and pea association, 10 cotton 
associations, 7 fruit and vegetable associa- 
tions, 1 nut association, 2 poultry associations, 

2 rice associations, and 1 miscellaneous 
marketing association. 

Iowa and Indiana ranked 1st and 2d in 
net value of building materials handled by 



16 



Table 11. — Estimated net value of seed handled by cooperatives in the 10 ranking States 
in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 




Net sales 


Rank 


State 


Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 



$1,000 



Illinois 


7,793 


6.9 


1 


1 


Iowa 


6,915 


6.2 


2 


3 


Ohio 


6,843 


6.1 


3 


4 


Missouri 


5,981 


5.3 


4 


2 


Minnesota 


5,634 


5.0 


5 


7 


New York 


5,220 


4.6 


6 


5 


Tennessee 


4,991 


4.4 


7 


13 


Texas 


4,875 


4.3 


8 


17 


Virginia 


4,850 


4.3 


9 


9 


Pennsylvania 


4,438 


4.0 


10 


6 


Others 


55,095 


48.9 


- 


- 


Total 


112,635 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 

cooperatives in 1962-63 (table 12). Together, 
they accounted for 30.0 percent of the total net 
volume. Of the 10 ranking States in 1962-63, 
8 had also ranked among the toplOin 1953-54. 
California showed the most substantial up- 
ranking during the period, moving from 20th 
to 3d. 

Farm Machinery and 
Other Equipment 

Farm machinery and other equipment with 
a gross value of almost $105.6 million was 
handled by 1,781 cooperatives in 1962-63 
(tables 2, 33, 35). Other equipment includes 
dairy and poultry equipment, water systems, 
irrigation pumps and pipe, and similar equip- 
ment used in farm production. 

The net value of these supplies handled by 
farmer cooperatives in 1962-63, excluding 
intercooperative business, amounted to $75.9 
million, or 71 percent of gross value. 

Interassociation business, representing the 
value at manufacturing or wholesale level of 
farm machinery and other equipment purchased 
by other cooperatives from regional coopera- 
tives, accounted for $29.7 million, or 28.1 
percent of the gross volume. Net value, repre- 
senting purchases made directly by individual 



patrons, amounted to 71.9 percent of the gross 
volume. Both gross and net volumes increased 
slightly from the previous year by 0.1 and 
1.1 percent, respectively. 

Gross volume of farm machinery and other 
equipment handled by 1,208 farm supply coop- 
eratives amounted to almost $80.3 million. 
Net sales amounted to $52.0 million and 
represented 68.5 percent of the total net value 
of farm machinery and other equipment handled 
by all cooperatives in 1962-63. 

Farm machinery and other equipment 
handled by 573 cooperatives of other types 
amounted in net value to almost $23.9 million. 
A total of 329 grain cooperatives handled 
farm machinery and other equipment with a 
net value of almost $15.3 million. Ranking 
next in importance were 125 dairy coopera- 
tives with a net volume of $4.8 million. 

The remaining sales of farm machinery and 
other equipment made by other types of coop- 
eratives had a net value of more than $3.8 
million and were reported by 57 cotton asso- 
ciations; 36 fruit and vegetable associations; 
5 livestock associations; 5 poultry associa- 
tions; 4 miscellaneous marketing associations; 
3 dry bean and pea associations; 2 each of rice, 
nut, and sugar products associations; and 1 each 
of tobacco, wool, and service associations. 



17 



Table 12. — Estimated net value of building materials handled by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 



State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 


Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 



$1,000 



Iowa 


18,470 


18.6 


1 


1 


Indiana 


11,297 


11.4 


2 


2 


California 


7,012 


7.0 


3 


20 


North Dakota 


6,384 


6.4 


4 


5 


Minnesota 


5,506 


5.5 


5 


6 


Illinois 


5,433 


5.5 


6 


4 


Michigan 


4,822 


4.8 


7 


8 


New York 


4,820 


4.8 


8 


12 


Ohio 


4,426 


4 D 5 


9 


3 


Nebraska 


4,159 


4.2 


10 


7 


Others 


27,156 


27.3 


- 


- 


Total 


99,485 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 

Wisconsin, New York and Ohio ranked 1st, 
2d, and 3d, respectively, in net value of farm 
machinery and other equipment handled by 
cooperatives in 1962-63 (table 13). The 10 
leading States accounted for 60.2 percent of 
the total net volume of these supplies pur- 
chased. Nine of the 10 States leading in the 
purchase of farm machinery and equipment in 
1962-63 also ranked among the leading 10 
in 1953-54. Illinois advanced from 11th to 
10th position during the period. 

Sprays and Dusts 
(Farm Chemicals) 

The gross value of sprays and dusts (farm 
chemicals) handled by 3,089 cooperatives in 
1962-63 was more than $96.4 million (tables 
2, 33, 35). 

Net value, excluding intercooperative busi- 
ness, amounted to $64.7 million and repre- 
sented 67.1 percent of the total gross value. 
The interassociation business, representing 
the value at manufacturing or wholesale level 
of sprays and dusts (farm chemicals) pur- 
chased by other cooperatives from regional 
cooperatives, amounted to $31.7 million, or 
32.9 percent of the total gross value. 



Gross value of sprays and dusts (farm 
chemicals) handled by farmer cooperatives 
increased 4.8 percent and net value increased 
3.8 percent, compared with 1961-62. 

The gross volume of sprays and dusts (farm 
chemicals) handled by 1,682 farm supply coop- 
eratives amounted to $68.6 million. The net 
value, representing 63.0 percent of the total 
net value of these supplies handled by all types 
of cooperatives, amounted to almost $40.8 
million. 

Other types of cooperatives also handled 
sprays and dusts as a sideline. Their net 
sales for these chemicals were as follows: 
190 fruit and vegetable associations, almost 
$9.2 million; 799 grain associations, $7.3 
million; 186 cotton associations, almost $4.9 
million; 170 dairy associations, more than 
$974,000; and 6 rice associations, more than 
$483,000. 

The remaining net sales of sprays and dusts 
(farm chemicals) amounted to almost $1.1 
million and were made by 4 dry bean and pea 
associations, 10 livestock associations, 7 nut 
associations, 4 poultry associations, 2 sugar 
products associations, 8 wool associations, 15 
miscellaneous marketing associations, and 6 
service associations. 



18 



Table 13. — Estimated net value of farm machinery and equipment handled by cooperatives 
in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 l 





Net sales 2 


Rank 


State 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








Wisconsin 


6,586 


8.7 


1 


-i 


New York 


6,189 


8.2 


2 


7 


Ohio 


5,403 


7.1 


3 


1 


Indiana 


5,111 


6.7 


4 


3 


Nebraska 


4,432 


5.8 


5 


9 


Minnesota 


4,337 


5.7 


6 


5 


Oregon 


3,881 


5.1 


7 


6 


Washington 


3,588 


4.7 


8 


8 


Pennsylvania 


3,241 


4.3 


9 


10 


Illinois 


2,932 


3.9 


10 


11 


Others 


30,223 


39.8 


- 


- 


Total 


75,923 


100.0 


- 


- 


* Excludes intercooperative busines 


s. 






2 Preliminary. 











The 3 leading States in net value of sprays 
and dusts (farm chemicals) handled by coop- 
eratives, Mississippi, Washington, and Cali- 
fornia, together accounted for more than a 
fourth, or 25.7 percent, of the total net volume 
(table 14). The 10 top ranking States accounted 
for more than half, or 54.9 percent, of the 
total net volume of these supplies handled by 
cooperatives. Considerable shifts in rank posi- 
tion had occurred for some States when com- 
pared to the period 10 years previous. In 
1962-63, Texas ranked 5th, moving up from 
12th place in 1953-54. During the same period, 
Ohio moved from 17th to 8th position and 
Iowa from 14th to 9th position. 



Meats and Groceries 

In 1962-63, 800 cooperatives handled meats 
and groceries having a gross value of $69.0 
million (tables 2, 33, 35). After eliminating 
the value of interassociation business, net 
value amounted to $54.8 million and repre- 
sented 79.4 percent of the gross value. The 
remaining 20.6 percent of the gross value 
represented interassociation business of $14.2 
million, the value of meats and groceries 



purchased from regional cooperatives by other 
associations. 

Gross value of meats and groceries handled 
by farmer cooperatives increased 0.2 percent, 
and net value decreased almost 0.5 percent, 
compared with 1961-62. The increase in gross 
business accompanied by a decrease in net 
business was due to a greater amount of 
intercooperative business. 

Gross sales of meats and groceries by 336 
farm supply cooperatives amounted to $58.7 
million. Their net sales amounted to $44.5 
million and represented 81.2 percent of the 
net value of meats and groceries handled by 
all types of farmer cooperatives. 

A total of 464 cooperatives of other types 
handled meats and groceries as a sideline 
activity. Net value of these items amounted 
to almost $10.3 million. Included were 338 
dairy associations handling meats and gro- 
ceries with a net value of almost $4.5 million. 
Dairy products, such as cheese, butter, and 
ice cream, are purchased for their patrons 
by many dairy cooperatives. These products 
are not processed by the cooperatives as 
part of their operations. They are pur- 
chased at wholesale for retail sale to 
patrons. 



19 



Table 14. — Estimated net value of sprays and dusts (farm chemicals) handled by 
cooperatives in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 



State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








Mississippi 


6,999 


10.8 


1 


4 


Washington 


5,248 


8.1 


2 


1 


California 


4,429 


6.8 


3 


3 


Florida 


3,736 


5.8 


4 


5 


Texas 


3,327 


5.1 


5 


12 


Illinois 


2,840 


4.4 


6 


9 


Pennsylvania 


2,753 


4.3 


7 


6 


Ohio 


2,198 


3.4 


8 


17 


Iowa 


2,157 


3.3 


9 


14 


Michigan 


1,858 


2.9 


10 


8 


Others 


29,169 


45.1 


- 


- 


Total 


64,714 


100.0 


- 


- 



Grain cooperatives also handled a large 
volume of meats and groceries in 1962-63, 
with 62 associations handling a net volume 
amounting to almost $3.6 million. Fifty-two 
service cooperatives had net sales of meats 
and groceries amounting to $1.7 million. These 
service cooperatives were primarily locker 
plants. 

Remaining sales of meats and groceries by 
other types of cooperatives had a net value 
of more than $545,000 and were made by 2 
cotton associations, 2 fruit and vegetable as- 
sociations, 1 livestock association, and 7 
poultry associations. 

The 3 States leading in net value of meats 
and groceries handled by cooperatives, 
Missouri, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, accounted 
for 47.2 percent of the total net volume 
(table 15). Eighty- six percent of the total net 
volume of meats and groceries was handled 
by the 10 leading States. Of the 10 ranking 
States in 1962-63, 9 States had also occupied 
positions among the leading 10 States in 
1953-54. Colorado, 9th ranking State in 
1962-63, rose from 11th position held 10 
years previous. 



Containers and 
Packaging Supplies 

Containers and packaging supplies were 
handled by 1,132 cooperatives in 1962-63. 
The gross value of this business amounted to 
almost $58.3 million and net value, after 
duplication resulting from interassociation 
business was eliminated, amounted to almost 
$31.1 million (tables 2, 33, 35). 

Net volume represented 53.3 percent of the 
gross volume. Interassociation business of 
$27.2 million, representing the value at whole- 
sale or manufacturing level of containers and 
packaging supplies purchased from regional 
cooperatives, amounted to 46.7 percent of the 
gross volume. Packing boxes and cartons, 
paper and plastic bags, frozen food containers, 
and similar material used by local coopera- 
tive packinghouses or processing and locker 
plants in their own packing or processing 
operations comprised a large part of the inter- 
association volume. 

Compared with 1961-62, gross value of 
containers and packaging supplies handled by 
farmer cooperatives decreased 3.1 percent, 



20 



Table 15. — Estimated net value of meats and groceries handled by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 



State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








Missouri 


10,560 


19.3 


1 


2 


Minnesota 


8,537 


15.6 


2 


1 


Wisconsin 


6,759 


12.3 


3 


3 


Nebraska 


4,783 


8.7 


4 


4 


Kansas 


4,586 


8.4 


5 


5 


Virginia 


3,998 


7.3 


6 


9 


Michigan 


3,025 


5.5 


7 


6 


North Dakota 


2,885 


5.3 


8 


7 


Colorado 


1,054 


1.9 


9 


11 


Iowa 


959 


1.7 


10 


10 


Others 


7,661 


14.0 


- 


- 


Total 


54,807 


100.0 


- 


- 



i Excludes intercooperative business. 
2 Preliminary. 



but net value increased 8.9 percent due to a 
smaller volume of intercooperative business. 

Containers and packaging supplies handled 
by 370 farm supply cooperatives had a gross 
value of almost $20.8 million and a net value 
amounting to $3.4 million, representing almost 
11.0 percent of the total net value of con- 
tainers and packaging supplies handled by all 
types of cooperatives. 

Among other types of cooperatives handling 
containers and packaging supplies as a side- 
line, 167 fruit and vegetable associations had 
net sales of this supply item amounting to 
almost $13.9 million; 355 cotton associations 
had net sales of almost $10.5 million; 19 
poultry associations had net sales of $1.1 
million; and 86 dairy associations had net 
sales of more than $622,000. 

The remaining net sales of these materials 
amounted to almost $1.6 million. They were 
made by 6 dry bean and pea associations, 49 
grain associations, 10 rice associations, 2 
sugar products associations, 14 wool associa- 
tions, 11 miscellaneous marketing associa- 
tions, and 43 service associations. 

Table 16 shows Texas, Washington, and 
California as the 3 leading States in net value 



of containers and packaging supplies handled 
by cooperatives in 1962-63. The 10 ranking 
States accounted for 78.2 percent of the total 
net sales. 

Miscellaneous Supplies 2 

Plant equipment, automotive supplies, hard- 
ware, chicks, and other supplies not separately 
classified comprised the miscellaneous sup- 
plies category. These supplies were handled 
by 4,652 cooperatives in 1962-63 and had a 
gross value of almost $366.2 million (tables 
2, 33, 35). 

After deductions were made for interasso- 
ciation business, net value amounted to almost 
$208.2 million and represented 56.9 percent 
of the gross value. The interassociation busi- 
ness of $158.0 million amounted to 43.1 
percent of the gross value and represented 
the value at manufacturing or wholesale level 



2 In addition to the miscellaneous farm supplies 
covered in this section of the report, cooperatives also 
purchased for their patrons stocker and feeder animals 
valued at almost $411.0 million. See discussion on 
livestock and livestock products, page 27. 



21 



Table 16. — Estimated net value of containers and packaging supplies handled by 
cooperatives in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 ' 



State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 


Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 



$1,000 



Texas 


8,194 


26.4 


1 


3 


Washington 


4,141 


13.3 


2 


2 


California 


2,840 


9.1 


3 


1 


Maine 


2,482 


8.0 


4 


6 


Florida 


1,425 


4.6 


5 


4 


New Jersey 


1,356 


4.4 


6 


5 


Utah 


1,086 


3.5 


7 


32 


Colorado 


1,003 


3.2 


8 


11 


Michigan 


987 


3.2 


9 


9 


Ohio 


762 


2.5 


10 


16 


Others 


6,774 


21.8 


- 


- 


Total 


31,050 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 



of miscellaneous supplies purchased by other 
cooperatives. 

Compared with the previous year, gross 
value of miscellaneous supplies handled by 
farmer cooperatives increased 7.0 percent, 
and net value increased 6.1 percent. 

Miscellaneous farm supplies were handled 
by 2,414 farm supply cooperatives. Their 
gross sales of these items amounted to 
$296.9 million and net sales, $157.6 million, 
or 75.7 percent of the total. 

Each of the marketing categories had coop- 
eratives handling various quantities of miscel- 
laneous supplies in 1962-63. Of particular 
importance were 1,349 grain associations 
with a net volume of almost $29.4 million; 
594 dairy associations with a net volume of 
$12.8 million; 100 cotton associations with 
a net volume of $3.8 million; and 108 fruit 
and vegetable associations with a net volume 
of $2.3 million. 



The remaining net sales, amounting to 
almost $2.2 million, were made by 4 dry 
bean and pea associations, 24 livestock asso- 
ciations, 3 nut associations, 18 poultry asso- 
ciations, 4 rice associations, 4 sugar prod- 
ucts associations, 1 tobacco association, 6 
wool associations, 6 miscellaneous marketing 
associations, and 17 service associations. 

Wisconsin, Virginia, and Minnesota ranked 
as the 3 leading States in net value of miscel- 
laneous farm supplies handled by cooperatives. 
Together, these States accounted for 21.3 per- 
cent of the total net volume (table 17). The 
10 ranking States handled slightly over half, 
or 50.2 percent, of the total net volume of 
miscellaneous farm supplies purchased by 
cooperatives. Among the leading 10 States in 
1962-63, 6 States also ranked among the top 
10 in 1953-54. North Dakota, Kansas, Kentucky, 
and Maryland rose in rank from 1953-54 to be 
among the leading States 10 years later. 



22 



Table 17. — Estimated net value of 
in the 10 ranking State 


miscellaneous farm supplies handled by cooperatives 
5 in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 


State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 


Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 



$1,000 



Wisconsin 


17,969 


8.6 


1 


2 


Virginia 


13,411 


6.5 


2 


5 


Minnesota 


12,813 


6.2 


3 


3 


Ohio 


11,694 


5.6 


4 


1 


North Dakota 


9,230 


4.4 


5 


12 


Kansas 


8,934 


4.3 


6 


13 


Iowa 


8,806 


4.2 


7 


6 


Indiana 


8,149 


3.9 


8 


4 


Kentucky 


6,744 


3.3 


9 


19 


Maryland 


6,730 


3.2 


10 


17 


Others 


103,709 


49.8 


- 


- 


Total 


208,189 


100.0 


- 


_ 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. Miscellaneous farm supplies includes plant equip- 
ment, automotive supplies, hardware, chicks, and other supplies not separately classified 

2 Preliminary. 



MARKETING VOLUME 



In 1962-63, 13 major categories of farm 
products having a combined gross value of 
almost $13.9 billion were marketed by 6,295 
cooperatives (tables 1, 2, 35). The net value 
for these farm products, excluding $3.1 bil- 
lion of interassociation business, amounted to 
more than $ 10.8 billion. Sales made by terminal 
sales agencies for local cooperatives accounted 
for the interassociation business of $3.1 bil- 
lion. The $10.8 billion was the value of all 
farm products marketed direct for individual 
patrons. 

Dairy products continued to lead in the value 
of farm products marketed by cooperatives. 
These products accounted for 32.3 percent of 
the total net value of marketings in 1962-63 



(fig. 7). The 5 leading commodity groups — 
dairy products; grain, soybeans, and soybeans 
products; livestock; fruits and vegetables; and 
cotton — accounted for 85.2 percent of the 
total net value of farm products marketed by 
cooperatives in the same period. 

California ranked first with almost $1.4 
billion in net value of farm products marketed 
in 1962-63, or 12.7 percent of the total (table 
18). The 10 States leading in value of farm 
products marketed by cooperatives together 
handled 57.1 percent of the total net busi- 
ness. 

Gross and net values of farm products, 
classified by commodity group, are shown in 
tables 2 and 34. Table 2 presents gross and 



23 



I 



FIG. 
7 



Relative Importance of Major Farm Products 
Marketed by Cooperatives, 1962-63 



WOOL and MOHAIR 1 0.2% 

DRY BEANS and PEAS \ 0.3% 

NUTS ■ 1.1% 

RICE H|l.9% 

TOBACCO Hi 2.9% 

SUGAR PRODUCTS ■■3.9% 

POULTRY PRODUCTS ^H 3 < ^ 

COTTON and PRODU CTS •••• HI^HI 6 .5 % 
FRUITS and VEGETABLES ••• ^■HHH 9 - 7 % 
LIVESTOCK and PRODUCTS ■HHHHHBH1 1 4 S : : 

GRAIN, SOYBEANS, and ^^^ 7 , Q » 

SOYBEAN PRODUCTS ' ' y /o 

DAIRY PRODUCTS ■HHHH^MHBHH^H 3 2 .3 

OTHER PRODUCTS |0.6% 

Based on net business of $10.83 billion. 



Table 18, — Estimated net value of farm products marketed by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 l 


State 


Farm products marketed 2 


Rank 


Net value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 



$1,000 



California 


1,374,372 


12.7 


1 


1 


Minnesota 


735,199 


6.8 


2 


3 


Iowa 


604,927 


5.6 


3 


6 


Illinois 


601,810 


5.5 


4 


2 


Wisconsin 


582,430 


5.4 


5 


4 


Texas 


551,185 


5.1 


6 


7 


Ohio 


530,130 


4.9 


7 


5 


New York 


474,207 


4.4 


8 


8 


Indiana 


369,830 


3.4 


9 


9 


Kansas 


358,265 


3.3 


10 


15 


Others 


4,651,810 


42.9 


- 


- 


Total 


10,834,165 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 



24 



net amounts and proportions for 1962-63, 
with proportions computed as a percent of 
total net business volume (includes market- 
ing, purchasing, and related service activ- 
ities). Table 34 presents a time series of 
gross and net dollar volumes, grouped by 
commodity, for the period extending from 
1950-51 to 1962-63. A time series of total 
gross and net values of farm products marketed 
is shown for the same period in table 1. 

Classification by commodity, regional area, 
and State in table 35 further refines the presen- 
tation of gross and net marketing volumes. 
This table also indicates the number of coop- 
eratives handling a particular commodity in 
each State. 



Dairy Products 

Dairy products with a gross value of over 
$4.5 billion (tables 2, 34, 35) were marketed 
by 1,490 cooperatives in 1962-63. After dupli- 
cation resulting from over $1.0 billion of 
interassociation business was eliminated, the 
net value amounted to slightly below $3.5 
billion (fig. 8). Dairy products represented 
32.3 percent of the total net value of all 
farm products marketed by cooperatives in 
1962-63. The value of dairy products exceeded 
that of any other major group of farm prod- 
ucts marketed by cooperatives in 1962-63. 

Gross sales increased 2.8 percent and net 
sales increased 2.1 percent from 1961-62 to 
1962-63. 

A total of 1,398 cooperatives whose primary 
business was marketing dairy products had 
gross sales of $4.5 billion and net sales of 
almost $3.5 billion in 1962-63. 3 This net 
volume represented 99.8 percent of the net 
value of dairy products marketed by all coop- 
eratives in 1962-63. 

The 92 cooperatives of other types that 
marketed dairy products as a sideline activ- 
ity accounted for sales with a net value of 
almost $6.5 million. Among these cooperatives, 
15 poultry associations had net sales of $2.5 
million, 15 grain associations had net sales 



of $0.8 million, 57 farm supply associations 
handled a net volume of $1.5 million, and 
combined net sales for 2 cotton, 1 miscel- 
laneous farm products, and 2 service asso- 
ciations were $1.7 million. 

Table 19 shows that Wisconsin held top rank 
in net sales in 1962-63, with a volume of 
$474.8 million, or 13.6 percent of the total. 
The 3 leading States, Wisconsin, New York, 
and Minnesota, handled over a third, or 34 
percent, of the total net volume of dairy 
products marketed through cooperatives in 
1962-63. Of the 10 States leading in net sales 
of dairy products in 1962-63, 3 ranked higher, 
5 the same, and 2 lower compared with their 
rank 10 years previous. 

Grain, Soybeans, 
Soybean Meal and Oil 

Grain, soybeans, and soybean products 
marketed by 2,647 cooperatives in 1962-63 
had a gross value of $3.62 billion (tables 2, 
34, 35). The net value, after duplication 
arising from business done between coopera- 
tives was eliminated, amounted to almost 
$2.37 billion and accounted for 21.9 percent 
of the net value of all farm products marketed 
by cooperatives (fig. 9). Grain, including soy- 
beans and soybean meal and oil, ranked second 
in the value of farm products marketed by 
cooperatives in 1962-63. 

Comparison with 1961-62 shows gross sales 
increased 9.9 percent and net sales, 9.5 per- 
cent. The gross value of $3.62 billion included 
sales of $1.25 billion made by regional coop- 
eratives for local associations. Net sales of 
$2.37 billion represented 65.4 percent of the 
total gross sales of grain, soybeans, and soy- 
bean meal and oil marketed by cooperatives. 

For 1,971 cooperatives whose predominant 
business was marketing grain, including soy- 
beans and soybean products, gross sales 
amounted to $3.23 billion. 4 Net sales of $2.08 
billion for these grain cooperatives accounted 
for 87.8 percent of the net value of grain 
marketed by all cooperatives in 1962-63. The 
remaining 12.2 percent of total net sales 



3 Does not include 5 cooperatives that were newly 
organized or performing services only. 



4 Does not include 2 newly organized associations 
and 1 association temporarily inactive. 



25 




Dairy Products 



INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS 




< 
z! 4 
o 
a 

z 3 
o 



CO 



NET BUSINESS * 



I I I 
I I I I I I I I I 
I I I I I I I I I 



1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 

^Excludes intercooperative business. 



Table 19.--Estimated net value 
ranking States in 


of dairy products marketed by cooperatives in the 10 
1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 


State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 


Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 



$1,000 



Wisconsin 


474,791 


13.6 


1 


1 


New York 


371,858 


10.6 


2 


3 


Minnesota 


341,590 


9.8 


3 


2 


Pennsylvania 


209,125 


6.0 


4 


4 


Michigan 


193,785 


5.5 


5 


5 


Ohio 


155,717 


4.4 


6 


6 


Iowa 


155,252 


4.4 


7 


7 


California 


129,113 


3.7 


8 


9 


Texas 


117,595 


3.4 


9 


13 


Illinois 


116,026 


3.3 


10 


8 


Others 


1,233,800 


35.3 


- 


- 


Total 


3,498,652 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 



26 







Grain, Soybeans, and Soybean Products 



< 

O 



oo 



1.50 
1.00 

0.50 


2.50 

2.00 

1.50 

1.00 

0.50 





INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS 



I I I 



I 
III 



NET BUSINESS * 



I I 
I I I 
III 



II I 
III 

I II 



1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 

^ Excludes intercooperative business, 



made by 676 cooperatives handling grain and 
soybeans as a sideline activity amounted to 
$288.4 million. 

Of the cooperatives that handled grain and 
soybeans as a sideline, farm supply coopera- 
tives continued to lead, with 588 associations 
handling a net volume of almost $255.8 mil- 
lion. Grain marketed by 48 cotton cooperatives 
had a net value of almost $13.7 million; 15 
livestock associations handled a net volume of 
grain valued at almost $8.9 million; 13 dairy 
cooperatives marketed a net volume of more 
than $3.2 million; 6 dry bean and pea associa- 
tions had net sales of almost $4.4 million; 
and the remaining net sales of almost $2.2 
million were made by 2 fruit and vegetable, 
1 poultry, 1 miscellaneous products, and 2 rice 
associations. 

Illinois, Kansas, and Iowa were the 3 leading 
States in net value of grain, soybeans, and 



soybean products marketed through coopera- 
tives in 1962-63 (table 20). Combined, they 
handled over a third, or 36.0 percent, of the 
total net volume during the period. The top 10 
States marketed over three-fourths, or 78.7 
percent, of the total volume. Compared with 
their rank in 1953-54, 2 States improved, 
5 States remained the same, and 3 States de- 
clined. Kansas showed the most noticeable 
progress, moving up to 2d rank from 5th 
held in 1953-54. 

Livestock and 
Livestock Products 

A total of 507 cooperatives, including live- 
stock trucking cooperatives, handled livestock 
in 1962-63 with a gross value of almost $1.72 
billion (tables 2, 34, 35). After eliminating 
intercooperative business from the gross 



27 



Table 20.~Estimated net value of grain, soybeans, and soybean meal and oil marketed by 
cooperatives in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 * 



State 



Net sales 



Value 



Percent 



Rank 



1962-63 



1953-54 



$1.000 



Illinois 


315,658 


13.3 


1 


1 


Kansas 


272,522 


11.5 


2 


5 


Iowa 


265,268 


11.2 


3 


2 


North Dakota 


231,360 


9.8 


4 


3 


Minnesota 


176,710 


7.5 


5 


4 


Ohio 


153,944 


6.5 


6 


6 


Indiana 


130,139 


5.5 


7 


7 


Nebraska 


117,417 


4.9 


8 


8 


Washington 


110,595 


4.7 


9 


9 


Oklahoma 


90,540 


3.8 


10 


12 


Others 


503,851 


21.3 


- 


- 


Total 


2,368,004 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 

sales, net sales amounted to almost $1.61 
billion (fig. 10). The intercooperative business 
of $108 million represented the sales made 
by regional cooperatives for local associa- 
tions. Livestock and livestock products ranked 
third in the value of farm products marketed 
by cooperatives in 1962-63. These products 
accounted for 14.9 percent of the net value 
of all farm products marketed by coopera- 
tives. 

Net volume of $1.61 billion represented 
93.7 percent of the total gross volume of 
livestock and livestock products marketed 
by cooperatives. Gross sales increased 
5.9 percent and net sales increased 6.4 
percent when compared with those of 1961- 
62. 

Gross sales of livestock and livestock prod- 
ucts of almost $1.69 billion were handled by 
445 cooperatives whose business was pri- 
marily livestock marketing or trucking. 5 
Their net sales amounted to more than $1.58 
billion and represented 98.3 percent of the 
net volume of livestock marketed by all types 
of cooperatives. Included in this net volume 



Does not include 1 newly organized association, 1 
inactive association, and 1 association marketing only 
wool during 1962-63. 



was almost $411.0 million of stocker and 
feeder animals purchased for patrons. 

The 445 livestock handling cooperatives in- 
cluded many cooperatives whose primary func- 
tion was trucking livestock to central markets. 
They did only a limited amount of actual 
marketing at the local level. 

Net value of livestock marketed by other 
types of cooperatives handling livestock as a 
sideline activity amounted to $27.4 million. 
Included in these cooperatives were 28 farm 
supply cooperatives with net sales of $19.2 
million; 14 grain cooperatives with net sales 
of $5.9 million; and 3 dairy cooperatives with 
net sales of almost $1.0 million. The remain- 
ing sales of $1.3 million were made by 4 
poultry, 1 cotton, 1 miscellaneous products, 
and 11 wool associations. 

Ohio, Minnesota, and Illinois were the 3 
States leading in net value of livestock 
marketed by cooperatives in 1962-63 (table 
21). Together, they accounted for 32.0 per- 
cent of total net volume. Over three-fourths, 
or 77.5 percent, of the total net sales were 
made by cooperatives in the 10 ranking States. 
Only 2 of the 10 leading States remained in 
the same rank as in 1953-54. Four States 
moved up in the rankings and 4 were placed 
in lower positions. 



28 




Livestock and Livestock Products 



< 

O 

o 



< 

o 



CO 



200 

150 

100 

50 


2.00 

1.50 

1.00 

0.50 





NTERC00PERATIVE BUSINESS 



I I I 

II I 




II I I 

III I 



NET BUSINESS * 



I I I 
III 



II I I 
I I II 



1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 

FISCAL YEAR 



1961 1962 1963 



♦ Excludes intercooperative business. 



Table 21. — Estimated net value of livestock and livestock products marketed by coop- 
eratives in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54* 



State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 




Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 



$1,000 



Ohio 


177,266 


11.0 


1 


2 


Minnesota 


173,678 


10.8 


2 


4 


Illinois 


164,639 


10.2 


3 


1 


Iowa 


159,924 


9.9 


4 


3 


Indiana 


152,956 


9.5 


5 


5 


California 


125,123 


7.8 


6 


9 


Nebraska 


95,264 


5.9 


7 


7 


Missouri 


89,521 


5.6 


8 


6 


Wisconsin 


59,345 


3.7 


9 


8 


Texas 


49,075 


3.1 


10 


12 


Others 


362,380 


22.5 


- 


- 


Total 


1,609,171 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business, 

2 Preliminary. 



29 



Fruits and Vegetables 

In 1962-63, a total of 640 cooperatives of 
all types marketed fruits and vegetables with 
a gross value of almost $1.5 billion (tables 2, 
34, 35). After eliminating duplication result- 
ing from interassociation business, the net 
value amounted to almost $1.1 billion and 
accounted for 71.6 percent of the total gross 
sales of fruits and vegetables marketed by 
cooperatives (fig. 11). Interassociation busi- 
ness amounting to $417.7 million represented 
the value of sales made by regional coopera- 
tives for local associations. 

When compared with 1961-62, gross sales 
increased 5.9 percent and net sales increased 
5.2 percent. 

Fruit and vegetable marketing was the pri- 
mary business of 601 cooperatives. 6 Gross 
value of their fruit and vegetable volume 
amounted to $1.4 billion and net value, over 
$1.0 billion. This net business accounted for 
97.9 percent of the total net sales of fruits 
and vegetables made by all types of coop- 
eratives in 1962-63. 

Other types of cooperatives marketed fruits 
and vegetables as a sideline activity. Thirty- 
nine of these associations handled a net vol- 
ume of $22.1 million in 1962-63. Included 
were 20 farm supply cooperatives with net 
sales of $20.3 million, 9 service associations 
with a net volume of $1.1 million, and a com- 
bined net volume of $0.7 million for 2 dairy, 
2 grain, and 1 each of dry bean and pea, 
cotton, livestock, nut, poultry, and miscel- 
laneous products associations. 

California far outranks other States in net 
value of fruits and vegetables marketed by 
cooperatives (table 22). The 4 leading States — 
Florida, Oregon, and Washington, in addition 
to California — accounted for almost three- 
fourths, or 74.8 percent, of the total net value 
of cooperative fruit and vegetable marketings. 
These 4 States maintained the same rank 
they held 10 years previous. The remaining 
6 leading States changed position, 4 ranked 



higher and 2 lower when compared with their 
rank in 1953-54. 



Special Crops 

Gross value of special crops — sugar prod- 
ucts, tobacco, rice, and dry beans and peas — 
marketed by cooperatives in 1962-63 amounted 
to over $1.0 billion (tables 2, 34, 35). Their net 
value, after eliminating business done between 
cooperatives, amounted to almost $976.5 mil- 
lion (fig. 12). 

Sugar Products 

The total value of all sugar products 
marketed by 66 cooperatives in 1962-63 
amounted to almost $425.7 million (tables 2, 
34, 35). 7 No interassociation business was 
reported by these cooperatives. Products in- 
cluded in this commodity group were sugar, 
sugarcane, sugar beets, honey, maple syrup, 
molasses, and sorghum. 

California outranked other States in net value 
of sugar products marketed by cooperatives 
(table 23). In 1962-63, net sales of these 
products in California amounted to almost 
$250.4 million, or 58.8 percent of the total. 
Together, the 10 leading States accounted for 
96.3 percent of the total net volume marketed. 



Tobacco 

In 1962-63, 30 cooperatives specialized in 
marketing tobacco. 8 Sales of these coopera- 
tives were valued at $313.8 million (tables 2, 
34, 35). No interassociation business was re- 
ported. 

Table 24 shows that North Carolina and 
Kentucky ranked first and second, respec- 
tively, in the net value of tobacco marketed 
by cooperatives. Together, these two States 
handled 62.6 percent of the total net volume. 



6 Does not include 24 cooperatives that were in- 
active, newly organized, or performing only a service 
function. 



7 Does not include 2 cooperatives that were tempo- 
rarily inactive. 

8 Does not include 1 cooperative that was tempo- 
rarily inactive. 



30 











FIG. 

ii 


Fruits and Vegetables 


600 
400 

^ 200 

1 
o 1000 

z 800 

o 

3 600 

i 400 

200 
n 










INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS 




■ ■ 1 H 




■ ■ II ■ 1 




1 1 1 1 1 




1111 








NET BUSINESS * ^ m 




R Si! 

II III 

m M M w M 


1 1 MM 
i § M M 
1 1 1 1 
III! 








1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 

* Excludes intercooperative business 





Table 22. — Estimated net value of fruits and vegetables marketed by cooperatives in the 
10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 





Net sales 2 


Rank 


State 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








California 


488,400 


46.3 


1 


1 


Florida 


165,707 


15.7 


2 


2 


Oregon 


68,632 


6.5 


3 


3 


Washington 


66,717 


6.3 


4 


4 


New York 


49,016 


4.7 


5 


6 


Michigan 


36,319 


3.4 


6 


7 


Pennsylvania 


34,966 


3.3 


7 


5 


Massachusetts 


19,771 


1.9 


8 


10 


Wisconsin 


19,265 


1.8 


9 


12 


Ohio 


17,750 


1.7 


10 


9 


Others 


88,066 


8.4 


- 


- 


Total 


1,054,609 


100.0 


- 


- 



Excludes intercooperative business. 
2 Preliminary. 



31 



FIG. 
12 



Special Crops 



200 


^ 1,000 

< 

=! 800 
o 

z 600 
o 

i 400 
200 




INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS 



NET BUSINESS * 



I I I I I I 
I I I I I I I I I 

I I I I I I I I I 



954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 







* Exc! 


udes intercoo 


perative business. 


Table 23. — Estimated net value of sugar products marketed by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 * 


State 


Net sales* 


Rank 


Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 



$1,000 



California 


250,379 


58.8 


1 


1 


Idaho 


36,924 


8.7 


2 


8 


Colorado 


35,237 


8.3 


3 


2 


Montana 


15,786 


3.7 


4 


6 


Louisiana 


15,270 


3.6 


5 


3 


Nebraska 


14,620 


3.4 


6 


4 


Washington 


13,832 


3.3 


7 


7 


Michigan 


12,427 


2.9 


8 


9 


Iowa 


8,612 


2.0 


9 


11 


Oregon 


6,837 


1.6 


10 


( s ) 


Others 


15,771 


3.7 


- 


- 


Total 


425,695 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 

3 No cooperative marketing of sugar products reported during 1953-54. 



32 



Table 24. — Estimated net value of tobacco marketed by cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 





2 

Net sales 


Rank 


State 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








North Carolina 


145,546 


46.4 


1 


2 


Kentucky 


50,976 


16.2 


2 


1 


Virginia 


25,887 


8.2 


3 


4 


South Carolina 


24,156 


7.7 


4 


6 


Georgia 


19,974 


6.4 


5 


5 


Tennessee 


17,090 


5.4 


6 


3 


Maryland 


6,822 


2.2 


7 


7 


Florida 


5,174 


1.6 


8 


13 


Indiana 


4,900 


1.6 


9 


11 


Ohio 


4,634 


1.5 


10 


9 


Others 


8,680 


2.8 


- 


- 


Total 


313,839 


100.0 


- 


- 



Excludes intercooperative business. 
Preliminary. 



Ri 



ce 



Sixty cooperatives marketed rice with a 
gross value of almost $243. 7 million in 1962-63 
(tables 2, 34, 35). After eliminating inter- 
cooperative business, the net value amounted 
to $207.3 million. This net value represented 
85.1 percent of the total gross volume of rice 
marketed by cooperatives in 1962-63. 

Gross sales increased 18.6 percent and net 
sales, 16.7 percent compared with 1961-62. 

Cooperatives marketed rice in only 5 States 
in 1962-63. Of these States, California, 
Arkansas, and Texas ranked as the top three. 
Together, they accounted for over 90 percent 
of total net sales (table 25). 

Beans and Peas (Dry Edible) 

In 1962-63, a total of 69 cooperatives 
marketed dry beans and peas with gross sales 
of $40.2 million (tables 2, 34, 35). Their net 
sales, after eliminating duplication arising 
from business done between cooperatives, 
amounted to almost $29.6 million. This rep- 
resented 73.6 percent of the total gross vol- 
ume of dry beans and peas marketed by 
cooperatives in 1962-63. There was little 
change in gross sales, but net sales de- 
creased 3.3 percent compared with 1961-62. 



The business of 12 cooperatives primarily 
marketing dry beans and peas accounted for a 
gross volume of $21.9 million. 9 Their net 
sales were $16.2 million, representing 54.9 
percent of the net volume of dry beans 
and peas marketed by all types of coop- 
eratives. 

Other types of cooperatives also marketed 
dry beans and peas in 1962-63. Of these as- 
sociations, 57 handled a net volume amounting 
to $13.3 million. Thirty-six farm supply coop- 
eratives marketed dry beans and peas with a 
net value of $5.9 million; 19 grain coopera- 
tives had net sales of $7.1 million; and 2 fruit 
and vegetable cooperatives had net sales of 
dry beans and peas amounting to more than 
$321,000. 

Michigan, California, and Washington were 
the 3 leading States in net value of dry beans 
and peas marketed by cooperatives in 1962-63 
(table 26). Together, Michigan and California 
accounted for over half, or 51.6 percent, of 
the total net sales of dry beans and peas, 
while the combined net sales of the 10 leading 
States accounted for all but a fractional per- 
cent of the total. 



9 Does not include 2 associations performing serv- 
ices only. 



33 



Table 25. — Estimated net value of rice marketed by cooperatives in the 5 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 * 





Net sales 2 


Rank 


State 


Value 


Percent 


1962- 


63 




1953-54 


California 

Arkansas 

Texas 

Louisiana 

Mississippi 


$1,000 

73,609 
59,209 
57,665 
13,050 
3,815 




35.5 

28.6 

27.8 

6.3 

1.8 


1 
2 
3 
4 
5 






2 
3 

1 
4 
5 


Total 


207,348 




100.0 


- 






- 



Excludes intercooperative business. Rice marketed cooperatively in only 5 States 
during 1962-63. 

2 

Preliminary, 



Cotton and Cotton Products 

Cotton and cotton products were handled by 
560 cooperatives in 1962-63. These coopera- 
tives included 516 associations that handled 
cotton as a primary activity and 44 associa- 
tions that handled it as a sideline. 10 Their 
gross sales amounted to $811.1 million (tables 
2, 34, 35). After eliminating $110.5 million 
representing intercooperative business, net 
sales amounted to $700.6 million (fig. 13). 

In comparison with 1961-62, gross value of 
marketings increased 13.0 percent and net 
value increased 12.2 percent. Cotton and cot- 
ton products represented 6.5 percent of the 
total net value of farm products marketed by 
cooperatives in 1962-63. 

The 516 specialized cotton associations had 
gross sales of $794.2 million and net sales 
of almost $683.8 million. This net value rep- 
resented 97.6 percent of the total net value 
of such products marketed by all types of 
cooperatives in 1962-63. 

The other cooperatives marketing cotton and 
cotton products had net sales of $16.8 million. 
These sales represented 2.4 percent of the 
total net sales of cotton and cotton products 
marketed by all cooperatives. Eleven grain 
cooperatives accounted for more than $2.9 



io Does not include 12 cotton associations that either 
did not operate in 1962-63 or performed compressing, 
warehousing, or other special related services but did 
not market cotton or cotton products. 



million of these net sales; 30 farm supply 
cooperatives handled more than $12.3 million; 
and 1 miscellaneous marketing and 2 livestock 
associations had net sales of $1.6 million. 

Cotton cooperatives were most active in 
ginning operations, with only $1.3 million of 
ginning receipts earned by other types of 
cooperatives not primarily engaged in ginning. 
Ginning fees, including bagging and ties, 
amounted to almost $54.3 million for 507 
cooperatives. 

The 3 ranking States, Texas, California, and 
Mississippi, accounted for slightly over three- 
fourths, or 75.3 percent, of total net sales of 
cotton and cotton products marketed by coop- 
eratives in 1962-63 (table 27). Texas ranked 
1st in net sales of cotton and cotton products 
with $237.4 million, or 33.9 percent of the 
total. Of the 10 States leading in net sales in 
1962-63, 3 were ranked higher, 3 were ranked 
the same, and 4 were ranked lower compared 
with 1953-54. The most significant rise in 
rank was for Arizona, which moved from 12th 
to 4th place during the 10-year period. 



Poultry Products 

Of 479 cooperatives marketing poultry prod- 
ucts in 1962-63, 95 cooperatives specialized 
in the commodity and 384 cooperatives handled 
it as a sideline. Gross business amounted to 
almost $504.1 million and net business, after 



34 



Table 26. — Estimated net value of dry beans and peas marketed by cooperatives in the 
10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 



State 




Net sales 


Rank 
















Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 






$1,000 






Michigan 




7,997 27.0 


1 


2 


California 




7,286 24.6 


2 


1 


Washington 




3,823 12.9 


3 


6 


Colorado 




3,272 11.1 


4 


4 


Idaho 




3,237 11.0 


5 


5 


New York 




2,678 9.1 


6 


3 


Wyoming 




839 2.8 


7 


7 


Oregon 




387 1.3 


8 


(*) 


New Mexico 




35 .1 


9 


9 


Montana 




17 .1 


10 


8 


Others 




7 (4) 


- 


- 


Total 


29,578 100.0 


- 


- 


1 Excludes 


intercooperative business. 






2 Preliminary. 











[ Less than 0.05 percent. 



duplication arising from inter association busi- 
ness was eliminated, amounted to more than 
$420 million (tables 2, 34, 35 and fig. 14). 
Net business volume represented 83.3 percent 
of the total gross volume of poultry products 
marketed by cooperatives in 1962-63. 

Gross sales increased 0.3 percent and net 
sales decreased 0.9 percent with comparison 
to 1961-62. The decrease in net sales re- 
sulted from a larger amount of intercoopera- 
tive business. 

A gross volume of almost $254.2 million 
was handled by the 95 cooperatives that 
specialized in marketing poultry products in 
1962-63." Their net volume was almost 
$187.0 million and represented 44.5 percent 
of the total net value of poultry products 
marketed by all cooperatives. 

A total of 384 cooperatives of other types 
marketed a net volume of $233.1 million of 
poultry products as a sideline activity. Farm 
supply cooperatives were the most important 
of these other cooperatives with 213 associa- 
tions having net sales of $158.4 million. The 
cooperatives handling remaining sideline 



11 Does not include 2 inactive cooperatives. 



poultry sales were: 121 dairy, with net sales 
of $27.3 million; 4 cotton, with net sales of 
$41.8 million; 36 grain, with net sales of 
$4.0 million; and 5 livestock, 1 fruit and 
vegetable, 1 miscellaneous products, and 3 
service associations with combined net sales 
of almost $1.6 million. 

In 1962-63, California ranked 1st in net 
value of poultry products marketed by coop- 
eratives, followed by Minnesota and Alabama 
(table 28). Together, the 10 leading States 
handled 64.1 percent of total net volume. A 
considerable change has occurred in the rank 
of States since 1953-54 due mainly to the in- 
creasing influence of the South in the poultry 
industry. This is evidenced by the rise in 
rank of Alabama and Georgia from 1953-54 
to 1962-63. They ranked 3d and 4th, respec- 
tively in 1962-63, while 10 years previous 
they ranked 22d and 28th in total net sales 
of poultry products. 



Nuts 

Ninety- eight cooperatives marketed nuts 
(tree nuts and peanuts) having a gross value 



35 




Cotton and Cotton Products 



200 



£ o 

< 

§ 600 
o 



400 



200 



INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS 



NET BUSINESS * 



I 



lllllllll 

I I I I I 



1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 

♦ Excludes intercooperative business. 



Table 27. — Estimated net value of cotton and cotton products marketed by cooperatives 
in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 



State 


Net sales 2 


Rank 


Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








Texas 


237,355 


33.9 


1 


1 


California 


157,769 


22.5 


2 


3 


Mississippi 


132,453 


18.9 


3 


2 


Arizona 


58,363 


8.3 


4 


12 


Arkansas 


25,005 


3.6 


5 


5 


New Mexico 


22,388 


3.2 


6 


6 


Oklahoma 


20,293 


2.9 


7 


4 


Alabama 


10,892 


1.5 


8 


10 


North Carolina 


9,574 


1.4 


9 


8 


Louisiana 


9,299 


1.3 


10 


7 


Others 


17,213 


2.5 


- 


- 


Total 


700,604 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business, 

2 Preliminary. 



36 




Poultry Products 



200 



on 
on 

< 

O 
o 



400 
300 
200 
100 




INTERCOOPERATIVE BUSINESS 




NET BUSINESS * 



I I I I I I I I I 
I I I I I I I I I 
I I I I I I I I I 



1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 

FISCAL YEAR 

♦ Excludes intercooperative business. 



Table 28. — Estimated net value of poultry products marketed by cooperatives in the 
10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 





Net sales 


Rank 


State 










Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








California 


55,700 


13.3 


1 


1 


Minnesota 


37,552 


8.9 


2 


3 


Alabama 


30,363 


7.2 


3 


22 


Georgia 


28,944 


6.9 


4 


28 


Virginia 


21,771 


5.2 


5 


7 


New York 


21,091 


5.0 


6 


4 


North Carolina 


20,081 


4.8 


7 


14 


Wisconsin 


18,483 


4.4 


8 


13 


Ohio 


17,838 


4.3 


9 


6 


New Jersey 


17,334 


4.1 


10 


2 


Others 


150,963 


35.9 


- 


- 


Total 


420,120 


100.0 


- 


- 



Excludes intercooperative business. 
Preliminary. 



37 



of $133.3 million in 1962-63 (tables 2, 34, 35). 
Net business, eliminating the duplicating ef- 
fects of interassociation business, amounted 
to almost $122.9 million. This net business 
volume represented 92.1 percent of the total 
gross volume of nuts marketed by coopera- 
tives. Gross business increased 2.2 percent 
and net business moved upward 4.7 percent 
with comparison to 1961-62. 

Gross sales of 31 cooperatives whose pri- 
mary business was marketing nuts amounted 
to $97.4 million. The net value amounted to 
almost $89.5 million. This represented 72.8 
percent of the total net value of nuts marketed 
by all types of cooperatives. 

Other types of cooperatives that marketed 
nuts as a sideline had net sales of almost 
$33.4 million in 1962-63. Among these 67 
cooperatives, cotton associations continued to 
be the most important, with 2 organizations 
reporting a net volume of almost $31.5 mil- 
lion. Fifty- eight farm supply cooperatives 
marketed nuts with a net value of $1.1 million. 
The remaining sales of almost $0.8 million 
were made by 4 fruit and vegetable, 1 tobacco, 
and 2 grain associations. 

Table 29 shows California, Georgia, and 
Oklahoma as the 3 leading States in net value 
of nuts marketed by cooperatives in 1962-63. 



Together, these 3 States accounted for more 
than three-fourths, or 77.3 percent, of the 
net volume marketed. The 10 leading States 
in net sales by cooperatives in 1962-63 also 
held the top 10 positions 10 years earlier. 
However, only 2 States maintained the same 
ranking. Of the 8 remaining States, 4 ranked 
higher and 4 ranked lower when compared 
with their rank in 1953-54. 



Wool and Mohair 

Gross sales of wool and mohair of 253 
cooperatives amounted to $23.4 million in 
1962-63 (tables 2, 34, 35). After eliminating 
the value of intercooperative business, the 
net sales amounted to almost $23.2 million. 
The interassociation business of almost 
$224,000 represented sales made by regional 
cooperatives for other associations. 

Net business volume represented 99.0 per- 
cent of the total gross volume of wool and 
mohair marketed by cooperatives in 1962-63. 
Gross sales decreased 5.8 percent and net 
sales 4.3 percent compared with 1961-62. 

For 159 cooperatives whose primary busi- 
ness was wool marketing, gross sales amounted 
to almost $21.1 million. Their net sales 



Table 29. — Estimated net value of nuts marketed by cooperatives in the 10 ranking States 
in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 1 



Excludes intercooperative business. 
Preliminary. 





2 

Net sales 


Rank 


State 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








California 


56,456 


46.0 


1 


1 


Georgia 


27,878 


22.7 


2 


2 


Oklahoma 


10,633 


8.6 


3 


4 


North Carolina 


9,621 


7.8 


4 


7 


Alabama 


6,260 


5.1 


5 


10 


Florida 


3,179 


2.6 


6 


9 


Texas 


2,808 


2.3 


7 


3 


Virginia 


2,552 


2.1 


8 


6 


Oregon 


2,469 


2.0 


9 


5 


New Mexico 


197 


.2 


10 


8 


Others 


797 


.6 


- 


- 


Total 


122,850 


100.0 


- 


- 



38 



amounted to more than $21.0 million and ac- 
counted for 90.8 percent of the total net vol- 
ume of wool marketed by all types of coopera- 
tives. 

There were 94 cooperatives of other types 
that marketed wool as a sideline activity in 
1962-63. Their net sales amounted to more 
than $2.1 million. These associations in- 
cluded 70 farm supply cooperatives with net 
sales of wool amounting to almost $1.1 mil- 
lion; 9 grain cooperatives with net sales of 
more than $831,000; and 12 livestock coop- 
eratives with net sales of almost $236,000. 
Additional net wool sales of more than $13,000 
were made by 1 poultry association, 1 nut 
association, and 1 dairy association. 

In 1962-63, South Dakota ranked 1st in net 
value of wool and mohair marketed by coop- 
eratives, followed by Minnesota and Utah 
(table 30). The 10 leading States accounted 
for 69.5 percent of total net sales. The rank- 
ings of several of these States had changed 
considerably when compared with the previous 
10-year period, 1953-54. Minnesota moved up 
from 11th to 2d place, California from 31st 
to 5th, and Nebraska from 26th to 6th. Only 1 
of the 10 leading States in 1962-63 held the 
same rank in 1953-54. Five States ranked 
higher and 4 lower than they had 10 years 
previous. 



Miscellaneous 

Miscellaneous farm products were marketed 
by 189 cooperatives in 1962-63. Their gross 
value amounted to more than $62.0 million 
(tables 2, 34, 35). Net sales, after duplication 
arising from interassociation business was 
eliminated, amounted to $60.5 million. The 
miscellaneous group of farm products included 
forest products, fur pelts, hay, hops, seed 
marketed for growers, nursery stock, tung oil, 
coffee, and other farm products not separately 
classified. 

Net business volume represented 97.5 per- 
cent of the total gross volume of miscellaneous 
farm products marketed by cooperatives in 
1962-63. Gross sales increased 24.4 percent 
and net sales 28.4 percent compared with 
1961-62. 

The primary business of 61 cooperatives 
was marketing miscellaneous farm prod- 
ucts. 12 These organizations had gross sales 
of almost $53.5 million and net sales of more 
than $53.4 million. Net sales of these coopera- 
tives represented 88.3 percent of the total net 
value of miscellaneous farm products marketed 
by all types of cooperatives in 1962-63. 



12 3 cooperatives that were temporarily inactive were 
not included. 



Table 30. — Estimated net value of wool and mohair marketed by cooperatives in the 
10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 * 





Net sales 


Rank 


State 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 








South Dakota 


3,027 


13.0 


1 


1 


Minnesota 


2,189 


9.4 


2 


11 


Utah 


1,663 


7.2 


3 


2 


Montana 


1,648 


7.1 


4 


7 


California 


1,522 


6.6 


5 


31 


Nebraska 


1,479 


6.4 


6 


26 


Iowa 


1,275 


5.5 


7 


9 


Ohio 


1,174 


5.1 


8 


6 


Wyoming 


1,160 


5.0 


9 


3 


Idaho 


970 


4.2 


10 


4 


Others 


7,075 


30.5 


- 


- 


Total 


23,182 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. 

2 Preliminary. 



39 



Cooperatives of other types had net sales 
of miscellaneous farm products amounting to 
almost $7.1 million. Among these 128 asso- 
ciations were 84 farm supply cooperatives with 
net sales of almost $5.2 million; 29 grain 
associations with net sales of almost $1.2 
million; 7 dairy cooperatives with net sales 
of almost $387,000; and 3 service associations 
with net sales of almost $259,000. The re- 
maining sales of miscellaneous farm prod- 
ucts, having a net value of almost $72,000, 
were made by 1 fruit and vegetable asso- 
ciation, 2 dry bean and pea associations, 1 



livestock association, and 1 poultry associa- 
tion. 

California and Georgia ranked 1st and 2d 
in net value of miscellaneous farm products 
marketed by cooperatives and accounted for 
over half, or 53.1 percent, of total net sales 
(table 31). Comparison of 1962-63 with 
1953-54 shows a substantial shift in the rank 
of many of the 10 leading States. In 1962-63, 
only 1 of these States maintained the same 
ranking held 10 years earlier. Six States had 
moved up in position, and 3 States were 
ranked lower. 



Table 31, — Estimated net value of miscellaneous farm products marketed by cooperatives 
in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 * 



State 



Net sales 2 



Value 



Percent 



Rank 



1962-63 



1953-54 



$1,000 



California 


19,461 


32.1 


1 


2 


Georgia 


12,685 


21.0 


2 


17 


Oregon 


4,284 


7.1 


3 


8 


Wisconsin 


4,255 


7.0 


4 


1 


Washington 


4,087 


6.7 


5 


4 


Idaho 


2,633 


4.3 


6 


18 


Hawaii 


2,106 


3.5 


7 


(3) 


New York 


1,672 


2.8 


8 


3 


Mississippi 


1,613 


2.7 


9 


33 


Utah 


1,205 


2.0 


10 


10 


Others 


6,512 


10.8 


- 


- 


Total 


60,513 


100.0 


- 


- 



1 Excludes intercooperative business. Miscellaneous products includes forest products, 
fur pelts, hay, hops, seed marketed for growers, nursery stock, tung oil, coffee, and 
other farm products not separately classified. 

2 Preliminary, 

3 No cooperative marketing of miscellaneous farm products reported during 1953-54. 



SERVICES 



Service receipts of $303 million for 1962-63 
represented a slight increase of 0.4 percent 
over service receipts reported in the previous 
period (tables 2, 33, 35). Services for patrons 
were performed by 5,412 cooperatives. 

Major service receipts of cooperatives in- 
cluded storage revenue of $109.0 million 



representing almost 36.0 percent of total 
service receipts; cotton ginning revenue 
amounting to almost $42.1 million and repre- 
senting 13.9 percent of total service receipts 
(if an additional $12.2 million in bagging and 
ties reported separately were included, total 
ginning revenue would be $54.3 million); and 



40 



receipts for trucking, including livestock 
trucking, amounting to almost $39.4 million 
and accounting for 13.0 percent of total serv- 
ice receipts. 

Other services performed by cooperatives 
were valued at $112.8 million and represented 
37.2 percent of total receipts for all services. 
These other services included fruit and grain 
drying, locker plant operations, fruit picking 
and packing, feed grinding, repair of machinery 
and equipment, and similar important serv- 
ices. 



Texas, California, and Kansas ranked 1st, 
2d, and 3d, respectively, in value of service 
receipts for 1962-63 (table 32). Together, they 
accounted for more than a third, or 35.8 per- 
cent, of the total amount of service receipts. 
The 10 leading States accounted for over 
two- thirds, or 67.3 percent, of total service 
receipts. States making notable advancement 
in rank during the period 1953-54 to 1962-63 
included Iowa, moving from 11th to 4th posi- 
tion, and Nebraska, moving from 25th to 7th 
position. 



Table 32. — Estimated value of service receipts in the 10 ranking States in 1962-63 and 

their rank in 1953-54 





Service 


receipts 1 


Rank 




State 












Value 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




$1,000 










Texas 


47,927 


15.8 


1 


2 




California 


31,179 


10.3 


2 


1 




Kansas 


29,535 


9.7 


3 


6 




Iowa 


20,091 


6.6 


4 


11 




Minnesota 


17,620 


5.8 


5 


7 




Washington 


13,441 


4.4 


6 


4 




Nebraska 


13,343 


4.4 


7 


25 




Oklahoma 


11,191 


3.7 


8 


5 




North Dakota 


9,946^ 


3.3 


9 


12 




Florida 


9,872 


3.3 


10 


3 




Others 


99,136 


32.7 


- 


- 




Total 


303,281 


100.0 


- 


- 





1 Preliminary. 



41 



Table 33. — Estimated value of farm supplies purchased and services furnished 



Period 



Building 
materials 



Containers 

and packaging 

supplies 



Farm 
machinery 

and equipment 



Feed 



Fertilizer 



1950-51 
1951-52 
1952-53 
1953-54 
1954-55 
1955-56 
1956-57 
1957-58 
1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-63 4 



$1,000 





Gross value (includes 


intercooperative business) 






- 


- 


107,007 


911,089 


261,362 


72,953 


44,937 


126,318 


1,069,484 


296,810 


84,567 


49,787 


114,937 


1,118,693 


345,741 


89,810 


52,830 


96,885 


1,066,723 


372,218 


109,904 


50,321 


93,813 


1,071,860 


396,979 


111,914 


52,858 


98,159 


1,018,486 


418,688 


117,549 


55,333 


101,968 


1,079,344 


436,426 


111,998 


56,521 


100,125 


1,099,969 


460,320 


127,116 


56,669 


108,749 


1,222,317 


518,000 


138,814 


59,970 


110,081 


1,198,680 


583,628 


136,161 


58,191 


104,774 


1,205,445 


630,393 


143,272 


60,124 


105,447 


1,281,360 


682,380 


146,423 


58,258 


105,580 


1,371,256 


753,396 



Net value (excludes intercooperative business) 



1950-51 
1951-52 
1952-53 
1953-54 
1954-55 
1955-56 
1956-57 
1957-58 
1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-63 4 



40,255 


17,799 


55,626 


21,383 


61,985 


25,512 


77,258 


22,680 


79,075 


25,283 


82,195 


26,782 


76,321 


26,899 


87,387 


28,681 


91,114 


27,725 


91,370 


26,628 


95,576 


28,501 


99,485 


31,050 



68,106 


694,794 


156,229 


76,459 


810,937 


183,654 


74,337 


848,598 


216,317 


69,770 


810,432 


232,239 


64,991 


808,125 


250,000 


68,718 


774,769 


261,369 


71,368 


804,914 


274,814 


72,239 


809,127 


283,596 


76,246 


895,555 


314,268 


76,472 


885,924 


334,404 


75,169 


890,785 


361,563 


75,112 


935,631 


387,224 


75,923 


993,847 


429,504 



1 Includes plant equipment, automotive supplies, hardware, chicks, and other supplies not separately classified. 

2 Includes receipts for trucking, cotton ginning, storage, grinding, locker plants, and miscellaneous services. 



42 



by cooperatives, by specified commodity groups, 1950-51 to 1962-63 



Meats and 
groceries 



Petroleum 
products 



Seed 



Sprays and 

dusts 

(farm chemicals) 



Miscellaneous 
supplies 1 



Service 
receipts 2 



$1,000 
Gross value (includes intercooperative business) 



- 


585,005 


123,337 


- 


3 449,721 


99,958 


46,111 


653,610 


128,792 


33,167 


289,913 


114,480 


53,809 


674,940 


134,046 


34,765 


255,623 


141,750 


57,579 


705,527 


126,727 


37,886 


235,542 


157,802 


53,949 


731,210 


139,081 


44,759 


229,983 


195,522 


54,397 


783,810 


133,485 


50,116 


250,783 


214,880 


57,258 


845,858 


137,139 


57,247 


264,863 


234,629 


58,687 


896,053 


133,471 


63,224 


289,032 


246,964 


62,841 


930,356 


135,826 


70,118 


317,930 


272,866 


63,767 


965,184 


141,446 


78,639 


319,760 


298,177 


63,971 


991,950 


139,409 


82,919 


331,498 


305,600 


68,874 


996,256 


143,006 


92,067 


342,063 


302,102 


69,035 


1,016,618 


162,089 


96,445 


366,163 


303,281 



Net value (excludes intercooperative business) 



37,999 
45,666 
48,378 
46,607 
46,960 
49,018 
49,745 
52,513 
52,753 
51,937 
55,090 
54,807 



377,013 


90,480 


- 


3 298,791 


99,958 


421,524 


95,001 


24,663 


210,432 


114,480 


436,274 


101,306 


24,002 


190,259 


141,750 


448,131 


94,551 


26,606 


160,448 


157,802 


465,668 


99,747 


31,885 


154,656 


195,522 


493,605 


97,298 


35,599 


163,410 


214,880 


529,679 


100,010 


40,764 


166,395 


234,629 


552,415 


95,864 


43,054 


178,230 


246,964 


580,150 


97,374 


47,075 


191,812 


272,866 


596,180 


101,635 


53,202 


188,748 


298,177 


621,910 


100,344 


56,426 


196,154 


305,600 


624,688 


100,969 


62,328 


196,219 


302,102 


634,246 


112,635 


64,714 


208,189 


303,281 



8 Includes the value of building materials, containers and packaging supplies, sprays and dusts (farm chemicals), 
meats and groceries, as well as miscellaneous supplies not separately classified. 
4 Preliminary. 



43 



Table 34. — Estimated value of farm products marketed by cooperatives, 



Period 



Beans and peas 
(dry edible) 



Cotton 
and cotton 
products 



Dairy 
products 



Fruits and 
vegetables 



Grain, soy- 
beans, and 

soybean 
meal and oil 



Livestock 
and live- 
stock 
products 



1950-51 
1951-52 
1952-53 
1953-54 
1954-55 
1955-56 
1956-57 
1957-58 
1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-63 2 



$1,000 



Gross value 


(includes inter cooperative business) 






31,945 


349,522 


2,298,692 


875,441 


2,057,803 


1,407,026 


42,612 


437,626 


2,590,928 


911,446 


2,463,229 


1,758,628 


40,163 


420,985 


2,851,888 


948,361 


2,415,778 


1,577,407 


39,125 


597,697 


2,897,611 


958,839 


2,220,335 


1,390,386 


38,939 


452,833 


2,909,594 


1,032,755 


2,338,457 


1,443,883 


39,216 


541,249 


3,032,891 


1,108,997 


2,405,617 


1,291,458 


34,660 


542,860 


3,303,949 


1,058,681 


2,587,883 


1,296,095 


34,698 


460,815 


3,495,708 


1,206,198 


2,621,725 


1,434,638 


39,743 


632,860 


3,565,978 


1,290,137 


2,867,768 


1,686,955 


41,598 


668,747 


3,679,523 


1,321,423 


2,944,798 


1,613,026 


46,641 


673,148 


3,892,735 


1,351,847 


3,203,139 


1,567,434 


40,190 


717,920 


4,401,113 


1,390,759 


3,295,382 


1,622,108 


40,200 


811,062 


4,524,833 


1,472,308 


3,621,924 


1,717,063 



Net value (excludes intercooperative business) 



1950-51 
1951-52 
1952-53 
1953-54 
1954-55 
1955-56 
1956-57 
1957-58 
1958-59 
1959-60 
1960-61 
1961-62 
1962-632 



25,030 


320,019 


1,933,665 


552,641 


1,361,499 


1,321,944 


35,888 


380,375 


2,166,004 


596,537 


1,616,427 


1,647,778 


33,177 


375,449 


2,396,207 


590,497 


1,584,885 


1,476,653 


31,526 


522,610 


2,409,353 


610,409 


1,492,307 


1,296,080 


32,242 


394,874 


2,431,522 


675,566 


1,543,716 


1,337,354 


29,537 


478,944 


2,542,657 


723,272 


1,572,018 


1,180,114 


27,842 


487,397 


2,764,355 


723,269 


1,663,529 


1,173,666 


26,702 


412,501 


2,918,196 


823,928 


1,677,607 


1,299,668 


27,450 


574,438 


2,972,625 


892,320 


1,895,431 


1,527,042 


28,849 


607,390 


3,055,521 


941,811 


1,929,114 


1,471,069 


33,900 


3 591,404 


3,242,972 


941,421 


2,104,524 


1,434,149 


30,548 


624,607 


3,425,433 


1,002,590 


2,162,219 


1,512,571 


29,578 


700,604 


3,498,652 


1,054,609 


2,368,004 


1,609,171 



1 Includes coffee, forest products, fur pelts, hay, hops, nursery stock, rung oil, and other farm products not 
separately classified. 

2 Preliminary. 



44 



by specified commodity groups, 1950-51 to 1962-63 



Nuts 



Poultry 
products 



Rice 



Sugar 
products 



Tobacco 



Wool and 
mohair 



Miscellaneous 1 



141,012 
128,475 

90,288 
114,761 

80,481 
128,919 
130,169 
126,088 
137,642 
136,854 
144,887 
130,446 
133,330 



113,485 
92, 367 
55,216 
83,850 
46,273 
91,238 
96,211 
93,072 
109,493 
114,533 
124,152 
117,380 
122,850 



$1,000 
Gross value (includes intercooperative business) 



304,045 


131,191 


149,785 


125,842 


30,882 


81,591 


357,130 


149,677 


147,313 


173,399 


46,170 


54,064 


380,734 


176,423 


119,895 


168,307 


39,398 


65,318 


401,363 


182,952 


129,484 


158,850 


34,456 


72,868 


394,538 


174,582 


132,278 


216,946 


31,767 


100,860 


403,838 


165,305 


125,041 


189,989 


28,986 


52,881 


419,520 


165,040 


286,262 


199,586 


30,957 


54,453 


417,121 


167,142 


349,688 


145,161 


23,862 


55,898 


452,549 


157,341 


331,575 


175,092 


28,754 


46,089 


464,730 


167,680 


336,952 


241,287 


23,291 


48,500 


503,347 


179,573 


371,457 


139,896 


23,192 


46,426 


502,517 


205,427 


411,036 


201,003 


24,886 


49,869 


504,074 


243,695 


425,695 


313,839 


23,406 


62,034 



Net value (excludes intercooperative business) 



263,689 


90,729 


149,785 


125,842 


29,270 


74,168 


321,018 


111,585 


147,313 


173,399 


42,031 


45,962 


336,671 


135,654 


119,895 


168,307 


35,465 


57,719 


363,730 


141,818 


129,484 


158,850 


32,259 


66,510 


350,416 


140,182 


132,278 


216,946 


29,039 


94,335 


358,004 


132,922 


125,041 


189,989 


25,425 


45,998 


364,073 


140,392 


286,262 


199,586 


24,386 


47,919 


356,889 


145,012 


349,688 


145,161 


19,725 


50,299 


391,566 


135,212 


331,575 


175,092 


27,822 


43,023 


390,488 


145,018 


336,952 


241,287 


22,527 


45,355 


424,927 


155,743 


371,457 


139,896 


22,471 


44,231 


423,905 


177,684 


411,036 


201,003 


24,258 


47,130 


420,120 


207,348 


425,695 


313,839 


23,182 


60,513 



3 Revised. 



45 



Table 35. 



Estimates of gross and net sales 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives 1 by commodity groups, 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63 3 





Beans and peas (dry edible) Cotton and cotton products 


Dairy products 




Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales *' 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales^ 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales 


Geographic division 
and State 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 
$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 
$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 
SI, 000 


Net 
(excludes 
interc ©op- 
erative 
business) 
$1,000 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


3 

4 
14 
6 
1 
4 


2 
3 
7 
3 

1 
1 


5 
7 
21 
9 
2 
5 


23,831 
15,649 
81,358 
25,500 
8,618 
29,463 


23,831 
15,649 
80,578 
25,500 
8,618 
29,463 


New Hampshire 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 


New England 


~ 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


32 


" 


- 


184,419 


183,639 


New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 


23 


" 


23 


4,022 


2,678 


" 


" 


_ 


- 


- 


124 

8 

43 


9 
3 
10 


133 
11 
53 


509,026 

20,881 

231,752 


371,858 

13,076 

209,125 




23 


- 


- 


4,022 


2,678 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


175 


- 


- 


761,659 


594,059 




21 


- 


21 


11,575 


7,997 


- 


- 


- 




- 


29 
10 
37 
25 
265 


5 
11 
7 
5 
10 


34 
21 
44 
30 
275 


168,696 
102,795 
167,371 
224,786 
742,319 


155 717 




79 376 




116 026 




193 785 


Wisconsin 


474,791 


East North Central... 


21 


- 


- 


11,575 


7,997 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


366 


- 


- 


1,405,967 


1,019,695 


Minnesota 


- 


i 


1 


7 


7 


1 


3 


4 


2,565 


2,327 


392 
151 
41 
32 
41 
34 
18 


8 
7 
4 
4 
3 

6 


400 
158 
45 
36 
44 
34 
24 


558,595 
230,372 
83,418 
19,366 
40,183 
36,669 
64,946 


341,590 
155 252 




83 379 


North Dakota 

South Dakota 


14,130 
34,873 
36 669 




64 946 






West North Central... 


- 


- 


- 


7 


7 


1 


- 


- 


2,565 


2,327 


709 


- 


- 


1,033,549 


730,839 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 
1 
5 


- 


1 
1 
5 


9,574 

49 

6,521 


9,574 

49 

5,037 


4 
19 

4 
11 

4 
11 
11 


1 
5 

4 
6 
1 
1 
2 


1 
9 
23 
10 
12 
5 
13 
11 


3,780 
61,963 
67,451 
12,903 
36,563 
15,984 
28,956 
59,742 


3 780 




61,182 




67 451 


West Virginia 


12,903 
36,563 
15,984 
28,956 




59,742 






South Atlantic 


" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


- 


- 


16,144 


14,660 


64 


- 


- 


287,342 


286,561 




" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 

7 

60 


1 
2 


2 

8 

62 


8,481 

12,994 

136,450 


8,481 

10,892 

132,453 


5 
7 
1 
5 


7 
4 
1 
2 


12 

11 

2 

7 


42,707 

40,690 

3,224 

27,593 


38,405 




40 264 




3,224 




27,593 


East South Central... 


" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


69 


- 


- 


157,925 


151,826 


18 


- 


- 


114,214 


109,486 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


31 

5 

59 

330 


3 
3 
1 


34 

8 

60 

330 


31,042 

9,547 

25,509 

296,401 


25,005 

9,299 

20,293 

237,355 


1 
5 
11 
11 


2 

4 
3 


3 

5 
15 
14 


14,294 

28,808 

41,238 

117,637 


14,294 




28,808 




41,143 




117,595 






West South Central... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


425 


- 


- 


362,499 


291,952 


28 


- 


- 


201,977 


201,840 




2 

3 
10 

1 


2 
4 
1 
1 


2 
6 
4 
11 
1 


301 

6,647 

2,545 

3,572 

35 


17 

3,237 

839 

3,272 

35 


19 
4 


2 
4 

1 


21 

8 

1 


25,058 
68,953 

1,319 


22,388 
58,363 

1,319 


7 
6 
2 

7 
1 
3 
9 
1 


1 
4 
1 
3 
2 
1 
1 
1 


8 

10 
3 

10 
3 
4 

10 
2 


4,897 
49,103 

2,512 
25,315 

4,064 
25,248 
36,621 

2,287 


4,534 




39,304 




2,428 




25,265 




4,021 




24,405 


Utah 


36,587 




1,444 








16 


- 


r 


13,100 


7,400 


23 


- 


- 


95,330 


82,070 36 


- 


- 


150,047 


137,988 












6 

1 
2 


2 


6 
3 
2 


3,823 

387 

7,286 


3,823 

387 

7,286 


35 


1 


36 


176,599 


157,769 


12 
23 
25 


3 
3 

1 


15 
26 
26 


119,460 

49,522 

213,017 


61,219 




40,646 




129,113 








9 


- 


- 


11,496 


11,496 


35 


- 


- 


176,599 


157,769 


60 


- 


- 


381,999 


230,978 






TOTAL (48 States).. 


69 


- 


- 


40,200 


29,578 


560 


- 


- 


811,062 


700,604 


1,488 


- 


- 


021,173 


3,495,085 


Alaska 

Hawaii 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


1 
1 


3 
1 


3,618 

161 


3,567 


UNITED STATES 


69 


- 


" 


40,200 


29,578 J 


560 


" 


- 


811,062 


700,6041 1,490 


- 




4,524,791 


3,498,652 



See end of table for footnote references. 
Table continued on following page. 



46 



Table 35. 



Estimated of gross and net sales 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives' by commodity groups, 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63"- Continued 





Fruits and vegetables 


Grain, soybeans, soybean meal and oil 


Livestock and livestock products 




Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling ^ 


Value of sales 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling •* 


Value of sales^ 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales 


Geographic division 
and State 


Gross 
(includes 

interc cop- 
era tive 

business) 
$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 
$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
interc cop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 

in 

Sl.it- 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
' quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 




9 
2 
2 
3 

3 


- 


9 
2 
2 
3 

3 


5,767 

955 

4 

19,771 

1,155 


5,767 

955 

4 

19,771 

1,155 


1 

1 


1 


2 

1 


454 
171 


454 

(71 


1 

1 
1 

1 


- 


1 

1 
1 

1 


2 

4 
1,062 

31 


2 




4 
1,062 

31 




19 


- 


- 


27,652 


27,652 


2 


- 


- 


454 


454 


4 


- 


- 


1,099 


1,099 




22 

14 
14 


1 
2 
3 


23 
16 
17 


49,016 
17,381 
34,966 


49,016 
17,381 
34,966 


82 
11 
16 


1 
2 


82 
12 
18 


7,082 

956 

2,926 


4,778 

908 

2,895 


3 

3 

10 


3 


3 
3 
13 


22,760 
4,875 
3,754 


22,760 
4,875 




3,752 




50 


- 


- 


101,363 


101,363 


109 


- 


- 


10,964 


8,581 


16 


- 


- 


31,389 


31,387 




14 
2 
8 

32 
7 


2 
1 
1 
1 
2 


16 
3 
9 

33 
9 


17,836 
537 
4,708 
36,353 
19,265 


17,750 
537 
4,708 
36,319 
19,265 


176 
100 
199 
68 
43 


3 
2 
2 
1 


176 
103 
201 
70 
44 


262,103 

230,336 

417,879 

58,325 

4,063 


153,944 

130,139 

315,658 

29,404 

3,962 


4 
4 

16 
8 

99 


3 
5 
4 
2 
5 


7 

9 

20 

10 

104 


178,358 
153,435 
173,883 
44,186 
87,209 


177,266 




152,956 




164,639 




44,185 




59,345 






East North Central... 


63 


- 


- 


78,699 


78,579 


586 


- 


- 


972,706 


633,107 


131 


- 


- 


637,071 


598,391 




7 
3 
6 

1 

1 
1 


1 


7 
3 
7 

1 

1 
1 


1,621 

309 

1,337 

1,722 

794 
92 


1,621 

309 

1,337 

1,722 

794 
92 


233 
295 
92 
288 
145 
194 
255 


3 

4 
2 
1 
4 
2 
7 


236 

299 
94 
289 
149 
196 
262 


239,172 
391,536 
98,286 
347 , 105 
112,898 
166,496 
468,268 


176,710 
265,268 

62,526 
231,360 

85,216 
117,417 
272,522 


152 

35 

22 

29 

4 

2 

4 


5 
12 
3 
6 
7 
7 
6 


157 
47 
25 
35 
11 
9 
10 


224,630 
160,708 
90,213 
40,035 
24,744 
95,278 
16,124 


173,678 




159,924 




89,521 




36,111 
23,847 
95,264 




15,958 






West North Central... 


19 


- 


- 


5,875 


5,875 


1,502 


- 


- 


1,823,761 


1,211,019 


248 


- 


- 


651,732 


594,303 




1 
3 

10 
1 
9 
8 
3 

63 


1 
1 


1 
3 

10 
1 
9 
9 
3 

64 


686 

1,174 

2,538 

17 

2,801 

2,901 

658 

249,990 


686 

1,174 

2,538 

17 

2,801 

2,901 

658 

165,707 


9 
13 
12 

2 

1 
1 
6 


2 
3 

1 

1 

1 


U 
16 
12 
3 
1 
2 
6 
1 


3,047 
11,116 
9,251 

419 
2,363 

691 
4,619 

522 


2,731 
6,710 
7,749 

380 
2,126 

632 
3,576 

391 


30 
9 
4 
4 
2 
3 


2 

1 
1 


30 
11 
4 
5 
2 
4 


19,492 
3,092 
3,268 
623 
1,700 
4,320 










17,865 




2,908 

3,247 

618 

1,700 


Florida 


4,320 








98 


- 


- 


260,765 


176,482 


44 


- 


- 


32,028 


24,295 


52 


- 


- 


32,495 


30,658 




4 
6 

2 

1 


- 


4 
6 
2 
1 


47 

610 

56 

2 


47 

610 

56 

2 


1 

3 

8 

14 


1 
2 


2 

3 

10 

14 


3,087 
1,623 
5,216 
8,359 


2,415 

180 

1,876 

6,874 


14 
3 
8 
1 


2 

1 

2 


16 
4 
8 
3 


25,161 
4,548 
7,043 

16,071 


20,434 




4,548 




7,043 




16,071 


East South Central... 


13 


- 


- 


715 


715 


26 


- 


- 


18,285 


11,345 


26 


- 


- 


52,823 


48,096 




5 

7 

2 

10 


1 

1 


6 
7 
2 

11 


5,115 

831 

37 

2,038 


5,115 

831 

37 

2,038 


9 

2 

94 

97 


3 
2 


9 

2 

97 

99 


51,068 

506 

190,602 

118,661 


47,463 

506 

90,540 

78,649 


1 

2 

4 


2 
2 
1 
3 


3 
2 
3 
7 


147 

157 

26,365 

53,628 


147 




157 




26,365 




49,075 






West South Central... 


24 


- 


- 


8,021 


8,021 


202 


- 


- 


360,837 


217,158 


7 


- 


- 


80,297 


75,744 




2 
6 

19 
3 
6 
5 


1 
3 


2 
7 

19 
3 
9 
5 


909 
12,319 

12,952 
1,104 

17,266 
1,772 


909 
12,319 

8,379 
1,104 
4,640 
1,772 


54 
10 
7 
26 
6 
1 
5 


2 
6 
2 
6 
1 


56 

16 
9 

32 
7 
1 
5 


103,411 

33,539 

3,753 

46,546 

3,969 

12 

3,988 


56,169 
17,910 

2,813 
28,704 

2,777 
12 

2,014 


2 
6 

2 
2 


7 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 

2 


9 
7 
2 
4 
1 
1 
2 
2 


14,217 
6,055 
5,492 

37,729 
1,497 

12,140 

18,821 
2,292 


13,864 




6,055 




5,492 




37,729 




1,497 




12,140 


Utah 


18,821 


Nevada 


2,292 




41 


- 


- 


46,322 


29,123 


109 


- 


- 


195,218 


110,399 


12 


- 


- 


98,243 


97,890 








52 

25 

225 


3 


52 

28 

225 


81,716 

88,467 

769,390 


66 , 7 17 

68,632 

488,400 


40 

20 

6 


2 
3 

1 


42 

23 

7 


139,117 

58,905 

9,594 


110,595 

31,442 

9,554 


2 
2 
5 


2 
1 


2 
4 
6 


399 

3,444 

125,434 


399 




3,444 




125,123 






Pacific 


302 


- 


- 


939,573 


623,749 


66 


- 


- 


207,616 


151,591 


9 


- 


- 


129,277 


128,966 






TOTAL (48 States).. 


629 


- 


- 


1,468,985 


1,051,559 


2,646 


- 


- 


3,621,869 


2,367,949 


505 


- 


- 


1,714,426 


1,606,534 




1 
10 


1 


1 
11 


(61 

3,183 


161 j 1 

2,910! 


- 


1 


161 






- 


2 


(61 




Hawaii 


"I 2 


161 






UNITED STATES 


640 


- 


- 


1,472,168 


1,054,469] 2,647 


- 


- 


3,621,869 


2,367,949| 507 


- 


- 


1,714,426 


1,606,534 



See end of table for footnote references. 
Table continued on following page. 



47 



Table 35. - Estimates of gross and net sales 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives 2 by commodity groups, 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63- Continued 





Nuts 


Poultry products 


Rice 




Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 


Value of sa les * 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales' 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales' 


Geographic division 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 

SI. 000 


Net 
(excludes 
intereoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI. 000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 
SI, 000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI, 000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI, 000 


Net 


and State 


Head- 

quar- 

ters 

in 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


intercoop- 
erative 

business) 
SI, 000 




" 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 

1 
2 

3 


2 
2 

1 
1 
1 
2 


4 
2 
2 
3 
1 
5 


1,121 
479 

23 
3,958 

37 
2,631 


1,121 

441 

23 

3,750 

2,506 


- 


- 


- 


- 




New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


- 


- 


8,249 


7,841 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


New York 

Pennsylvania 


. 


- 


- 


" 


- 


8 

13 

9 


2 
3 


8 
15 
12 


21,270 
18,913 
14,397 


21,091 
17,334 
13,990 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


_ 


Middle Atlantic 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


- 


- 


54,580 


52,415 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10 
2 
3 

11 

14 


1 

1 

1 
1 


11 
2 
4 
12 
15 


29,707 

959 

61 

4,474 

20,394 


17,838 

959 

61 

4,304 

18,483 


- 


- 


- 


- 














- 






East North Central... 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


40 


- 


- 


55,595 


41,645 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Minnesota 


42 


- 


42 


112 


112 


87 
17 
120 
11 
22 
35 
13 


1 
1 

1 
1 
1 

1 


88 
18 
120 
12 
23 
36 
14 


59,345 

14,355 

12,706 

625 

5,642 
10,341 

3,356 


37,552 
14,230 
4,033 
466 
5,483 
7,115 
3,356 


- 


- 


; 


_ 


- 


North Dakota 

South Dakota 


. 






West North Central... 


42 


- 


- 


112 


112 


305 


- 


- 


106,370 


72,235 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




1 
1 

11 

1 


1 
1 

1 


1 

2 

1 

11 

2 


2,552 

9,621 

30 

29,025 

3,561 


2,552 

9,621 

4 

27,878 

3,179 


1 

8 

7 
3 

7 
4 


1 
3 
1 
2 
2 
1 
1 


1 
4 
9 
2 
9 
4 
8 
4 


945 

3,390 
22,202 

5,159 
21,644 

1,921 
29,409 

4,787 


945 

3,191 
21,771 

5,159 
20,081 

1,711 
28 , 944 

4,787 


- 




- 








- 


West Virginia 


; 




- 




14 


- 


- 


44,789 


43,234 


30 


- 


- 


89,457 


86,589 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 




2 
2 


1 
1 
1 


1 
3 
3 


122 

6,285 

138 


122 

6,260 

113 


1 

5 
12 


1 

1 


1 

6 
13 


24 

30,363 
17,621 


24 

30,363 
16,891 


2 


- 


2 


3,815 


- 




3,815 


East South Central... 


4 


- 


- 


6,545 


6,495 


18 


- 


- 


48,008 


47,278 


2 


- 


- 


3,815 


3,815 




3 
4 


1 
1 
2 
1 


1 
1 
5 
5 


30 

570 

10,684 

3,191 


85 

10,633 

2,808 


2 

1 

8 

1<J 


1 
1 


2 

1 

9 

11 


5,367 

142 

4,027 

7,522 


5,367 

142 

2,573 

4,795 


16 

18 

18 


1 


16 
18 

19 


59,209 
18,611 

88,451 


59 209 




13 050 








57,665 


West South Central... 


7 


- 


- 


14,475 


13,531 


21 


- 


- 


17,058 


12,877 


52 


- 


- 


166,271 


129,924 


Montana 


- 


1 
1 


1 
1 


197 
197 


197 
197 


2 
1 

2 

4 


2 


2 
3 

2 

4 


26 
960 

3,885 
16,456 


26 

916 

3,885 
10,418 






- 


- 


- 




- 






Utah 

Nevada 


- 




- 


- 


- 


394 


394 


9 


- 


- 


21,327 


15,245 


- 


- 


- 










5 
25 


1 


1 

5 

25 


125 

2,469 

64,387 


125 

2,469 

56,456 


2 
3 

10 


1 
2 
1 


3 

5 

11 


17,945 
12,897 
70,393 


17,228 
9,722 
55,700 6 


- 


6 


73,609 










73 609 






Pacific 


30 


- 


- 


66,981 


59,050 


15 


- 


- 


101,235 


82,650 


6 


- 


- 


73,609 


73 609 






TOTAL (48 States).. 


97 


- 


- 


133,296 


122,816 


476 


- 


- 


501,879 


418,775 60 


- 


- 


243,695 


207 , 348 


Alaska 


1 


. 


1 


161 


id 


3 


- 


3 


2,195 


1,345 


- 


- 


_ 


- 


- 








98 


- 


- 


133,296 


122,816 


479 


- 


- 


504,074 


420,120 


60 


- 


- 


243,695 


207,348 



See end or table Tor rootnote references. 
Table continued on following page. 



48 



Table 35. - Estimates of gross and net sales 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives 2 by commodity groups, 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63' - Continued 





Sugar products 


Tobacco 


Wool and mohair 




Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales^ 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 


Value of sales 


Geographic division 
and State 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 
$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 

State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 

out of 

State 


Total 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 

out of 

State 


Total 

in 
State 


(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 




1 


- 


1 


11 


11 


1 


1 


1 
1 


801 
980 


801 
980 


1 
2 


1 

1 


2 

1 
2 


172 

16) 


172 


New Hampshire 


18) 


Rhode Island 

Connecticut 


tei 




1 


" 


- 


11 


11 


1 


- 


- 


1,781 


1,781 


3 


- 


- 


172 


172 




1 


_ 


1 


325 


325 


- 


" 


- 


- 


- 


3 

1 

29 


1 
1 


4 

2 

29 


63 

38 

529 


29 

38 

529 






Middle Atlantic 


1 


- 


- 


325 


325 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


33 


- 


- 


630 


596 


Ohio 


2 
7 


- 


2 
7 


851 
12,427 


851 
12,427 


2 


1 
2 


1 
2 

2 


4,634 
4,900 

1,629 


4,634 
4,900 

1,629 


1 
4 
2 
1 
4 


1 
2 


1 
4 
3 
3 
4 


1,174 

818 

34 

107 

700 


1 174 




818 

34 






107 
700 








9 


- 


- 


13,278 


13,278 


2 


- 


- 


11,163 


11,163 


12 


- 


- 


2,833 


2,833 




2 
1 

1 
3 

1 


i 


2 

1 

1 
1 
3 

1 


1,665 
8,612 

700 

614 

14,620 

750 


1,665 
8,612 

700 

614 

14,620 

750 


- 


1 
1 


1 

1 


14 
2,163 


14 
2,163 


3 

1 

60 

3 

1 


1 
1 

1 
2 
1 


4 
2 
60 
3 
2 
2 
1 


2,189 

1,275 

802 

158 

3,027 

1,479 

633 


2,189 

1,275 

626 

158 

3,027 

1,479 

633 










West North Central 


8 


- 


- 


26,961 


26,961 


- 


- 


- 


2,177 


2,177 


68 


- 


- 


9,563 


9,387 


Delaware 


3 


i 


1 
3 


112 
2,180 


112 
2,180 


2 

4 

4 
2 


5 
2 

4 
3 

1 
1 


2 

9 
2 
8 
3 

1 
3 


6,822 
25,887 

3,093 

145,546 

24,156 

19,974 

5,174 


6,822 
25,887 

3,093 

145,546 

24,156 

19,974 

5,174 


20 
28 

1 


- 


20 
28 

1 


,575 
'267 

6 


575 

v 253 

6 


West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 




- 




3 


- 


- 


2,292 


2,292 


12 


- 


- 


230,652 


230,652 


49 


- 


- 


848 


834 






1 


- 


1 


25 


25 


8 
7 


2 
4 


10 
11 


50,976 
17,090 


50,976 
17,090 


2 
16 

8 


- 


2 
16 

8 


5 
250 

104 


5 
250 




Mississippi 


104 




1 


- 


- 


25 


25 


15 


- 


- 


68,066 


68,066 


26 


- 


- 


359 


359 




9 


- 


9 


15,270 


15,270 


- 


- 


- 




- 


1 
3 

2 


1 

1 
1 


2 

3 
1 
3 


18 

62 

292 

590 


18 

62 

292 

590 






West South Central 


9 


- 


- 


15,270 


15,270 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6 


- 


- 


962 


962 




5 
9 
2 
2 

10 


2 
3 

1 


7 

12 

2 

2 

1 
10 


15,786 

36,924 

2,577 

35,237 

7 
5,954 


15,786 

36,924 

2,577 

35,237 

7 
5,954 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21 

19 

6 

2 

4 
2 


1 
2 
1 
2 

1 


22 
21 

7 
4 

4 
3 


1,648 
970 

1,160 
433 

1,663 
62 


1,648 

970 

1,160 

433 


New Mexico 


Utah 


1,663 
62 






28 


- 


- 


96,485 


96,485 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


54 


- 


- 


5,936 


5,936 






1 
1 
4 


1 


1 
2 
4 


13,832 

6,837 

10 250,379 


13,832 

6,837 

10 250,379 


_ 


" 


- 


- 


- 


1 
1 


1 
1 

1 


1 
2 
2 


190 

370 

1,522 


190 

370 

1,522 










6 


- 


- 


271,048 


271,048 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2,082 


2,082 




TOTAL (48 States) 


66 


- 


- 


425,695 


425,695 


30 


- 


- 


313,839 


313,839 


253 


- 


- 


23,385 


23,161 




- 


1 


1 


1 10 1 


110) 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1 
1 


1 
1 


I - '! 


161 

16) 






66 


- 


- 


425,695 


425,695 


30 


- 


- 


313,839 


313,839 


253 


- 


- 


23,385 


23,161 



See end or table for footnote 
Table continued on following ; 



49 



Table 35. - Estimates of gross and net sales 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives 1 by commodity groups, 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63^ - Continued 









Miscellaneous 11 






Total farm products marketed 








Building materials 






Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 1 * 


Value of sales 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 


Value of sales' 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales 


Geographic division 
and State 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 
S1.000 


Net 

(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI, 000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI, 000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI, 000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI, 000 


Net 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 




- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


12 

7 

14 

15 

1 
9 


4 
5 
9 
4 
2 
4 


16 
12 
23 
19 
3 
13 


31,347 
17,083 
81,389 
51,103 
8,655 
34,260 


31,347 
17,045 
80,609 
50,895 
8,618 
34,135 


2 

1 
5 

5 


1 
1 
1 
1 

1 


3 
1 
2 
6 

6 


32 

2 

9 

198 

66 


17 

2 

9 

127 




Rhode Island 








- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


58 


- 


- 


223,837 


222,649 


13 


- 


- 


307 










26 
1 
2 


- 


26 
1 
2 


1,709 

272 

2 


1,672 

272 

2 


246 
48 
112 


11 
7 
18 


257 

55 

130 


615,273 

63,316 

288,326 


474,207 

53,884 

265,259 


191 
15 
55 


1 
1 
3 


192 
16 
58 


10,490 
1,395 
3,581 


4,820 

629 

1,275 








29 


- 


- 


1,983 


1,946 


406 


- 


- 


966,915 


793,350 


261 


- 


- 


15,466 


6,724 




4 
26 
3 
5 
5 


1 


4 
26 
4 
5 
5 


956 

145 

684 

540 

4,255 


956 
145 
684 
540 
4,255 


233 
116 
266 

143 
427 


12 
22 
14 
13 
18 


245 
138 
280 

156 
445 


664,315 
493,925 
764,620 
392,773 
879,834 


530,130 
369,830 
601,810 
329,068 
582,430 


113 
98 

118 
62 
97 


2 
5 
4 
2 


113 
100 
123 
66 
99 


6,882 

18,497 
8,751 
7,247 
3,415 










5 433 




4 822 




2 276 






East North Central 


43 


- 


- 


6,580 


6,580 


1,185 


- 


- 


3,195,467 


2,413,268 


488 


- 


- 


44,792 


28,254 




10 

3 

31 

2 
2 
1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


10 
3 

31 
1 
3 
3 
2 


180 
57 
566 
130 
553 
844 
8 


180 
57 

566 
37 

506 

809 
8 


795 
471 
178 
354 
190 
238 
273 


18 
24 
14 
13 
16 
13 
19 


813 
495 
192 
367 
206 
251 
292 


1,087,411 
807,224 
292,168 
409,841 
187,661 
326,528 
554,177 


735,199 
604,927 
246,590 
284,684 
153,566 
274,174 
358,265 


61 
200 
60 
36 
45 
72 
74 


4 
8 
1 
3 
5 
3 
3 


65 
208 
61 
39 
50 
75 
77 


6,565 
21,307 
4,484 
6,408 
4,533 
5,998 
6,198 


5 506 




18 470 




2 599 




6,384 
4,051 
4 159 




3,616 






West North Central 


49 


- 


- 


2,338 


2,163 


2,499 


- 


- 


3,665,010 


2,657,405 


548 


- 


- 


55,493 


44,785 




2 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 
4 


- 


2 
1 

1 
2 
1 

1 

4 


250 

3 

20 

8 

1 

12,685 

406 


250 

3 

20 

8 

1 

12,685 

406 


10 
26 
94 
41 
34 
17 
37 
93 


3 
9 
10 
12 
8 
5 
5 
3 


13 
35 
104 
53 
42 
22 
42 
96 


8,458 
84,715 

149,951 
24,970 

231,388 
46,362 

133,659 

330,682 


8,142 
79,329 

146,391 
24,733 

229,567 
46,062 

129,520 

245,886 


3 

12 
2 
1 
1 
9 
1 


2 

1 
2 
1 
1 


3 
14 
3 
3 
2 
10 
1 


77 

1,964 

15 

2,587 

782 

829 

22 






77 




613 




15 
987 
514 
332 




22 








12 


- 


- 


13,373 


13,373 


352 


- 


- 


1,010,185 


909,630 


29 


- 


- 


6,276 


2,560 




2 
1 
3 




2 
1 
3 


33 

76 

1,613 


33 

76 

1,613 


36 
47 
27 
97 


12 
10 
3 
7 


48 

57 

30 

104 


122,032 
73,447 
65,257 

211,766 


112,331 
71,578 
59,790 

205,529 


6 
38 

4 
14 


1 
1 
2 


6 

39 

5 

16 


93 

1,944 

83 

452 


93 




1,296 




57 




164 






East South Central 


6 


- 


- 


1,722 


1,722 


207 


- 


- 


472,502 


449,228 


62 


- 


- 


2,572 


1,610 




1 

5 
3 


- 


1 

5 
3 


57 

219 
615 


57 

219 
615 


61 

49 
153 
450 


9 
5 
12 
12 


70 

54 

165 

462 


166,347 

74,504 

298,973 

688,734 


156,680 

68,210 

192,095 

551,185 


15 
4 
28 
11 


3 

3 
2 


18 

4 

31 

13 


1,303 
160 

2,417 
411 


691 




145 




1,516 




81 






West South Central.... 


9 


- 


- 


891 


891 


713 


- 


- 


1,228,558 


968,170 


58 


- 


- 


4,291 


2,433 




1 
7 
3 

4 


1 
3 


2 

10 
3 

4 


88 

2,695 

21 

1,205 


41 

2,633 

21 

1,205 


89 
54 
17 
62 
27 
14 
42 
3 


15 
19 

7 
13 

7 
11 

1 

5 


104 
73 
24 
75 
34 
25 
43 
8 


141,283 
149,212 

18,060 
165,669 

35,924 
123,823 

86,480 
5,960 


92,994 

120,268 

15,330 

142,904 

32,019 

99,764 

78,434 

5,117 


11 

! 

12 
3 
2 
7 


1 
3 

1 
2 
2 

1 


12 
11 
1 
13 
5 
4 
8 


677 
916 
25 
972 
102 
1,226 
277 


677 




351 




25 




532 




57 




788 


Utah 


150 












15 


- 


- 


4,009 


3,900 


308 


- 


- 


726,411 


586,830 


44 


- 


- 


4,195 


2,580 








7 
8 
8 


1 
1 
1 


8 
9 
9 


4,093 
5,436 
19,503 


4,087 
4,284 
19,461 


114 

81 

350 


10 

14 
6 


124 

95 

356 


380,700 

228,734 

1,781,113 


278,215 

168,233 

1,374,372 


24 
22 
24 


3 
2 
3 


27 
24 
27 


2,782 
2,004 
7,777 


1,839 




999 




7,012 






Pacific 


23 


- 


- 


29,032 


27,832 


545 


- 


- 


2,390,547 


1,820,820 


70 


- 


- 


12,563 


9,850 






TOTAL (48 States)... 


186 


- 


- 


59,928 


58,407 


6,273 


- 


- 


13,879,432 


10,821,350 


1,573 


- 


- 


145,955 


99,017 




J 


- 


3 


2,106 


2,106 


2 
20 


2 

4 


4 
24 


3,819 

10,212 


3,768 
9,047 


1 
3 


- 


1 
3 


161 

12 


1 6 1 


Hawaii 


12 






UNITED STATES 


189 


. 


- 


62,034 


60,513 


6,295 


- 




13,893 463 


10,834,165 


1,577 


- 


- 


145,967 


99,029 



50 



Table 35. - Estimates of gross and net sales" of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives" by commodity groups, 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63- - Continued 





Containers and packaging supp! 


ies 




Fai : 


iachiner> 


and equipment 


Feed 




Est 
of 


mated n 
roopera 
handlin 


umber 
ives 


Value of sales 


Estimated nur 

of cooperate 

handling 


iber 
es 


Value 


of sales 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales 




Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 
$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 

(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 


Geographic division 
and State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI. 000 




3 

1 
4 
8 

2 


1 
2 
2 

1 


4 
3 
6 
8 

3 


2,482 

11 

281 

177 

51 


2,482 

11 

281 

177 

51 


2 
1 
3 
4 

6 


2 
2 
3 
4 

1 


4 
3 
6 
8 

7 


573 

12 

144 

143 

195 


571 
12 

144 
82 

195 


4 

1 

4 

11 

10 


2 
3 
2 

2 
3 


6 
4 
6 

11 
2 

13 


10,397 
3,900 
6,186 

17,601 
1,396 

19,883 


9,299 




3,491 




6,013 




15,336 




1,273 




17,950 








18 


- 


- 


3,002 


3,002 


16 


- 


- 


1,067 


1,004 


30 


- 


- 


59,363 


53,362 








197 
29 
55 


2 

1 
1 


199 
30 
56 


865 

1,414 

830 


554 

1,356 

568 


196 

20 
64 


4 
3 
6 


200 
23 
70 


11,412 
2,076 
4,219 


6,189 
1,085 
3,241 


205 
21 
79 


1 

1 
3 


206 
22 
82 


153,337 
39,495 
75,737 


103,276 




29,911 




54,275 








281 


- 


- 


3,109 


2,478 


280 


- 


- 


17,707 


10,515 


305 


- 


- 


268,569 


187,462 








16 

4 
22 
24 
27 


1 
2 
2 
2 
2 


17 
6 
24 
26 
29 


913 
71 
233 
996 
480 


762 
63 
223 
987 
154 


96 
76 
89 
45 
125 


1 

5 
4 
2 
5 


97 
81 
93 
47 
130 


7,578 
6,502 
4,233 
1,738 
8,965 


5,403 
5,111 
2,932 
1,659 
6,586 


183 
106 
230 
98 
250 


2 
1 

5 
6 
8 


185 
107 
235 
104 
258 


52,265 
51,817 
60,647 
27,904 
58,804 


36,377 




29,209 




43,574 




19,678 




41,203 








93 


- 


- 


2,693 


2,189 


431 


- 


- 


29,016 


21,691 


867 


- 


- 


251,437 


170,041 




65 
27 
10 
14 
7 
7 
4 


2 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
2 


67 
29 
12 
16 

9 
10 

6 


2,009 
207 
69 
126 
100 
285 
25 


474 
119 
61 
38 
56 
32 
25 


169 
88 
55 
87 
53 
91 
82 


2 
7 
5 
2 
2 
4 
3 


171 
95 
60 
89 
55 
95 
85 


7,316 
3,670 
3,460 
4,483 
3,171 
5,588 
3,580 


4,337 
2,762 
1,698 
2,538 
2,154 
4,432 
2,414 


562 
375 
163 
268 
184 
218 
254 


6 

11 

3 

9 

10 
4 
7 


568 

386 
166 
277 
194 
222 
261 


69,255 
105,551 
86,470 
9,169 
15,272 
24,789 
45,915 


50,208 




71,005 




51,258 




5,534 




11,404 




19,397 




36,188 








134 


- 


- 


2,821 


805 


625 


- 


- 


31,268 


20,335 


2,024 


- 


- 


356,421 


244,994 




1 
2 
9 
1 
7 
3 
4 
15 


1 
1 


2 
2 
9 
1 
7 
4 
4 
15 


33 

9 

125 

1 

239 

351 

5 

4,383 


33 

9 

125 

1 

194 

331 

5 

1,425 


7 
11 
2 
4 
3 
16 
6 


1 
3 
3 
3 

1 
1 


8 
14 
5 
7 
4 
17 
6 


1,096 

964 

75 

1,786 
297 
526 
665 


1,096 

748 

75 

1,574 
266 
445 
665 


10 
38 
73 
25 
5 
3 
48 
15 


2 
2 

1 
2 
1 

1 
1 


12 
40 
73 
26 
7 
4 
49 
16 


3,821 
20,192 
36,286 

6,973 
29,736 

8,507 
22,738 

4,310 


2,926 




13,484 




27,789 




4,961 




22,333 
5,942 
11,083 




3,061 








42 


- 


- 


5,146 


2,123 


49 


- 


- 


5,409 


4,869 


217 


- 


- 


132,563 


91,579 








2 
11 

6 
32 


- 


2 
11 

6 
32 


8 

81 

51 

619 


8 

81 

51 

619 


6 
47 

6 
24 


1 
3 
2 
2 


7 
50 

8 
26 


174 
2,228 

135 
794 


174 

2,028 

92 

623 


47 
91 
43 
55 


2 
1 
1 
3 


49 
92 
44 
58 


14,680 
19,704 
14,277 
16,828 


10,432 




12 350 




8 524 




6 413 






East South Central 


51 


- 


- 


759 


759 


83 


- 


- 


3,331 


2,917 


236 


- 


- 


65,489 


37,719 




15 

12 

57 

264 


2 
2 


15 

12 

59 

266 


548 

152 

1,117 

9,796 


534 

152 

691 

8,194 


18 

6 

21 

75 


5 

5 
4 


23 
6 

26 
79 


598 

119 

1,000 

1,031 


421 
113 
711 
929 


42 

25 

130 

204 


3 
1 
6 
5 


45 

26 

136 

209 


26,141 

2,199 

19,082 

24,829 


14 199 




1 607 




13 409 




21 540 








348 


- 


- 


11,613 


9,571 


120 


- 


- 


2,748 


2,174 


401 


- 


- 


72,251 


50,755 




6 
6 
3 
18 
16 
2 
8 


2 

1 
1 

4 


6 
8 
4 
19 
16 
6 
8 


9 

134 
6 

1,424 
663 
585 

1,389 


9 

134 

5 

1,003 

421 

7 

1,086 


29 
14 
2 
25 
3 
1 
5 


1 
4 
2 
1 
2 

2 


30 
18 
4 
26 
5 
1 
7 


1,799 

1,292 

57 

860 

106 

60 

664 


865 
974 

26 
649 
106 

60 
622 


56 
18 
12 
47 
6 
2 
12 


3 
6 
2 
2 

2 
2 


59 
24 
14 
49 
8 
4 
12 


4,431 
3,747 
766 
6,362 
1,455 
1,854 
10,945 


3 580 




3,315 




737 




4 651 




1 117 




836 


Utah 


10 752 












59 


- 


- 


4,210 


2,665 


79 


- 


- 


4,838 


3,302 


153 


- 


- 


29,560 


24 988 








36 

6 

56 


1 
1 


36 

7 

57 


6,917 

530 

17,356 


4,141 

375 

2,840 


40 
26 
26 


3 
4 
3 


43 
30 
29 


3,990 
4,442 
1,694 


3,588 
3,881 
1,577 


66 
36 
32 


5 
4 
2 


71 
40 
34 


33,358 
22,691 
77,066 


32 988 




20 489 




76,982 








98 


- 


- 


24 , 803 


7,356 


92 


- 


- 


10,126 


9,046 


134 


- 


- 


133,115 


130 459 






TOTAL (48 States) 


1,124 


- 


- 


58,156 


30,948 


1,775 


- 


- 


105,510 


75,853 


4,367 


- 


- 


1,368,768 


991,359 




8 


- 


8 


102 


102 


6 


- 


6 


70 


70 


1 
5 


: 


1 
5 


1,933 


< o] 




1 933 






UNITED STATES 


1,132 


- 


- 


58,258 


31,050 


1,781 


- 


- 


105,580 


75,923 


4,373 


. 


- 


1,370,701 


993 292 







See end of table for footnote references. 
Table continued on following page. 



51 



Table 35. 



Estimates of gross and net sales 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives 2 by commodity groups. 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63-' - Continued 





Fertilizer 


Meats and groceries 


Petroleum products 




Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 1 * 


Value of sales 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handlings 


Value of sales 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales 


Geographic division 
and State 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

51,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 
SI. 000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 
$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

51,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 

51,000 


Net 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 

out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head, 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

SI. 000 




6 

1 

4 

11 

8 


1 
2 
2 

1 
2 


7 
3 
6 

11 

1 

10 


3,998 
534 

1,096 

2,368 
226 

1,900 


3,983 
584 

1,061 

2,235 
226 

1,703 


1 

9 
2 


1 


1 

9 
3 


178 

387 
196 


178 

387 
167 


3 
1 
5 
7 

3 


2 
2 
2 
1 
1 
1 


5 
3 
7 

8 
1 
4 


428 

49 

525 

133 

1 

20 


423 

49 

525 

107 

1 

20 








30 


- 


- 


10,172 


9,792 


12 


- 


- 


761 


732 


19 


- 


- 


1,156 


1,125 






203 
23 
83 


2 
2 
4 


205 
25 
87 


26,174 
5,259 
19,876 


14,389 

2,903 

12,079 


6 
2 
5 


1 
2 


6 
3 
7 


149 
120 
212 


149 

86 

212 


64 
10 
50 


2 

1 
2 


66 
11 
52 


39,982 
7,172 
29,245 


25,835 
4,702 
18,652 








309 


- 


- 


51,309 


29,371 


13 


- 


- 


481 


447 


124 


- 


- 


76,399 


49,189 




185 
104 
181 
111 
246 


2 
2 
5 
6 
6 


187 
106 
186 
117 
252 


30,954 
37,408 
61,259 
15,561 
37,944 


17,473 
20,439 
31,797 
10,613 
14,593 


8 

7 

23 

19 

130 


2 
1 
2 
3 
2 


10 

8 

25 

22 

132 


650 

468 

691 

4,558 

9,425 


645 

423 

683 

3,025 

6,759 


115 
91 

110 
76 

231 


2 
4 
5 
6 


115 
93 

114 
81 

237 


35,367 
56,138 
91,732 
21,784 
79,274 


23,449 
39,410 
54,739 
15,325 
46,543 












East North Central... 


827 


- 


- 


183,126 


94,915 


187 


- 


- 


15,792 


11,535 


623 


- 


- 


284,295 


179,466 




499 
353 
165 
289 
137 
208 
232 


4 
9 
2 
9 
9 
4 
5 


503 
362 
167 
298 
146 
212 
237 


40,765 
55,008 
47,992 
13,846 
8,063 
28,570 
34,787 


20,789 
31,246 
18,570 
6,652 
3,001 
16,492 
18,687 


261 
41 

103 
34 
18 
25 
26 


2 
3 

1 
1 
1 
1 
1 


263 

44 
104 
35 
19 
26 
27 


13,632 
959 

14,824 
3,097 
738 
4,811 
4,586 


8,537 

959 

10,560 

2,885 

676 

4,783 

4,586 


255 
202 
103 
156 
130 
196 
238 


4 
9 
1 
7 
6 
4 
2 


259 
211 
104 
163 
136 
200 
240 


86,822 
102,815 
36,981 
42,653 
42,793 
75,144 
85,273 


58,660 
63,492 
20,922 
28,036 
31,067 
41,333 
46,840 












West North Central... 


1,883 


- 


- 


229,031 


115,437 


508 


- 


- 


42,647 


32,986 


1,280 


- 


- 


472,481 


290,350 




10 
38 
76 
25 
6 
3 
50 
40 


3 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 

1 


13 
40 
77 
26 
8 
4 
50 
41 


1,682 

8,968 
15,030 

2,992 
10,060 

3,500 
12,663 
10,284 


1,068 
5,938 
11,588 
2,221 
5,911 
2,198 
7,364 
9,688 


1 

10 

1 

3 

1 


1 
1 
1 
1 


2 

11 

2 

4 

1 


3 

4,012 

1 

529 

15 


3 

3,998 

1 

526 

15 


2 

16 

27 

2 

1 

3 
2 


2 

1 
1 
2 
3 
1 
1 


4 
17 
28 
4 
4 
1 
4 
2 


1,628 
10,111 
11,212 

1,290 

1,471 

442 

235 

24 


1,279 

7,493 

7,417 

505 

590 

250 

58 

24 






North Carolina 








248 


- 


- 


65,179 


45,976 


16 


- 


- 


4,560 


4,543 


53 


- 


- 


26,413 


17,616 




51 
92 
44 
71 


1 
1 
3 
2 


52 
93 
47 
73 


7,738 
24,045 
21,735 
50,723 


5,460 
11,004 
14,661 
31,671 


3 


1 
1 


1 
1 
3 


103 
24 
57 


57 


10 

88 

9 

26 


3 
3 
2 
3 


13 
91 
11 
29 


4,043 
8,687 
1,227 
4,772 


2 324 




3,854 






3,481 


East South Central... 


258 


- 


- 


104,241 


62,796 


3 


- 


- 


184 


57 


133 


- 


- 


18,729 


10,497 




55 
36 

113 
154 


6 
3 
4 
2 


61 

39 

117 

156 


14,158 
8,777 

11,826 
9,750 


9,364 
6,910 
6,346 
6,448 


6 

4 
10 


1 
1 


7 

4 

11 


151 

231 
206 


150 

231 
177 


36 
4 
80 
98 


4 

3 
2 


40 

4 

83 

100 


11,316 

483 

18,887 

10,016 


5 559 








8 277 










West South Central... 


358 


- 


- 


44,511 


29,068 


20 


- 


- 


588 


558 


218 


- 


- 


40,702 


21,450 




80 

32 
6 

53 
8 
4 

16 


3 
6 
2 
2 
2 
5 
1 
1 


83 
38 

8 
55 
10 

9 
17 

1 


3,324 
6,318 

291 
5,433 

826 

1,222 

1,087 

1 


1,854 

3,812 

245 

2,268 

474 

629 

867 

1 


7 
2 
1 
5 

1 

4 


1 


7 
2 
1 
5 
1 

5 


501 

261 

94 

1,054 

100 

215 


501 

261 

94 

1,054 

100 

201 


98 

30 
3 

47 
4 
3 

16 


2 
5 
1 
1 
2 
1 
1 


100 
35 
4 
48 
6 
4 
17 


19,180 

11,385 

862 

14,092 

610 

325 

2,238 


12 467 




7 010 




644 
10 350 




197 




216 


Utah 


1 216 












199 


- 


- 


18,502 


10,150 


20 


- 


- 


2,225 


2,211 


201 


- 


- 


48,692 


32 100 








80 
48 
108 


4 
5 
3 


84 
53 
111 


14,348 
12,405 
19,928 


9,598 
6,835 
14,922 


9 
5 
5 


1 
1 


9 
6 
6 


669 

817 

66 


669 

758 

66 


67 
35 
21 


3 

4 
3 


70 
39 
24 


27,217 

16,916 

2,898 


19 471 




10 024 




2 238 








236 


- 


- 


46,681 


31,355 1 19 


- 


- 


1,552 


1,493 


123 


- 


- 


47,031 


31 733 






TOTAL (48 States).. 


4,348 


- 


- 


752,752 


428,860 1 798 


- 


- 


68,790 


54,562 


2,774 


- 


- 


1,015,898 


633,526 




1 
12 


. 


1 
12 


161 

437 


16) 1 

437 | 1 


_ 


1 

1 


161 
161 


I6J 
161 


8 


- 


8 


720 






720 






UNITED STATES 


4,361 


- 


- 


753,189 


429,297 J 800 


- 


- 


68,790 


54,562 


2,782 


- 


- 


1,016,618 


634,246 



52 



Table 35. 



Estimates of gross and net sales 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives' by commodity groups, 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63 , - Continued 





Seed 




sprays ar 


d dusts (farm chemicals) 




M 


scellaneous supplies 






Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 4 


Value of sales 


Estimated n 

of cooperat 

handling 


imber 
ves 


Value of sales 


Geographic division 
ana State 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 
erative 
business) 
$1,000 


Gross 
(includes 
intercoop- 

erative 

business) 

$1,000 


Net 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 

State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 




3 

4 
8 

8 


1 
2 
2 

1 
2 


4 
2 
6 
8 
1 
10 


529 
207 
420 
869 
82 
661 


524 
207 
407 
821 
82 
589 


7 

3 
8 

4 


2 
2 
2 

1 
1 
2 


9 
2 
5 

9 
1 
6 


678 
173 
328 
818 
67 
521 


667 

173 
318 
746 
67 
462 


4 
3 
5 
11 

6 


3 
3 
4 
3 
1 
2 


7 
6 
9 

14 
1 
8 


1,034 
393 
947 

2,256 
144 

1,060 


998 




393 
926 




1,461 
144 
940 




23 


- 


- 


2,768 


2,630 


22 


- 


- 


2,585 


2,433 


29 


- 


- 


5,834 


4,862 








202 
22 
83 


2 
1 
3 


204 
23 
86 


8,679 

1,577 
6,876 


5,220 

900 

4,438 


206 
22 
82 


2 
2 

4 


208 
24 
86 


3,023 

460 

3,924 


1,542 

315 

2,753 


222 
20 
90 


4 
2 

7 


226 
22 
97 


11,075 

2,045 

10,335 


4,585 




655 




6,675 




307 


- 


- 


17,132 


10,558 


310 


- 


- 


7,407 


4,610 


332 


- 


- 


23,455 


11,915 




181 
106 
213 
100 
233 


2 

6 
6 
5 


183 
106 
219 
106 
238 


10,961 
5,822 

11,255 
3,991 
7,015 


6,843 
4,013 
7,793 
2,902 
4,395 


117 
88 

113 
79 

162 


2 
3 
5 
4 
5 


119 
91 

118 
83 

167 


3,908 
3,508 
5,250 
2,397 
3,029 


2,198 
1,734 
2,840 
1,858 
1,601 


188 
109 
227 
112 
366 


6 
5 

10 
11 
10 


194 
114 
237 
123 
376 


16,059 
13,297 
10,592 
7,686 
28,744 


11,694 




8,149 




4,971 




4,795 




17,969 






East North Central... 


833 


- 


- 


39,044 


25,946 


559 


- 


- 


18,092 


10,231 


1,002 


- 


- 


76,378 


47,578 




420 
329 
146 
269 
152 
83 
172 


3 
8 
1 
9 
8 
4 
3 


423 
337 
147 
278 
160 
87 
175 


8,473 
9,530 
10,797 
3,918 
2,161 
933 
2,566 


5,634 
6,915 
5,981 
2,621 
1,606 
592 
2,449 


310 
205 
84 
227 
106 
103 
153 


4 
8 
2 
6 
6 
3 
4 


314 
213 
86 
233 
112 
106 
157 


2,620 
3,695 
2,317 
1,461 
1,095 
1,939 
2,845 


1,670 

2,157 

1,136 

994 

702 

981 

1,693 


587 
375 
128 
338 
225 
226 
204 


6 
12 
6 
9 
9 
5 
6 


593 
387 
134 
347 
234 
231 
210 


36,193 
15,692 
22,637 
13,082 
9,324 
11,201 
13,876 


12,813 




8,806 




5,717 


North Dakota 


9,230 
6,710 
6,448 




8 934 






West North Central... 


1,571 


- 


- 


38,378 


25,798 


1,188 


- 


- 


15,972 


9,333 


2,083 


- 


- 


122,005 


58,658 




10 
36 
74 
24 
5 
2 
50 
15 


3 
2 

1 
1 
1 

1 


13 
38 
74 
25 
6 
3 
50 
16 


602 
3,449 
6,183 
1,282 
4,615 
1,931 
3,190 

980 


462 
2,396 
4,850 

966 
2,944 
1,355 
2,102 

868 


6 

14 
3 
8 
5 
48 
35 


1 
1 
2 
1 
2 
1 
1 
1 


1 

7 
16 

4 
10 

6 
49 
36 


3 
137 
1,013 
53 
3,073 
1,511 
2,340 
3,828 


3 

137 

407 

53 

1,564 

1,098 

1,327 

3,736 


10 
39 
77 
26 
9 
5 
41 
20 


3 
3 
5 
4 
5 
3 
3 
2 


13 
42 
82 
30 
14 
8 
44 
22 


1,646 
9,268 

19,220 
3,889 

10,247 
2,489 
8,715 
1,947 


1 308 




6,730 




13,411 




3,127 
5,015 
1,291 
3,257 


Florida 


1,277 








216 


- 


- 


22,232 


15,943 


119 


- 


- 


11,958 


8,325 


227 


- 


- 


57,421 


35,416 




47 
91 
46 
57 


1 
1 
1 
3 


48 
92 
47 
60 


3,132 
8,405 
3,950 
5,575 


2,465 
4,991 
2,792 
3,575 


8 
83 
37 
64 


1 
3 
3 

4 


9 
86 
40 
68 


168 
3,150 
1,367 
8,306 


161 
1,627 

791 
6,999 


47 
86 
35 
50 


5 
6 
5 
5 


52 
92 
40 
55 


8,354 
8,021 
5,491 
4,965 


6 744 




3 116 




2 554 




2,533 


East South Central... 


241 


- 


- 


21,062 


13,823 


192 


- 


- 


12,991 


9,578 


218 


- 


- 


26,831 


14,947 




43 

19 

115 

290 


2 
1 
2 
1 


45 

20 

117 

291 


2,776 

868 

2,226 

5,362 


1,719 

799 

1,829 

4,875 


29 

17 

61 

190 


6 
1 
3 
3 


35 

18 

64 

193 


1,838 
1,174 
1,100 
4,175 


893 
1,063 

671 
3,327 


38 

15 

95 

131 


7 

7 
5 


45 

15 

102 

136 


4,875 

364 

5,010 

4,962 


3 256 




348 




2,908 




3 414 






West South Central... 


467 


- 


- 


11,232 


9,222 


297 


- 


- 


8,287 


5,954 


279 


- 


- 


15,211 


9,926 




31 

19 
6 

37 
6 
3 

11 


3 
4 
2 

1 
2 


34 

23 
8 

37 
7 
5 

11 


616 
1,065 
143 
683 
90 
209 
547 


402 
824 
138 
482 
90 
134 
510 


82 

25 
4 

38 
4 
5 

13 


2 
4 
2 
1 
1 
2 
1 


84 

29 
6 

39 
5 
7 

14 


816 
857 

73 
744 

69 
766 
544 


608 
508 

65 
483 

24 
454 
445 


112 
32 
14 
69 
5 
5 
20 


2 
7 
1 
1 
3 
5 
2 


114 
39 
15 
70 
8 
10 
22 


6,448 
3,598 

344 
3,430 

212 
2,699 
2,554 


4 849 




2 669 




291 




2 588 




55 




1 498 


Utah 


1 451 


Nevada 






113 


- 


- 


3,353 


2,580 


171 


- 


- 


3,869 


2,587 


257 


- 


- 


19,285 


13 401 








43 
37 
60 


3 
2 
3 


46 
39 
63 


2,861 
2,196 
1,782 


2,659 
1,742 
1,685 


87 
49 
84 


5 
3 

4 


92 
52 
88 


6,907 
2,507 
5,738 


5,248 
1,854 
4,429 


88 
58 
72 


5 
6 
5 


93 
64 
77 


7,770 
5,912 
6,016 


4 875 




3 414 




3 152 








140 


- 


- 


6,839 


6,086 


220 


- 


- 


15,152 


11,531 


218 


- 


- 


19,698 


11 441 






TOTAL (48 States).. 


3,911 


- 


- 


162,040 


112,586 


3,078 


- 


- 


96,313 


64,582 


4,645 


- 


- 


366,118 


208,144 




1 
3 


. 


1 
3 


(61 
11 


(61 
11 


11 


- 


11 


132 


132 


1 
6 


- 


1 
6 


(61 

39 






39 






UNITED STATES 


3,915 


- 


- 


162,051 


112,597 


3,089 


- 


- 


96,445 


64 , 7 14 


,4,652 


- 


- 


366,157 


208,183 



See end of table for footnote references. 
Table continued on following page. 



53 



Table 35. - Estimates of gross and net sales 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives' by commodity groups, 

geographic divisions, and States, 1962-63 5 - Continued 





Total supplies 


Services 


Total 




Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling * 


Value of 


sales 


Estimated number 

of cooperatives 

handling 14 


Estimated 
receipts 12 


Estimated 
number of 
coopera- 
tives 

in 
State 13 


Estimated 
number of 
coopera- 
tives doing 
business 
in State i3 


Gross 
business 


Net business 


Geographic division 


Gross 
(includes 

intercoop- 
erative 

business) 
SI, 000 


Net 
(excludes 
intercoop- 

erative 
business) 

$1,000 


inter- 


and State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 

in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
in 
State 


Head- 
quar- 
ters 
out of 
State 


Total 
State 


cooperative 
business) 




SI, 000 


S 1,000 


S1.000 




11 

5 

14 

23 

16 


4 
4 
5 
4 
2 
3 


15 
9 

19 

27 
2 

19 


20,329 
5,331 

10,323 

24,759 
1,916 

24,357 


19,142 
4,922 

10,071 

21,259 
1,793 

21,976 


5 
3 
10 
5 
1 
5 


2 
2 
1 
1 
2 
3 


7 
5 
11 
6 
3 
8 


285 
205 
530 
390 
68 
296 


16 

8 
21 
34 

2 
23 


22 
15 
31 
40 
6 
29 


51,961 
22,619 
92,242 
76,252 
10,639 
58,913 


50 774 




22,172 




72,544 
10,479 
56,407 




69 


- 


- 


87,015 


79,163 


29 


- 


- 


1,774 


104 


- 


312,626 


303 586 








294 
45 
123 


6 
5 

11 


300 
50 
134 


265,186 
61,013 
154,835 


166,559 
42,542 
104,168 


158 
29 
80 


2 

1 
4 


160 
30 
84 


5,161 
1,360 
2,638 


414 
68 
188 


428 

77 

211 


885,620 
125,689 
445,799 


645 927 




97 786 




372,065 


Middle Atlantic 


462 


- 


- 


481,034 


313,269 


267 


- 


- 


9,159 


670 


- 


1,457,108 


1,115,778 




219 
119 
353 
154 
439 


9 
7 
11 
14 
18 


228 
126 
364 
168 
457 


165,537 
193,528 
254,643 
93,862 
237,095 


109,270 
119,848 
154,985 
65,664 
142,079 


206 
110 
277 
105 
348 


3 

6 
5 

5 
8 


209 
116 
282 
110 
356 


9,140 
6,633 
9,013 
3,155 
6,232 


259 
129 
413 
196 
67 2 


276 
154 
432 
219 
700 


838,992 
694,086 

1,028,276 
489,790 

1,123,161 


648 540 




496 311 




765 808 




397 887 




730,741 






East North Central... 


1,284 


- 


- 


944,665 


591,846 


1,046 


- 


- 


34,173 


1,669 


- 


4,174,305 


3,039,287 




918 
513 
183 
435 
275 
345 
315 


11 
17 
10 
13 
13 
11 
12 


929 
530 
193 
448 
288 
356 
327 


273,650 
318,434 
230,031 
98,243 
87,250 
159,258 
199,651 


168,628 
205,931 
118,502 
64,912 
61,427 
98,649 
125,432 


733 
400 
127 
360 
210 
261 
286 


12 
15 
8 
9 
13 
7 
8 


745 
415 
135 
369 
223 
268 
294 


17,620 
20,091 
4,062 
9,946 
5,124 
13,343 
29,535 


1,127 
586 
205 
494 
299 
370 
329 


1,151 
621 
223 
515 
323 
389 
351 


1,378,681 
1,145,749 
526,261 
518,030 
280,035 
499,129 
783,363 


921 447 




830,949 




369,154 




359,542 
220,117 
386,166 




513,232 






West North Central... 


2,984 


- 


- 


1,366,517 


843,481 


2,377 


- 


- 


99,721 


3,410 


- 


5,131,248 


3,600,607 




13 
54 
105 
28 
23 
9 
58 
56 


4 
3 
6 
4 
6 
3 
4 
2 


17 
57 
111 
32 
29 
12 
62 
58 


9,415 
53,310 
96,009 
16,571 
64,343 
19,810 
51,256 
26,443 


7,079 
37,363 
70,946 
11,925 
41,638 
13,245 
25,988 
20,766 


10 
30 
64 
24 
22 
5 
19 
34 


1 
1 
4 
5 
6 
2 
2 


11 
31 
68 
29 
28 
7 
21 
34 


52 
450 

1,686 
471 

1,240 
506 
636 

9,872 


13 

65 
174 
67 
45 
18 
73 
111 


18 
74 

188 
78 
58 
24 
80 

115 


17,925 
138,475 
247,646 

42,012 
296,971 

66,678 
185,551 
366,997 


15,273 




117,142 




219,023 


South Carolina 


37,129 
272,445 

59,813 
156, 144 




276,524 








346 


- 


- 


337,157 


228,950 


208 


- 


- 


14,913 


566 


- 


1,362,255 


1,153,493 




58 
100 

50 
104 


5 
6 
7 
7 


63 
106 

57 
111 


38,390 
76,368 
48,340 
93,091 


27,861 
40,347 
30,360 
56,135 


50 
96 
27 
89 


3 
7 
3 

4 


53 

103 

30 

93 


312 
1,629 

1,342 
4,281 


92 
135 

62 
136 


105 
148 
70 
148 


160,734 

151,444 
114,939 
309,138 


140,504 




113,554 




91,492 




265,945 


East South Central... 


312 


- 


- 


256,189 


154,703 


262 


- 


- 


7,564 


425 


- 


736,255 


611,495 




70 

44 

158 

429 


11 
4 
12 
10 


81 

48 

170 

439 


63,704 
14,296 
62,896 
70,538 


36,786 
11,620 
36,589 
56,116 


61 

23 

151 

452 


6 

1 
8 
4 


67 

24 

159 

456 


7,639 

1,464 

11,191 

47,927 


108 

68 

172 

522 


126 

76 

189 

539 


237,690 

90,264 

373,060 

807 , 199 


201,105 




81,294 




239,875 




655,228 






West South Central... 


701 


- 


- 


211,434 


141,111 


687 


- 


- 


68,221 


870 


- 


1,508,213 


1,177,502 




139 
54 
15 
92 
18 
8 
29 


4 
9 
3 
4 
4 
6 
3 
1 


143 
63 
18 
96 
22 
14 
32 
1 


37,801 

29,573 
2,661 

35,054 
4,233 
8,946 

20,460 
1 


25,812 

19,858 
2,270 

24,060 
2,641 
4,622 

17 , 300 
1 


84 
30 
10 
65 
26 
4 
21 


4 
7 
3 
9 

7 
7 

2 


88 
37 
13 
74 
33 
11 
21 
2 


2,441 
2,146 
326 
4,100 
3,099 
3,036 
2,400 
42 


172 
85 
25 

103 

29 

17 

60 

3 


189 
107 
33 
118 
38 
30 
64 
9 


181,525 
180,931 

21,047 
204,823 

43,256 

135,805 

109,340 

6,003 


121,247 




142,272 




17,926 




171,064 




37,759 




107,422 


Utah 


98,134 




5,160 








355 


- 


- 


138,729 


96,564 


240 


- 


- 


17,590 


494 


- 


882,730 


700,984 








137 
81 
171 


8 
10 
6 


145 

91 

177 


106,819 
70,420 
140,321 


85,076 
50,371 
114,903 


93 
50 
142 


5 
5 
3 


98 
55 
145 


13,441 

5,340 

31,179 


175 
108 
390 


188 
129 
400 


500,960 

304,494 

1,952,613 


376,732 




223,944 




1,520,454 








389 


- 


- 


317,560 


250,350 


285 


- 


- 


49,960 


673 


- 


2,758,067 


2,121,130 






TOTAL (48 States).. 


6,902 


- 


- 


4,140,300 


2,699,437 


5,401 


- 


- 


303,075 


8,881 


- 


18,322,807 


13,823,862 




1 
18 


_ 


1 
18 


161 

3,457 


(61 

3,457 


1 
10 


1 


1 
11 


161 

180 


2 
24 


4 
28 


5,351 
13,849 


5,300 




12,684 






UNITED STATES 


6,921 


- 


- 


4,143,757 


2,702,894 


5,412 


- 


- 


303,255 


8,907 


- 


18,342,007 


13,841,846 



See next page for footnote references. 



54 



1 The value of products marketed is allocated to the State in which they originate and the value of farm 

supplies is allocated to the State in which they are sold. 
^ Includes independent local cooperatives, federations, and centralized cooperatives. 

3 Preliminary data covering operations of cooperatives whose fiscal years ended during the period July 1, 
1962, through July 30, 1963, with limited exceptions. 

4 The total number of cooperatives handling each commodity within a State includes not only the coopera- 
tives handling the commodity that have headquarters in that State, but all other cooperatives handling 
the commodity in that State whose headquarters are located in other States. Number of cooperatives 
handling a commodity include those performing specific services on the commodity, such as cotton ginning 
cooperatives, livestock trucking cooperatives, rice drying cooperatives, and fruit drying cooperatives. 
(Income for these specific services is included with service receipts.) 

^ Includes the value of commodities marketed by cooperatives under price support program in 1962-63- 
Business volume is influenced by the extent to which producers participate in the program. 

6 Value is included in total dollar volume of all farm products marketed, farm supplies handled, or services 
performed in order not to reveal separate commodity data for an individual association. 

7 Value of grain allocated to State of origin. 

8 Value of wool allocated to State of origin. 

9 Includes the volume of a statewide federation of county wool pools which is responsible for selling all 
wool in the pools. Payment is made by the federation to the pool manager who is responsible for pay- 
ments to the individual wool growers. 

10 The volume of a sugar cooperative with headquarters in California whose business originated in Hawaii 

is included in the dollar volume of California. 
H Includes forest products, fur pelts, hay, hops, nursery stock, tung oil, coffee, and other farm products not 

separately classified. 
I* Charges for services in which no duplication occurs. 
*3 Because many cooperatives do more than one type of business, these totals are less than the number that 

would be obtained by adding the number of cooperatives handling individual items or performing services. 



55 



COMPOSITION OF FARMER COOPERATIVES 



The 1962-63 survey included a total of 8,907 
marketing, farm supply, and related service 
cooperatives compared with a total of 9,039 
in the 1961-62 survey. Memberships in these 
cooperatives totaled 7,218,750 compared with 
7,098,980 in the previous survey. 



Number 

Number of farmer cooperatives continued to 
decline in 1962-63. The total of 8,907 farmer 
cooperatives reported in the 1962-63 survey 
represented a decrease of 132 associations, 
or about 1.5 percent of the number of asso- 
ciations reported the previous year. 

Reorganization among cooperatives involv- 
ing consolidation, merger, and acquisition is 
responsible for much of this decline. The 
downward trend in the number of farmer 
cooperatives during the past several years 
has reflected such reorganizations. 

Some reduction in number was also caused 
by removing the names of a few inactive 
associations from the survey list. An associa- 
tion, by established policy of Farmer Coop- 
erative Service, is considered to be inactive 
or to have liquidated when it fails to provide 
information on its operations for 5 continuous 
years during which time periodic requests 
are made for such information. 

Since organizations included for the first 
time in the 1962-63 survey balanced off a 
certain number of associations which quit 
operating during the same period, the de- 
crease of 132 associations represents a net 
figure. Most of the associations initially re- 
porting were newly organized. However, a few 
associations that had been organized during 
an earlier period were also included for the 
first time because information on their coop- 
erative status had only recently been obtained 
by Farmer Cooperative Service. The coopera- 
tive status of an organization (marketing, 
farm supply, or related service) must be 
established by its own response or, in a very 



limited number of cases, through other reliable 
sources. Otherwise, the organization cannot be 
included in the annual survey of farmer coop- 
eratives. 

The related service cooperatives included 
in this survey perform activities relevant to 
the marketing of farm products and the pur- 
chasing of farm supplies. These activities 
include trucking, storing, grinding, and similar 
services affecting the form, quality, or loca- 
tion of farm products and supplies handled 
by cooperatives. They do not include credit, 
electric, irrigation, dairy herd improvement, 
or other types of services performed by 
cooperatives for farmers. 

Comparison of the 1962-63 with the 1961-62 
period shows marketing cooperatives de- 
creased from 62.2 to 61.8 percent of the 
total number of cooperatives, farm supply 
cooperatives increased from 35.5 to 36.0 
percent; and service associations decreased 
from 2.3 to 2.2 percent (table 36). The graphic 
proportion of the total number represented by 
each of the functional groups in 1962-63 ap- 
pears in figure 15. 

In analyzing the percentages shown in table 
36, it must be recognized that in each annual 
survey some cooperatives are reclassified 
because of changes in the commodity group 
or service that represents the major portion 
of their dollar volumes. 

In table 37, cooperatives are classified so 
that changes in their operations are reflected 
to the extent that they can be measured ac- 
cording to dollar volume. Each cooperative is 
classified according to the commodity that 
consistently represents the largest percentage 
of its dollar volume of business. 

The method of classifying cooperatives for 
purposes of the annual survey is discussed in 
the appendix, pages 69 and 70. 

The statistics in this report were based on 
current information furnished by 94 percent of 
all cooperatives included in the 1962-63 sur- 
vey. Percentage of participation in this survey 
for cooperatives in each commodity and func- 
tional group is shown in appendix table 2. 



56 



Table 36. --Number and percent of marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1950-51 to 

1962-63 



Period 1 


Marketing 


Farm 


supply 


Service 


Total 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


1950-51 


6,519 


64.8 


3,283 


32.6 


262 


2.6 


10,064 


100.0 


1951-52 


6,594 


64.8 


3,324 


32.6 


261 


2.6 


10,179 


100.0 


1952-53 


6,501 


64.2 


3,378 


33.4 


249 


2.4 


10,128 


100.0 


1953-54 


6,457 


64.1 


3,374 


33.5 


241 


2.4 


10,072 


100.0 


1954-55 


6,330 


63.9 


3,346 


33.8 


227 


2.3 


9,903 


100.0 


1955-56 


6,284 


63.5 


3,375 


34.1 


235 


2.4 


9,894 


100.0 


1956-57 


6,284 


63.5 


3,373 


34.1 


234 


2.4 


9,891 


100.0 


1957-58 


6,119 


62.8 


3,383 


34.8 


233 


2.4 


9,735 


100.0 


1958-59 


6,042 


62.5 


3,387 


35.1 


229 


2.4 


9,658 


100.0 


1959-60 


5,828 


62.3 


3,297 


35.3 


220 


2.4 


9,345 


100.0 


1960-61 


5,727 


62.5 


3,222 


35.2 


214 


2.3 


9,163 


100.0 


1961-62 


5,626 


62.2 


3,206 


35.5 


207 


2.3 


9,039 


100.0 


1962-632 


5,502 


61.8 


3,211 


36.0 


194 


2.2 


8,907 


100.0 



1 For years prior to 1950-51, see appendix table 5. 

2 Preliminary. 




57 



Table 37. - Number- and estimated memberships' 1 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1962-63 

(Classified according to major product handled or function performed.) 



Geographic division 


Bean and pea 
(dry edible) 


Cotton and cotton ^ . , 

products Dair y Products 


Fruit and vegetable 


Grain 4 


and State 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated J Cooperatives 
memberships § listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 








" 


- 


- 


- 


2 

4 
13 
6 
1 
4 


1,865 
1,160 
6,705 
1,930 
450 
1,495 


8 
2 

2 

- 
2 


2,460 
525 

575 

40 


" 






- 








- 


- 


- 


- 


30 


13,605 


14 


3,600 


- 


- 




- 


(51 


- 


- 


124 

8 

44 


38,475 

2,205 

21,830 


20 

9 15 
13 


4,955 
2,840 
2,075 


1 


161 




" 


" 


- 


176 


62,510 


48 


9,870 


1 


161 




3 


5 2,270 


" 


- 


'30 
10 
37 
23 

265 


28,270 
16,135 
23,245 
26,835 
75,150 


'15 

3 

8 

25 

6 


1,835 
845 

405 

6,720 

455 


98 

36 

176 

22 

2 


60,560 




80,910 




86 , 940 




19,035 
1,715 






East North Central 


3 


2,270 


- 


- 


365 


169,635 


57 


10,260 


334 


249,160 




- 


- 


(8J 


2,665 


388 
146 
13 
29 
32 
19 
12 


99,830 
62,295 
15,160 
16,640 
14,405 
36,990 
29,425 


5 
3 
6 

1 

1 
1 


510 
395 
220 
190 

150 
40 


216 

257 
31 
9 289 
140 
178 
226 


127,135 




121,950 




26,010 


North Dakota 


99,380 
68,875 
86,955 
134,405 








- 


- 


16) 


2,665 


639 


274,745 


17 


1,505 


1,337 


664,710 




- 


- 


1 
1 

3 

(81 


6,840 

35 

69,135 

13,500 


(61 

4 
17 

4 
11 

3 
10 
11 


320 

3,330 

4,140 

1,040 

1,540 

430 

670 

325 


1 
3 

9 11 

1 

7 

5 

9 4 

63 


900 

540 

385 

10 

580 

1,360 

170 

17,280 


2 






620 








- 




- 


- 


5 


89,510 


60 


11,795 


95 


21,225 


2 


620 








- 


- 


3 

6 

44 


7,445 
43,615 
32,580 


5 
7 
1 
5 


3,030 

7,405 

40 

3,315 


4 
5 
2 
1 


440 
1,765 


- 


- 




135 
20 5 


295 


East South Central 


- 


- 


53 


83,640 


18 


13,790 


12 


2,360 1 5 


295 




- 


- 


'32 

5 

53 

'322 


5,460 
4,245 
27,740 
81,570 


1 
4 
5 
10 


1,185 

1,720 

13,785 

5,215 


4 
'8 
1 

9 11 


715 

850 

25 

2,425 


3 

82 

62 


9,755 








53,645 
23,380 






West South Central 


- 


- 


412 


119,015 


20 


21,905 


24 


4,015 


147 


86,780 




1 
2 

4 


1,745' 

1,990 

5 775 


19 
'5 

181 


5,930 
5,765 

20 


6 
6 
2 
7 
1 
3 
8 
1 


3,660 

10,275 

860 

4,655 

260 

270 

2,710 

50 


2 
5 

18 
3 
6 

'6 


190 
2,755 

2,020 
270 
325 

2,745 


52 

9 

4 

22 

2 

5 


24,315 




5,255 

3,825 

13,115 

1,260 






Utah 


1,745 








7 


4,510 


24 


11,715 


34 


22,740 


40 


8,305 


94 


49 515 








1 

(6) 

3 


570 

45 

1,135 


34 


8,920 


11 
23 
25 


3,860 
5,640 
3,815 


54 

25 

'230 


5,830 
4,820 
28,555 


35 
15 
4 


11 550 




5 195 




1 475 






Pacific 


4 


1,750 


34 


8,920 


59 


13,315 


309 


39,205 


54 


18,220 






TOTAL (48 States) 


14 


8,530 


528 


315,465 


1,401 


604,040 


616 


100,345 


1,974 


1,069,300 


Hawaii 


- 


- 


. 


" 


2 


80 


9 


610 


- 


_ 


UNITED STATES 


14 


8,530 


528 


315,465 j 1,403 


604,120 


625 


100,955 


1,974 


1,069,300 



See end of table for footnote reference 
Table continued on following page. 



58 



Table 37. - Number 1 and estimated memberships 2 of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1962-63 - Con- 
tinued 

(Classified according to major product handled or function performed.) 



Geographic division 


Livestock Nut 


Poultry and poultry 
products 


Rice Sugar products 


and State 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated i Cooperatives 
memberships \ listed 


Estimated 
memberships 






Maine 


1 


535 


- 


- 


2 


575 


- 


- 


1 


105 












1 


535 


- 


- 


2 


575 


- 


- 


1 


105 


New York 


3 

1 
2 


25,190 
2,215 
2,850 


- 


- 


4 
13 
6 


755 

3,095 
8,720 


- 


- 


1 


95 








6 


30, 255 


- 


- 


23 


12,570 


- 


" 


1 


95 




3 
3 

15 

7 

99 


78,100 
64 , 945 
61,470 
18,585 
68,435 


- 


- 


7 
1 
1 
2 
2 


16,305 

10 

40 

165 

3,620 


- 


- 


2 

7 
'l 


425 








3,130 
350 








127 


291,535 


- 


- 


13 


20,140 


- 


- 


10 


3,905 




148 
26 
5 
29 
3 
2 
2 


134,255 
49,860 
40,685 
24,815 
15,505 
33,615 
9,575 


- 


. 


8 
7 

1 

9 
2 


2,115 

5,820 

10 

4,415 
7 20 


- 


- 


2 

1 

18 1 
1 

3 
1 


295 




710 




95 




105 




2 195 




50 








215 


308,310 


- 


- 


27 


13,080 


- 


- 


8 


3,450 




28 
9 
2 
3 
2 

X 


9,605 
3,230 
1,380 
1,190 
1,770 
910 


1 

181 

iei 
1 


3,260 

9,805 

580 

30,000 


1 
2 

181 

3 

2 
4 


20 

6,100 

2,025 

245 

100 
140 


- 


- 


% 




Florida 


205 




48 


18,085 


2 


43,645 


12 


8,630 


- 


- 


4 


205 








14 
3 
7 

1 


19,265 
10,990 
6,720 
24,955 


(81 


180 


1 
1 


125 
400 


2 


150 


1 


5 




- 




25 


61,930 


(81 


180 


2 


525 


2 


150 


1 


5 




1 

let 
1 
4 


830 

55 

26,020 

12,510 


(8) 

1 
1 


10 

4,855 
5,245 


1 

1 
3 


30 

85 
165 


16 
18 

18 


7,555 

1,400 

2,520 


9 






525 








6 


39,415 


2 


10,110 


5 


280 


52 


11,475 


9 


525 




1 
6 

(61 

2 

1 

18) 


1,840 
965 

1,270 

7,585 
150 
185 

2,815 
45 


: 

16) 
181 


85 
20 


1 
3 


80 
270 


- 


- 


5 
9 
2 
2 

10 


1,535 
5,880 
1,305 
4,750 






Utah 


2,400 




10 


14,855 


iei 


105 


4 


350 


- 


- 


28 


15,870 








2 
1 
4 


185 

1,965 

11,855 


18) 

4 
7 22 


145 

1,085 

12,455 


1 
5 


175 
170 


6 


2,465 


1 
1 
4 


1, 135 




800 




4,075 






Pacific 


7 


14.005 


26 


13,685 


6 


345 


6 


2,465 


6 


6,010 






TOTAL (48 States) 


445 


778,925 


30 


67,725 


94 


56,495 


60 


14,090 


68 


30,170 




»3 


65 


1 


25 


3 


125 


- 


- 


18) 


25 




448 


778,990 [ 31 


67,750 


97 


56,620 


60 


14,090 


68 


30,195 



See end of table for footnote references. 

Table continued on following page. 



59 



Table 37. - Number- and estimated memberships- of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1962-63 - Con- 
tinued 
(Classified according to major product handled or function performed.) 



Geographic division 


Tobacco 


Wool and mohair 


Miscellaneous 


Total marketing 


and State 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 




Number 




1 

161 


115 
135 


1 

lei 
2 


315 

5 
265 


~ 


- 


11 
6 
13 
13 
1 
8 






1 685 




6,710 
















1 


250 


3 


585 


- 


- 


52 


19,255 




" 


- 


3 

1 
29 


240 

500 

7,435 


4 
1 


2,715 
60 


160 
39 
94 


72 425 
















" 


- 


33 


8,175 


5 


2,775 


293 


126,250 








n 

IS) 

2 


4,330 
3,750 

1,870 


1 

(8) 
1 


5,530 

420 
6,000 


1 

3 

4 
3 


10 

150 
170 
220 


158 
53 

240 
93 

381 


195 365 




166 595 




172,250 




77 330 




157,815 






East North Central 


3 


9,950 


2 


11,950 


11 


550 


925 


769,355 




(8) 
IS) 


20 
1,330 


1 

161 

2 
3 

161 
18) 
(6) 


12,975 
8,840 
2,580 
575 
7,805 
6,355 
4,500 


3 
3 

1 
1 


250 
1,400 

30 
45 


771 
443 
58 
351 
186 
206 
242 


377,385 




251,270 




88,660 




141,695 




111 140 




167,025 

177,995 




tei 


1,350 


6 


43,630 


8 


1,725 


2,257 


1,315,170 




2 
4 

(8) 

4 

(8) 

IS) 

2 


15,100 
46,540 

2,300 

193,590 

48,510 

37,890 

7,210 


13 
ii 2 4 


3,080 
2,170 


1 

1 
1 
2 

1 
4 


5 

65 
70 
110 
3,685 
55 


1 
11 
78 
39 
29 
14 
23 
92 


1,220 




18 995 




73 730 




10 840 




214 050 




52 215 




143,420 




39,625 








12 


351,140 


37 


5,250 


10 


3,990 


287 


554 095 








8 
7 


40,785 
33,935 


2 

15 

8 


160 
1,785 

985 


1 
1 
2 


795 

20 

455 


35 

41 
18 
68 


63,810 




64,300 




50,930 




62,755 








15 


74,720 


25 


2,930 


4 


1,270 


162 


241,795 




- 


- 


(81 

3 

18) 
18) 


200 

465 

2,000 

300 


2 


60 


58 

47 

144 

433 


25,740 




9,260 




128,155 




133,390 






West South Central 






3 


2,965 


2 


60 


682 


296,545 




- 


- 


21 

13 

6 

2 

4 
2 


1,925 

2,410 

855 

165 

580 
140 


1 
3 

2 


215 
465 

850 


88 
52 
16 
58 
25 
14 
39 
3 


33,680 




29,750 




10,105 




33,145 




7,955 




6,565 


Utah 


14,115 




255 








- 


- 


48 


6,075 


6 


1,530 


295 


135,570 








" 


~ 


18) 

1 
1 


935 
960 

645 


5 
2 
8 


195 

140 

1,770 


109 

73 

346 


24,405 




20,825 




77,335 






Pacific 


- 


- 


2 


2,540 


15 


2,105 


528 


122,565 






TOTAL (48 States) 


31 


437,410 


159 


84,100 


61 


14,005 


5,481 


3,580,600 




: 


- 


lei 


5 


3 


575 


2 
19 


85 


Hawaii 


1,425 






UNITED STATES 


31 


437,410 


159 


84,105 


64 


14,580 


5,502 


3,582,110 







See end of table for footnote references 

Table continued on following page. 



60 



Table 37. - Number 1 and estimated memberships' of farmer marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1962-63- Con- 
tinued 
(Classified according to major product handled or function performed) 



Geographic division 


Farm supply 


Service ^ 


Total 


and State 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 


Cooperatives 
listed 


Estimated 
memberships 




Number 




3 

4 
"19 

12 


12,470 
3,470 
7,585 

15,520 
1,325 
7,895 


4 
2 
1 
3 


725 

95 

115 

205 


16 
8 

21 

34 
2 

23 


17,110 




5,155 




15,020 




19,140 




1,890 




10,345 








42 


48,265 


10 


1,140 


104 


68,660 








249 
27 
89 


75,550 

21,110 

120,635 


5 
2 
5 


1,440 
120 
140 


414 
68 
188 


149,415 




32,145 




163,685 








365 


217,295 


12 


1,700 


670 


345,245 








97 
73 
152 

"27 96 3 


114,870 
241,545 
262,890 
78,160 
251,975 


4 
3 

21 
7 

18 


820 
1,415 
8,290 

130 
1,325 


259 
129 
413 
196 
672 


311,055 




409,555 




443,430 




155,620 




411,115 






East North Central 


691 


949,440 


53 


11,980 


1,669 


1,730,775 




"334 
143 
146 
136 
112 
157 
85 


233,385 
171,870 
337,035 
102,930 

78,635 
115,180 

39,955 


22 

1 
7 
1 
7 
2 


4,990 

170 

860 

35 

1,525 

130 


1,127 
586 
205 
494 
299 
370 
329 


615,760 




423, 140 




425,865 




245,485 




189,810 




283,730 




218 080 








1,113 


1,078,990 


40 


7,710 


3,410 


2,401,870 




12 
49 
91 
26 
7 
2 
50 
18 


21,345 
62,955 

165,330 
51,475 

167,100 

43,425 

34,245 

6,870 


5 
5 

2 
9 
2 

1 


670 

2,285 

40 

1,640 

210 

5 


13 
65 

174 
67 
45 
18 
73 

111 


22,565 




82 620 




241 345 




62 355 




382,790 
95,850 
177 665 




46 500 








255 


552,745 


24 


4,850 


566 










56 
91 
41 
65 


114,290 
64,715 
37,975 
96,765 


1 
3 
3 
3 


30 

2,410 

830 

755 


92 
135 

62 
136 


178 130 




131 425 




89 735 




160 275 








253 


313,745 


10 


4,025 


425 


559,565 




48 
20 
27 
67 


44,945 
4,775 
14,280 
29,145 


2 

1 

1 

22 


340 

195 

675 

4,880 


108 

68 

172 

522 


71 025 








143,110 
167 415 










162 


93,145 


26 


6,090 


870 


395,780 




83 

32 
5 

42 
2 
3 

18 


43,095 
29,020 
2,970 
19,920 
430 
69,740 
15,285 


1 

1 

3 
2 

3 


230 
1,000 

55 
405 

605 


172 
85 
25 

103 

29 

17 

60 

3 






59,770 






53,120 
8 790 








Utah 


30,005 
255 








189 


180,460 


10 


2,295 


494 


318,325 






64 
34 
38 


87,395 

40,525 
33,465 


2 
1 
6 


155 

90 

715 


175 
108 
390 


111,955 
61,440 
111,515 










136 


161,385 


9 


960 


673 


284,910 




TOTAL (48 States), , , , 


3,206 


3,595,470 


194 


40,750 


8,881 


7,216,820 




5 


420 


- 


- 


2 
24 


8S 








UNITED STATES 


3,211 


3,595,890 


194 


40,750 


8,907 


7 218 750 







See next page for footnote references. 



61 



1 Includes independent local cooperatives, federations, and centralized cooperatives. 

2 Includes members (those entitled to vote for directors) but does not include non-voting patrons. (There is 
some duplication in these membership figures because many farmers belong to more than one cooperative). 

3 Preliminary data covering operations of cooperatives whose fiscal years ended during the period July 1, 
1963, with limited exceptions. 

* Includes soybeans, soybean meal, and soybean oil. 

5 It is estimated that approximately 4,600 additional members affiliated with other types of cooperatives market 
dry beans. These include Colorado, 2,500; Michigan, 900; Montana, 200; and New York, 1,000. 

6 No individual memberships. 

7 Cooperatives performing specific services on a commodity are included. Incorporated local associations of 
a federation that performs the actual marketing or processing are counted. 

° The cooperative which this membership is affiliated has been counted in the State in which the cooperative 

maintains its headquarters. 
9 Cooperatives that are temporarily inactive because of crop failures or for other reasons are included. 

10 Membership of cooperatives marketing nuts fluctuates from year to year and is affected by the extent to 
which producers participate in price support or stabilization programs. 

" Includes sugar, sugarcane, sugar beets, honey, maple syrup, molasses, and sorghum. 

12 Includes forest products, fur pelts, hay, hops, nursery stock, tung oil, coffee, and other farm products not 
separately classified. 

^3 Member-patrons. 

" Includes a statewide federation of county wool pools. Payment is made by the federation to the pool man- 
ager who is responsible for payment to the individual wool growers. 

15 Includes cooperatives furnishing special marketing or related services. 

16 Includes incorporated local cooperatives without facilities that are affiliated with an operating regional 
cooperative. 



62 



Memberships 



Reversing the downward trend for the first 
time since 1958-59, when a temporary re- 
versal occurred, memberships in marketing, 
farm supply, and related service cooperatives 
in the United States increased by 119,770. 
This was an increase of 1.7 percent over the 
previous year. The total number of member- 
ships amounted to 7,218,750 (table 38). 

A total of 3,582,010 memberships in market- 
ing cooperatives was reported in 1962-63, an 
increase of 162,010 over the previous year. 
These cooperatives accounted for 49.6 per- 
cent of the total number of memberships in 
cooperatives compared with 48.2 percent in 
1961-62. Memberships in farm supply coop- 
eratives dropped from 51.2 percent of the total 
to 49.8 percent, while those in service coop- 
eratives remained at 0.6 percent. Many 
farmers were members of more than one 
cooperative and were counted two or more 
times. Therefore, the total memberships of 
7,218,750 contained duplication not pos- 
sible to eliminate under current reporting 
methods. 

For those commodity groups that operate 
under price stabilization programs, particu- 
larly cotton, nuts, and tobacco, membership 
figures vary widely. Tobacco associations 



participating in the administration of price 
supports were responsible for the largest 
proportion of the increase in cooperative 
memberships during 1962-63. Growth in the 
memberships of these stabilization associa- 
tions periodically reverses the downward trend 
in total number of memberships in coopera- 
tives. For several years this trend in coop- 
erative memberships has reflected the con- 
tinued decrease in total number of farmers 
in the United States. 

The variety of services performed by coop- 
eratives also affects membership figures. For 
example, a producer may use the services of 
a cooperative for marketing only one com- 
modity out of a number of farm products 
marketed by the cooperative or for purchasing 
one or more production supplies from a coop- 
erative classified in the marketing group. 
His business with the cooperative may not, 
therefore, be in the commodity group that 
represents the predominant portion of the 
cooperative's business volume and determines 
how the cooperative shall be classified in 
these statistics, but his membership will be 
included arbitrarily in that commodity group. 

The number of marketing cooperatives and 
their estimated memberships are shown by 
specified commodity groups in table 39. 
Marketing associations in 5 commodity 



Table 38. — Memberships in marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, 1950-51 to 1962-63 



Period 1 


Marketing 


Farm supply 


Service 


Total 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


1950-51 


4,117,950 


58.1 


2,878,890 


40.6 


94,280 


1.3 


7,091,120 


100.0 


1951-52 


4,229,125 


57.4 


3,032,550 


41.2 


102,030 


1.4 


7,363,705 


100.0 


1952-53 


4,247,035 


56.8 


3,138,820 


42.0 


89,230 


1.2 


7,475,085 


100.0 


1953-54 


4,273,350 


56.1 


3,252,860 


42.8 


82,030 


1.1 


7,608,240 


100.0 


1954-55 


4,213,485 


55.4 


3,322,490 


43.7 


67,880 


.9 


7,603,855 


100.0 


1955-56 


4,223,260 


54.6 


3,443,610 


44.6 


64,865 


.8 


7,731,735 


100.0 


1956-57 


4,121,700 


53.7 


3,489,425 


45.5 


61,920 


.8 


7,673,045 


100.0 


1957-58 


3,879,675 


51.8 


3,543,185 


47.3 


63,595 


.9 


7,486,455 


100.0 


1958-59 


3,860,950 


51.1 


3,643,525 


48.2 


54,075 


.7 


7,558,550 


100.0 


1959-60 


3,621,900 


49.8 


3,600,465 


49.5 


51,090 


.7 


7,273,455 


100.0 


1960-61 


3,473,425 


48.2 


3,679,675 


51.1 


49,795 


.7 


7,202,895 


100.0 


1961-622 


3,420,100 


48.2 


3,634,690 


51.2 


44,190 


.6 


7,098,980 


100.0 


1962-63 3 


3,582,110 


49.6 


3,595,890 


49.8 


40,750 


.6 


7,218,750 


100.0 



1 For years prior to 1950-51, see appendix table 6. 

2 Revised. 

3 Preliminary. 



63 



Table 39. — Number and estimated memberships of farmer marketing cooperatives, by specified 

commodity groups, 1962-63 l 



Commodity group 
(classified according to 
major product handled) 



Cooperatives 
listed 



Estimated 

memberships 





Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Beans and peas (dry edible) 


14 


0.2 


8,530 


0.2 


Cotton and cotton products 


528 


9.6 


315,465 


8.8 


Dairy products 


1,403 


25.5 


604,120 


16.9 


Fruits and vegetables 


625 


11.3 


100,955 


2.8 


Grain, soybeans, soybean meal 










and oil 


1,974 


35.9 


1,069,300 


29.9 


Livestock and livestock products 


448 


8.1 


778,990 


21.7 


Nuts 


31 


.6 


67,750 


1.9 


Poultry products 


97 


1.8 


56,620 


1.6 


Rice 


60 


1.1 


14,090 


.4 


Sugar products 


68 


1.2 


30,195 


.8 


Tobacco 


31 


.6 


437,410 


12.2 


Wool arid mohair 


159 


2.9 


84,105 


2.4 


Miscellaneous 


64 


1.2 


14,580 


.4 


Total marketing 


5,502 


100.0 


3,582,110 


100.0 



1 Preliminary. 



groups — cotton, grain, nuts, tobacco, and mis- 
cellaneous — showed small increases. All other 
commodity groups had decreases in number 
of associations except sugar products which 
was unchanged from the previous year. 

Membership increases for 6 commodity 
groups included small increases for the rice, 
sugar, and miscellaneous groups; moderate 
increases for the grain and nut groups; and 
a substantial increase for the tobacco group. 
All other commodity groups in the marketing 
category had decreases in their total number 
of memberships. 

Number and estimated memberships of local 
and regional cooperatives are classified by 
commodity groups in table 40. Of the 8,907 
cooperatives included in the 1962-63 survey, 
8,121, or 91.2 percent, were local associa- 
tions. These cooperatives had a total of 
4,457,150 memberships, or 61.7 percent of 
the total. Regional cooperatives represented 
8.8 percent of all associations with 38.3 per- 
cent of the memberships in 1962-63. 

Minnesota was first among all States in 
number of marketing cooperatives with 771 



and memberships with 377,385 (table 41). The 
same position was held by Minnesota 10 years 
previous, in 1953-54. The 10 ranking States 
accounted for 65.4 percent of the total number 
and 56.5 percent of the total memberships of 
marketing associations. 

Minnesota was also the leading State in 
number of farm supply cooperatives with 334, 
but Missouri ranked first in number of farm 
supply association memberships with 337,035 
(table 42). Minnesota retained the rank it held 
in 1953-54 in number of farm supply coopera- 
tives. Missouri moved up from its 2d place 
position. The 10 ranking States accounted for 
56.0 percent of the total number and 57.5 
percent of the total memberships of these 
associations. 

The average number of memberships in 
marketing, farm supply, and related service 
cooperatives increased from 755 in 1953-54 
to 810 in 1962-63 (fig. 16). In the same period, 
average dollar volume per association, ex- 
clusive of intercooperative business, increased 
steadily from $941,000 to over $1.5 million. 



64 



Table 40. — Number and estimated memberships of marketing, farm supply, and related service cooperatives, by 
specified commodity groups, for local and regional cooperatives, 1962-63 1 





Cooperatives 


Memberships 2 




Local 


Regional 


Local 


Re 


jgional 


Commodity group 


















(classified 




Percent of 




Percent of 




Percent of 




Percent of 


according to major 




total in 




total in 




total in 




total in 


product or function) 


Number 


each 

commodity 

group 


Number 


each 

commodity 

group 


Number 


each 

commodity 

group 


Number 


each 

commodity 

group 


Beans and peas 


















(dry edible) 


6 


42.9 


8 


57.1 


3,060 


35.9 


5,470 


64.1 


Cotton and products 


496 


93.9 


32 


6.1 


102,795 


32.6 


212,670 


67.4 


Dairy products 


1,101 


78.5 


3 302 


21.5 


339,565 


56.2 


264,555 


43.8 


Fruits and vege- 


















tables 


533 


85.3 


3 92 


14.7 


54,185 


53.7 


46,770 


46.3 


Grain 4 


1,944 


98.5 


30 


1.5 


1,013,190 


94.8 


56,110 


5.2 


Livestock and prod- 


















ucts 


410 


91.5 


38 


8.5 


141,005 


18.1 


637,985 


81.9 


Nuts 


25 


80.6 


6 


19.4 


9,110 


13.4 


58,640 


86.6 


Poultry products 


80 


82.5 


3 17 


17.5 


46,930 


82.9 


9,690 


17.1 


Rice 


54 


90.0 


6 


10.0 


5,995 


42.5 


8,095 


57.5 


Sugar products 


- 


- 


3 68 


100.0 


- 


_ 


30,195 


100.0 


Tobacco 


- 


- 


31 


100.0 


- 


- 


437,410 


100.0 


Wool and mohair 


144 


90.6 


15 


9.4 


22,680 


27.0 


61,425 


73.0 


Miscellaneous 


60 


93.8 


4 


6.2 


14,260 


97.8 


320 


2.2 


Total marketing 


4,853 


88.2 


649 


11.8 


1,752,775 


48.9 


1,829,335 


51.1 


Farm supply 


3,088 


96.2 


123 


3.8 


2,665,095 


74.1 


930,795 


25.9 


Service 


180 


92.8 


14 


7.2 


39,280 


96.4 


1,470 


3.6 


Total marketing, 


















farm supply, and 


















service 


8,121 


91.2 


786 


8.8 


4,457,150 


61.7 


2,761,600 


38.3 



1 Preliminary. 

2 Membership figures are greatly affected each year by the comparative importance of cooperatives in price 
stabilization programs, particularly in cotton, nuts, and tobacco. They are also affected by the number of members 
reported who may not be active patrons in a specific year. 

3 Includes bargaining cooperatives. See definition in appendix, page 69. 

4 Includes soybean marketing and processing cooperatives. 



65 



Table 41. — Number and estimated memberships of farmer marketing cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 





Cooperatives 








Memberships 






State 


listed 1 




Rank 


State 


listed 1 


Rank 




Number 


Percent 


1962- 


53 1953-54 




Number 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 


Minnesota 


771 


14.0 


1 


1 


Minnesota 


377,385 


10.5 


1 


1 


Iowa 


443 


8.0 


2 


2 


Iowa 


251,270 


7.0 


2 


4 


Texas 


433 


7.9 


3 


4 


North 




















Carolina 


214,050 


6.0 


3 


8 


Wisconsin 


381 


6.9 


4 


3 


Ohio 


195,365 


5.5 


4 


2 


North Dakota 


351 


6.4 


5 


6 


Kansas 


177,995 


5.0 


5 


14 


California 


346 


6.3 


6 


5 


Illinois 


172,250 


4.8 


6 


3 


Kansas 


242 


4.4 


7 


8 


Nebraska 


167,025 


4.7 


7 


11 


Illinois 


240 


4.4 


8 


7 


Indiana 


166,595 


4.6 


8 


7 


Nebraska 


206 


3.7 


9 


9 


Wisconsin 


157,815 


4.4 


9 


9 


South Dakota 


186 


3.4 


10 


10 


Georgia 


143,420 


4.0 


10 


16 


Others 


1,903 


34.6 


- 


- 


Others 


1,558,940 


43.5 


- 


- 


Total 


5,502 


100.0 


- 


- 


Total 


3,582,110 


100.0 


- 


- 



Preliminary. 



Table 42. — Number and estimated memberships of farm supply cooperatives in the 10 
ranking States in 1962-63 and their rank in 1953-54 





Coopei 


ratives 








Memberships 






State 


listed 1 


Rank 


State 


listed 1 




Rank 




Number 


Percent 


1962-63 


1953-54 




Number 


Percent 


1962- 


63 1953-54 


Minnesota 


334 


10.4 


1 


1 


Missouri 


337,035 


9.4 


1 


2 


Wisconsin 


273 


8.5 


2 


2 


Illinois 


262,890 


7.3 


2 


1 


New York 


249 


7.8 


3 


3 


Wisconsin 


251,975 


7.0 


3 


3 


Nebraska 


157 


4.9 


4 


7 


Indiana 


241,545 


6.7 


4 


4 


Illinois 


152 


4.7 


5 


5 


Minnesota 


233,385 


6.5 


5 


5 


Missouri 


146 


4.5 


6 


4 


Iowa 


171,870 


4.8 


6 


7 


Iowa 


143 


4.5 


7 


6 


North 




















Carolina 


167,100 


4.6 


7 


6 


North Dakota 


136 


4.2 


8 


8 


Virginia 


165,330 


4.6 


8 


8 


South Dakota 


112 


3.5 


9 


11 


Pennsylvania 


120,635 


3.4 


9 


9 


Ohio 


97 


3.0 


10 


9 


Nebraska 


115,180 


3.2 


10 


12 


Others 


1,412 


44.0 


- 


- 


Others 


1,528,945 


42.5 


- 


- 


Total 


3,211 


100.0 


- 


- 


Total 


3,595,890 


100.0 


- 


- 



Preliminary. 



66 



FIG. 
16 



Average Number of Memberships and 
Average Dollar Volume Per Cooperative 



o 



on 



16 



12 



1.6 



to 



CO 



MEMBERSHIPS 

VOLUME OF BUSINESS * 



I I I I 
I I I I I 

r r r r I 

9 1 I I I I 
11 I 111 

i ■ 1 1 1 ■ ■ ■ I 

II 1 I 1 1 lil 1 



1953-54 1955-56 1957-58 1959-60 1961-62 



1 2 *"> 

LU CO 



CO Q 

0.8 ^- <=> 

LU O 



0.4 



o S 



* Excludes intercooperative business. 



67 



APPENDIX 



The explanation that follows of the methods 
used in classifying cooperatives for the annual 
survey should give users of this report a 
better understanding of the types of coopera- 
tives covered in these statistics. 

Classification of 
Cooperatives 

The 1962-63 survey discussed in this report 
included only marketing, farm supply, and re- 
lated service cooperatives. It did not include 
rural electric associations, production credit 
associations, rural credit unions, other types 
of credit cooperatives, or production coopera- 
tives, such as dairy herd improvement asso- 
ciations and dairy-cattle artificial breeding 
associations. 

Marketing cooperatives in this report in- 
clude those associations whose business is 
predominantly marketing farm products for 
their patrons, with more than 50 percent of 
their total dollar volume derived from the 
sale of such products. 

Marketing cooperatives are further classi- 
fied in this report according to which major 
commodity out of 13 classifications is pre- 
dominant in each association's business, meas- 
ured on the basis of dollar volume. Farm 
supply cooperatives are those whose farm 
supply business accounts for more than 50 
percent of their total dollar volume. Related 
service cooperatives have the major function 
of trucking, storing, drying, or similar serv- 
ices related to marketing or farm supply ac- 
tivities. 

Many cooperatives handle more than one 
commodity and provide both marketing and 
farm supply facilities, as well as facilities 
and equipment for performing such related 
services as storing, drying, and trucking, for 
their patrons. Such associations are classified 
according to the predominant commodity or 
function in their business volumes. 

Cooperatives are also classified according 
to organizational structure as follows: 

Local Association . - A local association is 
essentially a cooperative providing coopera- 



tive services in a local area or community, a 
county, or even several counties. Individual 
farmers are the members of these local co-. 
operatives. Local associations usually per- 
form a limited number of the first steps in- 
volved in marketing. In the case of farm supply 
associations, practically all sales are at the 
retail level. Local associations may or may 
not be affiliated with other cooperatives. 

Regional Association . - A regional coopera- 
tive is one that serves a district comprised of 
a number of counties, or, in some cases, a 
number of States. Types of associations classi- 
fied as regional for purposes of this report 
are described as follows: 
' 1. All federated cooperatives. These are 
cooperative organizations whose membership 
is composed of two or more local associations 
organized to market farm products or pur- 
chase production supplies for their patrons. 
Individual farmers are not members of strictly 
federated associations, but are members of 
the local associations that comprise the fed- 
eration. Regional federations may be members 
of other federated associations. 

2. Centralized associations usually serving 
more than 8 or 10 counties. A regional cen- 
tralized association is structurally like a 
small scale local association in that individual 
farmers make up the membership. In a strictly 
centralized regional there are no autonomous 
local associations. 

3. Cooperatives with large volumes that are 
neither strictly federated nor strictly central- 
ized as they have both local cooperatives and 
individual farmers as members. 

4. Some associations with small business 
volumes that market farm products for, or 
sell production supplies to, both local asso- 
ciations and individual producers, or do busi- 
ness in more than one State. 

5. Bargaining associations. These associa- 
tions derive all or a major portion of their 
business volume from negotiating with distrib- 
utors, processors, and other buyers over 
price, quantities, grade, terms of sale, and 
other factors involved in selling members' 
farm products. While the primary function of 



68 



such an association is to bring buyer and 
seller together to contract for the sale of 
members' products, many bargaining associa- 
tions now perform additional functions. Dairy 
bargaining associations at one time generally 
performed only price negotiation functions. 
Many now, however, perform such additional 
functions as physically handling a portion of 
the milk and making spot sales for their pa- 
trons. Bargaining associations, like other 
dairy marketing cooperatives, represent their 
members at Federal or State milk order hear- 
ings. 

Users of these national statistics who wish 
to make comparisons from year to year in 
specific commodity groups should keep in 
mind the differences in classification between 
State and national data. For example, State 
agencies frequently publish directories that 
include credit, electric, and other types of 
service cooperatives not directly related to 
marketing farm products or purchasing pro- 
duction supplies. 

Frequently cooperatives may operate in a 
specific State for a considerable period of 
time before they are included in the national 
survey. This may be due to one of the follow- 
ing reasons: (1) The Farmer Cooperative 
Service may not have received information on 
the cooperative; or, (2) the cooperative may 
not have completed and returned the initial 
questionnaire sent to it by Farmer Cooperative 
Service to obtain data on its status as a bona 
fide farmer cooperative. 

For inclusion in the annual survey, a coop- 
erative is defined as one which meets the fol- 
lowing requirements: 

(1) Farmers or agricultural producers hold 
the controlling interest in the cooperative; 
(2) no member of the cooperative is allowed 
more than one vote because of the amount of 
stock or membership capital he owns therein, 
or the cooperative does not pay dividends on 
stock or membership capital in excess of 8 
percent a year; and (3) the cooperative does 
not deal in products of nonmembers to an 
amount greater in value than it handles for 
its members. 

For many years it has been the practice in 
the national survey to classify cooperatives 



according to the predominant commodity in 
each cooperative's business volume. 

If a cooperative consistently indicates that 
it is handling a larger volume of a commodity 
than the one it was originally organized to 
handle and that provided the basis for classi- 
fication when it was first included in the na- 
tional survey, this cooperative is reclassified 
into the commodity group currently represent- 
ing the predominant product in its business 
volume. 

This practice differs from that followed in 
many State surveys in which cooperatives are 
classified according to the commodity groups 
they were originally organized to handle. 

From the previous discussion, it can be 
seen that there will frequently be differences 
between the national statistics and those pub- 
lished as the result of specific State surveys. 

In the 1950-51 survey, cooperatives for the 
first time in an annual survey furnished data 
by individual commodities handled and serv- 
ices performed. 1 Regional cooperatives were 
requested to furnish information on member- 
ships and business volumes for the individual 
States they served in 1950-51. For the first 
time, it was possible to discontinue the former 
practice of crediting all memberships and 
business to the State in which each regional 
maintained its headquarters. This was the be- 
ginning of more realistic figures for States in 
geographic areas where regional cooperatives 
were of major importance in cooperative ac- 
tivities. 

Cooperative Participation 

In the 1962-63 survey discussed in this re- 
port, 94 percent of the 8,907 cooperatives 
listed with Farmer Cooperative Service fur- 
nished current information on their member- 
ships and dollar volumes (appendix table 1). 
All but a few of the associations in the remain- 
ing 6 percent had furnished reports earlier 
during the period covered between the 1950-51 
and 1961-62 surveys. On the basis of these 

1 A detailed discussion of the revisions initiated in 
statistical methods in 1950-51 was given in "Statistics 
of Farmers' Marketing, Purchasing, and ServiceCoop- 
eratives, 1950-51." U.S. Farm Credit Admin. Misc„ Rpt c 
169. See pp. 1-3. 



69 



earlier reports, it was possible to develop 
estimates for these associations on an in- 
dividual association basis. General estimates 
based on averages for commodity and State 
groups were, therefore, required for less than 
1 percent of the 8,907 cooperatives included 
in this survey. 

Appendix table 1. — Cooperatives furnishing information 
for survey, 1950-51 to 1962-63 







Percent of 




Total number 


cooperatives 


Fiscal year 


of cooperatives 


furnishing 




included 1 


current 
information 


1950-51 


10,051 


80 


1951-52 


10,166 


87 


1952-53 


10,114 


90 


1953-54 


10,058 


92 


1954-55 


9,887 


92 


1955-56 


9,876 


93 


1956-57 


9,872 


92 


1957-58 


9,716 


92 


1958-59 


9,658 


93 


1959-60 


9,345 


95 


1960-61 


9,163 


94 


1961-62 


9,039 


94 


1962-63 


8,907 


94 



1 Years prior to 1958-59 not adjusted to include Alaska 
and Hawaii. 

Cooperatives Furnishing 
Information 

The number of cooperatives on which in- 
formation was received in the 1962- 63 survey, 
classified according to major commodity 
groups, is shown in appendix table 2. On a 
functional basis, information was supplied by 
93 percent of the total number of marketing 
cooperatives, 95 percent of the farm supply 
cooperatives, and 91 percent of the service 
cooperatives. 

All but two of the commodity groups among 
the marketing cooperatives showed a per- 
centage of 92 or above from which current 
information was received. These two com- 
modity groups were livestock, with 8 1 percent, 
and sugar products, with 85 percent, of the 
respective associations reporting. 

In the total of 8,907 cooperatives, branches 
and subsidiaries were not included as in- 



dividual organizations. Each cooperative, ir- 
respective of the number of subsidiaries or 
branches it owned, was counted as one as- 
sociation. 



Procedures for Obtaining 
Information 

The complex operations of many regional 
farm supply cooperatives require that at least 
3 months elapse to permit completion of their 
audits before the first request is mailed out 
from Farmer Cooperative Service. If no re- 
sponse to the first request is received, a 
second request is mailed 6 weeks later. If 
again no reply is received, a third request 
follows in another 6 weeks. In this procedure, 
6 months are required for these three regular 
requests. 

Many special letters are sent to officers or 
staff members to obtain information or to 
verify or correct information received that 
appears to be inaccurate. These letters are 
time consuming but are essential in obtaining 
complete and accurate data. 

In addition to obtaining data through special 
correspondence, a careful review is made of 
many cooperative publications to develop cur- 
rent information on nonreporting associations. 
These publications frequently furnish informa- 
tion on the annual meetings of affiliated locals. 
The annual volume figures published in such 
articles often provide a basis for requesting a 
more detailed or complete commodity break- 
down through correspondence or for making 
special estimates. 

For the very small number of cooperatives 
from whom no specific information can be 
obtained on business volume either directly 
or indirectly, estimates are compiled on the 
basis of averages developed for reporting 
cooperatives. Estimates on the number of 
members in nonreporting cooperatives are 
developed on an individual association basis 
using the most recent membership figure 
supplied by the nonreporting association. This 
arbitrary estimate tends to reflect more or 
less static membership for less than 1 percent 
of the total number of associations. 



70 



Appendix table 2. — Number and percent of returns from 8,907 cooperatives, 1962-63 



Commodity group 
(classified accord- 
ing to major 
product or function) 



Local cooperatives 



Number 
listed 



Associations on 

which current 

information was 

received 2 



Regional cooperatives 1 



Number 
listed 



Associations on 
which current 
information was 
received 2 



Total 



Number 
listed 



Associations on 

which current 

information was 

received 



Number Percent 



Number Percent 



Number Percent 



Beans and peas (dry 




















edible) 


6 


6 


100 


8 


8 


100 


14 


14 


100 


Cotton and products 3 


496 


466 


94 


32 


32 


100 


528 


498 


94 


Dairy products 


1,101 


1,059 


96 


4 302 


289 


96 


1,403 


1,348 


96 


Fruits and vegetables 


533 


512 


96 


4 92 


91 


99 


625 


603 


96 


Grain 5 


1,944 


1,794 


92 


30 


30 


100 


1,974 


1,824 


92 


Livestock and products 6 


410 


327 


80 


38 


38 


100 


448 


365 


81 


Nuts 


25 


25 


100 


6 


6 


100 


31 


31 


100 


Poultry and products 


80 


79 


99 


4 17 


17 


100 


97 


96 


99 


Rice 


54 


52 


96 


6 


6 


100 


60 


58 


07 


Sugar products 7 


- 


- 


- 


4 68 


58 


85 


6* 


58 


85 


Tobacco 


- 


- 


- 


31 


31 


100 


31 


31 


100 


Wool and mohair 


144 


134 


93 


15 


15 


100 


159 


149 


94 


Miscellaneous 8 


60 


58 


97 


4 


4 


100 


64 


62 


97 


Total marketing 


4,853 


4,512 


93 


649 


625 


96 


5,502 


5,137 


93 


Farm supply 


3,088 


2,942 


95 


123 


122 


99 


3,211 


3,064 


95 


Service 


180 


163 


91 


14 


14 


100 


194 


177 


91 


Total marketing, 




















farm supply, and 




















service 


8,121 


7,617 


94 


786 


761 


97 


8,907 


8,378 


94 



1 See page 69 for definition of regional cooperatives. 

2 Includes cooperatives which did not return the annual survey questionnaire, but for which detailed audits or other 
operating or financial statements were supplied. 

3 Includes cooperatives marketing or ginning cotton and processing cotton products. 

4 Includes bargaining cooperatives. 

5 Includes soybean marketing, and processing cooperatives. 
6 Includes livestock marketing, trucking, and processing cooperatives. 
7 Includes sugar, sugarcane, sugar beets, honey, maple syrup, molasses, and sorghum. 

8 Includes coffee, forest products, fur pelts, hay, hops, nursery stock, tung oil, and other commodities not specified 
elsewhere. 



71 



Appendix table 3. — Number, memberships, and dollar volume of marketing, farm supply, and 
related service cooperatives, by States, 1962-63 * 













Net business 




State 


Cooperatives 


Memberships in 
State 


(excludes inter 














cooperative business) 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Amount 
$1,000 


Percent 


State rank 


Alabama 


62 


0.7 


89,735 


1.2 


91,492 


0.7 


35 


Alaska 


2 


( 2 ) 


85 


( 2 ) 


5,300 


( 2 ) 


49 


Arizona 


17 


.2 


76,305 


1.1 


107,422 


.8 


32 


Arkansas 


108 


1.2 


71,025 


1.0 


201,105 


1.4 


24 


California 


390 


4.4 


111,515 


1.5 


1,520,454 


11.0 


1 


Colorado 


103 


1.2 


53,120 


.7 


171,064 


1.2 


25 


Connecticut 


23 


.3 


10,345 


.1 


56,407 


.4 


40 


Delaware 


13 


.1 


22,565 


.3 


15,273 


.1 


46 


Florida 


111 


1.2 


46,500 


.6 


276,524 


2.0 


17 


Georgia 


73 


.8 


177,665 


2.5 


156,144 


1.1 


26 


Hawaii 


24 


.3 


1,845 


( 2 ) 


12,684 


.1 


47 


Idaho 


85 


1.0 


59,770 


.8 


142,272 


1.0 


27 


Illinois 


413 


4.6 


443,430 


6.1 


765,808 


5.5 


4 


Indiana 


129 


1.4 


409,555 


5.7 


496,311 


3.6 


10 


Iowa 


586 


6.6 


423,140 


5.9 


830,949 


6.0 


3 


Kansas 


329 


3.7 


218,080 


3.0 


513,232 


3.7 


9 


Kentucky 


92 


1.0 


178,130 


2.5 


140,504 


1.0 


28 


Louisiana 


68 


.6 


14,230 


.2 


81,294 


.6 


37 


Maine 


16 


.2 


17,110 


.2 


50,774 


.4 


41 


Maryland 


65 


.7 


82,620 


1.2 


117,142 


.8 


30 


Massachusetts 


34 


.4 


19,140 


.3 


72,544 


.5 


38 


Michigan 


196 


2.2 


155,620 


2.2 


397,887 


2.9 


11 


Minnesota 


1,127 


12.7 


615,760 


8.5 


921,447 


6.7 


2 


Mississippi 


136 


1.5 


160,275 


2.2 


265,945 


1.9 


19 


Missouri 


205 


2.3 


425,865 


5.9 


369,154 


2.7 


15 


Montana 


172 


1.9 


77,005 


1.1 


121,247 


.9 


29 


Nebraska 


370 


4.2 


283,730 


3.9 


386,166 


2.8 


12 


Nevada 


3 


( 2 ) 


255 


( 2 ) 


5,160 


( 2 ) 


50 


New Hampshire 


8 


.1 


5,155 


.1 


22,172 


.2 


44 


New Jersey 


68 


.8 


32,145 


.5 


97,786 


.7 


34 


New Mexico 


29 


.3 


8,790 


.1 


37,759 


.3 


42 


New York 


414 


4.6 


149,415 


2.1 


645,927 


4.7 


8 


North Carolina 


45 


.3 


382,790 


5.3 


272,445 


2.0 


18 


North Dakota 


494 


5.5 


245,485 


3.4 


359,542 


2.6 


16 


Ohio 


259 


2.9 


311,055 


4.3 


648,540 


4.7 


7 


Oklahoma 


172 


1.9 


143,110 


2.0 


239,875 


1.7 


20 


Oregon 


108 


1.2 


61,440 


.9 


223,944 


1.6 


21 


Pennsylvania 


188 


2.1 


163,685 


2.3 


372,065 


2.7 


14 


Rhode Island 


2 


(2) 


1,890 


( 2 ) 


10,479 


.1 


48 


South Carolina 


18 


.2 


95,850 


1.3 


59,813 


.4 


39 


South Dakota 


299 


3.4 


189,810 


2.6 


220,117 


1.6 


22 


Tennessee 


135 


1.5 


131,425 


1.8 


113,554 


.8 


31 


Texas 


522 


5.9 


167,415 


2.3 


655,228 


4.7 


6 


Utah 


60 


.7 


30,005 


.4 


98,134 


.7 


33 


Vermont 


21 


.2 


15,020 


.2 


91,210 


.7 


36 


Virginia 


174 


2.0 


241,345 


3.3 


219,023 


1.6 


23 


Washington 


175 


2.0 


111,955 


1.6 


376,732 


2.7 


13 


West Virginia 


67 


.8 


62,355 


.9 


37,129 


.3 


43 


Wisconsin 


672 


7.5 


411,115 


5.7 


730,741 


5.3 


5 


Wyoming 


25 


.3 


13,075 


.2 


17,926 


.1 


45 


United States 


8,907 


100.0 


7,218,750 


100.0 


13,841,846 


100.0 


- 



12 



1 Preliminary. 

2 Less than 0.05 percent. 



Appendix table 4.-Estimated business in specified commodity and service groups of marketing, farm 
supply, and related service cooperatives, 1961-62 





Cooperatives 




Gross business 


Net business 




handling 




(includes intercooper- 


(excludes intercooper- 
ative business) 








Percent 


ative business) 
















Item 






of 












Number 




total 
coopera- 
tives l 


Amount 


Percent 


Amount 


Percent 



Products marketed for patrons: 



Beans and peas (dry edible) 


66 


Cotton and cotton products 


555 


Dairy products 


1,550 


Fruits and vegetables 


670 


Grain, soybeans, soybean meal 




and oil 


2,650 


Livestock and livestock products 


530 


Nuts 


107 


Poultry products 


536 


Rice 


61 


Sugar products 


66 


Tobacco 


31 


Wool and mohair 


276 


Miscellaneous 2 


212 


Total farm products 


S 6,422 


Supplies purchased for patrons: 




Building materials 


1,672 


Containers 


1,128 


Farm machinery and equipment 


1,833 


Feed 


4,395 


Fertilizer 


4,314 


Meats and groceries 


878 


Petroleum products 


2,781 


Seed 


3,900 


Sprays and dusts 




(farm chemicals) 


3,095 


Miscellaneous 


4,578 


Total farm supplies 


3 6,982 



Receipts for services: 
Trucking, cotton ginning, 
storage, grinding, locker 
plants, miscellaneous 

Total business 



3 5,495 
3 9,039 



0.7 

6.1 

17.1 

7.4 

29.3 

5.9 
1.2 

5.9 

.7 

.7 

.3 

3.1 

2.3 

71.0 



18.5 
12.5 
20.3 

48.6 
47.7 
9.7 
30.8 
43.1 

34.2 
50.6 

77.2 



$1,000 



4 302,102 
17,209,607 



$1,000 



40,190 


0.2 


30,548 


0.-' 


717,920 


4.2 


624,607 


4.8 


4,401,113 


25.6 


3,425,433 


26.3 


1,390,759 


8.1 


1,002,590 


7.7 


3,295,382 


19.1 


2,162,219 


16.6 


1,622,108 


9.4 


1,512,571 


11.6 


130,446 


.8 


117,380 


.9 


502,517 


2.9 


423,905 


3.2 


205,427 


1.2 


177,684 


1.4 


411,036 


2.4 


411,036 


3.2 


201,003 


1.2 


201,003 


L.5 


24,886 


ol 


24,258 


.2 


49,869 


.3 


47,130 


.4 


12,992,656 


75.5 


10,160,364 


78.0 


143,272 


.8 


95,576 


.7 


60,124 


.4 


28,501 


.2 


105,447 


.6 


75,112 


.6 


1,281,360 


7.4 


935,631 


7.2 


682,380 


4.0 


387,224 


3.0 


68,874 


.4 


55,090 


.4 


996,256 


5.8 


624,688 


4.8 


143,006 


.8 


100,969 


.8 


92,067 


.5 


62,328 


.5 


342,063 


2.0 
22.7 


196,219 


1.5 


3,914,849 


2,561,338 


19.7 



1.8 



302,102 



100.0 13,023,804 



2.3 
100.0 



1 Number of cooperatives handling each commodity group is computed as a percentage of the total number of 9,039 cooperatives 
listed. 

2 Includes coffee, forest products, fur pelts, hay, hops, seed marketed for growers, nursery stock, tung oil, and other farm products 
not separately classified. 

3 Because many cooperatives do more than one type of business, these totals are less than the number that would be obtained by adding 
the number of cooperatives handling individual items or performing individual services. 

4 Charges for services in which no duplication occurs. 



73 



Appendix table 5. - Number listed of marketing and farm supply coopera- 
tives 1 for specified periods , 2 1913 to 1949-50 



Period 



Marketing 



Farm supply 



Total 



Number 



Percent 



Number 



Percent 



Number 



Percent 



1913 3 


2,988 


96.4 


111 


3.6 


3,099 


100.0 


1915 3 


5,149 


94.9 


275 


5.1 


5,424 


100.0 


1921 4 


6,476 


87.8 


898 


12.2 


7,374 


100.0 


1925-26 


9,586 


88.7 


1,217 


11.3 


10,803 


100.0 


1927-28 


10,195 


89.4 


1,205 


10.6 


11,400 


100.0 


1929-30 


10,546 


87.9 


1,454 


12.1 


12,000 


100.0 


1930-31 


10,362 


86.7 


1,588 


13.3 


11,950 


100.0 


1931-32 


10,255 


86.2 


1,645 


13.8 


11,900 


100.0 


1932-33 


9,352 


85.0 


1,648 


15.0 


11,000 


100.0 


1933-34 


9,052 


83.0 


1,848 


17.0 


10,900 


100.0 


1934-35 


8,794 


82.2 


1,906 


17.8 


10,700 


100.0 


1935-36 


8,388 


79.9 


2,112 


20.1 


10,500 


100.0 


1936-37 5 


8,142 


75.8 


2,601 


24.2 


10,743 


100.0 


1937-38 


8,300 


76.2 


2,600 


23.8 


10,900 


100.0 


1938-39 


*,100 


75.7 


2,600 


24.3 


10,700 


100.0 


1939-40 


8,051 


75.3 


2,649 


24.7 


10,700 


100.0 


1940-41 


7,943 


74.9 


2,657 


25.1 


10,600 


100.0 


1941-42 


7,824 


74.2 


2,726 


25.8 


10,550 


100.0 


1942-43 


7,708 


73.8 


2,742 


26.2 


10,450 


100.0 


1943-44 


7,522 


73.0 


2,778 


27.0 


10,300 


100.0 


1944-45 


7,400 


72.9 


2,750 


27.1 


10,150 


100.0 


1945-46 


7,378 


72.7 


2,772 


27.3 


10,150 


100.0 


1946-47 


7,268 


71.8 


2,857 


28.2 


10,125 


100.0 


1947-48 


7,159 


70.6 


2,976 


29.4 


10,135 


100.0 


1948-49 


6,993 


69.4 


3,082 


30.6 


10,075 


100.0 


1949-50 


6,922 


69.0 


3,113 


31.0 


10,035 


100.0 


Includes 


Independent local 


associations, 


federations, 


centralized 


associations, 


and sales 



^agencies. 

TMost statistics pertaining to marketing and farm supply cooperatives are now compiled on the 
basis of the marketing season which includes the period during which the farm products of a 
specified year are moved into the channels of trade. Marketing seasons overlap. 

-'Compiled from tables appearing in U. S. Dept. Agr. Bui. 547, 82 PP., illus. , 1917. See 

„pp. 14-25; and U. S. Dept. Agr. Tech. Bui. 40, 98 pp., Illus., 1928. See pp. 70-75. 

.Includes only associations reporting dollar business. 

^Information is from a survey made by the Farm Credit Administration in cooperation with the 
district banks for cooperatives and 33 State agricultural colleges, for 1936-37. 



74 



Appendix table 6. - Estimated membership 1 of marketing and farm supply 
cooperatives for specified periods, 2 1915 to 1949-50 



Period 


Market 


ing 


Farm s 


.upply 


Tot. 


al 




Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


Number 


Percent 


1915 3 


591,683 


90.9 


59,503 


9.1 


651,186 


100.0 


1925-26 


2,453,000 


90.9 


247,000 


9.1 


2,700,000 


100.0 


1927-28 


2,602,000 


86.7 


398,000 


13.3 


3,000,000 


100.0 


1929-30 


2,630,000 


84.8 


470,000 


15.2 


3,100,000 


100.0 


1930-31 


2,608,000 


86.9 


392,000 


13.1 


3,000,000 


100.0 


1931-32 


2,667,000 


83.3 


533,000 


16.7 


3,200,000 


100.0 


1932-33 


2,457,300 


81.9 


542,700 


18.1 


3,000,000 


100.0 


1933-34 


2,464,000 


78.1 


692,000 


21.9 


3,156,000 


100.0 


1934-35 


2,490,000 


75.9 


790,000 


24.1 


3,280,000 


100.0 


1935-36 


2,710,000 


74.0 


950,000 


26.0 


3,660,000 


100.0 


1936-37 4 


2,414,000 


73.8 


856,000 


26.2 


3,270,000 


100.0 


1937-38 


2,500,000 


73.5 


900,000 


26.5 


3,400,000 


100.0 


1938-39 


2,410,000 


73.0 


890,000 


27.0 


3,300,000 


100.0 


1939-40 


2,300,000 


71.9 


900,000 


28.1 


3,200,000 


100.0 


1940-41 


2,420,000 


71.2 


980,000 


28.8 


3,400,000 


100.0 


1941-42 


2,430,000 


67.5 


1,170,000 


32.5 


3,600,000 


100.0 


1942-43 


2,580,000 


67.0 


1,270,000 


33.0 


3,850,000 


100.0 


1943-44 


2,730,000 


64.2 


1,520,000 


35.8 


4,250,000 


100.0 


1944-45 


2,895,000 


64.3 


1,610,000 


35.7 


4,505,000 


100.0 


1945-46 


3,150,000 


62.9 


1,860,000 


37.1 


5,010,000 


100.0 


1946-47 


3,378,000 


62.1 


2,058,000 


37.9 


5,436,000 


100.0 


1947-48 


3,630,000 


61.6 


2,260,000 


38.4 


5,890,000 


100.0 


1948-49 


3,973,000 


62.2 


2,411,000 


37.8 


6,384,000 


100.0 


1949-50 


4,075,000 


61.9 


2,509,000 


38.1 


6,584,000 


100.0 



4he membership estimates for the years since about 1935 Include members, contract members, 
and shareholders, but; do not Include patrons not in these categories. (There is some duplica- 
tion in these membership figures due to the fact that some farmers belong to more than one 
association. ) 

Tfost statistics pertaining to marketing and farm supply cooperatives are now compiled on the 
basis of the marketing season which Includes the period during which the farm products of a 
specified year are moved into the channels of trade. Marketing seasons overlap. 

-'Compiled from tables in U. S. Dept. Agr. Bui. 547, 82 pp., lllus. , 1917. See pp. 14-25; and 

^U. S. Dept. Agr. Tech. Bui. 40, 98 pp., lllus., 1928. See pp. 70-75. 

Estimates are based on data collected by the Farm Credit Administration in cooperation with 
the banks for cooperatives and 33 State agricultural colleges for 1936-37. 



75 



Appendix table 7. -Estimated business 1 of market ing and farm supply coop- 
eratives for specified periods , 2 1913 to 1949-50 



Period 


Market 


ing 


Farm s 


jpply 


Toti 


j1 




$1,000 


Percent 


$1,000 


Percent 


$1,000 


Percent 


1913 3 


304,385 


98.1 


5,928 


1.9 


310,313 


100.0 


1915 3 


624,161 


98.2 


11,678 


1.8 


635,839 


100.0 


1921 


1,198,493 


95.4 


57,721 


4.6 


1,256,214 


100.0 


1925-26 


2,265,000 


94.4 


135,000 


5.6 


2,400,000 


100.0 


1927-28 


2,172,000 


94.4 


128,000 


5.6 


2,300,000 


100.0 


1929-30 


2,310,000 


92.4 


190,000 


7.6 


2,500,000 


100.0 


1930-31 


2,185,000 


91.0 


215,000 


9.0 


2,400,000 


100.0 


1931-32 


1,744,000 


90.6 


181,000 


9.4 


1,925,000 


100.0 


1932-33 


1,199,500 


89.5 


140,500 


10.5 


1,340,000 


100.0 


1933-34 


1,213,000 


88.9 


152,000 


11.1 


1,365,000 


100.0 


1934-35 


1,343,000 


87.8 


187,000 


12.2 


1,530,000 


100.0 


1935-36 


^l, 586, 000 


86.2 


^254, 000 


13.8 


1,840,000 


100.0 


1936-37 5 


^l, 882,600 


85.7 


^313,400 


14.3 


2,196,000 


100.0 


1937-38 


H 2, 050, 000 


85.4 


4 350,000 


14.6 


2,400,000 


100.0 


1938-39 


4 1, 765,000 


84.0 


4 335,000 


16.0 


2,100,000 


100.0 


1939-40 


^1, 729,000 


82.8 


4 358,000 


17.2 


2,087,000 


100.0 


1940-41 


H l, 911,000 


83.8 


^369, 000 


16.2 


2,280,000 


100.0 


1941-42 


^2, 360, 000 


83.1 


4 480,000 


16.9 


2,840,000 


100.0 


1942-43 


4 3, 180,000 


84.1 


11 600, 000 


15.9 


3,780,000 


100.0 


1943-44 


^4, 430, 000 


85.9 


^730, 000 


14.1 


5,160,000 


100.0 


1944-45 


4 4, 835, 000 


85.7 


4 810,000 


14.3 


5,645,000 


100.0 


1945-46 


4 5, 147,000 


84.8 


4 923,000 


15.2 


6,070,000 


100.0 


1946-47 


4 6, 005, 000 


84.4 


^l, 111,000 


15.6 


7,116,000 


100.0 


1947-48 


H 7, 195,000 


83.3 


4 1, 440, 000 


16.7 


8,635,000 


100.0 


1948-49 


l+ 7, 700,000 


82.6 


^1, 620,000 


17.4 


9,320,000 


100.0 


1949-50 


4 7, 082, 600 


81.2 


4 1, 643,400 


18.8 


8,726, 000 


100.0 



Includes the value of commodities sold or purchased for patrons and the service charges for 
associations rendering other essential services either In marketing or purchasing. 

%ost statistics pertaining to marketing and farm supply cooperatives are now compiled on the 
basis of the marketing season which Includes the period during which the farm products of a 
specified year are moved into the channels of trade. Marketing seasons overlap. 

-'Compiled from tables appearing in U. S. Dept. Agr. Bui. 547, 82 pp., illus., 1917. See 

„PP. 14-25; and U. S. Dept. Agr. Tech. Bui. 40, 98 pp., illus., 1928. See pp. 70-75. 
Combining the supply business by all associations the estimated totals are: 1935-36 marketing 
season, $315,000,000; 1936-37, $313,400,000; 1937-33, $440,000,000; 1938-39, $416,000,000; 
1939-40, $448,200,000; 1940-41, $450,000,000; 1941-42, $600,000,000; 1942-43, $750,000,000; 
1943-44, $1,010,000,000; 1944-45, $1,095,000,000; 1945-46, $1,220,000,000; 1946-47, 

c$l,452,000,000; 1947-48, $1,822,000,000; 1948-49, $2,022,440,000; 1949-50, $2,233,856,000. 

^Estimates are based on data collected by the Farm Credit Administration in cooperation with 
the banks for cooperatives and 33 State agricultural colleges for 1936-37. 



76 



Appendix table 8< 



Year 



Number of farmers' mutual fire insurance companies , 
costs, 1914-61 1 2 



insurance in force, and 



Companies-' 



Hunber 



Amount of 
insurance in 
force Dec. 31 



$1 ,000 



Cost per $100 of insurance 



Losses 



Expenses 



Cents 



Total 



1914 

1915 

1916 

1917 

1918 

1919 

1920 

1921 

1922 

1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 

1928 

1929 

1930 

1931 

1932 

1933 

1934 

1935 

1936 

1937 

1938 

1939 

1940 

1941 

1942 

1943 

1944 

1945 

1946 

1947 

1948 

1949 

1950 

1951 

1952 

1953 

1954 

1955 

1956 

1957 

1958 

1959 

I960 1 * 

1961 5 



1,947 
1,879 
1,883 
1,829 
1,866 
1,922 
1,944 
1,951 
1,918 
1,907 
1,929 
1,839 
1,911 
1,889 
1,884 
1,876 
1,886 
1,863 
1,847 
1,826 
1,852 
1,941 
1,936 
1,924 
1,914 
1,904 
1,898 
1,885 
1.877 
1,878 
1,847 
1,841 
1,833 
1,803 
1,806 
1,808 
1,777 
1,745 
1,759 
1,694 
1,709 
1,651 
1,636 
1,634 
1,633 
1,608 
1,592 
1,600 



5,264, 119 
5,366,760 
5,635,968 
5,876,853 
6,391,522 
6,937,523 
7,865,988 
8,409,683 
8,769,948 
9,057,938 
9,487,029 
9,477,139 
9,988,580 
10,345,463 
10,781,212 
11,118,510 
11,382,104 
11,292,339 
10,974,082 
10,466,384 
10,571,508 
11,083,300 
11,339,510 
11,569,476 
11,868,569 
12,143,881 
12,294,287 
12,518,913 
12,982,390 
13,777,555 
14,221,012 
15,170,456 
16,941,434 
19,263,745 
20,769,410 
22,488,417 
24, 160,742 
25,493,692 
27,716,145 
26,898,393 
28,295,428 
28,222,975 
28,547,955 
29,164,350 
30,693,815 
32,516, 186 
33,932,135 
35,278,000 



20.4 

17.5 

19.6 

18.2 

18.8 

17.3 

17.4 

19.4 

20.9 

19.8 

20.4 

21.1 

19.4 

19.0 

20.5 

21.8 

24.8 

24.1 

24.9 

21.2 

19. 

15. 

20. 

16. 

18. 



18.4 
17. 1 
16.2 
14.6 
16.2 
15.9 
15.6 
15.8 
15.8 
16.4 
14.0 
14.6 
14. 1 
13.8 
14.3 
16.7 
15.9 
15.9 
14.7 
15.5 
17.3 
16.9 
18.6 



6.0 
6.0 
5.9 
6.4 
6.3 
7.8 
8.4 
7.8 
5.8 
6.6 
6.5 
6.7 
6.9 
6.3 
6.6 
6.6 
6.8 
6.9 
7.1 
7.3 
7.2 
7.5 
7.4 
7.6 
8.0 
8.2 
8.1 
8.4 
8.1 
7.7 
7.8 
8.0 
8.8 
8.5 
8.7 
8.3 
8.4 
8.0 
8.2 
7.3 
7.5 
7.5 
7.9 
7.9 
8.3 
8.5 
8.4 
7.5 



26.4 
23.5 
25.5 
24.6 
25.1 
25.1 
25.8 
27.2 
26.7 
26.4 
26.9 
27.8 
26.3 
25.3 
27.1 
28.4 
31.6 
31.0 
32.0 
28.5 
26.9 
23.2 
28. 1 
24.1 
26.0 
26.6 
25.2 
24.6 
22.7 
23.9 
23.7 
23.6 
24.6 
24.3 
25.1 
22.3 
23.0 
22. 1 
22.0 
21.6 
24.2 
23.4 
23.8 
22.6 
23.8 
25.8 
25.3 
26.1 



Data supplied by the Bureau of Agricultural Economics for periods 1914-33 and 1943-52. Data for years 1934-41 supplied by 

2 Insurance Section, Cooperative Research and Service Division, FCA, and from 1953 by Farm Economics Division, ERS. 
1914-33 Includes companies with more than 65 percent of their Insurance on farm property; later years those with more than 50 
percent. In recent years between 86 and 88 percent of total Insurance has been on farm property. 

'Number of companies for which data were obtained; perhaps not entirely complete for any year. 

^Revised. 

'Preliminary. 



77 



Appendix table 9. — Major types, number, and memberships of farmer cooperatives 



Type 



Year or date of data 



Associations 



Estimated memberships or 
participants 



Marketing and farm supply: 
Marketing 1 
Farm supply i 
Miscellaneous services 1,4 

Service: 

Federal land bank associations 6 
Production credit associations 6 
Banks for cooperatives 6 
Rural credit unions 9 
Rural electric cooperatives io 
Rural telephone cooperatives io 
Farmers' mutual fire insurance 
companies 13 

Production: 

Mutual irrigation companies ** 
Dairy herd improvement 

associations 15 
Dairy-cattle artificial breeding 

associations 16 



1962-63 


2 5,502 


1962-63 


3 3,211 


1962-63 


5 194 


Jan. 1, 1965 


738 


Jan. 1, 1965 


483 


Jan. 1, 1965 


13 


Jan. 1, 1964 


700 


Oct. 1, 1964 


"913 


Oct. 1, 1964 


"212 


Jan. 1, 1964 


1,500 


1959 


7,729 


Jan. 1, 1964 


1,420 


Jan. 1, 1964 


16 44 



3,582,110 

3,595,890 

40,750 



7 362,131 

537,526 

8 3,838,088 

258,692 

12 4,951,081 

12 455,045 

3,500,000 



161,679 

67,664 

17 459,503 



1 Farmer Cooperative Service, Department of Agriculture. 

When associations marketing farm products but principally engaged in providing some other services are in- 
cluded, the total is 6,295. 

3 When associations purchasing farm supplies but principally engaged in providing some other services are in- 
cluded, the total is 6,921. 

Includes general trucking, storage, grinding, locker plant, and other services. 
5 When associations providing miscellaneous services but principally engaged in marketing or farm supply ac- 
tivities are included, the total is 5,412. 

Farm Credit Administration. 

Represents the number of Federal Land Bank loans outstanding as of June 30, 1964. 

Estimated members of associations borrowing from banks for cooperatives as of June 30, 1964. 

Credit Union National Association, Inc. 

Rural Electrification Administration, Department of Agriculture. 

Includes only associations that are REA borrowers. 

Includes only memberships of associations financed by REA. 

Farmer Cooperative Service, Department of Agriculture estimates. 

Preliminary. Bureau of the Census, 1959 Census of Irrigation. 

Dairy Husbandry Research Branch, Department of Agriculture. 

Number of cooperative bull studs and herds. 



6 
7 

8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 



78 



OTHER PUBLICATIONS AVAILABLE 



Farmer Cooperatives in the United States, FCS Bulletin 1. 

Farmer Cooperatives — Farm Business Tools, Agricultural Information Bulletin 275. Beryle 
Stanton. 

Organizing a Farmer Cooperative, FCS Circular 18. 

Managing Farmer Cooperatives, Educational Circular 17. Kelsey B. Gardner. 

Sizing Up Your Cooperative, Educational Circular 11. 

The Story of Farmers' Cooperatives, Educational Circular 1. 

Regional Cooperatives Handling Under $10 Million of Supplies, 1960-61, General Report 115. 
J. Warren Mather and Anne L. Gessner. 

Trends in Growth of Farmer Cooperatives, 1950-60, General Report 110. Kelsey B„ Gardner 
and Anne L. Gessner. 

Management Training Among Farmer Cooperatives, General Report 65. David Volkin and 
Nelda Griffin. 

Methods of Financing Farmer Cooperatives, General Report 32. Helim H. Hulbert, Nelda 
Griffin, and Kelsey B. Gardner. 



A copy of each of these publications may be obtained upon request while a supply is available 
from — 



Farmer Cooperative Service 
U.S. Department of Agriculture 
Washington, D.C. 20250