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BOSTON 

PUBLIC 

LIBRARY 







7 



y 



Qualifications 



J 1RV 



i 



■ . 



Of A Project Team 

Harborwalk Phase 1 

Signage System 

Prepared for The Boston Redevelopment Authority 



WATERFRON. 
G851 
1989 



Arthur Griffin: New England, Study No.2 



January 2, 1989 



Emel Hadzipasic 

Boston Redevelopment Autliority 

Harbor Planning and Development Office 

One First Avenue 

Charlestown Navy Yard 

Boston, Massachusetts 02129 

Dear Ms. Hadzipasic: 

Thank you for giving me the opportunity to submit my qualifications, 
and those of my project team, for the Boston Redevelopment Authority's Harborwalk, Phase 1 
signage system. 

The design, production, and installation of this system will require the skills of an 
accomplished team; it is with confidence that I offer this team, and my approach. 

Sincerely, 



nn 



Linda Mikula 



( 



JETTER Jy[AKER 

17 East Broadway South Boston MA 02127 



Relevant Past Experience 

Linda Mikula 
817 East Broadway 
South Boston, MA 02127 

BFA Sculpture, Boston University School of Fine Art, 1975 

Certificate Graphic Design and Visual Communication 

Program Advertising Design 

Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, 1986-present 

Scholarship Bookbuilders of Boston, January 1989 

As the former manager of the interior and exterior signage program at the 
Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary (October, 1986-October, 1988), I am familiar 
with the unique legibility requirements of visually impaired persons, non-English 
speaking persons, children, and visitors. My work with the Infirmary allowed 
experimentation with diverse letter forms; ultimately a standardized system was 
developed with the flexibility to address the visual capacity of very specific groups. 
In 1987, a major project within the Infirmary was the design and production of 
symbolic, color-coded maps to describe a hospital visit to pre-verbal pediatric 
patients. This system was later exhibited at the Boston Children's Museum. A 
signage program was developed in 1988 for the Infirmary's new Low Vision Clinic 
using large point-size text and graphic elements directing patients through the 
hospital. Also developed, sited, and implemented in 1988 was an exterior 
directional signage program along major arteries in accordance with MDC 
"Trailblazer" standards. 

Perhaps the most novel project accomplished in 1988 was the design of a 
collaborative external campus project with the Massachusetts General Hospital. 
Based on my work with Low Vision individuals and the theory that the eye 
recognizes form before it reads text, the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary was 
able to place its own logotype form with specific additional interletter spacing and 
arrow shapes adjacent to a vastly different typeface. Using this type of form 
manipulation emergency patients arriving by vehicle should identify the route to 
the Emergency Entrance by recognizing and following a specific shape. This 
system is currently in the production phase. 



The Project Team 

Working efficiently and cost-effectively on the Infirmary's signage program 
required specific skills provided by specific professions. My approach to the 
Harborwalk Phase 1 Signage System begins with the formation of the following 
team: 

Rothman, Rothtnan, and Heineman Architects 
711 Atlantic Avenue, Boston, MA 

This firm will provide the urban planning skills required to site signage 
appropriately, preparing detailed maps identifying locations for sign 
placement. This firm will advise on the structural integrity of signage 
located near the shoreline as well as the integrity of the substratum. 
Rothman, Rothman, and Heineman will therefore participate actively 
during the first six months of the project. 

McGann Bronze, Incorporated; Robert Alfred, President 

11 Miller Street, Cambridge, MA 

This firm has been preparing patterns for and casting metal letters for over 

100 years. Mr. Alfred's expertise will be a valuable asset in the production of 

historic sculptural signage along the waterfront. 

Robert Adam, Director of Preservation Carpentry 
North Bennet Street School, North End, Boston, MA 

Mr. Adam will advise on the techniques of working with weathered wood 
and the preservation of that wood. Wood and metal are the materials 
which I would select to produce permanent descriptive signage along the 
walk. 

Lloyd Lillie, Professor of Art 

Boston University School of Fine Art 

Mr. Lillie's facile talent will be the most dramatic component of the figural 
signage along the water's edge. During the first six months of the project, 
Mr. Lillie will provide sketches for figural signage. Figural signage will 
appear at historic sites. 



A Brief Discussion of The Team's Approach 

Typographic designs and elements will be developed by Linda Mikula during 
the first six months of the project. Maps will be developed by Linda Mikula 
emphasizing large, permanent areas in order to enhance immediate recognization 
and in an attempt to curtail obsolescence. These elements and maps will be used 
to produce directional signage along roadways as well as informational kiosks 
within public transportation facilities, pedestrian orientation signs, water 
transportation signs and destination signs. Siting of these directional signs will be 
done by Rothman, Rothman, and Heineman. Concomitantly, Mr. Lillie will 
produce sketches for several figural signs. This work will take six months. 

Production on approved directional signage designs will commence during the 
next six months as will manufacture of informational kiosks. Installation of 
directional signage will begin in the latter part of this six month period; 
installation of manufactured informational kiosks will begin in the third six 
months of the project and will be completed by the end of the second year. 

Production of the figural signs, under the direction of Mr. Lillie, Mr. Adam, 
and Mr. Albert, will begin during the second six months of the project and 
continue for eighteen months. 

This schedule is pending approvals which may require additional time. 



References for the Applicant Firm 

Mr. Roger Keating 

Former Director of Facilities Planning 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

(617)749-5250 

Mr. Joseph Castellana 

Vice President for Support Services 

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 

573-3025 

The applicant firm has filed a Minority/Women Identification Statement with the 
Massachusetts Water Resources Authority 



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Rothman 



Rothman 



Heineman 



Architects Inc 



71 1 Atlantic Avenue 
Boston MA 02111 
(617)451 6990 



Planning 



Feasibility 



Urban Design 



Architecture 



Interiors 



3 January 1989 

Ms. Linda Mikula 

President 

Letter Maker 

817 East Broadway 

South Boston, MA 02127 

Re: Harborpark Project 

RRH Architects Inc Project No, 

Dear Linda: 



88308.90 



Martha L Rothman 
President 

Robert M Heineman 
Vice President 

Elliot Paul Rothman 
Treasurer 

M Murray Leibowitz 
Principal 

Herman B Zinter 
Associate 

Arthur G Chan 
Associate 

Anne D Dooley 
Interior Design 



Rothman Rothman Heineman Architects Inc is pleased to join your 
team as master planning, urban design and architectural consultant 
for the Harborpark project. 

As primary architect for the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 
(MEEI), we are familiar with Letter Maker's superb graphic design 
work at MEEI and are eager to work with you. RRH Architects Inc 
will assist Letter Maker in identifying the exterior directional 
siting of all signs in accordance with an appropriate spacing for 
pedestrians as well as automobiles; assist in the graphics on 
locational maps; and advise on the structures and foundations 
needed to support the signs. 



Rothman Rothman Heineman 
for its master planning 
a First Award by the Bos 
Visions National Design 
and its Neighbors." We 
for commercial area revi 
Boston. In 1968, Elliot 
Marketplace project whil 
Associates, Inc. 



Architects Inc is nationally recognized 
and urban design and was recently awarded 
ton Society of Architects for the Boston 
Competition for our submittal, "The Fens 
have also completed conceptual planning 
talization in the Medical Science Park of 

Paul Rothman initiated the Faneuil Hall 
e an associate of Benjamin Thompson and 



We look forward to participating with you in Harborpark. 
Sincerely, 



Martha L. Rothman, AIA 



MARTHA L. ROTHMAN 



POSITION: 
EDUCATION: 



PROFESSIONAL 
REGISTRATION: 



President 

Master of Architecture, 1965 

Harvard University Graduate School of Design 

Bachelor of Arts, 1961 
Sarah Lawrence College 

Massachusetts Reg. No. 3108 
New York Reg. No. 014371 
Vermont Reg. No. 1113 
Maine Reg. No. 1269 
New Hampshire Reg. No. 1056 
Connecticut Reg. No. 3188 
Maryland Reg. No. 6539-R 
NCARB Reg. No. 16,569 



AIA No. 
BSA 



006657704 



PROFESSIONAL 
EXPERIENCE: 



Martha directs complex projects. She has 

strong analytical skills and the ability to visualize/document 

programs with clients. She integrates critical user 

requirements with major mechanical, electrical and plumbing 

systems. 

Recent RRH Architects Inc. experience includes: 

o Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary 
Boston, Massachusetts 

- Ophthalmology Space Planning 

- Magnetic Resonance Imaging 

o Beth Israel Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 

- Master Planning 

Pre-DON Planning, 1978-1980 
Master Plan, 1987 

- Libby Building Addition 
Computer Medicine Laboratory 



Finard Building 
Emergency Unit, Cardiac 
Clinical Laboratories 
Radiation Therapy 



Care, 



Rothman 



Rothman 



Heineman 



Architects Inc 



- Reisman Building 
Labor & Delivery Suite 
Neonatal Intensive Care Unit 

Intensive Care and Acute Care Nursing Units 

- Stoneman Building Renovations 
Acute Care Nursing Units 

- Magnetic Resonance Imaging Facility 
MRI & Radiology Patient Support 

o Maine Medical Center Master Plan 
Portland, Maine 

o Veterans Administration Medical Center 

Clinical Addition/Renovation of Building 200 
Togus, Maine 

o Boston University School of Graduate Dentistry 
Boston, Massachusetts 

o Harvard Medical School Building C Feasibility Study 
Boston, Massachusetts 

o Massachusetts General Hospital 
Operating Rooms/Recovery Room 
Boston, Massachusetts 

AWARDS AND 1988 Boston Visions First Award, "The Fens and its 

PUBLICATIONS Neighbors," Boston Society of Architects. 

"Many More: Women in Architecture, 1978-1988," 
1988 AIA National Convention, Exhibition. 

Progressive Architecture , 1972 Design Awards, Middlesex County 
House of Correction Architectural Education Program, Citation. 

Category of Medicine: Association of Visual Communicators, 
Bronze Award. 

Martha L. Rothman-Ell iot Paul Rothman Inc. /'Reconciling High- 
Tech with High Touch," Designer notebook, Health Care Strategic 
Management (Volume3, Number 2, February 1985), pp. 32-34. 

Rothman, Martha L.; Rothman, Elliot Paul; Dooley, Anne De B.; 
with illustrations by Stubbs, Elizabeth W., "CHILD: Children's 
Health in Living Design," an analytical tool that provides 
design ideas that contribute to the healthy development of 
children during hospitalization, published by Rothman Rothman 
Heineman Architects Inc., (formerly Martha L. Rothman-Ell iot 
Paul Rothman Inc.) 3 pp. 

Rothman 



Rothman 



Heineman 



Architects inc 



ELLIOT PAUL ROTHMAN 



POSITION: 
EDUCATION: 



PROFESSIONAL 
REGISTRATION: 



ACADEMIC 
EXPERIENCE: 



PROFESSIONAL 
EXPERIENCE: 



Director 

Master of City Planning in Urban Design, 1961 
Harvard University Graduate School of Design 

Master of City Planning, 1960 

Harvard University Graduate School of Design 

Bachelor of Architecture, 1958 
Carnegie Institute of Technology 
(Carnegie Mellon University) 

Massachusetts Reg. No. 2929 
Maine Reg. No. 656 
New Jersey Reg. No. C-6425 
West Viginia Reg. No. 1868 
Rhode Island Reg. No. 1073 
Pennsylvania Reg. No. B8367 
NCARB No 10,791 



AIA 
BSA 



Reg. No. 006657415 



Associate Professor of Architecture 

Department of Architecture 

Harvard University Graduate School of Design, 1967-1969 

Elliot has 26 years of professional experience, 
primarily in medical facilities. He is the founding 
principal of the firm. 

As a founding associate of Benjamin Thompson and Associates, 
Elliot initiated the award winning Quincy Market project in 
1969. 

Elliot was the assistant to the Director of Planning for the 
Tufts New England Medical Center from 1961 to 1964. 
Concepts which Elliot initiated with Herman H. Field, 
Planning Director: Spanning Washington Street with the 
Boston Floating Hospital, relocation of the Orange Line and 
demolition of the Orange Line elevated have all been 
implemented. 

Recent RRH Architects Inc experience includes: 

o Beth Israel Hospital Master Planning 
Boston, Massachusetts 

o Polymer Research Center Feasibility Study 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
University of Massachusetts 



Rothman 



Rothman 



Heineman 



Architects Inc 



o Boston University School of Graduate Dentistry 
Boston, Massachusetts 

o Boston City Hospital 
Oral Surgery Renovation 
Ambulatory Pediatrics Renovation 
Boston, Massachusetts 

o Maine Medical Center Master Plan 
Portland, Maine 

o Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Eastern Massachusetts 
Regional Labatory for Massachusetts Medical 
Examiner and the Massachusetts Crime Laboratory, 
Planning and Schematic Design 
Boston, Massachusetts 

AWARDS AND 1988 Boston Visions First Award, "The Fens and its 

PUBLICATIONS: Neighbors," Boston Society of Architects. 

Progressive Architecture , 1972 Design Awards, Middlesex 
County House of Correction Architectural Education Program, 
Citation. 

Category of Medicine: Association of Visual Communicators, 
Bronze Award. 

Rothman, Elliot Paul and Louderback, Terry A.,"Stoneman 
Building: (Chapter 2) The Symphony of Flexibility 
Continues," Modern Steel Construction (Volume XXV Number 
1/First Quarter 1985), 3 pp. 

Martha L. Rothman-Ell iot Paul Rothman Inc., "Reconciling 
High-Tech with High Touch," Designer Notebook, Health Care 
Strategic Management (Volume 3, Number 2, February 1985), 
pp. 32-34. 

Rothman, Elliot Paul, "Renovation: A Tool for Hospital 
Commercialization," Hospitals (February 16, 1985), 3 pp. 

Rothman, Martha L.; Rothman, Elliot Paul; Dooley, Anne De; 
with illustrations by Stubbs, Elizabeth W., "CHILD: 
Children's Health in Living Design," an analytical tool that 
provides design ideas that contribute to the healthy 
development of children during hospitalization, published by 
Rothman Rothman Heineman Architects Inc, (Formerly Martha L. 
Rothman-Ell iot Paul Rothman Inc) 3 pp. 



Rothman 



Rothman 



Heineman 



Archlfectslrtc 



COMMITTEES AND Chairman, Designer Selection Board, 1982 - 1983 
APPOINTMENTS: Board Member, Designer Selection Board, 1980 - 1984 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Appointed by Governor Michael S. Dukakis 

Organized conference entitled, "The Constitutional Issues in 
Correctional Architecture", March 11, 1977, at the Charles 
Street Jail, Suffolk County, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Appointed Inmates Architectural Expert for the new Suffolk 
County Jail by the Massachusetts Appellate Court, Judge 
Liacos, presiding, 1987-1990. 

Member Rotch Travelling Scholarship Committee, 1985-1988. 
Boston Society of Architects. 

OTHER DESIGN: Design of ritual silver and tea set with silversmith Harold 

Pride. 



Rothman 



Rothman 



Heineman 



Architects Inc 



ANNE De B. DOOLEY 



POSITION: 
EDUCATION: 



PROFESSIONAL 
EXPERIENCE: 



ADDITIONAL 
PUBLICATIONS 



Interior Designer 

Interior and Environmental Design Studies, 1980-82 
New England School of Art and Design 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Graduate Studies, 1977-80 
Clinical Psychology 
Johns Hopkins University 

Bachelor of Arts, 1975 
University of Maryland 
Baltimore, Maryland 

Anne has a special knowledge of the influence of 
hospital design on the recovery and well-being of patients. She 
has lectured on "Creating Environments for the Dying." She has 
published the booklet: "Immobilized and Isolated Patients." 
Before joining RRH Architects Inc, Anne was a pediatric play 
therapist at Johns Hopkins Hospital. 

Recent RRH Architects Inc experience includes: 

o Beth Israel Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Interior Finishes and Equipment Planning: 

- Reisman Building 
Patient Care 

- Finard Building 
Diagnostic/Treatment/Patient Care 

- Libby Building 

Computer Facilities/Offices 

o Veterans Administration Medical Center 

Clinical Addition/Renovation of Building 200 
Togus, Maine 

o Boston University 

George Sherman Union Conference Center 
Boston, Massachusetts 

o Eli and Bessie Cohen Hillel Academy 
Marblehead, Massachusetts 

Rothman, Martha L.; Rothman, Elliot Paul; Dooley, 
Anne De B.; with illustrations by Stubbs, Elizabeth W., "CHILD: 
Children's Health in Living Design," an analytical tool that 
provides design ideas that contribute to the healthy development 
of children during hospitalization, published by Rothman Rothman 
Heineman Architects Inc, (formerly Martha L. Rothman-Elliot Paul 
Rothman Inc) 3 pp. 

Rothman 



Rothman 



Heineman 



Architects Inc 



SEAN HAYES 



POSITION: 
EDUCATION: 



PROFESSIONAL 
EXPERIENCE: 



Architectural Designer 

Bachelor of Architecture, 1988 
Carnegie Mellon University 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

RRH Architects Inc. experience includes: 

o Boston Visions 

o Beth Israel Hospital 
Boston, Massachusetts 

- South East Building 



Rothman 



Rothman 



Heineman 



Arcriitecls inc 




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The Boston Globe, November 16, 1988 



Architectural firms rewarded 
for their visions of Boston 



By John King 
Globe Staff 

Imagine the transformation of 
Logan International Airport into a 
community that extends for miles 
into the harbor. Or landscaped 
boulevards connecting the Emer- 
ald Necklace to the Charles River. 
Even an art museum housed in an 
empty waterfront drydock. 

These and 10 other images - 
some focused, some fantastic - 
were unveiled last night as win- 
ners of the Boston Visions nation- 
al design competition, a contest 
sponsored by the Boston Society of 
Architects and designed, said BSA 
president Charles Redmon, "to 
stimulate discussions of Boston's 
future." 

"A couple of ideas, on first 
glance, seem to be way out," ad- 
mitted Boston architect M. David 
Lee, one of the seven jurors who 
sifted through 195 entries. "With- 
out the constraints of politics and 
economics, you can pursue a vi- 
sion that's more idealistic - and 
along the way even discover some- 
thing quite practical." 

The contest was funded by sev- 
eral local developers and institu- 
tions as well as the Boston Rede- 
velopment Authority. Planners 
were asked to submit ideas for one 
of three specific areas: the Charles 
River waterfront, the Central Ar- 
tery land between North and 
South Stations, and Washington 



Street. Entrants also could pro- 
pose an idea for the city at large. 

A total of $50,000 in prizes was 
presented, with 85,000 each going 
to seven "first award" winners, 
and 82,500 each going to the six 
"second award" winners. 

First award winners included: 

• Graham Gund Architects of 
Cambridge, for a proposed west- 
ward extension of Boylston Street. 

• Kuen-Shan Huang of Jamai- 
ca Plain, who would transform 
pieces of the artery into sculptures 
or monuments. 

• Wellington Reiter of Newton- 
ville, who suggested moving the 
Institute of Contemporary Art to 
Drydock 3 in the Boston Marine 
Industrial Park. 

© Paul Mortensen of Charles- 
town, for a proposed series of pub- 
lic squares and esplanades along 
the Charles River near North Sta- 
tion. 

• Rothman Rothman Heine- 
man Architects of Boston. Their 
proposal, "The Fens and its neigh- 
bors," envisions a series of land- 
scaped boulevards lacing together 
neighborhoods between the 
Charles River and the Fens open 
space system. 

• Communitas Inc. of Boston 
received two first awards - one for 
"Boston 20S8," which would turn 
Logan airport into a mammoth 
residential community, and "Bos- 
ton's Safety Belt," a Boston Har- 



bor dam designed to protect the 
shoreline from flooding due to 
changed environmental condi- 
tions. 

"The response was what we 
were hoping for - visions that 
bring completely new ways of 
looking at the city," said Steven 
Cecil, who organized the competi- 
tion. "Even if there's no practical 
application, they can have a pow- 
erful impact by changing people's 
way of thinking." 

Second awards were presented 
to: Bill Boehm and Sebastian Cray 
of Cambridge; Lian-Chuan Chen 
and Johngwann Kahng of Cam- 
bridge; Peter Droege of Boston; 
Paul Lukez of Boston; the team of 
Bank, Choa, Harrisson, Keichel, 
Mariano and Spillane of Boston; 
and a group headed by Professor 
Robert Yaro of Amherst and Har- 
ry Dodson of Ashfield. 






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/r/cCyann d5ronze, incorporated 



P. O. BOX B 

CAMBRIDGE, MA 02140 

Telephone: 617 - 491-4400 



December 30,1988 



Linda Mikula 

Letter Maker 

817 East Broadway 

South Boston, MA 02127 

Dear Linda: 

We at McGann Bronze Company feel complimented that you have 
asked us to participate in what promises to be a most interesting and 
challenging project - that of describing, explaining and signing the many 
points of interest and history in the Boston area. We do indeed look forward 
to working with you and the other members of your group in the capacity of 
advisor, consultant, and producer of metal signage. 

As we have discussed, McGann Bronze, founded in 1869, has consistently 
been a leader in this industry. Today, even to a greater degree, McGann 
makes use of the latest technologies to produce the finest in cast and 
engraved metal tablets. 

We look forward to a most pleasant and rewarding relationship. 

Attached is a list of a few of our most recent projects. 

Cordially, 

W 
Robert M. Alfre 





; r, t * .«r"l# ^| 







;$$f&i 



" ; 



/ MCGA 
\ BRON 

\ INCORPOR 

W 



mNN \ 

BRONZE / 

INCORPORATED I 

r -r^y 



P.O. Box B 
Cambridge, MA 02140 



Robert M. Alfred 



(617)491-4400 



P.O. Box B 



Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140 



(617) 491-4400 







ago, the McGann Bronze name has become 
synonymous with quality. Quality in our 
workmanship. Quality in our products. Using 
timeless materials and the skills of our trade, 
McGann produces works of permanence. 



Designers at McGann work closely with 
clients to create practical and effective 
plaques— to commemorate an event, dedicate 
a building, recognize a donor, label a work of 
art, or title a monument. Our work is our 
legacy. Whether cast or engraved, a 
distinctive McGann product is worthy of your 
most important message. 




The universal placement of McGann plaques 
is testimony to the enduring quality of our 
craftsmanship and the reputation we have 
earned. 






THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY 



lil'i'l' |i|i[ !■►' 



America: in _ 
universities, in hospital complexes and 
banking institutions, in churches and 
synagogues, in parks and cemeteries, on 
boats and bridges, on skyscraper 
cornerstones and on boardroom doors. 

Whether your project is large or small, 
McGann designers are prepared to 
translate your sketch or message into just 
the right tablet to suit your needs. 

In addition, McGann offers detailed 
proposals at no obligation, competitive 
prices, and dependable delivery schedules. 



September 18, 1943, Tsrswa; Ocl©l«r5-6. 1943/fcakc: Noi 
*"'". Gilberts: AC-16 (VFJS, VB-16. \ 
March 18 to April 30. 1941. Palau. HolJandU. Truk: J 
July 5. 1944. Marl 



ILLUSION 
Janet L, Kennedy 







EDWARD WOLL _ ,\ AUDITORIUM 



;;>. ^m ^;'.v* 



M ISDE DICATED TO ED WOLL BY HIS ASS0CIATES1N 

RECOGNITION 01- HIS UNIQUE AND ENDURING 

VS TO THE GENERAL ELECTRIC AIRCRAFT ENGINE 

IN OVER \Ql ARFl-R OK \ CENTURY OF ASSOCIATION HE 

\NI3 FSTEEM m HIS EXTRAORDINARY 

\S \N ENGINEER, MANAGER. PRODUCT 

PLANNER and SUCCESSFUL ARCHITECT OF A SPECTRUM OF 

VNPJSC MRCRAH I NG1NE PRODUCTS. HE WAS REGARDED 

■ VS \ L! *DER rEACHER \ND AS AN INDIVIDUAL 

UiiH HOI NDI ESS CARE AND CONCERN FOR HIS FELLOW WORKERS. 



GENERAL © ELECTRIC 

















■ 


* 


HI 








»«CM BRIDGE 
1905-1982 








—^ —^ i^^H ^H^ M^H 





DEDICATED MARCH 24, 1982 



Since we customize every plaque 
per your specifications, we have 
no stock systems per se. 
However, below you'll see some 
of our more popular configurations 
for single and modular units. 



(617) 491-4400 



SINGLE UNITS 



MULTIPLE RECOGNITION 




Cast plaque and 
engraved nameplates, 
applied to wood base 



Engraved nameplates and Individual lettering, 
applied to wood base 



COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 

ACKNOWLEDGES THE FOLLOWING EMPLOYEES 




D DD □ 




n 




n 




D IDI 


C=I (=l i — I 1=1 



Individual lettering, photographs In frames 
and engraved nameplates applied to wood base 



Custom designed single units that utilize various production techniques can be be used effectively— from the 
simplest to the most elegant surroundings— to recognize donors, staff members, and the like. Our designers 
work with you to create the unit most suited to your needs. Units with engraved nameplates can be updated 
easily and at low cost. 



MODULAR UNITS 



COMMUNITY HOSPITAL 



BENEFACTORS 



L. 

□ 
□ 



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DONORS PATRONS 



© 

Honor 

Roll 

of 

Donors 



























































Individual panels with engraved nameplates, applied to wood base 



Individual panel with add-on modules 



Modular units offer the flexibility for growth and change, but retain their appearance of permanence and 
timelessness. Add-on panels with nameplates can be ordered as you need them. So there's no need to worry 
if you start out with "only" two or three. 



TREES OF LIFE 




&*m * 




4=ir J .£' ' _t_ 




Nameplates applied directly to wall surface 



Cast plaque with applied engraved name plates 



A Tree of Life is a work of art in its own right. Not only does it enhance its surroundings, but it recognizes 
individuals as belonging to the same family of sponsors. 



The most common methods for 
fabrication are listed below. Please 
do not hesitate to call us if you 
have any questions or wish to 
discuss your design ideas with us. 



(617) 491-4400 



METHODS 




Cast 




Engraved and Infilled 




Cast and engraved 




Cast with bas-relief 



Whether cast or engraved, virtually any typeface can be reproduced. Our artists can reproduce portraits to be 
cast in bas-relief from photograhs or from your sketches. 



APPLICATIONS 




Applied cast unit 
to wood base 




Applied cast unit to 
cast or engraved plaque 




Individual 

and cast or engraved 

unit, applied to wood base 



A plaque may be as simple or complex as necessity or desire dictates. Combinations of various materials and 
fabrication methods can produce unique and dramatic effects. Possibilities include using base units of finely 
finished wood, integrating pieces of brass and steel, and applying individually cast letters. 



MATERIALS 



Cast: Bronze 
Brass 
Aluminum 



Engraved: 



Bronze 
Brass 

Aluminum 
Stainless Steel 



STYLES 



Tablets can be rectangular 



square 



I, ovalC J or contoured r_ J. Use a shape of your design or 



one of ours. We offer a wide range of typographic fonts from old style £ to contemporary L in both upper L 
and lower case/. We can also reproduce from your camera-ready artwork. On all of our projects, our designers 
will prepare artwork for your approval prior to final reproduction. 



The finest in cast and engraved 
tablets and plaques 



McGann Bronze Inc. 



P.O. Box B 



Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140 



(617) 491-4400 



NORTH • BENNETSTREET SCHOOL 

1885 • A Century cf Community Service and Education in Craftsmanship • 1985 

December 31, 1988 

16 Parker Road 
Shirley Center, MA 
01464 

Linda Mikula 

Letter Maker 

817 East Broadway 

South Boston, MA 02127 

Dear Miss Mikula: 

I am pleased to be considered as a member of your team for the 
Harbor Walk Proposal we discussed recently. Although I have not been directly 
involved with a signage project such as this before, I feel I have a background that 
would allow me to make a significant contribution. 

For over twenty years, I have been involved in preservation trades, as a 
craftsman, consultant and educator. As a woodworker, I have practiced as a 
furniture maker and conservator. As a preservation carpenter and housewright, I 
have been involved in many projects to preserve historic structures (see attached 
list). 

As an educator, I have taught on both secondary and post-secondary levels, 
with the bulk of my experience teaching building preservation trades. In the mid- 
1970 's, I led a first-in-the-nation federally-funded pilot program to teach 
preservation work on a secondary vocational level. The program's major project 
was the complete restoration of Westford Academy, perhaps the nation's oldest 
two-story academy building, which now serves as the headquarters of the 
Historical Society in Westford, Massachusetts. My current academic involvement, 
the preservation program here at North Bennet Street School, was begun several 
years ago and stands today as the sole comprehensive training program available 
for preservation carpenters in the United States. Through this program, 
experienced carpenters are taught both traditional and "state of the art" techniques 
for preserving pre-twentieth century structures. 

My present work is both satisfying and stimulating. Nevertheless, I welcome 
the opportunity to work as part of a team on the Harbor Walk Project. 

Sincerely, 





Robert Adam 



39 North Bennet Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02 1 1 3 
(617) 227-0155 



Robert Adam 

16 Parker Road 

Shirley Center, MA 01464 



Major Preservation Projects, 1972-present 

Glavey Homestead, Littleton, Massachusetts, c.1730: period double door entrance 
(1972) 

Hazen Tavern, Shirley, Massachusetts, c.1820, Asher Benjamin: extensive frame 
stabilization and exterior reconstruction of tavern ell including sills, entrances, 
stairs and woodwork (1973-74) 

Old Chelmsford Garrison House, Chelmsford, Massachusetts, c.1695: extensive 
frame stabilization and reconstruction of barn complex (1973-74) 

Lewis Barn, Westford, Massachusetts, 19th century barn: reconstruction, adaptive 
reuse to antique shop (1975) 

Old Westford Academy, Westford, Massachusetts, c.1792: complete restoration 
including roofing, entrances, period interior, staircases, all mechanical systems; an 
adaptive reuse reconstruction from Fire Station to Historical Society Headquarters 
(1975-77) 

Parlee House, Chelmsford, Massachusetts, c.1740: double door entrance (copy of 
original), stair hall reconstruction (1976) 

Valley Farm, Shirley, Massachusetts, c.1790: general maintenance, sash repairs, 
roofing (1978) 

Hobart House, Littleton, Massachusetts, c.1790: general maintenance, sash repairs, 
roofing (1978) 

Betsey Kelsey House (home of Benton MacKaye, founder of Appalachian Trail 
System), Shirley Center, Massachusetts, c.1835: extensive reconstruction and 
preservation including all structural, mechanical and cosmetic components. 
National Register Property (1979-83) 



First Parish Church, Shirley Center, Massachusetts, c.1750: major structural bell 
tower repairs; consulting services, general preservation maintenance (1981- 
present) 

Old Westford Academy, Westford, Massachusetts, c.1792: complete reconstruction 
and erection of bell tower cupola copied from remains of original after demolition 
by lightning (1982) 

Johnson-Stone House, Shirley Center, Massachusetts, c.1790: reconstruction of 19th 
century well house (1984) 

Littleton Depot, Littleton, Massachusetts, c.1865: railroad station, reconstruction of 
round-top windows from early photos, entrance, adaptive reuse design, 
consulting. Construction of gate tenders shanty from photos (1983-87) 

Kelsey House Barn, Shirley Center, Massachusetts: complete construction of new 
period timber frame "barn" studio (1987-present) 

Recent Major Projects with North Bennet Street School 

Preservation Program 

Enoch Robinson's Round House, Somerville, Massachusetts, c.1865: research, 
stabilization, complete restoration of exterior details, new sash (1986-present) 

Bixby House, Sturbridge Village, Sturbridge, Massachusetts, c.1810: wood shingle 
roofing (May 1986) 

Crocheron House, Staten Island, New York, c.1812: whole house moving to 
Richmondtown Restoration Museum (October 1987) 

Eastfield Village, East Nassau, New York: various projects on numerous 18th and 
19th century buildings, including dismantling and re-erecting buildings, timber 
repairs, roof slating, brick and plaster work (1983-present) 

Valley Farm, Shirley Center, Massachusetts, c.1710. National Register Property: 
Phase 1: Consulting, design for extensive roof framing and cornice 
reconstruction (1987) 

Phase 2: Consulting, design, and project management for complete dismantling 
and reconstruction of carriage shed ell to include all period details of framing 
and finish and roofing (1988) 

Golden Ball Tavern, Weston, Massachusetts, c.1760: consulting for structural 
survey, cyclical maintenance program, chimney repairs (1988-present) 



VtWPflll. 



The Only One Around 



Boston hardware manufacturer 
EniK.li Robinson cook great pride 
in his individualism. He dropped 
out u( the Masons and Odd 
Fellow 5 w hen they became too 
popular for his liking And when 
his first house, a large Greek 
Revival with an octagonal cupola, 
was copied by a neighbor, he was 
incensed He determined to build 
a house that no one could 
duplicate. 

On a then-rural hillside 
overlooking the Boston skyline, 
Robinson chose an uncommon 
shape — round — and an 
uncommon building system — 
horizontal planks laid in a 
running Kind, like brickwork — 
that assured him of a place in 
building history. In 135 or so 
years, the house has yet to be 
copied. 

The walls of the house consist 
of thousands ot 1 S-inch-thick 
wood "bricks," each three to six 
feet long, stacked and nailed one 
on top of the other. Each short 
plank is eight inches wide at the 
widest point, and curves along its 
outer edge to follow the arc of 
the 40-toot-diameter building. 

The shallow, conical roof of 
the original two-story structure 
was formed from coopered one- 
inch planking laid on purlins and 
covered with painted canvas, 
similar to boat-deck construction. 
It was topped with a central, 
circular skylight, which lit the 
second-floor rotunda and the 
main, elliptical stairwell. 

Robinson added a third story 
about ten years later, probably 
for servants' quarters, and topped 
it with a soldered-seam tin roof 
and, again, a round skylight with 
radial mullions. 

Other unusual features are 
single-hung, arch-headed windows 
that slide up into pockets; the 
second-story pockets are covered 
in tin and project up from the 
roof. 

The clear-pine clapboard siding 
is divided into 32 equal segments 
by vertical astragal moldings that 
align with the windows. The 
vertical moldings and offset 
foundanon give the structure the 
look of a truncated, fluted 
column. 

The "round house" had seen 
better days when preservation 
work began last fall under the 
auspices of the North Bennett 
Street School in Boston. Ugly 
asphalt siding concealed the 
original clapboards The interior 
had suffered extensive water 
damage. And the building 
showed a disturbing bulge near 
the top of the first story. 
Restoranon director Robert 
Adam feels that the bulge 
resulted largely from the added 
loading of the third story, 
combined with the weakness 
caused by the double-high 



window openings (window plus 
pocket) The second-floor joists 
merely poke through the wall, 
and offer no support. 

To stabilize the structure and 
control the bulge, the North 
Bennett Street School plans to 
reinforce the window openings 
with steel angle, and band the 
perimeter — much like a barrel 
hoop. The clapboards and 
exterior trim will be removed and 
repaired after all parts are tagged 
and inventoried. Many of the 
deteriorated window parts will be 
reproduced in the school shop. 

Several years ot work are 
expected before the round house 
can again show off its uniqueness. 
Enoch would be pleased. ■ 









mm 





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The round house in its heyday (aboA?) shoxis off its arched uindou-s and fancy rooftop 
balustrades Tin-covered boxes on the lower roof are uindou ■pockets, boxes on the upper roof 
are purely ornamental Hou u looks undergoing restoration today (left). 




Section through the house (ah**') shorn 
the original coopered roof, nou hidden 
betueen the second and third floor i. Note, 
also, (he round cutout and circular railing 
in the third floor rotunda The hole uus 
originally for a circular skylighi 




The /itjt- floor plan 
(abotf left) features 
an oval living room, a 
round library with 
tuo alcoves, and an 
elegant elliptical stair 
Floor i and ceilings 
u*re framed radially 
(aboce righi) like a 
spidenveb. 
Foundation parging 
colored to mimic 
browns tone (right) 
auuits repair, as do 
the tagged and 
catalogued pine 
clapboards. 




mm 




Reprinted with permiss 
:U; Fnaland R.nH- 



ion of the 

February. 19P7 




Bookbinding 
inet and Furniture M; 
Carpentry 9 
Preservation Carpentry 10 
elry Making and Repair 

Locksmithing 14 
Piano Technology 17 
Violin Making and Restoration 
Admission and Financial Information 
Academic and Student Service Information 
Environment 24 






NORTH BENNET STREET SCHOOL 
39 North Bennet Street. Boston, Massachusetts 02113, (617) 227-0155 



FCRAFTCMANSHIPj 



The goal of training at North Bennet Street School is craftsmanship. This is the hallmark of the work of those who 
excel in the trades and crafts taught at this school. In these occupations the individual artisan makes invaluable 
contributions — careful choice of materials, precise use of hand tools and equipment, informed solutions to customer 
problems — that result in a product or repair that will offer years of service and satisfaction. The training at NBSS pro- 
vides the foundation for every graduate to achieve this goal. 

Everyone has seen and recognized examples of the work of accomplished craftsmen: the delightful sound of 
a re-tuned piano; the graceful curves of a Queen Anne chair; the beautiful design of a leather-bound book; the elegant 
setting for an heirloom diamond; the fascinating complexity of a master key system; the mellow amber finish of a 
violin; and the solid feel of a well-built house. In this work the artisan combines hand skills, knowledge, creative 
problem-solving, and a commitment to the highest quality of workmanship. These are the components of craftsman- 
ship. These are the elements of the training at North Bennet Street School. 

We rely on both traditional and contemporary methods to develop these qualities. Continued practice on 
practical projects develops hand skills and an understanding of correct procedures. The thoughtfully designed curricu- 
lum develops knowledge of materials and the ability to solve problems. Exposure to new methods and technology 
prepares graduates for prospective jobs. We look for the desire to excel in each new student and provide training that 
encourages all students to achieve their best. 

Our fundamental mission is clear: to train people to go to work and earn a living in their field of training. 
We know that our graduates are successful and productive employees. We are especially proud of those who have 
established their own businesses. Beyond successful employment, though, we expect all graduates to use their train- 
ing as the basis for further growth and learning, so that their work will come to represent the highest standards of 
their trade. 





North Bennet Street School remains com- 
mitted to the best part of the apprentice- 
ship system of learning. Practical projects 
are the main substance of students' train- 
ing. Beginning with the first assignment 
and continuing through the course, a student 
takes on increasingly difficult work. This 
method develops not only hand skills but 
also an understanding of procedures used 
in the trade. Each project builds on previ- 
ous learning and requires the student to 
solve more complex problems. There are 
lectures and suggested reading material, but 
the practical application of these lessons at 
the bench is the most important element. 
While working at the bench, advice and 
information is conveyed in a practical 
context at the time when a student needs 
it. Lessons learned this way are not easily 
forgotten. 

You imllsee this scene when you visit the 
shops at NBSS: 

Everyone is busy. At one student s bench 
the instructor shows a special technique to 



a few students gathered round, Tliey watch 
intently and ask questions to understand 
what they will do next at their own 
benches. Elsewhere, a new student seeks 
the advice of a more experienced one. 
Nearby several men and women debate 
the merits of the construction in one 
student's drawing. A few minutes later, 
having finished his demonstration, the 
instructor moves on to check, the progress 
of others. 

The design of courses and their content 
has been developed with the help of employ- 
ers and tradespeople in each field. They 
have made sure that course content is 
thorough. The instructors are responsible 
for guiding students through the course so 
that they will be ready to go to work after 
graduation. They expect not only that stu- 
dents perform required work, but that they 
do it well. This means continued practice 
through the course. 

Though the courses are demanding and 
the instructors expect hard work, the class- 
rooms and shops are informal. In part, this 
is the result of small classes, which allow 



instructors to give individual attention to 
students. In all classes new students have 
a chance to compare notes with those who 
have been here longer. But, just as impor- 
tant, is the interesting mix of students. 
Classes are made up of people of many ages, 
with diverse educational backgrounds and 
work experience, ail interested in their new 
endeavor. This encourages an exchange of 
ideas and opinions, whether in class or dur- 
ing lunch breaks, which is one of the most 
positive aspects of NBSS. 

Over the last century, NBSS has used 
this approach to teaching and learning. 
Many changes have been made at the sug- 
gestion of students, graduates, instructors, 
and employers. However, the commit- 
ment to practical instruction at the bench 
remains constant. 



Instructor Will Neptune with Ed Slattery 
from Rhode Island who enrolled "to work 
at a trade in which the work demands 
the best you can do, and then some." 





&<*.-* «■ 




OBJECTIVE: In an institutional bindery or 
hand binder) - the first-year graduate will 
bind new books or repair 19th and 20th 
century books using case bindings, will 
make protective boxes, and perform simple 
conservation measures as directed by a 
supervisor. The second-year graduate will 
bind books in leather and do simple finish- 
ing, including gold lettering and blind tool- 
ing, and will perform conservation work 
on leather books. 

DESCRIPTION: The emphasis of instruction 
during the first year is on a comprehensive 
survey of basic bookbinding techniques. 
Students will be introduced to basic bindery 
skills and language, from folding, gathering 
and sewing, through final titling and casing- 
in. An understanding of techniques will 
be accompanied by continued bench work 
until basic skills are mastered. Arrange- 
ments will be made to expose the student 
to historical and traditional bindings and 
binding styles, mostly through field trips. 
Students will be shown and will learn to 
identify different binding problems, evalu- 
ating them for solutions through a variety 



of techniques and materials. There will be 
an introduction to both production and 
conservation techniques, and there will 
be a practicum at the end of the year. First 
year graduates will receive a certificate as 
a Hand Binder. 

The second-year program consists of 
further development of more exacting skills 
in advanced bookbinding technique. These 
will include repair and simple restoration, 
and the continuation of basic skills into 
areas of leather binding and gold tooling. 
Subtleties of technique will be explored, 
such as alternative methods for endpapers. 
Most importantly, through an exposure to 
a wide variety of bindings the student will 
develop an independence of judgment to 
evaluate problems for both new bindings 
as well as repairs, to make choices of mate- 
rial usage, to think in terms of final esti- 
mates in both time and materials, and to 
make decisions about style and format. 
There will also be field trips and periodic 
demonstrations and lectures. At the end 
of this year, students will prepare work for 
a practicum. Successful graduates of the 
advanced course will receive a diploma 
as Craftsman Bookbinder. 
OPERATION: This course is 40 weeks (1100 
class hours) in length for each year. It meets 
daily from 8:00 to 2:00, September through 



June. One instructor will supervise an 
average class of twelve first and second- 
year students. 

An inventory of tools, materials, and 
equipment is available for student use. 
There is a small shop library. Students 
are expected to accumulate their own hand 
tools and a few basic texts. 
ADMISSION: Students are admitted in 
September and February. Applicants should 
have good manual dexterity and the patience 
to do detailed work. Previous binding expe- 
rience or other hand tool experience is very 
helpful. Applicants for the second year must 
have completed the first-year course. 
EMPLOYMENT: Graduates of the first-year 
course can expect to find employment 
as apprentices in library or institutional 
binderies. Graduates of the second-year 
program will be prepared for positions as 
handbinders in custom shops, production 
shops, or university binderies. Some may 
choose to become self-employed. 



Daiid Kinghom came to NBSSfrom St. 
Gregory's Abbey in Michigan and plans 
to work in an institutional library doing 
restoration and conservation. 





OBJECTIVE: While working in a custom 
furniture shop, the graduate will design, 
draw, estimate materials, construct, and 
finish major types of furniture, using hand 
tools and power equipment to perform 
joinery and ornamentation appropriate for 
the pieces. 

DESCRIPTION: A custom furniture maker is 
called upon to make a wide variety of furnish- 
ings. He or she needs a thorough knowledge 
of furniture construction, proficiency in 
the use of hand tools and power equip- 
ment, and an understanding of the logic 
of procedures used. This course requires 
a student to acquire all of these. 

The course curriculum is a series of 
projects. First, students complete a set of 
joint detail drawings and full-scale draw- 
ings of different types of furniture. These 
expose students to furniture joinery, prob- 
lems of construction, and the characteristics 
of traditional furniture design. 

The next phase involves the student in 
bench work and basic machine operation. 
Several small projects require the student to 
develop fundamental hand skills in the use 
of planes, chisels, and turning. Every student 
must then make a tool chest. This develops 
an understanding of procedures used in 
case construction and introduces the student 
to the use of major woodworking machinery. 



After completion of the tool chest, a 
student is expected to design and construct 
at least one example of a table, a chair, and 
another piece of case work. At this point 
students have greater latitude in choosing 
design and style, but are encouraged to 
incorporate ornamentation they have not 
yet encountered. 

Traditional American and English furni- 
ture is the basic teaching material of the 
course. Many essential aspects of custom fur- 
niture design and construction arise from 
this focus: conventional dimensions, 
proportion, joinery, and a wide variety of 
embellishment, such as carving, inlay, and 
veneer work. Students are encouraged to 
use traditional design elements to create 
their own unique pieces. 

Throughout the course students partici- 
pate in the maintenance and repair of power 
equipment. On a regular basis, there will be 
formal presentations on special aspects of 
woodworking, historical information, con- 
struction problems, as well as proper and 
safe use of machines and hand tools. Other- 
wise students learn at the bench on their 
own work, in small group demonstrations 
or informal discussions with peers. 
OPERATION: This course is 80 weeks 
(2200 class hours) in length and meets 
from 9:00 to 2:00 daily, September through 
June, with three instructors and an average 



of 36 students. The shop is open from 2:00 
to 5:00 for additional work time, with one 
instructor supervising. 

Students must provide their own hand 
tools, wood, hardware, and finishing mate- 
rials. There is a small shop library. All cus- 
tomary power tools and equipment are 
provided in the shop. Work benches and 
wood storage space are available for 
each student. 

ADMISSION: Two to four students are 
admitted to begin each month. This system 
allows students to progress at their own 
rate and to benefit from seeing the work 
of more than 30 people who precede them. 
Admission decisions are made in January 
and July for the entrance dates beginning 
six months later. Previous woodworking 
and drawing experience weigh heavily in 
the admission decision. 
EMPLOYMENT: Graduates of this course have 
begun work as employees or working for 
themselves in fields such as custom furni- 
ture making, architectural millwork, teach- 
ing, pattern making, and furniture restoration. 



Jennifer Buchwald worked as a carpenter 
and as an apprentice to a Shaker furni- 
ture maker in Massachusetts prior to 
enrolling in the Cabinet & Furniture 
Making Program. 








' 



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OBJECTIVE: While working in residential 
construction or renovation, the graduate 
will perform all basic tasks of the carpentry 
trade, both rough and finish, to meet code 
requirements, and to satisfy the clients. The 
graduate will read blueprints accurately for 
purposes of estimating materials and con- 
structing a-common single-family house. 
DESCRIPTION: The Carpentry program is 
designed to develop a student's hand skills, 
knowledge of efficient procedures, and an 
understanding of construction principles. 
Beginning with basic woodworking and 
planning, the student learns a systematic 
approach to building. Much of the course 
work is conducted in classrooms and shops 
where the planned exercises develop neces- 
sary skills. When feasible, on-site projects 
are scheduled to give practical experiences 
in building methods and cooperative work. 
Initial assignments and projects include 
drawing exercises and the use of basic tools 
and joinery techniques. Students will then 



learn by working on a variety of tasks. Exte- 
rior work includes floor, wall and roof fram- 
ing, sheathing, insulation, siding and roofing 
materials. Interior carpentry covers millwork 
and cabinets, kitchen and bath designs, stair 
layout and construction, window and door 
installation, as well as interior trim and 
finishing. Students will be exposed to new 
construction methods and recent innova- 
tions in building materials. 

Throughout the course there will be 
discussion and practice in the fundamentals 
of carpentry: accurate measurement, proper 
use and care of hand and power tools, drafting 
for the trade, blueprint reading, adherence 
to the building code, efficient construction 
methods, safety, and energy conservation. 
ORGANIZATION: This course is 36 weeks 
(1170 class hours) in length. The class meets 
from 8:00 to 3:00 daily, September through 
May. Two classes, averaging 13 students 
each, work in tandem with two instructors. 

Students must purchase their own hand 
tools and pay for materials used in pieces 
they keep. Completely equipped shops and 
classrooms are provided for training, as 
well as a small shop library. 



ADMISSION: Students are admitted in 
September and January. Applications should 
be received no later than May and October 
for respective classes. Applicants will be 
admitted based on maturity, seriousness, 
and demonstrated level of ability. Previous 
woodworking is helpful, but not essential. 
Since arithmetic skills are essential, all 
applicants will be asked to take computa- 
tion and applied arithmetic tests. 
EMPLOYMENT: Graduates of this course are 
usually employed by contractors doing both 
new and renovation construction in resi- 
dential and commercial buildings. This 
includes rough and finish work. Other 
graduates have been employed by cabinet 
shops specializing in custom interiors or 
exhibitions and displays. 



Ronald von Kriegenbergh was laid off 
from the Quincy Shipyard and retrained 
to be a carpenter at North Bennet. 





OBJECTIVE: While working on a pre-20th 
century building, or in new construction 
of traditional styles, the graduate will select 
appropriate materials and procedures to pre- 
serve architectural detail, stabilize structural 
members and, where necessary, recreate 
structural elements or millwork that are his- 
torically accurate for the period of the building. 
DESCRIPTION: The Preservation Carpentry 
course is designed to follow and comple- 
ment the School's long-standing course 
in contemporary residential construction. 
Through lectures, demonstrations, projects, 
and site work, the student will experience 
a broad range of construction methods, 
architectural detail, and approaches to work- 
ing on old buildings. 

Students will develop an understanding 
of all building components and systems, 
learn to analyze areas of deficiencies within 
these structures, and how to plan for 
appropriate materials and techniques to 
preserve or replace them. The student will 
also develop a working knowledge of the 
systematic recording of historic buildings, 
using simple photographic techniques, and 
accurate scale drawings. 



Through lectures, slide presentations, 
and field trips the class will be introduced 
to pre-20th century architectural styles, the 
framing systems used in them, and the tools 
and equipment needed for that work. In 
a demonstration project or reconstruction 
site, the class will undertake timber framing, 
using both traditional tools and modern 
equipment. The student will have the 
opportunity to recreate certain exterior 
detail to match original configuration and 
assembly: siding, door and window trim, 
cornices, roofing systems, and moldings. 
Likewise, the student will produce interior 
detail, including both window sash and 
frame-and-panel doors. 

The class will also be introduced to both 
masonry and metal components of older 
buildings. To the extent possible, students will 
also use new technologies that have been 
developed for preservation: epoxies, special 
metals, fastening systems, and adhesives. 

Since there are many opportunities to 
practice preservation and restoration skills 
in the Greater Boston area, it is expected that 
the class will often be held at different sites. 
Students should expect to provide their own 
transportation when those occasions arise. 
ORGANIZATION: This course is 36 weeks 
(1170 class hours) in length. Class meets 
from 8:00 to 3:00 daily, September through 



May. One instructor will supervise a class 
averaging ten students. Students must 
provide their own hand tools. The School 
provides a complete shop and materials 
for practice, plus a small shop library. 
ADMISSION: Students are admitted in 
September or January. Applications will 
be reviewed for decision as they are com- 
pleted. Applicants will be admitted based 
on prior experience in carpentry and/or 
preservation studies. An interview with 
the instructor is required. 
EMPLOYMENT: Graduates of this course will 
be prepared to work with contractors who 
specialize in preservation and conservation 
work. Due to their extensive background in 
pre-20th century buildings, graduates will 
be invaluable to the renovation/rehabilitation 
contractor. Graduates will also be able to 
perform advanced millwork and interior 
finish for buildings of traditional style. 
Some graduates may become self-employed, 
specializing in preservation/restoration work. 



Pamela Llhdsley left general carpentry 
work in Boston to enroll in Preservation 
Carpentry to ' 'get more insight and under- 
standing of carpentry and to be able to 
do high quality work." 




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OBJECTIVE: While working in a retail store 
or trade shop, the graduate will design and 
construct jewelry from gold or silver, set 
with precious stones and finished for sale. 
The graduate will undertake all repairs of 
jewelry to restore the pieces to their origi- 
nal appearance. 

DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to 
develop the competent jewelry mechanic, 
one who has a thorough understanding 
of the characteristics of metal and stones 
and who has the skills to create and repair 
jewelry. The graduate's ability to do care- 
ful work is extremely important since he 
or she must work with material that has 
great monetary value and is often irreplace- 
able because of sentimental attachment. 
The curriculum consists of a series of 
projects, each requiring new skills and build- 
ing on previous learning. Although a student 
may create original designs, the emphasis 
in the assigned projects is on traditional 
forms of jewelry, each representing unique 
construction problems. The first projects 
are made of copper and brass to develop 
basic skills in use of hand tools. The student 
becomes familiar with metal formation and 



manipulation processes. Sawing, graving, 
dapping, and soldering are covered during 
this time. This section culminates as the 
student completes a composite piece made 
from copper, brass, and silver using all the 
techniques learned previously. 

The student is then assigned several sim- 
ple pieces of jewelry to be made of silver. 
During these projects the student learns to 
set semi-precious stones in bezel settings. 
Later, the student cuts, grinds, and polishes 
his or her own semi-precious stones for 
particular settings. 

Having mastered many hand skills, the 
student undertakes simple repairs on cus- 
tomers' jewelry or on projects developed 
by the instructor. As a student's skill 
develops, he or she does other repairs, 
such as replacing prongs, rebuilding ring 
shanks, or repairing chains. Later, the stu- 
dent will do simple casting in cuttlefish and 
make a wax model suitable for casting. In 
the last phases of the course the student 
will set faceted stones in various settings: 
prong, bead, channel, pave, illusion, and 
bright cut. 

ORGANIZATION: This course is 72 weeks 
(1980 class hours) in length. The class 
meets from 8:00 to 2:00 daily, September 
through July. Two instructors supervise a 



class averaging 25 students. Students must 
provide their own hand tools and materials 
used for projects. Each student is assigned 
his own bench. All major equipment and 
specialized hand tools are provided, and 
a library is available in the shop. 
ADMISSION: Students are admitted to begin 
each month to fill available benches. Appli- 
cations will be reviewed for decisions as 
they are completed, and a starting date will 
be assigned. Applicants will be admitted 
based on their degree of manual dexterity 
and patience for detailed work, evidenced 
in application materials. Consideration will 
be given to maturity, motivation, and per- 
sonal integrity. 

EMPLOYMENT: Graduates of this course are 
initially employed in trade and retail shops, 
working on various aspects of the trade, 
such as repair of fine jewelry, custom design 
and fabrication, stone-setting, and repro- 
duction of classic jewelry. 



Marc Cohen enrolled in the jewelry Making 
& Repair program to refine his skills and 
to help expand a Boston jewelry store's 
repair department. 




13 



LOCKSMITHING 



OBJECTIVE: While working in a locksmith- 
ing shop or on the road, a graduate will 
perform all basic locksmithing tasks with 
minimum supervision to satisfy customer 
demand and to meet standards set by the 
School. A graduate will be able to service 
and repair all residential and commercial 
door-locking devices, set up a master- 
key system, install locks, service auto- 
motive locks, and open safes without 
knowing the combination. 
DESCRIPTION: A locksmith is called upon 
to do a wide range of work requiring a 
knowledge of available hardware and excel- 
lent hand skills. This curriculum is 
designed to give the student a thorough 
grounding in fundamentals with sufficient 
time for practice so that he or she is ready 
to do high quality work upon graduation. 

After an introduction to the range of 
security devices and their proper applica- 
tion, the student learns to service and 
repair mortise, cylindrical, and bit-key 
locks. The student then begins the process 
of learning to recognize keys by manufac- 
turer and keyway. Keys are cut, first by 
hand and then by duplication machine. 
After learning to re-pin cylinders, the stu- 



dent sets up a master key system for an 
apartment building, school, or business. 
Finally, the student learns to cut keys 
by code. 

Using carpentry tools and special lock- 
installation jigs, the student installs all of 
the common locking devices and the aux- 
iliary hardware that provides additional 
security. The student then learns how 
to gain emergency entry to automobiles, 
and how to remove, service, and repair 
ignition locks. 

After learning to service interchangeable 
core cylinders and high security cylinders, 
the student learns how to manipulate com- 
bination locks on safes and how to service 
and change the combination of the units. 

Throughout the course the instructor 
addresses questions about the operation of 
a small shop: sources of supply, inventory 
and equipment control, necessary equip- 
ment for the shop, and the general operation 
of a small locksmith shop. Even though 
the graduate may not open his or her 
own business, an awareness of these 
issues makes the graduate a valuable and 
constructive employee. 
ORGANIZATION: This course is 40 weeks 
(1300 class hours) in length. The class 
meets from 8:00 to 2:00 daily, September 
through June. One instructor supervises 
a class averaging 12 students. 



Students must provide their own hand 
tools and reference books. These are kept 
at the student's assigned bench. All major 
equipment and specialized tools are avail- 
able in the shop, as well as material for 
automotive and safe work and a small 
shop library. 

ADMISSION: Students are admitted in 
September and February. Applications will 
be reviewed for decisions and starting date 
as soon as they are complete. All applicants 
must submit two letters of personal recom- 
mendation from responsible persons out- 
side the family. In addition, each applicant 
must request a copy of his/her police rec- 
ord, if any, from the appropriate authority. 
EMPLOYMENT: Most graduates of this 
course begin work in established shops 
doing general lock work, both in the shop 
and on the road. This includes repairing 
locks, fitting keys, master-keying, and lock 
installing. Other graduates have become 
in-house locksmiths for businesses and 
institutions. 



Dawn Jones, a student from Boston, believes 
that success in Locksmithing demands 
' the ability to concentrate and a lot 
of patience!" 




14 




v\ >> 



^•^ 




OBJECTIVE: While working as a self-employed 
technician, a graduate will tune, regulate, 
and make repairs on the actions of both 
upright and grand pianos after completion 
of the first year course. Graduates of the 
second-year program will completely recon- 
dition and restore upright and grand pianos. 
DESCRIPTION: The emphasis during the 
first year Basic Piano Technology course is 
on comprehensive instruction in all phases 
of tuning the modern piano, including break- 
age repairs and action regulation. Students 
will become familiar with the nomenclature 
of the instrument and also gain a complete 
understanding of the principles governing 
their action. Tone regulation, the history 
of keyboard instruments, business practice 
and ethics, advertising and promotion are 
included in the curriculum. Arrangements 
are made during the first year for several 
field trips which may include the Museum 
of Fine Arts, a supply house, several related 
factory operations for both pianos and 
harpsichords. Periodic seminars are con- 
ducted at the School by professionals from 
the trade. Graduates of the first year basic 
course will receive a certificate as ajourney- 
man Piano Tuner. 



A candidate for the second year Advanced 
Keyboard Technology program must have com- 
pleted the first year Basic Piano Technology 
course. The major portion of the advanced 
program is devoted to comprehensive piano 
restoration on vertical and grand pianos 
(commonly called rebuilding). This includes 
initial appraisals and estimates, recording 
measurements, disassembly, casework and 
veneer repairs, and complete case refinishing. 
Soundboard repairs and bridge restoration 
or replacement, installing both upright and 
grand wrestplanks, complete renovation 
or replacement of actions, and additional 
work in troubleshooting are included. The 
advanced program also includes the finer 
points of keyboard tuning, the advanced 
action regulation, unusual piano actions, 
and tone regulating. An introduction to 
scale design is presented. During interviews 
applicants will be able to observe some of 
the above procedures and will be supplied 
with further details. Graduates from the 
advanced course will receive a diploma as 
Craftsman Technician of Stringed Keyboard 
Instruments. 

ORGANIZATION: This course is 36 weeks 
(1260 class hours) in length for each year. 
Classes meet from 8:00 to 3:30 daily, 
September through May. Two full-time and 
one part-time instructors supervise 26 first 
and second-year students. 



Students must purchase their own 
tuning and regulating tools. The shops for 
both classes have all necessary tools and 
equipment for repair and rebuilding. A fine 
library is available for student use. 
ADMISSION: Students are admitted in 
September only. Applicants are encouraged 
to complete application materials and visit 
the School by March. Later applicants will 
be considered for openings as available. All 
applicants must have an interview with the 
head of the department. In addition to a 
high school diploma, applicants should have 
reasonable sense of musical pitch. So called 
"perfect pitch" is not required. 
EMPLOYMENT: Graduates of the Basic Piano 
Technology course normally become self- 
employed tuners, while some begin work 
with piano stores and conservatories. Grad- 
uates of the Advanced Keyboard Technology 
course have been employed by piano manu- 
facturers and established rebuilding shops, 
as well as universities and retail stores. 



Prapbaporn TYongjaroenchai, a piano 
teacher from Bangkok, is a student of 
Piano Technology because ' 'my country 
is in need of piano technicians." 




17 




OBJECTIVE: While working in an instru- 
ment shop, the graduate will repair, restore, 
and set up stringed instruments and bows 
to meet the standards of the craft and 
needs of the professional musician. After 
training in instrument making and repair, 
the graduate will be prepared for employ- 
ment in an established shop where he or 
she can develop expertise and gain experi- 
ence in the more refined aspects of restor- 
ation and instrument making. 
DESCRIPTION: This course is designed to 
prepare the graduate to enter the stringed 
instrument field as a repair technician. 
The curriculum design assumes that a solid 
foundation in instrument making is a pre- 
requisite to mastering the art of restoration. 
During the three years a student will build 
six violins, a viola, and a cello. One of the 
first and last violins will be kept by the 
student; the School will retain the others. 
Approximately 60% of the course will 
focus on the techniques of making; 40% 
will focus on repair, restoration, varnish, 
and set-up. 

In the first year, basic elements of violin 
construction are taught. Students learn the 
use of traditional hand tools used in the 



trade, begin technical drawing, and complete 
the construction of three violins during 
this year. Individual instrument lessons 
also begin. 

In the second year, a fourth violin, a 
viola, and a cello are constructed, while 
instrumental lessons and mechanical 
drawing continue. 

In the final year, instrument and bow 
repair and restoration, final violin construc- 
tion, varnishing, antiquing, and set-up 
techniques are taught. For graduation, 
students will make two violins, with full- 
scale mechanical drawings, and give a 
graduation recital. 

ORGANIZATION: This course lasts three 
years, 40 weeks per year, for a total of 
120 weeks (3900 class hours). The class 
meets from 8:00 to 3:00 daily, Septem- 
ber through June. The shop is open 
until 5:00 each day for additional work 
time. One instructor supervises an aver- 
age of eleven students. 

Each student provides his or her own 
hand tools which can be kept at the stu- 
dent's bench. All other customary tools 
and equipment for a violin shop are pro- 
vided by the School. There is also a small 
shop library. Wood, parts, and finishing 
materials are provided by the School 
for the eight instruments made by 
each student. 



ADMISSION: Applicants are admitted for 
entrance in September and February. 
Applications are considered as they are 
completed and decisions are made for 
the next available openings. 

Applicants are considered on the basis 
of musical background, previous hand tool 
experience, previous drawing and painting 
experience, manual dexterity and hand/eye 
coordination , as well as letters of recom- 
mendation. Ability to play an instrument 
of the violin family is considered impor- 
tant, and lessons during the course will be 
required for students who are not proficient. 
EMPLOYMENT: Most graduates enter the 
field as repair technicians in established 
violin shops. As work experience and tech- 
nique develop, they can advance to instru- 
ment restoration and/or making. 



Christopher Write is a bass player and 
worked at a shop in Cincinatti that spe- 
cializes in the repair of string basses 
before deciding to enroll in Violin 
Making & Restoration 









HflB 


-^ 





18 



1 



ADMISSION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



CRITERIA: North Bennet Street School seeks 
students who have the desire to achieve 
success in one of its trades and who demon- 
strate the probability of actually being 
successful. We will consider for admission 
anyone over 16 years of age with a high 
school diploma or a GED. In unusual cir- 
cumstances, we will consider an applicant 
without either of these credentials, based 
on their ability to benefit from the training. 
The specific requirements for this will vary, 
but may include standardized tests, practi- 
cal examinations, or written examinations. 
Other specific course requirements are 
listed in the individual course descriptions. 
NOTICE OF NON-DISCRIMINATORY POLICY 
AS TO STUDENTS: North Bennet Street School 
admits students of any religion, sex, race, 
color, national and ethnic origin to all rights, 
privileges, programs, and activities gener- 
ally accorded or made available to students 
at the School. It does not discriminate on 
the basis of religion , sex , race, color, national 
or ethnic origin in administration of its 
educational policies, scholarships and loan 
programs, athletic, and other school admin- 
istered programs. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS: North Bennet Street 
School is approved by the US Immigration 
and Naturalization Service to accept foreign 



students. Applicants must document their 
ability to pay for all anticipated expenses 
during training. Since all teaching is in 
English, applicants who are not native 
English speakers should score 500 on 
the TOEFL, or complete courses at an ESL 
Language Center through level 108. 
APPLICATION PROCEDURE: There are three 
parts to the application procedure. An appli- 
cant will be considered for admission only 
after completion of all three parts. 

1. Interview — We expect all applicants 
for admission to NBSS to visit the School 
before enrollment. We want the chance to 
meet each applicant and have them visit 
our shops while classes are in session. 
Arrangements can be made by calling the 
Admissions Office at (617) 227-0155 any 
weekday between 8:30 and 4:30. You will 
not be considered for admission unless you 
visit the School for an interview or specifi- 
cally request a waiver of this requirement 
in writing. 

2. Application Form— The applicant 
should complete this form and send it to 
the Admissions Office. When completing 
the form, applicants should answer all 
questions and indicate the starting date and 
program for which application is being 
made. We consider the information given 
on the form to be very important. Be as 
complete and thorough as possible. 



3. Transcript — We expect a high school 
transcript and the transcript from the most- 
recently attended post-secondary school. 
The applicant is responsible for request- 
ing that these transcripts be sent to the 
Admissions Office. Students with a GED are 
expected to submit a copy to the School. 

Deadlines for completing the application 
procedure are given in a catalog insert and 
in the course descriptions. Applicants should 
complete the procedure as early as possible 
before the deadline to insure full considera- 
tion of their application. Students who are 
not accepted initially for the date they choose 
will be placed on a waiting list. Any unex- 
pected openings in the class will be filled 
by the most promising candidates on the 
waiting list. 

ENROLLMENT PROCEDURE: Upon acceptance 
by the School for a specific starting date, 
the Admissions Office sends each candidate 
an Enrollment Agreement that includes com- 
plete costs, payment plan options, and other 
terms of enrollment. This Agreement must 
be signed and returned in two weeks to 
signify acceptance by the student. 



Roy Nielsen. Director of Admissions, and 
Sally Mcintosh Miller, Director of Student 
Senices, confer regularly with students 
at the North Bennet Street School. 




20 



ADMISSION AND FINANCIAL INFORMATION 



REGISTRATION FEE: At the time of signing 
and returning the Enrollment Agreement, 
the student is expected to pay a Registration 
Fee of $50.00 as a commitment to enroll. 
This fee is not refundable ten days after 
signing the Enrollment Agreement and 
is not part of the tuition. 
TUITION: After signing the Enrollment 
Agreement and paying the Registration Fee, 
all students enter into a contract to pay tui- 
tion and fees in effect when the student 
begins the course. Current tuition rates are 
listed on a separate enclosure. Payment of 
the full tuition is due at the beginning of 
the course. Students may also choose an 
option of making monthly payments over 
the length of the course. The terms of 
these monthly payments are clarified in 
the Enrollment Agreement. In general, the 
student must make a down payment before 
the start of classes and agree to make pay- 
ments at the beginning of each month . These 
payments may be made in conjunction with 
financial aid. 

REFUND POLICY: Should a student withdraw 
or be terminated, the following refund pol- 
icy will apply. 



1. Full refund will be made if a student 
cancels within ten days of signing the 
Enrollment Agreement and before the 
beginning class. 

2. All monies in excess of the Registra- 
tion Fee will be refunded if a student cancels 
after ten days and before beginning class. 

3 If a student withdraws or terminates 
during the first week of class, he/she will 
receive a refund of all monies paid, less 
one-half ( Vi ) month's tuition (not to 
exceed $350) and the Registration Fee 

4. If a student withdraws after the first 
week and during the first quarter of the 
program, he/she will receive a refund of 
at least 75% of the tuition, less the 
Registration Fee. 

5. If a student withdraws during the 
second quarter of the program, he/she 
will receive a refund of at least 50% of 
the tuition, less the Registration Fee. 

6. If a student withdraws during the 
third quarter of the program, he/she will 
receive a refund of at least 25% of the 
tuition, less the Registration Fee. 

7. Students terminating after the third 
quarter of the program will not be entitled 
to a refund. 

8. For purposes of refunds of tuition, 
the effective date of termination shall be 
the day the student mails written notice 
of termination withdrawal, or on the last 



school day of the week during which the 
student last attended school for any 
period of time, whichever comes first. 

9. In cases of prolonged illness, acci- 
dent, death in the family, or other circum- 
stances that make it impractical to complete 
the course, the School will make a settle- 
ment reasonable and fair to both parties. 

10. Refund will be made within 
thirty (30) days after the effective date 
of withdrawal. 

FINANCIAL AID: North Bennet Street School 
is approved for participation in the Pell Grant 
and Guaranteed Student Loan programs by 
the U.S. Department of Education. Applica- 
tion for these programs can be made any 
time before the beginning of a course. Resi- 
dents of Massachusetts may also apply for 
the Massachusetts State Scholarship. Appli- 
cation must be made between January 1 
and May 1 of the year preceding the time 
you wish to enroll. More information on 
these financial aid programs is available 
from the Office of Student Services. 



Jorge Lagofrom Long Island, New York, 
is reviewing a grand piano action unth 
his teacher Christine Lovgren. 




//////jfuHimu 



21 



ACADEMIC AND STUDENT SERVICE INFORMATION 



ACCREDITATION: North Bennet Street School 
is accredited by the Accrediting Commission 
of the National Association of Trade and 
Technical Schools. The NATTS Accrediting 
Commission is listed by the U.S. Office 
of Education as a nationally-recognrzed 
accrediting agency under the provisions of 
Chapter 33, Title 38, U.S. Code, and subse- 
quent legislation. This accreditation con- 
firms that NBSS meets an extensive set of 
training standards applied to post-secondary 
trade and technical schools throughout the 
United States. 

GRADING AND RECORDS: Students are graded 
on performance and progress each month. 
The performance grade is based on the 
level of excellence achieved by the student 
on the practical projects assigned by the 
instructor and on written tests. The pro- 
gress grade is given on overall effort, speed, 
and advancement through the curriculum. 
The instructor reviews these grades with 
each student regularly. The grades are 
recorded on a permanent record card which 
is retained in each student's file. A copy 
of this record will be given to the student 
upon request. Students are graded monthly 



as follows: E-excellent (90-100), G-good 
(80-89), F-fair (70-79), P-poor (60-69), and 
U-unsatisfactory (helow 60). A student whose 
grades are "unsatisfactory" for more than 
one month beyond being informed of 
unsatisfactory performance will be subject 
to dismissal. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS: Candidates 
for a diploma must complete the entire cur- 
riculum for the course in which they are 
enrolled, and receive at least "Fair" (70%) 
grades in both performance and progress. 
Students must fulfill all obligations to the 
School, including academic, financial, and 
attendance requirements, to receive a diploma. 
Graduation is held once a year in late May 
or early June. Normally the graduate will 
be awarded a diploma at this time. Upon 
request, the student may receive a diploma 
before the graduation exercises, if his or 
her completion date is earlier than May 
and all other obligations have been met. 
TOOLS AND MATERIALS: All students are 
expected to have a complete set of hand 
tools as specified in the list available for 
each course. These tools may be bought 
through the School or can be acquired 
personally by the student. As noted in 
the course descriptions, all courses require 
student projects for training. Students must 
pay for materials and supplies for projects 
they keep. 



ATTENDANCE: An attendance record is kept 
for each student and becomes part of the 
permanent record. Regular class attendance 
is considered essential. Absence greater than 
10% of the total days in the course is con- 
sidered unsatisfactory and will subject the 
student to termination unless there are 
reasonable excuses for the absences. Students 
are expected to phone the School on the 
day of an absence. All absences must be 
excused. In cases of excessive absence for 
which there is good reason, a student who 
wishes to qualify for a diploma may arrange 
to extend the training time if (1) there is 
room in the course, and (2) the extra time 
is paid for at the usual monthly rate. 
TARDINESS: Students are expected to be in 
class during the entire class day. Tardiness 
and leaving class early without consent 
of the instructor are accumulated and will 
eventually count as absences. 
CONDUCT: Students are expected to behave 
in a mature, courteous, considerate, and 
well-mannered fashion at all times. Safety 
is the principal concern of all those in the 
school shops. If a student fails to meet these 
requirements, suspension or termination 
may result. 




22 



ACADEMIC AND STUDENT SERVICE INFORMATION 



WITHDRAWAL: A student may withdraw 
from a course at any time by informing the 
School in writing. The student will be respon- 
sible for expenses in accordance with the 
School's refund policy. 
LEAVE OF ABSENCE: A student is expected 
to complete the course as scheduled. When 
unusual and unanticipated circumstances 
require interruption of the normal schedule, 
a student may request a leave of absence. 
At the discretion of the School, a student 
may be granted leave for a period of 30 
days. If a student must withdraw from 
class for a period longer than 30 days or 
until the next starting date of the course, 
the tuition rate will be that rate prevailing 
at the time of the student's return. 
TERMINATION: A student may be termi- 
nated or suspended at the School's discre- 
tion prior to the completion of the course 
in which he or she is enrolled for the 
following reasons: unsatisfactory academic 
progress; excessive absence; non-payment 
of tuition; failure to comply with school 
rules and regulations; and unacceptable 
behavior. 

No refund will be granted for time when 
a student is suspended. The usual refund 
policy will apply to a student who is termi- 
nated. A student may appeal any suspension 



or termination to the Curriculum Committee 
of the NBSS Board of Directors. After termi- 
nation a student may be readmitted to a 
course if (1) there is room in the course, 
and (2) there is evidence of change in 
attitude or conditions which caused the 
original termination. 
COUNSELING: Members of the admini- 
strative staff are available to any student 
needing assistance with personal, academic, 
vocational, and/or financial problems. 
Instructors offer regular informal counsel- 
ing concerning academic and employment 
issues. Referrals for further assistance can 
be made outside the School by the Office 
of Student Services. It is the aim of North 
Bennet Street School to assist each student 
to realize the fullest in personal and profes- 
sional growth from the training experience. 
VETERANS: All current courses which have 
been offered for at least two years at North 
Bennet Street School are approved for 
training of veterans. Be sure to contact the 
Admissions Office regarding the proper forms 
required for your benefits well in advance 
of the start of the class in which you wish 
to enroll. 

HOUSING: NBSS does not provide housing, 
but the School's Office of Student Services 
does make referrals and helps students 
find roommates within Boston and its 
inner suburbs. 



PARKING: There is no parking on school 
property and the neighborhood in which 
the School is located is quite congested. 
Therefore, we encourage students to use 
public transportation (subway, buses and 
commuter rail) which is reasonably acces- 
sible to the School. If necessary, a student 
can arrange monthly parking at a near- 
by garage. 

PLACEMENT: North Bennet Street School 
does not guarantee placement to any grad- 
uate of its training programs. However, 
graduates are assisted in finding employ- 
ment in several ways: 

1. Employment Counseling — Before 
graduation the student has an interview 
with the Director of Student Services to 
plan a job search and develop a resume, 
if appropriate. 

2. Job Referral — Employer requests for 
applicants are posted in the shops and in 
the Office of Student Services. 

3. Job Development — The Director of 
Student Services and instructors keep 
in contact with trade representatives to 
develop possible sources of employment 
and to gather feedback from graduates 
and employers. 




23 



ENVIBONMENl 



HISTORY: North Bennet Street School has been training people for employment for over one hundred years. In 1885 it 
was one of the first schools in the United States to offer trade training outside traditional apprenticeships. It pioneered 
the concept of placing students in a classroom with a master for the sole purpose of learning a trade. Immigrants of 
that time, who were arriving by the thousands in Boston, were trained through this new educational technique to 
enter their first skilled jobs. School children came to NBSS for industrial arts classes, which became the testing ground 
for the development of vocational education in Boston Public Schools. Since these early years, thousands of people 
from Boston and well beyond have received training in many different trades, in response to the demand for well- 
trained workers and skilled craftsmen. 

LOCALE: From its founding, the School has been located in the North End of Boston, one of this city's oldest neigh- 
borhoods, adjacent to the historic Old North Church. The area retains many qualities of its late 19th century character 
when the School began. Nearby there are bakeries, butcher shops, fruit markets, dry grocers, and numerous restau- 
rants. Important historic sites are within walking distance: the Old North Church, Paul Revere House, Faneuil Hall, 
Quincy Market, and the Boston Garden. Also close by is the Boston Harbor Waterfront and the downtown commer- 
cial/financial district. 

The entire city of Boston remains an important resource for students. Not only are there major museums 
and libraries to visit, the many schools and colleges in the area offer lectures, concerts, and exhibitions that can 
enrich a student's experience. Many entertainment and recreational opportunities are also available within Boston 
and its suburbs, with the metropolitan public transportation system providing access to such activities. 
FACILITIES: NBSS operates in an early 19th century brick building that was once a church and then a sailor's retire- 
ment home. A main building, with three attached smaller buildings comprise the School's facility. During the last ten 
years, this facility has been made handicapped- accessible and the 45 rooms that house workshops and classrooms 
have been significantly upgraded. These rooms contain the space, equipment, and machinery necessary for proper 
instruction in the various fields of training offered at the School. Support services also located in the School's facility 
include Admissions, Academic and Student Services, Business and Administrative Offices. The School is easily identified 
at its location on the corner of Salem and North Bennet Streets by a large, 19th century clock mounted over the North 
Bennet Street School sign. 




24 







♦ OLD NORTH CHURCH 

• PARKING GARAGE 



DIRECi! 

M.B.T.A.: From Haymarket Square. Go under Express- 
way aiming right onto Cross Street. Turn left onto 
Salem Street. North Bennet Street is the third street 
on the right. School is on the corner of North Bennet 
and Salem Streets. Look for the large clock mounted 
on the corner of the School building. Green Line and 
Orange Line stop at Haymarket Station. 

TRAIN: From North Station. Walk along Canal Street 
to Haymarket Square and follow the above directions. 
From South Station. Take bus marked "Haymarket 
Square" and have bus operator let you off at the comer 
of North Bennet and Hanover Streets. Walk to other 
end of North Bennet Street, looking for the large 
clock mounted on the comer of the School building. 

CAR: From the Massachusetts Turnpike, head north 
on the Southeast (John Fitzgerald) Expressway. From 
the Express-way, take the North Station/Causeway 
Street exit At the bottom of the off ramp turn right 
onto Causeway Street. Continue onto Commercial 
Street. The easiest parking is at the Kinney Systems 
Garage, immediately adjacent to Polcari's Restaurant 
on Commercial Street. From the garage, turn left 
and walk along Prince Street, turning left again onto 
Salem Street. The School is located at the corner of 
Salem and North Bennet Streets. Look for the large 
clock mounted on the comer of the School building. 



Accredited School, National Association of 
Trade and Technical Schools 

PUBLICATION DATE: March, 1987 

This catalog is an official publication of 
North Bennet Street School. As such, it is 
subject to revision at any time. The School 
reserves the right to add, withdraw or 
revise any course, rate of tuition or fees, 
program of study, provision or requirement 
described within the catalog as may be 
deemed necessary. 



North Bennet Street School is grateful to 
the following people for their contribu- 
tion toward the cost of this catalog: 
Hughes Associates — design-, 
Walter Bibikow —photography-, 
The TypeWorks— typesetting; 
Dynagraf, Inc.— printing. 

NORTH BENNET STREET SCHOOL 
39 North Bennet Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 02113 
(617) 227-0155 



Boston University 

School for the Arts 

855 Commonwealth Avenue 

Boston, Massachusetts 02215 




December 31, 1988 



Linda Mikula 

Letter Maker 

817 East Broadway 

South Boston, MA 02127 



Dear Linda: 



It was nice to meet with you again after all these years 
and to hear about your proposal for the Boston Redevelopment Authority. 

Your concept for the project sounds very exciting and one that I 
would be interested in working on with you. I have done similar proposals 
with area architects and am therefore very familiar with the kinds of 
sculptural effects that you have in mind. 

Again, your project sounds like an excellent one that I would be 
proud to be associated with and I will look forward to hearing from you. 



Sincerely, 




Lloyd Lillie 
Professor of Art 



December 31, 1988 

Lloyd Lillie, Professor of Art 
Professional Commissions: 

1987 Seafarers: Three eleven-foot figures for James Center, Richmond, 
Virginia 



1986 Two life-size bronze figures of Mayor Thomas D'Alesandro, Jr., of 
Baltimore for the City of Baltimore 



1986 Life-size bronze sculpture of Katharine Lee Bates, authoress of 
America the Beautiful, for the City of Falmouth, Massachusetts 



1985 Life-Size bronze sculpture of Arnold "Red" Auerbach for the City of 
Boston 



1985 Design of the "Coach of the Year" Award for the NBA 



1983 Two life-size bronze chess players for John Marshall Park, Washington, 
DC. 



1980 Two life-size bronze sculptures of Mayor James Michael Curley for the 
City of Boston 



1978 Bronze sculpture of Booker T. Washington as a boy for his birthplace in 
Hardy, Virginia 



1976 Life-size bronze sculpture of Thomas Jefferson for the City of St. Louis 
(Duplicate sculpture for the University of Virginia, 1978) 



G851 
1989 




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BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



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