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Directory of Correspondence 

Middlebury, Vermont 05753 

For Information About: 

General Information 
Admissions (Undergraduate) 

Alumni Affairs 

Athletics 

Business Matters 
Development 
Educational Program 
Financial Aid 

Gifts and Bequests 
Graduate Schools Abroad 

Health of Students 
Payment of Bills 
Publicity 

Summer Schools (Graduate) 

Bread Loaf School of English 
Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference 

Foreign Language Schools Language Schools Office, Sunderland 

Language Center 

Vocational Placement and 

Guidance Director of Placement, Alumni House 


The Secretary of the College, Old Chapel 
Director of Admissions, Emma Willard 
House 

Director of Alumni Relations, Alumni 
House 

Director of Athletics, Memorial Field 
House 

Business Manager, Old Chapel 
Director of Development, Old Chapel 
Dean of the College, Old Chapel 
Director of Financial Aid, Emma Willard 
House 

Vice President, Old Chapel 
Director of Language Schools, Sunderland 
Language Center 

College Physician, Student Health Center 

Comptroller, Old Chapel 

Information Services Office, Old Chapel 


The Director of Admissions will process requests for catalogues received from perspective students 
and secondary schools. Colleges , universities , libraries , and others , should send requests for under¬ 
graduate catalogue to the Secretary of the College. The Director of the Language Schools will 
furnish information and bulletins pertaining to Middlebury*s summer program and the College's 
Graduate Schools Abroad. 



MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 
BULLETIN 


CATALOGUE NUMBER 1968-1969 


ONE HUNDRED AND SIXTY-NINTH YEAR 

August 1968 


Middlebury College Bulletin 

Published by Middlebury College in 
January , February , March , April , May , August , October , and November by the 
Publications Department , Old Chapel , Middlebury College , Middlebury , Vermont. 

Second Class postage paid at Middlebury , Vermont 05753 

Vol. LXIII, August, 1968, No. 6 





TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 

THE COLLEGE. 7 

PRESIDENT AND FELLOWS. 10 

ADMISSIONS. 12 

EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE. 14 

CURRICULUM. 17 

Undergraduate Work. 17 

Freshman Program. 17 

Winter Term. 18 

Major Concentration. 18 

Senior Program. 19 

Departmental Honors Program. 19 

Departmental Program. 20 

Degree Requirements. 22 

Transitional Regulations. 23 

Scholarship. 24 

Academic Honors. 25 

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 26 

Combined Professional School Plans. 26 

Pre-Medical Program. 26 

Environmental Studies. 26 

Junior Year Abroad. 27 

Critical Languages. 27 

Teacher Education. 28 

R.O.T.C. 28 

FACILITIES. 29 

DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM. 36 

COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES. 38 

COURSES. 49 

Humanities. 50 

Foreign Languages. . 70 

Social Sciences . .. 86 

Natural Sciences.105 

GENERAL INFORMATION.127 

Named and Endowed Scholarships, Loans, Prizes .... 127 

Attendance Statistics.136 

Historical Events. 137 

Alumni/Alumnae ..140 

Degrees Conferred.143 

Trustee Committees. 157 

Academic Administration and Staff.158 

Library Staff. 160 

Business Administration and Staff.160 

Faculty.162 















































The College 


THE HISTORY OF MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Middlebury College was an indigenous product of 19th century de¬ 
mocracy, financed from the thin purses of local citizens, and expressive 
of multiform culture brought from southern New England. 

A miller, two lawyers, a doctor, and a President of Yale University con¬ 
ceived the first plan for Middlebury College on the night of September 30, 
1798. The miller was Gamaliel Painter, whose name the oldest college build¬ 
ing in Vermont still bears; the lawyers, Seth Storrs, donor of the campus of 
the men’s college, and Samuel Miller, who entertained the group at this orig¬ 
inal meeting; the doctor, Darius Matthews, a probate judge as well as 
physician; and the Yale President, the great Timothy Dwight. 

Some thirty log cabins and frame houses, surrounded by wilderness, 
comprised the settlement at Middlebury in 1798. No road had yet been built 
to the pioneer village. The State of Vermont as a part of the Union was only 
seven years old and its Legislature still roved from town to town for its an¬ 
nual meeting. Grist and saw mills, a few shops for mechanics and black¬ 
smiths, a rough inn and a brewery offered the principal commercial accent to 
the village. Not even a church had been constructed. Still the establishment 
of a college as well as a grammar school seemed imperative to these immi¬ 
grants from Connecticut. 

President Dwight, in his visit of a single night, helped to outline a plan 
for procedure, but it took two years to persuade the Legislature that the 
request for founding a college in this wilderness should be honored. A charter 
was finally granted on November 1, 1800, and Jeremiah Atwater, a Yale 
graduate, appointed President; seven students were admitted the following 
day and Middlebury was under way, lodged in a building just completed for 
the Addison County Grammar School. President Atwater and one tutor 
comprised the entire administrative and teaching staff. Under them the first 
student was graduated in August, 1802. 

Greek and Latin were the core of the curriculum in those early years. 
Mathematics—ranging from “vulgar arithmetic” to trigonometry—history, 
geography, natural philosophy, astronomy, rhetoric, law, logic, metaphysics, 
and ethics rounded out a four-year program, with vocational purpose noted in 
such courses as navigation and surveying. A disciplinary system, based on 
the temper of the law of Moses and the text of Yale College rules and regula¬ 
tions, kept a student’s nose to the academic grindstone. As occasion for new 
rules of conduct arose, they were properly phrased, and appropriate fines 
attached. Students were their own janitors, laid their own hearth fires, 
lugged their water from outdoor cisterns, often cooked their own meals. 
Daily chapel prayers before dawn began the day and a daily chapel service at 
dusk ended it. 

It was distinctly a man’s college. Women were not even admitted inside 


7 


8 


THE COLLEGE 


the rail fence which surrounded the campus protectively. Yet the village of 
Middlebury did not neglect the education of women. Within three years after 
the men’s college was started, a “Female Academy,” one of the first in Amer¬ 
ica, was established here; and it was in Middlebury that Emma Hart Willard 
opened her first school for girls in a building now owned by the College, and 
wrote what has been called the Magna Carta for higher education of women. 
Although the College did not become co-educational for over eighty years 
after it was founded, the tradition for women’s education was strongly fixed 
at an early date. In spite of repeated earlier appeals, women were not ad¬ 
mitted until 1883, after the alumni had petitioned for the change. Joseph 
Battell gave the College the land for the women’s campus in 1909. 

The Middlebury College Summer Language Schools of English, French, 
German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish, which began with a German session 
in 1915, have achieved international reputation. In 1966, Chinese was added. 
The foreign language schools were pioneers in the development of specialized 
summer schools for the study of modem languages under a faculty of native 
instructors. The Bread Loaf School of English and the Bread Loaf Writers’ 
Conference have served as models for similar undertakings in various parts 
of the country. In 1949, the Graduate School of French in France was in¬ 
augurated, followed by the Graduate Schools of Spanish in Spain, German in 
Germany and Italian in Italy. 

EDUCATIONAL PURPOSE 

Middlebury College believes in the importance of the liberal arts and 
the liberal sciences. It believes that the central purpose of undergraduate 
education is the development of the human mind as broadly and as deeply 
as possible. The most compelling argument for the liberal arts is that besides 
providing the pleasure of doing something well, they enlarge the intellect and 
interests and bring an awareness of the concerns and problems of the rest of 
the community, laying upon men a mandate of reason toward restraint as 
well as toward freedom. The intrinsic values of liberal study are finally the 
most important and practical of all; when they appear, they illuminate the 
possibilities of what it can mean to be an intelligent and responsible human 
being. At Middlebury College the creative and performing arts are strongly 
supported. The cultivation of human sensibility through active involvement in 
the Arts is one of the fundamental goals of education in the Humanities. 

Middlebury College aims to prepare its students through study of the 
humanities and languages, and through the disciplines of the social and 
natural sciences, to respond intelligently to an ever-changing social, political, 
and scientific world. In this liberal environment the student comes to an 
awareness of his cultural heritage, the relation of his special field to his 
heritage, an understanding of the physical world in which he lives, and an 
ability to think analytically and critically. 

Middlebury College hopes to unlock the capacities and powers of its 
students in rational thinking, curiosity, imagination, and sensitivity, and to 
direct these human energies not only toward education as a continuing proc- 


THE COLLEGE 


9 


ess of self-education, but also toward social responsibility and leadership. This 
concept rests firmly on the base of an identifiable liberal tradition, a rational 
philosophy, and a belief that has been cherished and cultivated for 168 years 
at Middlebury. 

LOCATION 

Middlebury College is located on a broad hill overlooking a typical 
Vermont village and a wide sweep of Champlain Valley, with the Green 
Mountains visible to the east and the Adirondacks to the west. Most of the 
college buildings are constructed of grey limestone or white marble, their 
colonial architecture consistent with the mountain setting of the extensive 
campus. 

The campus includes about 250 acres for buildings, athletic grounds, 
and Otter Creek shoreline, and a mountain campus ten miles to the east. 
The United States Government maintains an adjacent area, formerly owned 
by the College, as part of the Green Mountain National Forest. Both tracts 
are used by students for outings and winter sports. 

Middlebury lies halfway between Burlington and Rutland, Vermont. 
Students not arriving by automobile should come via the New York Central 
to Albany, N.Y., and make bus connections on the Vermont Transit Lines to 
Middlebury. There is bus service from Montreal, Boston, and New York City 
on the Greyhound and Vermont Transit Lines. There is also scheduled airline 
service to Burlington from Boston via Northeast Airlines and from New York 
and Albany via Mohawk Airlines. Information about the local Middlebury 
Airport is available in the Airmen's Guide . There is no railroad passenger 
service direct to Middlebury. Baggage can be sent by railway express. 


President and Fellows 


President and Fellows—The Corporation 


James Isbell Armstrong, Ph.D., ll.d., l.h.d., Litt.D. 

President of the College 

Middlebury 

Life Trustees 



{Calendar year indicates first date of election) 


L. Douglas Meredith, a.b., m.a., Ph.D. (1960) 

Chairman of the Board and President of the Corporation 
President and Chief Executive Officer 

Central Vermont Public Service Corporation 

Rutland 

Arnold R. LaForce, b.s., m.b.a. (1961) 

Vice-Chairman of the Board 

President and Director, Central Securities Corp. 

New York, N. Y. 

Elbert C. Cole, m.a., Ph.D. (1939) 

Secretary of the Corporation 

Samuel Fessenden Clarke Professor of Biology, Emeritus 

Williams College 

Middlebury 

Stewart Ross, m.d., f.a.c.s. (1936) 

Physician and Surgeon 

Rutland 

Carleton H. Simmons, b.s. (1938) 

Hayden, Stone Incorporated 

Boston, Mass. 

Fred P. Lang, b.s. (1940) 

New York, N. Y. 

Joseph P. Kasper, b.s. (1940) 

Former President, Associated Merchandising Corporation 

Sarasota, Florida 


Alice Guest Howson, a.b., m.a. (1948) Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

Study Counselor, Vassar College 

Robert Dutton Proctor, a.b., m.f.a. (1955) Proctor 

First Vice President and Treasurer, Vermont Marble Company 


Paris Fletcher, b.s., ll.b., sc.d. (1956) 

Attorney, June, Fletcher & Whipple 

Worcester, Mass. 

Raymond J. Saulnier, Ph.D., ll.d. (1958) 

Professor of Economics, Columbia University 

Former Chairman, President’s Council of Economic Advisors 

New York, N. Y. 

William S. Youngman, a.b., ll.b. (1962) 

Chairman, American International Underwriters Corporation 

New York, N. Y. 


10 





GOVERNMENT 


11 


Term Trustees 



First 

Elected 

Expiration 

Date 


Foster R. Clement, Jr., a.b. 1960 

Vice President, retired, Chase Manhattan Bank 

1969 

Manchester 

Alexander Hamilton Fulton 

1964 

1970 

New York, N. Y. 

John Kruesi, a.b. 

1964 

1971 

Signal Mt., Tenn. 


Alumni Trustees 


Marian G. Cruikshank, a.b., m.a. 1964 
Teacher, Dr. Leo T. Doherty Memorial 

High School 

1969 

Worcester, Mass. 

Adrian C. Leiby, b.s., ll.b. 1965 

Attorney, LeBoeuf, Lamb, Leiby & MacRae 

1970 

New York, N. Y. 

Chester H. Clemens, b.s. 1966 

Vice-President, Loomis, Sayles & Co., Inc. 

1971 

Boston, Mass. 

Frederick W. Lapham, Jr., a.b. 
President, Prospect Realty, Inc. 

1967 

1972 

Burlington 

Raymond A. Ablondi, a.b., ph.D. 

1968 

1973 

Bloomfield Hills, Mich. 


Merchandising Manager, Lincoln-Mercury Division, 
Ford Motor Company 


Carroll Rikert, Jr., a.b., m.b.a., c.p.a. 

Treasurer and Assistant Secretary of the Corporation 


Middlebury 


Trustees Emeriti 

Walter H. Cleary, a.b., ll.b., ll.d., j.s.d. (1941) 

Horace S. Ford, ll.d. (1942) 

Leon S. Gay, ph.B. (1942) 

Egbert C. Hadley, a.b., b.s., D.Eng., ll.d. (1936) 
Gertrude Cornish Milliken, b.s., m.a., Ed.D. (1948) 


Newport 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Brandon 
Middlebury 
North Dighton, Mass. 





Admissions 


There is no fixed program of secondary 
school studies required for admission to Middlebury College. The discipline 
and the knowledge gained from the study of English, foreign languages, 
mathematics, science, and history are essential to success in college work. 
Distinctive achievement in secondary school studies, the promise of superior 
college performance, and a commitment to intellectual pursuits are necessary. 
Candidates are urged, moreover, to read widely beyond the requirements of 
classroom preparation and to attain a high level of accuracy and effectiveness 
in written expression. 

The secondary school program is the responsibility of each candidate in 
consultation with his school counselors. The program and record of each 
applicant will be assessed individually. A recommended secondary school 
program would include four years of English; four years of one foreign 
language (in preference to two years each of two languages); three or four 
years of mathematics; two or more laboratory sciences; two or more years of 
history; and some study of music, art, or drama. However, many candidates 
whose programs of study differ from that outlined above are admitted each 
year: the quality of an applicant’s secondary school achievement, especially 
in the two final years, is the factor of primary importance. 

Advanced Placement. Students taking college level courses in second¬ 
ary school may be considered for advanced standing in one or more courses 
at Middlebury. The candidate must take the appropriate Advanced Place¬ 
ment Test administered by the College Board to be eligible for Advanced 
Standing with credit. Candidates awarded credit for three Advanced Place¬ 
ment courses may apply for sophomore standing. 

College Board Examinations. All candidates for admission are required 
to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College Entrance Examination 
Board and three Achievement Tests, including the one in English Composi¬ 
tion. A student unable to obtain the application forms from a secondary 
school should write directly to the College Entrance Examination Board, 
P.O. Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540, requesting the Bulletin of 
Information and directions for filing the application. Candidates should take 
the College Board Tests in December or January of the senior year. 

Health Certificate. A satisfactory certificate of health must be pre¬ 
sented before matriculation. Successful candidates are required to fill out 
medical blanks which are supplied by the College. 

PROCEDURE FOR ADMISSION 

Inquiries regarding admission should be addressed to the Director of 
Admissions. Application forms will be furnished on request. Application 

12 



ADMISSIONS 


13 


papers must be accompanied by an application fee of $15. This fee is not 
refundable and will not be applied to term bills. The right is reserved to close 
the application list to candidates on January 15. All applicants will be noti¬ 
fied of the action on their applications by April 20. 

A personal interview is a desirable part of the admissions procedure at 
Middlebury. A visit to the College for this purpose may be made between 
mid-May of the junior year in secondary school and the middle of the senior 
year. No interviews are scheduled during February, March, April or early 
May. 

Early Decision Plan. Candidates who definitely plan to attend Middle¬ 
bury may request an Early Decision. However, only candidates with out¬ 
standing qualifications should apply, and they must agree to withdraw their 
other college applications if their application for admission to Middlebury 
is approved. Requests for Early Decision must be received by November 1st 
of the year prior to the year in which admission is desired. Early Decisions 
will be announced by December 1st. A non-refundable deposit of $200 
applicable to term bills must be forwarded by successful candidates before 
February 15. Unsuccessful candidates for Early Decision will be reconsidered 
with the regular applicant group. 

TRANSFERS 

A limited number of students can be accepted into the sophomore 
and junior classes by transfer from other colleges and universities. All such 
students must come from approved institutions of collegiate rank. Candidates 
for admission with advanced standing should write to the Director of Ad¬ 
missions for detailed information and application forms. 


Expenses and Financial 

Assistance 


EXPENSES 

No precise statement can be made regarding the cost of a year at 
Middlebury. The location of the College in a frugal Vermont countryside 
and the absence of metropolitan attractions permit a student to live eco¬ 
nomically. The College offers a limited amount of financial aid to deserving 
students. The Director of Financial Aid endeavors to assist undergraduates 
in finding remunerative work both on the campus and in town. 

A fairly accurate estimate of a year’s expenses may be made by selecting 
the applicable items from the following list of standard charges: 


Tuition. $2,000.00 

Activities Fee (Includes $42 Student Center fee) .... 66.00 

Medical Fee. 35.00 

Room ($225.00 due September 1, $250.00 due January 31) 475.00 

Board .' . . 600.00 

Special course fees (per term; see course descriptions) . . 


Sickness Insurance. 22.00 


Travel, textbooks, clothing, social dues and assessments must also be 
considered in estimating a year’s expenses. 

Tuition, board, room and student activities fees for the year are billed 
in two instalments, the first due September 1, and the second January 31. 
The applicable portion of matriculation and re-enrollment deposits, financial 
aid grants, and of any payments received in advance from such sources as 
Insured Tuition Payment Plan will appear as credits on term bills. Student 
loans will be credited only when executed and returned to the Comptroller. 
Failure to make payment when due automatically cancels the privilege of 
attending classes and incurs liability for a late payment fine of $5. An itemized 
statement showing special course fees and any additional charges will be 
mailed on or before November 1 for the first term and March 1 for the second 
term. These bills must be settled in full by November 15 and March 15, 
respectively. 

A charge of $250.00 is assessed for each regular course or its equivalent 
(e.g. independent study) in excess of four during the Fall or Spring terms. No 
charge will be made, however, for the basic R.O.T.C. course. For students 
enrolled in Music 25 and/or Music 35 doing work in practical or applied 
music, the established fee for private instruction is assessed. 

For graduate students, tuition is charged at the rates given above for a 
full program of four regular courses or the equivalent thereof; otherwise at 
the single course rate. 

A medical fee (see page 143) provides for various health services in- 

14 







EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 


15 


eluding enrollment in a one-year accident insurance plan. 

All graduate and undergraduate students are required to enroll in a 
one-year sickness insurance plan, unless exempted by presenting evidence of 
equivalent coverage satisfactory to the Treasurer. Descriptions of both the 
accident and sickness insurance plans will be forwarded with the billing due 
September 1st. 

A graduation fee of $11 is paid by all seniors. 

A charge of $1 is made upon matriculation for an identification card 
intended to serve for the entire undergraduate four-year course; when, on 
authorization of the Dean of the College, a lost identification card is replaced, 
a charge of $5 is made. 

A rebate of $5 per week may be allowed for absence from dining halls 
for two consecutive weeks or longer. 

No refund of tuition, fees, or room rent is made in the case of dismissal. 
Refunds may be made for entry into the Armed Forces through Selective 
Service, but in other cases of absence or withdrawal, refunds may be con¬ 
sidered only under exceptional circumstances. 

A fee of $25 is charged students who repeat the General Examination 
and who are not regularly enrolled in college. 

Entering students pay $100 when notitying the Admissions Department 
of their intent to matriculate. This deposit will be applied to the charges of 
the first term and is not refundable. 

Returning students pay a re-enrollment deposit of $100 in the Spring 
to be applied to the charges of the succeeding term and to be forfeited if the 
student fails by August 1 of any year to notify the Dean of his intention not to 
return for the succeeding term. 

Students may not take examinations, receive grades, nor expect honor¬ 
able dismissal until all financial accounts are settled. 

The right is reserved to change quoted charges if necessary. The College 
assumes no responsibility for loss of student property through fire, theft, or 
disappearance. 

The Registrar issues a transcript of record on request to students 
wishing to transfer or to secure a statement of their course credits for any 
other purpose. One copy of the college record is furnished free. A fee of one 
dollar is charged for a duplicate of the transcript. To students who are 
financially indebted to the College, or to those who have not surrendered 
Identification Cards on leaving college, no transcript will be issued until 
satisfactory arrangements have been made at the Treasurer’s office. No fee 
is charged for transcripts submitted to any branch of the armed service. 

FINANCIAL AID 

The goal of the Financial Aid Program at Middlebury College is to help 
those students with a demonstrated need who would otherwise not be able 
to attend college. Subject to continuing eligibility, Financial Aid, in some 
combination of a loan plus grant and/or job, is awarded for one academic 
year at a time, and is normally based on a student loan requirement of $650. 


16 


EXPENSES AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE 


Students should not apply for any specific grant (scholarship) as appropriate 
assignment will be made by the College. In order to retain the Grant portion 
of Financial Aid, a student must have for the previous semester a minimum 
average of 75 or a minimum grade of 70 in all courses. A Grant can also be 
withdrawn for misconduct. 

Middlebury College is a member of the College Scholarship Service, an 
activity of the College Entrance Examination Board at Princeton, New 
Jersey. Financial Aid awards are based on analysis by the College Scholarship 
Service (CSS) of the Parents 5 Confidential Statement (PCS) and on the Col¬ 
lege’s review of the CSS determination of need. Middlebury College requires 
no financial aid form other than the PCS. Parents of applicants for admission 
who require financial aid should submit the Confidential Statement directly 
to the College Scholarship Service before January 15th of the entering year. 
The form may be obtained from the secondary school counselor. Early Deci¬ 
sion candidates must file the PCS before December 1 of their senior year in 
secondary school. Renewal forms of the PCS must be filed annually by 
February 15 with the College Scholarship Service. 

Middlebury participates in the National Defense Student Loan, College 
Work-Study and Educational Opportunity Grants Programs. Awarding of 
loans, jobs and grants under these Federally-sponsored programs is handled 
by the College Financial Aid Office. The College also certifies applications 
for the various State Guaranteed Insured Loan Programs, and in special 
cases will also certify applications for loans from the United Student Aid 
Funds Program. 

As far as possible, the financial aid to upper classmen will include the 
offer of campus employment. Students can expect to be assigned jobs as 
waiters or waitresses, research or library assistants, clerk-typists, residence 
hall and student union desk clerks, etc. A few highly-qualified students can 
find summer employment, both on and off-campus, under the Federal Col¬ 
lege Work-Study Program which also assists in financing many of the student 
jobs listed above. Laundry, newspaper, magazine, travel, etc. concessions are 
also student-operated. The better-paying campus jobs are incorporated into 
the Financial Aid Program, but there are a number of lower-paying jobs that 
an interested student can apply for on his own initiative. 

It is assumed that all Financial Aid recipients will make a contribution 
from summer earnings towards their College budget. The expectancy from 
net summer earnings preceding Freshman Year is $200 for women and $300 
for men. Each subsequent summer, a $100 increment will be expected. 

Correspondence concerning financial aid to applicants for admission 
should be addressed to the Director of Admissions. Similar inquiries by 
upper-class students should be made at the Office of Financial Aid. 


Curriculum 


IVIiddlebury college confers one under¬ 
graduate degree, Bachelor of Arts. It also confers the graduate degrees, 
Master of Arts, Master of Science, and Doctor of Modern Languages. 


UNDERGRADUATE WORK 

The purpose of the liberal arts curriculum is to give every student a 
detailed knowledge of the work covered in at least one subject, and to 
correlate it with a broad understanding of the liberal arts and the liberal 
sciences. To achieve the scholarship which this objective implies, students 
work intensively in one or more departments and complete requirements and 
electives in fields outside of their specialization. 

The extent of a student’s academic work at Middlebury College is 
reckoned in courses sucessfully completed. For graduation a student must 
pass all 32 Fall and Spring term courses and 4 Winter Programs. 

The normal program of study is four courses in the Fall and Spring 
Term. In the Winter Term, students select one course for concentrated study. 
Physical Education and the basic R.O.T.C. courses in freshman and soph¬ 
omore years are carried as electives without credit as a course unit. No extra 
charge is made for the R.O.T.C. or Physical Education programs. Only stu¬ 
dents who have demonstrated superior ability in their academic work are 
permitted to take more than four courses in a term. Independent study in the 
Senior year counts as two course units. For departments on the new senior 
program (see p. 19) Independent Study counts as three course units. The 
course units are distributed between Fall, Winter and Spring terms as the 
department determines. 


FRESHMAN PROGRAM 

Prior to matriculation each freshman is furnished with complete course 
descriptions and registration cards on which he designates his selection of 
courses for the first term. During Freshman Week he meets with his faculty 
counselor who gives further assistance in planning a course of study. 

Every freshman is required to enroll in English Literature (English 12) 
either in the Fall or Spring term. Physical Education must also be taken by 
all Freshmen. To complete his academic program, each freshman elects 
three other courses from those open to freshmen. These courses may either 
offer a varied intellectual experience or prepare him, at least in part, for 
advanced work in a special field of knowledge. 

The courses open to freshmen, most of which also serve partially to ful¬ 
fill degree requirements (see below) include introductory courses in American 
Literature, Biology, Chemistry, Economics, Fine Arts, Geography, Geology, 
History, Mathematics, Music, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychol- 


17 




18 


CURRICULUM 


ogy, Religion, Sociology, and any of the ancient or modern languages. In 
general, only those courses numbered from 10 through 19 are open to fresh¬ 
men. Freshmen enrolled in a course within a department, however, may be 
assigned to a more advanced course by that department upon demonstration 
of special proficiency. Freshmen who have taken a modern language in high 
school and have acquired satisfactory preparation may continue the subject 
in intermediate courses. Freshmen, qualified by previous work and interest 
in a field, may elect courses above the freshman level on recommendation of 
the department concerned, the respective Dean and the Director of Ad¬ 
missions. It is advisable that students complete their science requirement 
during the first or second year. 

During the freshman year students should consult frequently with their 
faculty advisers. Freshmen are encouraged to talk with their advisers about 
any aspect of their academic experience. The adviser will assist in the choice of 
a field of major concentration which must be made toward the end of the 
spring term. 


WINTER TERM 

During the month of January, the student is given the opportunity 
through the Winter Program to acquaint himself, through intensive study, 
with an aspect of a discipline which is not normally the topic of the Fall and 
Spring terms. Winter programs are offered on a departmental and inter¬ 
departmental basis and are structured on three levels: courses without pre¬ 
requisites (open to non-majors), courses with pre-requisites and courses 
which are part of the departmental major. All courses contain independent 
study as a component. Each Fall the Curriculum Committee of the faculty 
publishes a Winter Term catalogue. A student may not take his freshman 
and sophomore courses within the same department. A department may not 
require more than two Winter courses as part of its major program. All 
Winter courses are graded on a Distinction, Pass, Fail basis. 

All students involved in foreign language courses numbered 11.1 and 
11.2 may be required to participate in a continuing program during the 
Winter term. Programs intended to fulfill the Physical Education require¬ 
ment also continue through the Winter term. 

MAJOR CONCENTRATION 

In registering for his major program the student normally consults the 
chairman of his chosen department. The chairman appoints a departmental 
adviser who recommends a pattern of courses for the student’s subsequent 
years. 

Departmental major requirements differ, but they all include courses so 
chosen from the student’s department and other departments that they 
form an integrated and coherent whole and a logical pattern leading to a 
deepening intellectual experience. In addition to the specific courses required 
for a particular major, cognate courses may be recommended to further the 
student’s particular academic interests or intentions. 


CURRICULUM 


19 


By faculty legislation, the College is gradually converting to a new senior 
work plan. Departments operating under the current plan require a minimum 
of 8 and a maximum of 12 Fall and Spring courses within the Department. 
Departments on the new plan require a minimum of 10 and a maximum of 
14 Fall and Spring courses. The standard senior work plan carries two course 
equivalents, the new plan carries three. Where honors programs are separate 
from Independent Study they carry two course equivalents. The senior 
program courses may be distributed over the Fall, Winter, and Spring terms. 

Should a student not be satisfied with his first choice of major he may, 
before the beginning of his third year, change to another major. Prior 
to the change, however, he should obtain assurance from the department to 
which the change is contemplated that he will be able to meet its major 
requirements. After the beginning of the third year a student may change 
his major only for exceptional reasons and with the consent of the Dean of 
Men or the Dean of Women. (See the Departmental Program below.) 

Where a joint major involving two or more departments is desirable a 
single General Examination will be taken. Details should be worked out with 
the department chairmen involved and cleared through the Senior Work 
Committee. 

STANDARD SENIOR PROGRAM 

Each senior enrolls for the normal four courses in the Fall and Spring 
terms as well as the Winter program. Independent Study counts as two courses 
in the student’s schedule but is not graded. 

Independent Study may be distributed among the Fall, Winter and 
Spring terms in whatever way the department deems appropriate. Independ¬ 
ent Study leads to the General Examination which is usually taken in May. 
For successful completion of the General Examination the student receives 
credit for two course units. 

NEW SENIOR PROGRAM 

The student will register for Independent Study, the schedule of meetings 
and work in such course to be entirely at the discretion of the department. 
The work will be graded and assigned a value in course units. In May of his 
senior year, the student will also take a General Examination for which he 
receives a grade. The combined total of Independent Study and General 
Examination shall be three course units. All students register for the normal 
four courses in the Fall and Spring terms and the Winter Program; the 
department shall determine how the course units granted for Independent 
Study and the General Examination are to be distributed throughout the 
three terms. 

Departments indicate in their course descriptions whether they are on 
the Standard Senior Program or the New Senior Program. 

DEPARTMENTAL HONORS PROGRAM 

A student wishing to work for Honors in his major field seeks admission 



20 


CURRICULUM 


to the Program by applying to the chairman of his department during 
April of his junior year and by proposing an investigation of a problem of 
sufficient importance and scope to serve as the equivalent of two courses. 
If the department chairman and staff approve the proposal, a departmental 
adviser is designated and the proposal is forwarded to the Faculty Honors 
Committee for its action. In order for the student to be admitted uncondition¬ 
ally to the Honors Program he must have term averages of 80 or better in 
two of the three fall or spring terms previous to application. He may be 
conditionally admitted to the Program if he has an average of 80 or better 
for one of the three previous fall or spring terms. In such cases final accept¬ 
ance is contingent on his achieving an average of 80 or better during the term 
in which he applies. 

When the candidate is admitted to the Program, his department assists 
him in working out an appropriate plan of preparatory reading and research 
to be completed during the summer before his senior year. His work during 
his senior year is done individually, but is directed and supervised through 
frequent meetings with his Honors adviser. 

The project culminates in the presentation of a thesis and in an oral 
examination conducted by a Board consisting of members of the major 
department and one member from outside the department. Three copies of 
the typed thesis are submitted by April 20 of the senior year, and the original 
copy is deposited in the College Library. The oral examination is held 
prior to the General Examination period in May. 

To receive Honors, the candidate must have an average of 80 or better 
in all work taken in his major department, at least an 80 in the General 
Examination, and he must have a grade of 85 to 88 inclusive in the Honors 
project. 

To receive High Honors, the candidate must have an average of 85 or 
better in his major department, at least an 85 in the General Examination, 
and he must have a grade of 89 to 92 inclusive in the Honors project. 

To receive Highest Honors, the candidate must have an average of 85 
or better in his major department, at least 88 in the General Examination, 
and he must have a grade of 93 or better in the Honors Project. 

These Honors are printed on the Commencement program and in the 
next annual Catalogue, and will be certified to, when requested, by a 
written certificate from the Registrar and the chairman of the department, 
stating the nature and quality of the work done. 

The Departments of Chemistry, Economics, History, and Psychology 
have been granted permission by the Faculty Honors Committee to change 
the qualification procedure for Honors. Candidates in these Departments 
should consult the Department Chairman in each case. 


THE DEPARTMENTAL PROGRAM 

Some departments offer a program of study that measures a student’s 
achievement at two levels: 




CURRICULUM 


21 


The Qualifying Level. A student must be able to use the methods and 
language of the discipline, and he must demonstrate a command and a com¬ 
prehension of a part of the subject matter of the discipline. A student whose 
development and achievement follow average patterns should be able to 
qualify in several subjects by the end of his second year. 

The Comprehensive Level. A student must demonstrate his general 
comprehension of the discipline after he has done advanced work under the 
direction of the Department. The average student will be able to complete a 
Department’s major program two years after he has qualified for advanced 
work in that Department. 

A department adopting this Program will so announce to its majors. 

PROGRAM OF DEPARTMENT SCHOLARS 

In order to encourage superior students and to free them for more rapid 
progress and more individual work in a course, the following program of 
Department Scholars is established: 

If a student thinks he can effectively do the work of a course independ¬ 
ently of the class meetings, the student may apply to the instructor of the 
course, at any time before the end of the third week of classes, to be designated 
a Department Scholar in the Course with the following privileges: 

I. (a) Be excused from all requirements of attendance in class, except 
that attendance may be continued if the student desires. 

(b) Be excused from all quizzes and examinations except the final 
examination. 

(c) Be excused, as the instructor shall determine, from any written 
work, laboratory work, or deadline for written reports, except that 
all work from which he is not excused shall be submitted at least 
one week prior to the end of classes. 

II. The following conditions must have been satisfied: 

(a) The student must have completed at least one term’s work in 
the Department. 

(b) A freshman shall have an average of at least 90 in all work already 
taken in the department; a sophomore, an average of at least 89; 
a junior, an average of at least 88; and a senior an average of at 
least 87. 

The application of the student shall include a list of the courses taken in 
the department, with the Instructors and the grades obtained, and a short 
statement as to the student’s reasons for wishing to be a Department Scholar. 
If the Instructor and the Department Chairman, after consultation with the 
other instructors in the department whom the student has had, believe that 
the student can profitably accomplish the work of the course under these 




22 


CURRICULUM 


privileges, they shall designate the student a Department Scholar in the Course. 
The course grade shall then be determined on the basis of the required written 
work submitted during the term (not in excess of that required of the regular 
members of the course) and of performance on the final examination. The 
student shall be informed of the relative weights of these two factors when 
the designation of Department Scholar is obtained. Moreover, the designa¬ 
tion shall be included with the Registrar’s record of the grade in the course, 
and the respective Dean shall be informed when a student becomes a Depart¬ 
ment Scholar. 


DEGREE REQUIREMENTS 

In addition to the freshman and major requirements, certain distribution 
requirements must be met before the Middlebury College degree is awarded. 

1. To be eligible for a degree a student must successfully complete 32 
Fall and Spring term courses or their equivalent and 4 Winter courses. No 
more than 14 Fall and Spring courses may be in the same department 
(Standard Senior Program: 12 courses). Only 6 courses with D grade may 
be applied to the degree requirements. 

2. Freshmen may not elect more than one course in a subject in a 
term. 

3. The last academic year of undergraduate work must be spent in 
residence in Middlebury, except as provided in the Technical, Medical, and 
Dental School Plans. 

4. Before graduation every student must meet, in addition to freshman 
requirements, the following Group Requirements: 

Group A—Two term courses of a literary and humanistic rather 
than a technical character. The courses that meet this requirement are 
marked with § in the listings of the departments of American Literature; 
English and Drama; Fine Arts; Music; Philosophy; Religion; Classics; 
French; German; Russian; Spanish and Italian. 

Group B—Two term courses chosen from the social and behavioral 
sciences. Any course given by the departments of Economics, History, Political 
Science, Psychology, or Sociology may be used to fulfill this requirement, as 
may Geography 10.1 and 10.2. 

Group G—Two term laboratory courses chosen from among the 
natural sciences and in one of the following departments: Biology, Chemistry, 
Geology, or Physics. 

Group D—A fourth term course (21.2), or its equivalent, or a more 
advanced course, chosen from among the ancient or modern foreign lan¬ 
guages. The equivalent is defined as an examination on the Qualifying Level 
(see p. 21) to be given by each department during the first week of the Fall 
term. 

5. All students are required to complete two years of Physical Education. 
This requirement should be completed by the end of sophomore year. 


CURRICULUM 


23 


TRANSITIONAL REGULATIONS FOR 4-1-4 CURRICULUM 

Adaptation to the 4-1-4 Curriculum in the Fall of 1968 required a 
series of transitional requirements for the classes previously enrolled under 
the two semester plan. 

Graduation Requirement: Students who entered Middlebury prior 
to September 1968 may complete graduation requirements as follows: 


Credits (as of Sept. 16, 1968) 

Terms to be completed 


Fall or Spring 

Winter 

105 

1 

0 

101 

1 

1 

86 

2 

1 

75 

3 

1 

71 

3 

2 

56 

4 

2 

45 

5 

2 

41 

5 

3 

26 

6 

3 

15 

7 

3 

11 

7 

4 

D Credits: Students who entered Middlebury prior to September 

be permitted to credit D’s to their record as follows: 


D credits for courses started 

D credits for courses started 

prior to September 16, 1968 

on or after Sept. 16, 1968 

22 or more D credits 

OD’s 


18 to 21 D credits 

ID 


14 to 17 D credits 

2D’s 


10 to 13 D credits 

3D’s 


6 to 9 D credits 

4D’s 


2 to 5 D credits 

5D’s 


0 to ID credits 

6D’s 



Credits in a Major Department: A student may count either 48 credits 
or 12 courses (54 credits or 14 courses for departments on the new senior 
program) in his major toward graduation requirements. For those intending 
to graduate in June 1969 the maximum may be computed according to either 
system counting 3 or 4 (in the case of laboratories) credits per course. 

Transfer of credits: Ordinarily a regular semester course at another 
institution will be considered the equivalent of a course at Middlebury. 
“Regular semester course” may be defined as any of the following: 3 or 4 


24 


CURRICULUM 


credits, 3 or 4 hours per week per semester, 39 or more 50 minute periods or 
their equivalent. The Dean of the College has discretion to decide on courses 
which do not specifically meet the criteria outlined. 

Students who leave without completing the graduation requirement may 
transfer up to 10 credits or 

7 credits plus one course ,or 

4 credits plus 2 courses, or 

3 courses in order to complete the graduation requirement. 

Failure in a Winter course cannot be satisfied by transfer credit. 

HONOR CODE 

Before enrolling at Middlebury College each student must agree to abide 
by and uphold the Honor System. This agreement is a condition of matricula¬ 
tion. Under the Honor System all quizzes, pre-announced tests, and final 
examinations are un-proctored and at the conclusion of the examination the 
student writes and signs on the examination booklet the following state¬ 
ment : 

“I have neither given nor received aid on this examination.” 

All violations of the Honor Code come under the jurisdiction of the 
Honor Board which is totally student managed. Anyone who observes an 
infraction should report the offense to the Honor Board. Any infraction of 
the Honor System is punishable by dismissal from College. 

SCHOLARSHIP 

When a student enters Middlebury College, he becomes a member of an 
academic community that makes its demands and measures its achievements 
not so much in terms of time as in terms of the task accomplished. Though 
he is required to register for a certain number of units each term, his com¬ 
mitment to his own education will undoubtedly involve many more hours 
a week in reading, in laboratory work, and in preparation for his classes than 
he will spend attending classes. 

Scholarship is graded on the scale of 100. Grades are interpreted as 
follows: 

A 90 to 100 Excellent 
B 80 to 89 Good 
C 70 to 79 Fair 

D 60 to 69 Passing 

F Below 60 Failure 

ACADEMIC HONORS 

The College recognizes superior academic achievement in the following 
ways: 

Dean’s List. Students who attain an average of 85 or better in their 



CURRICULUM 


25 


courses at the end of a Fall or Spring term, and who have no grade below 80 
are placed on the Dean’s List. For students on the Dean’s List attendance at 
classes is at their discretion as long as the quality of their work is maintained. 

Phi Beta Kappa. The Middlebury Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa Society 
is the Beta of Vermont, established in 1868. Students are elected to Phi Beta 
Kappa by the faculty members of the chapter on the basis of outstanding 
academic achievement in all fields of their endeavor. Special consideration 
is given to the attainment of Honors or High Honors in the major department. 
Students are eligible for election at the beginning of their senior year on the 
basis of three years work at Middlebury, or at the end of their senior year on 
the basis of four years work at Middlebury. Students graduating from Middle¬ 
bury who have transferred from other colleges may be elected on the basis 
of at least two years at Middlebury. 

Departmental Honors Program. Departmental Honors are awarded 
upon graduation in recognition of superior performance in the student’s 
major field. See pages 19-20 for description of this program. 

Commencement Honors. Commencement honors are awarded for high 
scholastic rank. The degree of A.B. is conferred cum laude upon those who have 
attained an average rank for their entire work at Middlebury of 85 to 88.99; 
magna cum laude if that rank is 89 to 90.99; summa cum laude if it is 91 or above. 

Honorary Appointments. The faculty makes honorary Commence¬ 
ment appointments: to the senior attaining highest rank, the appointment of 
Valedictorian; to the second in rank, the appointment of Salutatorian. 

Transfer students are not eligible for these appointments. 

Prizes, Scholarships, Fellowships. A number of awards providing hon¬ 
orary or financial recognition of academic achievement have been established. 
Some of these awards are granted during the student’s undergraduate career. 
Others provide assistance for graduate work. A complete listing of these 
awards is found on pages 127-135. 





Special Instructional Programs 

SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

Combined Professional School Plans. (Three Year Plan) Students 
normally spend four years at Middlebury before going on to graduate school 
or to professional schools. However, a student preparing for engineering, 
architecture, medicine, or dentistry who wishes to limit his education at 
Middlebury to three years may, under certain conditions transfer at the end 
of his junior year at Middlebury to an accredited professional school which 
requires a minimum of two more years of study for engineering, two or three 
years for architecture, and four years for medicine or dentistry. He may, upon 
receipt of the professional degree, become eligible, by vote of the Middlebury 
faculty, for a Middlebury A.B. 

For pre-engineering students Middlebury has formal agreements with 
Columbia University School of Engineering, the Duke University School of 
Engineering, and the University of Rochester which ensure admission to 
these schools on a combined five-year course of study. Students wishing to 
take advantage of any three year plan should consult Prof. Edwin L. Pool, 
the Chairman of the Pre-professional Committee, for detailed descriptions 
of the Middlebury course requirements. Any freshman even tentatively 
committed to Pre-professional studies should consult Prof. Pool during the 
Fall term. 

Pre-Medical/Pre-Dental Program. Although many students planning 
to attend dental or medical school following their graduation choose the 
joint Biology-Chemistry major, they may properly elect any undergraduate 
major. However, it is essential that their program include at least the minimal 
selection of courses required by the professional schools to which they will 
be applying. To insure this, all such students should consult with the chair¬ 
man of the Pre-professional Committee for approval of their academic pro¬ 
grams. 

During May of their junior year most premedical students take the 
Medical College Admission Test (Dental Aptitude Test, for predental 
students.) Also at this time, the students obtain recommendation forms 
and distribute them to faculty members of their choice. Early in the senior 
year, the Pre-professional Committee on the basis of an interview with each 
student and consideration of their faculty recommendations, prepares com¬ 
mittee recommendations and letters to be sent to the professional schools. 

Very able students may choose the combined professional school plan 
which permits the student to leave Middlebury at the end of the junior 
year. (See above: Combined Professional School Plans). 

Environmental Studies. Middlebury College has inauguarated an in¬ 
terdisciplinary major in Environmental Studies, with Fields of Emphasis in 
Ecology, Earth Science, and Human Ecology. Middlebury’s locale affords a 


26 



SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 


27 


unique opportunity for field work in these areas, and the Environmental 
Studies major is designed to take full advantage of this opportunity. The 
major is intended for the student who comes to Middlebury College with a 
firm background in science and an interest in such interdisciplinary careers 
as terrestrial or marine ecology, oceanography, earth science, physiography 
and human ecology. 

The curriculum is carefully constructed from the College’s offerings. 
Depending on his Field of Emphasis, the student essentially fulfills the 
departmental requirements for a major in Biology (Ecology), Geology 
(Environmental Geology), or Geography (Human Ecology). Moreover, all 
students majoring in Environmental Studies take a common core of courses 
in Biology, Geology, Geography, Mathematics, Physics, and Chemistry. The 
Ecology and the Environmental Geology programs include particular ad¬ 
ditional courses in the natural sciences, whereas the Human Ecology program 
includes particular additional courses in the social sciences. The depth in his 
Field of Emphasis, and the breadth in the core courses, give the student a 
foundation and perspective in environment that is appropriate to the liberal 
arts tradition. Also, the breadth releases the 2 unit Independent Study and 
General Examination from the confines of a departmental major, permitting 
instead the study of a topic that has interdisciplinary aspects, and permitting 
occasional interdisciplinary seminars. 

Students interested in this program should consult with the staff of one 
of the participating departments (Biology, Geology, or Geography) about 
specific course requirements. The program should be started in the Freshman 
year, in order to fulfill prerequisites for further study. 

Junior Year Abroad. The College permits certain well-qualified stu¬ 
dents to spend the junior year studying abroad. Students applying for 
permission to study abroad are judged on two principles: the extent to which 
they will profit from such study and the impression they will create abroad as 
representatives of Middlebury College. Ordinarily such students are ex¬ 
pected to participate in one of the established foreign study programs. 
Students in these plans receive credit from Middlebury after submitting 
proper credentials. 

Students may also make individual arrangements for study abroad and 
may be granted a year’s leave of absence from the College. No guarantee of 
credit is made in advance, and it is the responsibility of the student to present 
evidence that the work done abroad has been similar in kind and quality to 
that expected of him at Middlebury. 

Students interested in a Junior Year Abroad program should discuss 
their plans early with their faculty adviser and the Dean. 

Critical Languages Cooperative Program. Princeton University has 
recently established a Cooperative Undergraduate Program for Critical 
Languages and has invited Middlebury College to participate. The essence 
of the Program is that a student spends his junior year at Princeton, having 
acquired at least an elementary knowledge of the language he wishes to 


28 


SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAMS 


study. If the language is not available at Middlebury, he takes an intensive 
course at an approved summer school before going to Princeton. After the 
year at Princeton a student may take a second summer of language training 
before he returns to Middlebury for his senior year and the A.B. degree. Par¬ 
ticipation is competitive. The languages available are Arabic, Chinese, 
Japanese, Persian, Russian and Turkish supplemented by relevant area stud¬ 
ies in the humanities and social sciences. 

Teacher Education Program. Middlebury has always prepared 
teachers for the public and private schools. A special program of guidance for 
prospective teachers has been organized to help them develop those qualities, 
personal as well as scholarly and professional, which are most to be desired in 
effective teachers. The Teacher Education program offers opportunities for 
practice teaching on the elementary and secondary levels. Students who 
complete the Teacher Education Program should be able to gain provisional 
certification in most states. The director of Teacher Education is also 
available to advise students on M.A.T. programs and to assist in securing 
teaching positions. 

R.O.T.C. The Department of Military Science conducts courses in 
military subjects in accordance with the Army General Military Science 
curriculum. The objective of the Military Department is to prepare all Ad¬ 
vanced Course R.O.T.C. students for a commission in the Regular Army or 
the Army Reserve. See pages 124 to 126 for complete description. 






Facilities 


THE EGBERT STARR LIBRARY 

It is the aim of the Library to provide for the intellectual needs of 
students and faculty, to encourage recreational reading, and to stimulate a 
love of good books. 

Built in 1900 of six kinds of Vermont marble with funds bequeathed by 
Egbert Starr, the Library’s capacity was more than doubled in 1928 by the 
addition of two wings given by his son, Dr. M. Allen Starr. Additional 
wings and a remodeling of the main building were completed in 1962. 

The collection numbers about 180,000 volumes in all fields of knowl¬ 
edge, plus about 95,000 government documents. Especially noteworthy are 
the large sections in foreign languages: French, German, Italian, Russian 
and Spanish. The Library regularly receives about 1000 newspapers and 
periodicals. Students have free access to all the main stacks. During the 
summer, the Library serves the six Summer Language Schools on the 
campus as well as the School of English and the Writers’ Conference at 
Bread Loaf. 

The Abernethy Library is built around the nucleus of rare books 
bequeathed by Dr. Julian W. Abernethy and comprises one of the best 
collections of American literature in the country. It contains over 10,000 
volumes in first edition and about 1,000 manuscripts, mainly autograph 
letters of American authors. The room, furnished by Frank D. Abernethy, 
brother of the donor, serves the double function of treasure room and reading 
room. 

As part of the Abernethy Library, the Robert Frost Room has 300 
volumes of Frost’s books and books on Frost, most of them autographed. In 
addition, chiefly through the efforts of Mrs. Gorinne Tennyson Davids, the 
Collection includes about 2,800 items of such Frostiana as pamphlets and 
periodicals containing the poet’s work, book reviews, news items, photo¬ 
graphs, college bulletins, sheet music of his poetry, tape and disc recordings, 
and original manuscripts. 

Another collection unique in its field is the Helen Hartness Flanders 
Collection of over 9,500 New England items, including Child Ballads, ballads 
and folk songs of British and American origin, religious songs, fiddle-tunes 
and call-sets which have been recovered through oral transmission. There 
are about 4,400 mechanical recordings. Its library contains rare books, 
broadsides, chap-books, manuscripts, books on folklore as well as American 
and British regional collections and current folk song journals. 

Specialized collections of the Library’s books are also housed in the 
Chemistry Building, Warner Science Hall, the Chateau, and the Christian A. 
Johnson Memorial Building. 

COMPUTER FACILITY 

Teletypes are located in Munroe Hall that connect directly with a 




29 


30 


FACILITIES 


GE-625 computer at Dartmouth College. These provide students with access 
to a computer for class and laboratory work or for individual projects, using 
BASIC and other computer languages. 

BUILDINGS 

Administration Building (1836). The Old Chapel, built of grey lime¬ 
stone and for years used as the chief recitation hall, was completely remodeled 
in 1941 and turned over to administrative offices. Here are located the Old 
Chapel Room and the offices of the President, the Vice President, the 
Treasurer, the Deans, the Registrar, the Business Manager, the Comptroller, 
and the Editor of Publications. 

Allen Hall (1963) is constructed of slate from Fair Haven, the home 
for many years of Cecile Child Allen ’01, in whose memory it is named. 
It houses seventy women students and four house residents and is divided 
into four separate sections of varying size. In each section is a suite for 
the resident and a study lounge. Women agreeing to speak German, Russian, 
or Spanish are assigned to separate sections, each under the direction of a 
resident speaking that language. 

Atwater House is a three-story white frame dormitory on a tree-shaded 
street close to the campus, with accommodations for twenty students. 

Battell Halls (1950 and 1955) are located on the approach to the 
Chateau, and east of Pearsons Hall. They are constructed of grey limestone 
and house two hundred and fifty women. 

Bread Loaf Campus. Located twelve miles to the east of the village of 
Middlebury, this extensive tract of land and group of buildings, comprised 
of an inn and surrounding cottages, was willed to the College in 1915 by 
Colonel Joseph Battell; and has since been augmented by the construction 
of a library, a little theatre, and other housing accommodations. 

Carr Hall (1951), located on College Street east of Forest Hall, is a 
two-story limestone building constructed in memory of Reid Langdon Carr, 
’01, a former Trustee. Used for the Fine Arts for nearly twenty years, it was 
converted in 1968 to use as a College Dispensary until funds become available 
for a new building to serve this purpose. 

The Chateau (1925). Middlebury College was a pioneer in the plan of 
the separate language house, where the residents use the foreign language ex¬ 
clusively while in the building. The Chateau is one of the oldest and still 
the largest “maison francaise” in the United States. Its architecture was 
inspired by the Pavilion Henri IV of the palace of Fontainebleau. The Cha¬ 
teau contains a large salon and a Salon Louis XVI with authentic panels 
from the Hotel Crillon in Paris and furnishings of the period; a library, class¬ 
rooms, offices, a dining room, and rooms for forty-eight women. 

Charles A. Dana Auditorium, completed in September 1965, and 


FACILITIES 


31 


named in honor of Mr. Dana, benefactor of the College, is a fine modern 
270-place amphitheatre. Functioning as a part of the Sunderland Language 
Center, and connected with its electronic studios, it is used not only by the 
Language Schools, but by the whole College for concerts, lectures and other 
academic and cultural meetings. 

Chemistry Building, constructed in 1913, housed that department 
until it moved in 1968 into the new Science Center; and, is now awaiting 
renovation. 

Christian A. Johnson Memorial Building (1968). The gift of The 
Christian A. Johnson Endeavour Foundation, presented by Mrs. Johnson 
in memory of her husband, expresses in its handsome and generous archi¬ 
tecture Middlebury’s deep commitment to the programs in Art and Music 
which are located in the building. A large recital hall, the Johnson Gallery 
for exhibits of art, studios for painting, design, graphics and sculpture, prac¬ 
tice rooms for instrument and voice as well as a library and classroom facilities 
ring the great three-story open exhibition hall. The building is located on the 
site of the former music studios south of the Wright Theatre. 

The Deanery and the Faculty House. The acquisition and restoration 
of these two brick buildings adjoining the campus, built about the time of the 
founding of the College, was made possible in 1966 by the gifts of an anony¬ 
mous donor interested in providing housing accommodations for members 
of the faculty and staff, at the same time restoring and preserving outstanding 
specimens of early American architecture. 

Economics House (1909) houses the Faculty Lounge; the offices, library, 
and rooms of the Economics Department; and the Alumni Center, with 
offices of the Alumni and Alumnae Secretaries and the Placement Bureau. 

Forest Hall (1936) is a women’s dormitory constructed of grey limestone 
and containing sixty-three double suites of two rooms and connecting lava¬ 
tory, attractive reception rooms and dining rooms. It was built with funds 
derived from the sale of a large acreage of mountain forest to the federal 
government. 

Gifford Hall (1940), a five-story grey limestone men’s dormitory over¬ 
looking the campus, was the memorial gift of the late Mrs. James M. Gifford, 
widow of a long-time trustee of the College. 

Hepburn Hall (1916), the gift of A. Barton Hepburn, ’71, is a five-story 
dormitory of grey brick on one of the highest points of the campus. It was 
completely renovated and remodeled in 1958-59 as a dormitory for freshman 
men. 

Hillcrest (1918) is a three-story white frame building, housing students. 

Mead Memorial Chapel (1916). This colonial white marble structure of 
the New England meeting house type, the gift of John A. Mead, ’64, stands 
on the highest eminence of the campus, and the light which shines nightly 




32 


FACILITIES 


from its spire is a county landmark. Across its facade are chiseled the words 
“The Strength of the Hills Is His Also.” The chancel has accommodations for 
a vested student choir and contains a large pipe organ. In the tower is a 
carillon of eleven bells which are played daily by a student from 5:30 to 
6:00 while the College is in session. The small Sunderland Memorial Chapel 
is used for private devotion and special services. 

Munroe Hall (1941). Many of the departments have their classrooms 
and offices in Munroe Hall, the gift of the late Charles A. Munroe, ’96, a 
former trustee. The interior is modern while the exterior of grey limestone and 
marble trim conforms with the general colonial architecture of the older 
buildings. 

New Residence Halls for Men and Women: As the beginning of a 
modest planned expansion, the College will open new residence facilities on 
the hill beyond Pearsons Hall early in 1969. Designed to blend with the 
traditional Middlebury stone buildings, the new residences are modern in 
general concept incorporating a suite plan of rooms. Housing 111 women 
and 132 men, the two structures will be joined at the ground level with 
lounge and recreational facilities common to both. 

New Dining-Social Units: Now under construction at a distance 
beyond the new residence halls are the first three of an eventual nine units 
to be built around a serving kitchen, each separately articulated archi¬ 
tecturally. The dining capacity of 125 students which each of these units 
provides will permit extending into the upperclass years co-educational 
dining, offered hitherto only in Proctor Hall during the freshman year. 
Primarily, however, the social facilities integral to each unit are designed to 
initiate a more wholly co-educational social life than can possibly be de¬ 
veloped when centered around the separate housing facilities which com¬ 
prise a college residence system. Assignment of men and women students to 
those units will take place at matriculation. 

Painter Hall (1815) is the oldest college building in Vermont and a fine 
example of sturdy New England architecture. It bears the name of a founder 
and first benefactor of the College. Completely remodelled in 1936, it is a 
men’s dormitory. 

Pearsons Hall (1911), a marble building of colonial design which com¬ 
mands a view of both the Adirondacks and the Green Mountains, is a dorm¬ 
itory for junior women. 

Porter Hospital (1925) is a fireproof brick building with a beautiful 
view of the Green Mountains, the gift of William H. Porter to the College, 
for use by the College and the residents of Addison County. In 1960 the build¬ 
ing was completely renovated and a substantial wing was added. The Hospi¬ 
tal has a 48-bed capacity, modern equipment, graduate nurses always on 
duty, a resident surgeon, and local physicians on call. 

Recitation Hall (1917) is a frame building renovated to provide class- 



FACILITIES 


33 


room, laboratory, and storage facilities for the departments of Geography 
and Psychology. 

Redfield Proctor Hall (1960), named in honor of the late Governor 
Redfield Proctor, trustee and benefactor of the College, is the Dining Hall— 
Student Center. It contains student lounges and offices, a bookstore, the 
College Radio Station, Offices of the Chaplain, Director of Food Service, and 
other facilities. The large dining room, accommodating four hundred 
students by counter-buffet service, permits the entire freshman class, both 
men and women, to eat together during their first year in college. 

I Robert Frost Memorial. The cabin and other buildings which Mr. 

Frost used as his summer home in Ripton, adjoining the Bread Loaf Campus 
and known as the Homer Noble Farm, were acquired by the College in 1966 
through the gift of a generous benefactor. 

Science Center (1968). Located on the lower campus below Warner 
Hall, the Science Center houses the departments of Chemistry, Biology, 
Geology and Physics. Eventual expansion plans call for a fully integrated 
facility for all the natural sciences. 

Starr Hall (1861) was erected to complete “Old Stone Row 55 —Painter, 
Old Chapel, and Starr—and was rebuilt four years later after a fire. It was 
completely remodeled in 1946 and is a dormitory for freshman men. 

Starr Library (1900), including also the Abernethy Library and other 
collections, is described above. 

Stewart Hall (1956) is a modem dormitory of Vermont limestone 
containing accommodations for one hundred and fifty-two men in double 
rooms and an apartment for the faculty resident. Located on the upper 
campus south of Hepburn Hall, it enjoys attractive views of both the Green 
Mountains and the Adirondacks. It is named in recognition of the Stewart 
family’s long history of service to Middlebury College. 

Sunderland Language Center, completed in September 1965, and 
named in honor of the late Edwin S. S. Sunderland, trustee and benefactor of 
the College, is the headquarters of the Foreign Language Division and the 

( Summer Language Schools. Its modern audio-visual classrooms, recording 
and transmission studios, connecting with 63 library-type cubicles equipped 
with the latest devices for individual language study make this the finest 
Language Center in the country. 

Warner Science Hall (1901) houses the lecture rooms, laboratories, and 

I libraries of Biology. It was built through the benefactions of Ezra J. Warner, 
’61, as a memorial to his father, once a trustee of the College. The Natural 
History Museum on the upper floors houses a large collection of fossils of 
Vermont and the Champlain Valley and a complete series of the flowering 
plants and ferns of the region. A modern greenhouse has been added to the 
equipment for the courses in botany. 



34 


FACILITIES 


The Emma Willard House (acquired in 1959), where Emma Hart 
Willard established her Female Seminary in 1814, is occupied by the offices 
of the Directors of Admissions, the Teacher Training Program, and Financial 
Aid. 


Wright Memorial Theatre (1958), the drama and speech center, 
includes a 400-seat auditorium, a drama workshop, rehearsal rooms, debate 
rooms, classrooms and faculty offices. The building is named to honor 
Charles Baker Wright, Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature at 
Middlebury from 1885 to 1920. 

ATHLETIC FACILITIES 

The World War II Memorial Field House (1949) is a building 400 feet 
by 120 feet, located on South Main Street adjacent to Porter Field and the 
Fred D. Lang Memorial Field. Accommodations in this building provide for 
large assemblies, dances, an indoor skating rink with artificial ice, reg¬ 
ulation and practice basketball courts, a field cage, badminton, tennis, and 
volley ball courts, offices and other facilities. The headquarters, offices, rifle 
range and supply rooms of the R.O.T.C. unit are also located here. 

Beyond the Field House is the Middlebury College Golf Course, a nine- 
hole course owned and operated by the College. 

The Porter Athletic Field of about eighty acres contains a quarter-mile 
cinder track, a baseball diamond, the football field, soccer and lacrosse field, 
and bleachers. 

The Fred Davis Lang Memorial Field, situated east of the Memorial 
Field House, consists of approximately four acres of playing fields available 
for intramural sports. 

Sixteen outdoor tennis courts are located on the campus. 

The mountain campus includes the Middlebury College Snow Bowl 
containing an eight-mile cross-country ski trail, three Poma ski lifts, six slalom 
and downhill trails and slopes, and two jumps. The 3,185-foot ski lift is 
the first installed by any college and the 50-meter Gignac Memorial Jump 
is the largest collegiate jump in the country. The Neil Starr Shelter, which 
serves as a base building, contains first aid and food service facilities, and a 
library reading room. Its glass-walled main floor, balcony, and terrace afford 
a magnificent view of the lifts, slopes, and jumps. 

McCullough Gymnasium for Women (1912) is of marble in colonial 
style and contains facilities for women’s indoor athletic activities, squash and 
handball, body mechanics, and dance as well as arrangements for indoor 
archery, golf, and battleboard tennis. Offices, lecture room, lounge, and 
locker room are included. The campus also has a large playing area for 
women’s outdoor sports, field hockey, lacrosse, softball, and golf practice. 

The Arthur M. Brown Swimming Pool (1963), meeting N.G.A.A. 



FACILITIES 


35 


competition requirements, is for the use of the entire college. It was added 
to the McCullough Gymnasium through the generosity of Mr. and Mrs. 
John Kruesi and a bequest of Malcolm T. Anderson, ’25. 








Development Program 

The long range Development Program, inaugurated in 1954, seeks the 
additional funds necessary to provide increased teaching resources and 
academic facilities required to sustain Middlebury’s educational objectives. 

Instructional plant needs require funds for the development of the 
Science Center and for renovation of older Science buildings. Residential 
facilities would be improved greatly by gifts for new Residence Halls, new 
Dining-Social units and for equipping and endowing the Student Health 
Center. Funds for a Studio for Modern Dance and additional athletic fields 
are required to meet needs in physical education. 

Major attention is being given to the need for increased endowment. 
Gifts and bequests particularly helpful would be directed in support of in¬ 
creased funds for faculty research, for an improved faculty study and research 
leave program, for visiting lectureships, for library and fine arts acquisitions, 
and for scholarships. 

The endowment of a professorship is one of the finest and most reward¬ 
ing contributions that can be made to a college. Necessary funds for such an 
endowment would range from $400,000 to $500,000. The endowed professor¬ 
ships currently established at Middlebury and the dates of their founding are 
as follows: 


The Burr Professorship of Chemistry and Natural History (1829) 

The John C. Baldwin Professorship of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy (1 o ) 
The Levi P. Morton Professorship of Latin and French (1886-87) 

The Beman Professorship of Mathematics (1893) 

The James B. Jermain Professorship of Political Economy (1901) 

The A. Barton Hepburn Women’s Professorship (1908) 

The George Nye and Anne Walker Boardman Professorship of Mental and Moral 
Science (1908) 

The Paige-Wright Professorship of Economics (1913) 

The Fletcher D. Proctor Professorship of American History (1918) 

The Henry Norman Hudson Professorship of English (1920) 

The A. Barton Hepburn Professorship of Economics (1922) 

The John C. McCullough Professorship of Chemistry (1924) 

The Julian W. Abernethy Professorship of American Literature (1933) 

The Albert D. Mead Professorship of Biology (1949) 

The George Adams Ellis Professorship of Liberal Arts (1956) 

The Tean Thomson Fulton Professorships of Modern Languages and Literature (19b ) 
The Irene Heinz and John La Porte Given Professorship in Pre-medical Sciences 

(1966) 

The Charles A. Dana Professorships (1966) 


The Administration will be happy to discuss any of its future plans with 
friends of the College. Forms for gifts and bequests for endowment, general, 
and specific purposes are as follows: 


36 


DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM 


37 


Forms for Gifts and Bequests 

The corporate title of Middlebury College is “The President and Fellows of 
Middlebury College.” 


The following forms are suggested: 


General: 


Endowment : 


For A 
Specific 
Purpose : 


“I give (or bequeath) to The President and Fellows of Middlebury 
College , a corporation of the State of Vermont , located at Middlebury , 

Vermont , the sum of . for the uses and 

purposes of the said Corporation .” 

“I give (or bequeath) to The President and Fellows of Middlebury 
College , a corporation of the State of Vermont , located at Middlebury , 

Vermont , the sum of . to be added to 

the General Endowment of the said Corporation .” 

“I give (or bequeath :) to The President and Fellows of Middlebury 
College , a corporation of the State of Vermont , located at Middlebury , 

Vermont , the sum of . to be known as 

the . Fund , the principal to be invested 

and reinvested in its discretion , and the income therefrom to be used 

for the purposes of . If at any time , 

in the judgment of the Trustees of the said Corporation , the need 
of income for such purpose no longer exists , the Trustees of the said 
Corporation shall be , and hereby are , authorized to use the income 
from the Fund for such purpose as shall in their judgment promote 
the interests of the College” 


Middlebury College is accredited by the New England Association of 
Colleges and Secondary Schools, and the Vermont State Department of 
Education. 

The New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools ac¬ 
credits schools and colleges in the six New England states. Membership in one 
of the six regional accrediting associations in the United States indicates that 
the school or college has been carefully evaluated and found to meet standards 
agreed upon by qualified educators. Colleges support the efforts of public 
school and community officials to have their secondary school meet the 
standards of membership. 







College Regulations 
and Services 


The college furnishes each student with a 
pamphlet of regulations containing detailed information as to enrollment, 
attendance, scholarship, examinations, athletics, and student activities. All 
students are responsible for a thorough knowledge of and compliance with 

these regulations. . 

The College reserves the right to exclude at any time students whose 
conduct or academic standing it regards as undesirable, without assigning 
any further reason therefore. In such cases, the fees which are due or which 
may have been paid in advance will not be refunded or remitted, in whole 
or in part, and neither the College nor any of its officers shall be under any 
liability whatsoever for such exclusion. 

Course Changes. No change in studies is allowed during the first week 
of the classroom work except by the permission of the student’s adviser. 
During the second week of classroom work a change may be made only 
with the permission of the adviser, the respective Dean and the instructor in¬ 
volved and the payment of a fee of $5. After the second week of classroom 
work no change may be made except within a department and upon the 
initiative of the instructor. No refund of fees for extra courses or for the use of 
laboratories is allowed after the second full week of the term. 

Grades. Reports of standing are made to the Registrar by the instructors 
at the end of each term. Faculty members do not give out final course grades. 

Students are responsible for keeping parents correctly and currently 
informed of their standing and progress in college. Final grades and notices 
of academic probation are sent to parents. Parents are notified when a 
student is placed on warning in two courses. 

The Dean of Men, or the Dean of Women, will consider any special 
curricular problems of veterans and grant waivers to the usual requirements 
when circumstances involve such factors as health, extended interruption of 
education, and family responsibilities. 

“Successful completion of a year” for draft board certification is defined 
as “approved for continuance in college.” 

Transfer of Credit. Normally, transfer credits from other recognized educa¬ 
tional institutions are accepted only for the purpose of making up deficiencies 
in the student’s Middlebury record. All failures and all D courses in excess of 6 
must be made up by means of transfer credits. Whenever possible, the student 
should secure advance permission to attempt such work at another institu¬ 
tion. Transfer of credit forms are available at the Deans’ offices. No credit 
is granted for correspondence courses. 

In exceptional cases, and for sound educational reasons, students may 

38 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


39 


offer the following as equivalent to a year’s work or to a Fall or Spring 
term as appropriate: 

(a) Approved foreign study programs. 

(b) Summer programs of study approved in advance by the student’s 
major department and the Administration Committee. 

(c) Programs of study in conjunction with a Leave of Absence approved 
by the student’s major department and the Administration Com¬ 
mittee. 

(d) Three or more Advanced Placements at entrance, approved by the 
departments concerned, as equivalent to a year’s work on the 
recommendation of the Administration Committee. 

Failure, Probation, Warning and Readmission. A student who 
receives two failing grades, three D grades or one failing grade and two D’s 
during a fall or spring term will be dropped from College. First-term freshmen 
and seventh-term seniors will be reviewed by the Administration Committee 
prior to final action. 

A student who receives two D grades or one failing grade and a D grade 
in a single term will be placed on probation until the end of the following Fall 
or Spring term. A student on probation who receives one failing grade or two 
D grades in the subsequent Fall or Spring term will be required to withdraw. 

A student who receives a failing grade in the Winter term while on 
probation will be required to withdraw; if not on probation the student will 
be placed on probation for the Spring term. A student on probation from the 
previous fall and who receives an honors grade for the Winter Session will be 
removed from probation. A student may not be placed on probation more 
than twice in his College career. 

At any time when a student is failing a course, consistently receiving 
grades below 70, or in any way neglecting the obligations of a course, he is 
placed on warning for a minimum of four weeks. At the end of the four-week 
period he may be taken off warning by the Dean if the instructor certifies that 
his work has improved sufficiently to warrant this action. 

A student who is failing at the same time in three courses is dropped from 
college if it is the consensus of his instructors and the Dean that his failure is 
due to lack of application or to negligent attitude. 

A student dropped for academic failure will not be readmitted except 
by special action of the Administration Committee. Readmission is a special 
privilege, not a right. The Committee will take favorable action only when 
it is satisfied that the factors which led to failure have been rectified and that 
the student has both ample motivation and capacity to earn his degree. 
Mere lapse of time is not sufficient basis for readmission. The burden of 
proof of motivation and capacity rests with the student. The student is 
encouraged to enroll at another accredited institution and to achieve a 
good record there. In some cases, military service or employment related to 
his interests may be considered as evidence. 

Application for readmission is made to the Administration Committee 






40 


COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


through the Deans of Students. Any student readmitted will be on probation 
for the first term following his return and, if dropped a second time, will 
not be readmitted. A student dropped at mid-years may not be considered 
for readmission until the following September; a student dropped in June 
may not be considered for readmission until one academic year has elapsed. 

Extracurricular Activities. Middlebury College recognizes the value of 
extracurricular activities, and students are encouraged to participate in 
cultural, social, and athletic functions outside of scheduled class work, but 
participation in such events should not be at the expense of curricular 
obligations. 

Attendance. In order to achieve the levels of scholarship which are the 
objective of the students and of the College, students are advised to attend 
all scheduled meetings of their classes. Since the seriousness of absence 
varies among the courses, instructors announce their attendance policies. 
Students on the Dean’s List, however, are offered the prerogative of voluntary 
attendance, though they must be present for all pre-announced examinations 
and may, at the discretion of the instructor, be required to submit promptly 
all written requirements of the course. Whenever, in the opinion of the 
instructor, a student’s work in a course is being impaired by non-attendance, 
the Dean is informed and the student must comply with the instructor’s 
requirements for completing the work missed. For students not on the Dean’s 
List, instructors specify the conditions under which work may be made up 
after a necessary absence. When an absence has not been justified, however, 
the instructor has no responsibility for aiding the student in making up the 
work. 

When a necessary absence is taken in any course, the student is advised 
to prepare an “Explanation of Absence” form in the Dean’s Office (in the 
Dispensary Office if illness is the cause) and to submit the form to the instruc¬ 
tor. Absences are not excused by the Dean or Doctor prior to a student’s being 
placed on warning, except for a necessary absence from a pre-announced 
examination, or for an absence due to an emergency. The explanations are for 
information only. The Dean’s Office periodically submits to the faculty the 
names of students who are to be absent while participating in approved 
extracurricular activities. 

Reasons for absence which are usually accepted by the instructor and 
the Dean are necessary employment, illness (verified by the College Physi¬ 
cian), participation in recognized extracurricular events, and emergencies. 

Tardiness from a class or exercise is recorded as an absence. 

A student who is absent from a pre-announced examination without 
excuse receives a failure for the examination and is not granted the privilege 
of making it up. 

Auditing. With the advance permission of the instructor and the Dean 
a regularly enrolled student may attend other classes as an auditor. The 
instructor establishes the conditions under which the student may audit, 




COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


41 


but in no case can the student receive credit for auditing. Occasional visiting 
is also allowed with the previous permission of the instructor. 

Motor Vehicles. Qualified students are permitted to have or to operate 
a motor vehicle after the beginning of their sophomore year. 

RESIDENCE HALLS 

Middlebury is a residential college. All single men live in the residence 
halls or fraternity houses; all women live in the residence halls. 

Reservations are made by upperclassmen during the spring for the 
following year. Students reserving rooms are responsible for the year’s 
rental charge, unless special arrangements are made with the Director of 
Dining Halls at the time the room contract is signed. All rooms are assigned 
subject to residence halls regulations and the terms of the room contract. 
Occupants are liable for any damage to the residence halls and their fur¬ 
nishings. A student may be required to withdraw from college or be subject 
to lesser disciplinary penalties for failure to respect residence halls regulations, 
and forfeit the room charge already paid. The College does not accept re¬ 
sponsibility for loss of money or other personal property or damage thereto 
while located in the Halls. The Director of Residence Halls reserves the right 
to remove from a student’s room any item which constitutes a safety hazard or 
seriously interferes with the maintenance of the building. 

Rooms are ready for occupancy in September on the day preceding the 
first college exercises and, expect for seniors, are vacated in June on the 
day following the student’s last final examination. Residences are closed 
during the Thanksgiving, Christmas and Spring vacations, and students may 
not have access to rooms during these periods. 

Men’s Residences. Preference in choice of rooms is given to students in 
order of classes. Hepburn and Stewart Hall are reserved for freshmen. 
Residence Halls are furnished with single or double-deck beds, mattresses, 
desks, dresser and chairs. Bedding, pillows and other accessories are furnished 
by the occupants. Room fees include heat and electricity, and maid service 
once a week. Students provide their own laundry service. 

Student proctors in the upperclass Halls report to the Dean of Men and 
the Director of Residence Halls and represent the interests of both students 
and administration in matters concerning residence life. Junior Fellows in 
each section of the freshman halls have similar functions and in addition 
work closely with the Deans and the freshman counselors. 

Freshman men are required to dine in Proctor Hall. Other students may 
dine there, or at fraternity houses, or at restaurants in town. 

Women’s Residences. Each of the residences for undergraduate women 
is under the supervision of a head resident. The room charge includes heat, 
light and limited maid and janitor service. All rooms are furnished with 
single bed, pillow, mattress, study table, chiffonier or dresser, and chair for 




42 


COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


each student. Students provide their own bed linen and towels and provide 
for their laundering. All resident women students dine in college dining halls. 
Freshman women dine with the freshman men in Proctor Hall. 

Women’s residence halls include Forest Hall, Pearsons Hall, Battell 
North, Center, and South. The Chateau and Allen Hall accept qualified stu¬ 
dents who are interested in acquiring facility in spoken French, German, 
Spanish, or Russian. 


FRESHMAN WEEK 

Directly preceding the opening of the fall term, there is a four-day 
period of orientation to assist freshmen in adjusting to the college community. 
The program includes Freshman Convocation, an informal assembly, regis¬ 
tration, receptions and social gatherings, lectures by members of the college 
personnel, and placement tests. Each student is assigned to a faculty coun¬ 
selor. Freshmen are also assisted by upperclass student advisers. 


CHAPEL SERVICES 

On the highest eminence of the campus stands Mead Memorial Chapel, 
where members of the community may gather for common worship. During 
the week there are occasional services conducted by the chaplains, faculty 
members, and students. 

The main weekly service is on Sunday morning. The sermons are de¬ 
livered by the Chaplains, visiting clergymen, and faculty members. During 
1967-68 Dr. Ben Herbster, president of the United Church of Christ, the 
Reverend James Breeden of the Massachusetts Council of Churches, Pro¬ 
fessor Richard Hettlinger of Kenyon College, and Professor Paul L. Lehmann 
of Union Theological Seminary were among the guest preachers. 

In addition to services there are occasional lectures by eminent scholars, 
lay and clerical, who discuss topics of contemporary interest in theological 
and cognate fields. 

The chapel program is entirely voluntary. It is Christian in emphasis 
and ecumenical in breadth. 


ENDOWED LECTURESHIPS 

Julian W. Abernethy Lecture. Established in 1928 under the will of Julian W. 
Abernethy, Class of 1876. A writer of distinction is annually invited to address the College 
upon some aspect of American literature in commemoration of the birthday of Dr. Aber¬ 
nethy, founder of the Abernethy Library. 

William H. Edmunds *17 Memorial Lecture. Established by Vermont Transit, 
Addison and Chittenden Trust Companies in memory of William Edmunds. Income may 
be used to provide a lecture on the Middlebury campus in the Social Sciences. 

Charles S. Grant Memorial Lecture. Established by friends in memory of Pro¬ 
fessor Grant to provide an annual lecture in History. 

Samuel S. Stratton Lecture. Established by 1962-63 gifts to the Parents’ Fund to 



COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


43 


honor Dr. Stratton at the time of his retirement as the eleventh President of Middlebury, 
to provide an expanded program of visiting lecturers on the Middlebury campus. 

Class of 1914 Lectureship Lecture. Established by an anonymous member of the 
Class of 1914, to provide an annual lecture on Science and the Humanities. 

The John Hamilton Fulton Memorial Lectures. Given anonymously. To estab¬ 
lish lectures, performances and extended visits to the Middlebury campus by distinguished 
scholars, artists and performers. 

The Willard Duncan Carpenter T4 Memorial Lecture. Established by Mrs. 
Ethel G. Storm, Class of 1916, in memory of her first husband. For an annual lecture in 
economics by a visiting economist from a leading university, industry or government. 

HEALTH MEASURES 

The College Medical Fee provides for the services of a full-time physician 
who serves as Medical Director for the College. The Medical Director is 
assisted by two full-time registered nurses who provide round-the-clock 
attention at the College Dispensary. In addition to out-patient treatment at 
the Dispensary, space is provided for bed care of minor illness. The Medical 
Fee provides for four days of care for each student at the Dispensary without 
charge each year. In addition the Medical Fee covers accident insurance for 
all students. The Town of Middlebury has a well equipped hospital; there 
is a surgeon member of the American Board on the staff. Extensive medical 
facilities are available at Mary Fletcher Hospital in Burlington. 

The Medical Director of the College has general oversight of the health 
needs of the student. Every freshman must present before matriculation a 
satisfactory health certificate signed by a physician. Physical measurements 
and health records are filed and corrective exercise recommended when 
needed. All freshmen and sophomores who are physically able are required to 
participate in organized physical activities at least two periods a week. The 
College reserves the right to ask the withdrawal of any student whose physical 
condition is not satisfactory. A student may be requested to have a thorough 
physical examination once a year or whenever considered necessary by the 
Medical Director. The Medical Director authorizes all absences due to 
illness. 

The College maintains a Psychiatric Adviser on its administrative staff. 
He is a fully qualified psychiatrist and is on the campus two afternoons a 
week. Students may visit him directly or be referred to him by the Deans or 
by the Faculty Advisers. There is no charge for this service, but if, in the 
opinion of the Psychiatric Adviser, a student needs a continuing program of 
psychiatric assistance, such a program is arranged and financed privately by 
the student. The Psychiatric Adviser is in constant touch with the Deans and 
advises the College of all matters involving the mental health and welfare 
of the students. 


EXTRACURRICULAR PROGRAM 

The relatively small size of the College permits participation in a 



44 


COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


variety of extracurricular activities by all undergraduates. Theatrical pro¬ 
ductions, sports events, debates, lectures and weekend mountain trips are 
scheduled throughout the year. 

Concert-Film. Outstanding artists and films are brought to the campus 
under the supervision of a faculty committee appointed for that purpose. All 
regularly enrolled students are admitted to these concerts and films without 
charge. 

Many other special lectures are sponsored by the College, under special 
funds, or through various departments and organizations. 

Conference. An annual two-day symposium is held at which outstanding 
authorities in the fields of the arts, literature, economics, politics, religion, 
and science discuss with the students problems of current significance. 

Religion Conference. In 1953 a group of students organized and raised 
money for a weekend conference on religion. They envisioned an annual 
event for the purpose of “exploring the meaning of religion in modern life.” 
In 1957, Mr. Don Mitchell established an endowment to insure an annual 
income for the Religion Conference. As a result this conference has become 
one of the important occasions in the college calendar. 

Radio Station. Students operate an F. M. radio station licensed by the 
F. C. C. as a 10 watt educational facility. Programming features music, 
sports, interviews and news. 

ATHLETICS 

Middlebury College is a member of the Eastern College Athletic Con¬ 
ference, the largest collegiate athletic conference in the nation. This Con¬ 
ference has exacting rules of eligibility affecting competition by its members. 
Middlebury is also a member of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. 
The College maintains a healthy and active intercollegiate athletic program 
consisting of ten sports: football, soccer, basketball, skiing, hockey, baseball, 
track, lacrosse, golf, and tennis. There is also a freshman athletic program in 
some intercollegiate sports. Colleges of similar size and type such as Amherst, 
Williams, Wesleyan, Hamilton, and Union are met in most sports. In some 
sports Middlebury teams meet Army, Cornell, Dartmouth, Harvard, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Princeton, Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, and other large institutions. Middlebury, Norwich University, 
University of Vermont and St. Michael’s College play annually for the 
Vermont State Championship in most sports. 

Intramural games are scheduled in basketball, track, golf, rifle, soccer, 
lacrosse, bowling, tennis, relays, badminton, touch football, volleyball, 
hockey, softball, and swimming. Skiing and hockey are special features of 
the winter calendar. 

A sports program for women, under the direction of the Department of 
Physical Education for Women and the Women’s Recreation Association, 
includes intramurals, extramurals with other colleges, and participation in 




COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


45 


organized tournaments and meets open to college women. Activities include 
archery, badminton, basketball, bowling, diving, field hockey, folk dance, 
golf, ice skating, lacrosse, modern dance, riding, skiing, softball, squash, 
swimming, synchronized swimming, table tennis, tennis, trampoline, and 
volleyball. Performing groups include the Modern Dance Club and the 
Synchronized Swimming Club. 

Students take part in the Annual Winter Carnival which, in the thirty- 
four years since its inception, has assumed an important role in the social 
and sports life of the College. 

The College does not assume legal responsibility for the expense in caring 
for injuries sustained by athletes while training for or participating in athletic 
competition. 


ORGANIZATIONS 

Administrative organizations include the Interfraternity and Panhellenic 
Councils and Redfield Proctor Hall Board of Governors. 

Honorary organizations on the campus are: Phi Beta Kappa, Wau- 
banake, Blue Key, Mortar Board, Junior Counsellors and Sophomore Guides. 

There are also athletic, musical, dramatic, literary, religious, and 
departmental student clubs. 

Ten fraternities are represented: Alpha Sigma Psi, Chi Psi, Delta 
Kappa Epsilon, Delta Tau Omega, Delta Upsilon, Kappa Delta Rho, Phi 
Kappa Tau, Sigma Epsilon, Theta Chi, and Zeta Psi; and five national 
sororities: Alpha Xi Delta, Delta Delta Delta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Pi 
Beta Phi, and Sigma Kappa. 

Fraternity rushing is held at the beginning of the sophomore year. 
Sorority rushing takes place at the beginning of the spring term of the fresh¬ 
man year. 


PUBLICATIONS 

Undergraduates of Middlebury College publish the weekly newspaper, 
The Middlebury Campus. Students assume complete responsibility for the 
editorial content of the newspaper. The junior class publishes The Kaleido¬ 
scope, the student yearbook. The Middlebury Handbook , giving information 
about campus organizations and college regulations, is published annually. 

New Faces , a publication containing pictures of the members of the 
entering class, is published each year by the College in cooperation with 
the students and made available to parents and members of the student body. 

The Middlebury College News Letter , a quarterly magazine, is published 
by the College for its alumni. 

Tour Family and Middlebury is a quarterly publication distributed to 
parents and friends. 

The Middlebury College Bulletin is published eight times during the 
college year. Periodic numbers include catalogues of the academic year, the 



46 


COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


Language Schools, the Bread Loaf School of English, the Bread Loaf Writers’ 
Conference, and the Graduate Schools Abroad. 

VOCATIONAL PLACEMENT 

The Placement Office of Middlebury College provides a central source 
of information on employment for both undergraduates and graduates. Here 
are filed college credentials, the record of graduate work and further training, 
and of first and subsequent positions, together with references from teachers 
and employers. 

Opportunities are given students to meet representatives of various 
vocations and professions and to learn of openings and requirements in their 
fields of interest. The Occupational Library in the Placement Office assembles 
recent publications in a wide variety of fields. Many alumni provide voca¬ 
tional advice for undergraduates. 

GRADUATE WORK 

Academic Year. Middlebury College offers graduate courses leading to 
the Master of Science degree in the Departments of Biology and Chemistry 
during the regular academic year. Inquiries about these programs should be 
addressed to the chairman of the department concerned. Graduate students 
may be enrolled only upon recommendation of the department concerned 
and approval by the Graduate Work Committee. The courses which are 
regularly offered for graduate credit are: 

Biology: All Biology courses numbered 34.1 or above and Mathematics 
35.1 and 35.2. 

Chemistry: All Chemistry courses numbered 42.1 or above. 

In order to serve the needs of graduate students in these departments, cognate 
courses in other departments may, when appropriate, be raised to graduate 
level by inclusion of supplemental material. 

Candidacy for the Master of Science degree is subject to the following 
general regulations: 

1. The candidate must hold a baccalaureate degree from Middlebury 
College or from a comparable institution and must have completed an under¬ 
graduate course of study sufficient for effective graduate work. 

2. The candidate must satisfy Middlebury College of his fitness to 
undertake graduate study. 

3. The candidate must be a student in residence at Middlebury College 
for at least one academic year. 

4. In order to be granted the degree, the candidate must complete 
successfully graduate work equivalent to thirty units of credit. Not less than 
two-thirds of the required work must be done at Middlebury College and not 
less than two-thirds of the work to be counted toward the degree must be in 
the department in which the degree is to be granted. 

5. Graduate work done at other institutions may be transferred for 






COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


47 


credit toward a Middlebury degree, subject to appropriate conditions, but 
in no case may credit transferred exceed one-third of the total required for 
the degree. 

6. Graduate work in cognate fields may, upon approval of the major 
department, be counted toward the degree, but in no case may such cognate 
work exceed one-third of the total required for the degree. 

7. All work to be credited toward the degree must be completed with a 
grade of 80 or above. 

8. All work to be credited toward the degree must have been completed 
during the ten year period immediately preceding the granting of the degree. 

Candidacy for the Master of Science degree is subject also to such 
further regulations as Middlebury College may establish. 

Tuition fees for graduate study are the same as those for undergraduate 
work. There is an additional fee of $15 for the diploma. 

Summer Session. Graduate work leading to the Master of Arts degree 
in English is offered in the summer at the Middlebury College Bread Loaf 
School of English. Courses, varied each year, are given in English, American, 
and classical literature, literary history and criticism, dramatic arts, and the 
craft of writing. Full information about the curriculum and requirements for 
the degree is given in the Middlebury College Bulletin for the Bread Loaf 
School of English, published each year in February. All inquiries should be 
addressed to the Director. 

Graduate work leading to the Master of Arts degree is offered in the 
Middlebury College Summer Language Schools of French, German, Italian, 
Russian and Spanish. Courses, varied each year, are given in the spoken and 
written language, literature, civilization, and methods of teaching the lan¬ 
guage. Students are required to pledge themselves to use only the language 
of their school during the entire session. Full information about the cur¬ 
riculum and requirements for the degree is given in the Middlebury College 
Bulletin on the Summer Language Schools, published each year in March. 
All general inquiries should be addressed to the Secretary of the Language 
Schools; specific inquiries about admission and courses, to the Director of 
the School. 

Beginning and advanced courses for undergraduate and graduate credit 
are also offered in Mandarin Chinese, in a ten-week summer session. Full 
information is given in the special Bulletin on the Summer School of Manda¬ 
rin Chinese, which may be requested of the Secretary of the Language 
Schools. 

The Middlebury College Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference is also held 
at Bread Loaf during the two weeks following the School of English. This 
Conference offers lectures, discussions, and private consultations, at the 
graduate level, in fiction, non-fiction, poetry and children’s literature, but 
does not lead to a degree. Full information is provided in the special Bulletin, 
published each year in April. Inquiries should be addressed to the Bread 
Loaf Secretary. 



48 


COLLEGE REGULATIONS AND SERVICES 


The Graduate Schools Abroad. Middlebury College conducts Gradu¬ 
ate Schools of French in France, of German in Germany, of Italian in Italy, 
and of Spanish in Spain. 

The students spend the academic year on a coordinated program of 
advanced instruction in linguistics, phonetics, literature, history, the arts and 
social institutions. These courses are followed in the Faculties or other 
divisions and institutes, or in specially arranged graduate study, in Paris, 
Mainz, Florence, and Madrid. The students work under the close guidance 
and supervision of a resident representative of Middlebury College. At the 
close of the year, final examinations are administered under his direction, and 
the successful candidates receive the Middlebury Master of Arts degree, in 
addition to any foreign certificates or diplomas which they may earn. 

A preliminary summer of preparation at the Middlebury Summer School 
is normally required, and only those who prove themselves qualified are 
allowed to enroll. Members of the group make their own arrangements for 
transportation, board and room, with the advice and guidance of the Middle¬ 
bury Director. The Director facilitates worthwhile social contacts and assists 
their plans for travel, visits to museums, and attendance at theatres and 
concerts. A special bulletin will be sent on request. 

The Degree of Doctor of Modern Languages. In addition to the 
Master’s degree, Middlebury College offers, through the Foreign Language 
Schools, the advanced degree of Doctor of Modern Languages (D.M.L.). A 
detailed statement of the requirements for this degree will be sent on request. 



Courses 


Ihe departments of instruction are 
organized in four Divisions: Humanities, Foreign Languages, Social Sciences, 
Natural Sciences; they are described in this catalogue in the following order: 

Division of the Humanities 

American Literature 
English and Drama 
Fine Arts 

Division of the Foreign Languages 

Classics 
French 
German 

Division of the Social Sciences 

Economics 
History 

Political Science 

Division of the Natural Sciences 
Biology 
Chemistry 

Geography and Geology 
EXPLANATION OF NUMBERS AND SYMBOLS 

All regular (not Winter Term) courses except Honors (70) courses are given 
as term courses, with a final examination at the end of the term. Fall term courses 
are usually designated by .1 after the number; Spring term courses by .2. The figures 
.1 and .2 after the same number for two courses indicate that those two courses are 
complementary and together form an instructional program. The first course may 
or may not be prerequisite to the second and it may or may not be required to take 
both courses. Courses numbered 70 (Honors) may be treated as a unit for the year 
and given a tentative or “in-progress” grade at the end of a term. 

Courses numbered 10-19 are usually taken by freshmen; 20-29, by sophomores; 
30-39, by juniors; 40-49, by seniors. Schedules are cleared on this basis and conflicts 
will thus be most easily avoided by taking courses in proper sequence. 

At the head of each departmental section, the major is described and the require¬ 
ments for a major in that department are stated, together with recommended courses. 

Prerequisites to a course are shown in parentheses. Courses not being offered in 
1968-69 are bracketed. Abbreviations include: Lab., laboratory period; Lect., 
lecture period. Courses marked § satisfy Group A requirement (Page 23). Courses 
marked f satisfy the foreign language requirement (Page 70). 

The College reserves the right, without further notice, to cancel any courses 
herein described, or to make any other changes in staff, fees, and courses which may 
be deemed necessary. 


Music 

Philosophy 

Religion 

Russian 

Spanish and Italian 


Psychology 
Sociology— 
Anthropology 
Teacher Education 

Mathematics 
Physical Education 
Physics 


49 




Division of the Humanities 

Associate Professor David J. Littlefield, Chairman 

AMERICAN LITERATURE MUSIC 

ENGLISH AND DRAMA PHILOSOPHY 

FINE ARTS RELIGION 


AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Professors: R. L. Cook, H. M. Munford {chairman); Visiting Professor: Howard Mum- 
ford Jones; Associate Professor: H. P. Beck 

The aim of the program in the department of American Literature leading to a major is 
two-fold: (1) to study the culture of the American people as reflected in their most im¬ 
portant writings; and (2) to examine the structure and evaluate the meaning of these 
writings in the context of the social and intellectual backgrounds. The program, which 
introduces students to key works, authors, and periods of literature at the undergraduate 
level of awareness, is designed to lead to the graduate level of experience. 

Every student must satisfy a minimum requirement of eight fall and spring courses 
in the major and two terms of Independent Study. This requirement must include the 
basic course, the American Novel, four term courses in the department, the General 
Examination; one year of American History; and two period courses in English Literature 
beyond the Freshman English course. 

The Independent Study program is conducted by a background reading list and group 
meetings. 


Required for the Major: 21.1, 21.2 or the Qualifying Examination (students may qualify 
for the American Literature major either through their standing in 21.1 and 21.2 or 
through the Qualifying Examination), 31.1, 31.2; four other fall or spring term 
courses, Independent Study and the General Examination, one year of American 
History; and two fall or spring period courses in English Literature; 

21.1 American Literature § Fall, Spring 

A study in the growth of American literature from the seventeenth century 
through the first half of the nineteenth century, as emerging from its cultural 
backgrounds, and the significance of its major writers: Edwards, Franklin, 
Cooper, Irving, Poe, Hawthorne, Emerson, Thoreau, and others. Staff 

21.2 American Literature § Spring 

A study of the major writers from the second half of the nineteenth century to 
the present, with emphasis on particular works and their relevance to the 
more important traditions in American literary history. (Am. Lit. 21.1) 

Staff 

31.1 The American Novel § Fall 

The development of the American novel; the meaning and structure of the 
novels of the nineteenth century focusing on particular novels of Cooper, 
Hawthorne, Melville, Twain, Howells, James, Crane, Norris, and Dreiser. 
(Am. Lit. 21.1 and 21.2 and permission) Mr. Cook 

31.2 The American Novel § Spring 

An analysis of thematic and structural aspects in representative American 
novels of the twentieth century with concentration on Cather, Lewis, Dos 


50 



HUMANITIES 


51 


Passos, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, Wolfe, Cozzens, Warren, El¬ 
lison, Malamud, and Bellow. (Am. Lit. 21.1, 21.2, 31.1 and permission) 

Mr. Cook 


41.1 The American Short Story § Fall 

A study of the development of short prose fiction in America from Washing¬ 
ton Irving to the present time. The history of the short story form, techniques, 
and changing point of view will be considered with special regard to Haw¬ 
thorne, Melville, James, Crane, Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and others. (Am. 
Lit. 21.1 and 21.2 and permission) Mr. Beck 


41.2 Emerson § Fall 

A study in depth emphasizing Emerson’s work in the context of the time, 
and his reaction to nature, society, culture, religion, and science. (Am. Lit. 

21.1 and 21.2 and permission.) Mr. Jones 

42.2 Modern American Poetry § Spring 

A study of twentieth century American poetry, and the explication and 
evaluation of the poems of Robinson, Frost, Pound, Eliot, Crane, Williams, 
Stevens, Cummings, Marianne Moore, Robert Lowell, Roethke, and others. 
(Am. Lit. 21.1 and 21.2 and permission) Mr. Munford 

[44.1 American Biography §] 

A study of the growth of the American mind in the context of social and 
intellectual backgrounds, exemplified in the Puritan biographies and in the 
autobiographies of Lyman Beecher, Peter Cartwright, U.S. Grant, Henry 
Adams, Lincoln Steffens, and in the biographies of Lee, Lincoln, Henry 
Ford, and others. (Am. Lit. 21.1 and 21.2 and permission) Not to be offered 
in 1968-69. 


[45.1 Seminar] 

45.2 Seminar in Henry Adams Spring 

A seminar in the thought and art of Henry Adams with special attention to 
The Education and the Novels. (Am. Lit. 21.1 and 21.2, Juniors and Seniors, 
and permission). Mr. Munford 


46.2 Folk Ballads § Spring 

A study of the development of the ballad and related folksongs in America 
from their European antecedents. Special emphasis will be placed upon the 
dispersion of ballads, variants, occupational songs, and the relationship of 
the whole to American literature and literary concepts. (Am. Lit. 21.1 and 

21.2 and permission) Mr. Beck 


50.1 and 50.2 Special Research Fall and Spring 

Open to qualified majors. (Permission) Staff 


ENGLISH AND DRAMA 

Professors: P. M. Cubeta; H. B. Prickitt {chairman), E. T. Volkert; Associate Pro¬ 
fessors: J. H. Clagett, D. J. Littlefield, E. A. Martin, **R. M. Pack, *C. A. Potter; 
Assistant P rofessors: G. W. Bahlke, F. G. Cabot, R. W. Hill; Visiting Assistant Pro- 


*On leave, 1968-69 
* *Part-time 



52 


HUMANITIES 


fessor: D. C. Stuart; Instructors: D. DeLetis, W. A. Fregosi, M. S. Gohlke, W. W. 
Kerrigan, B. Teush; Associate: F. Kaufman 


Mr. Harris, Mr. Sparks 

Because of the varied nature of the Department’s offerings, courses are designated in the 
following manner: 

L Literature TA Theatre Arts 

DL Dramatic Literature W Writing 

In registration the symbol Eng. is used to designate all courses offered by the De¬ 
partment. For example, the first semester of the required freshman course would be 

designated: Eng. LI2.1. . 

The Department offers majors in English Literature and in Drama. Departmental 
reading lists are provided in each area as a basis for Independent Study and the General 
Examination. 


Required for a Major in English are (1) Interpretation of Literature: an Analytic and 
Generic Approach (L 12) or Advanced Placement; (2) Interpretation of Literature: 
an Historical Approach (L 20) or the Qualifying Examination (students may qualify 
for the English Major either by their standing in L 20 or by the Qualifying Examina¬ 
tion); (3) the Senior Program; (4) four other semester courses in literature. Recom¬ 
mended also are courses in Fine Arts, History, Music, Philosophy, and Foreign 
Languages. Sophomores are encouraged to elect, in addition to L 20, either American 
Literature Survey (AL 21), or English Novel (L 24), or Classics of Literature (L 33). 
Juniors are encouraged to elect courses from among the following: Shakespeare 
(DL 30), Modern Drama (DL 31), Nineteenth-Century Literature (L 37), Eigh¬ 
teenth-Century Literature (L 32), Contemporary Poetry (L 45.2), and a seminar. 
In addition to the required Senior Program, Seniors are encouraged to elect Renais¬ 
sance Literature (L 31), Honors (L 70) if qualified, and one or two seminars. Seminar 
offerings vary from year to year. Juniors and Seniors may undertake Special Reading 
and Research Projects (L 50, DL 50, or W 50). Only courses designated L or DL 
count toward the maximum of 14 courses permitted in the major. 

The Qualifying Examination will test the student’s ability to interpret literature 
critically and will examine his grasp and comprehension of a literary subject in an his¬ 
torical context. The subject of the Qualifying Examination in 1968-69 will be the 
Hero in Epic and Romance. The Qualifying Examination will be offered twice: once 
during the regular examination period at the end of the second semester, when it will 
incorporate the final examination in L 20, and again in September on the Friday 
morning before College begins. Any student, with the Department’s permission, may 
take the Qualifying Examination whether he has been enrolled in L 20 or not; a 
student who does not qualify during the second-semester examination period may 
take the Qualifying Examination again in September, although his grade in L 20.2 
will not be affected. 

The Senior Program (for students in the class of 1969 and subsequent classes) con¬ 
sists of the writing of an essay or completion of a project and the General Examination 
for a total of three courses. Each Senior is assigned to a faculty member for guidance 
in his essay or project and in his preparation for the General Examination. 

The Major in Drama is an area of emphasis within the English Major and as such has 
no specific course requirements other than English 20. A student majoring in Drama is 
responsible for the Senior Reading List for English Majors but beyond that has free 
selection of courses within the English and Drama Department as prescribed in the new 
senior plan. Theatre Arts (TA) courses are not included in that total. 

A student majoring in drama will develop a Senior Project in dramatic literature or 
theatre arts. In the General Examination he will have a choice of questions dealing 




HUMANITIES 


53 


primarily with dramatic literature. The General Examination will consist of two three- 
hour written examinations and an hour oral examination. 

All drama majors are required to serve on one production staff each year either for 
credit in a Production Seminar or on crew without credit. 


Literature 

L 12.1 Interpretation of Literature Fall and Spring 

Close critical reading of the lyric, short story, novel, and drama. Frequent 
short critical papers. (Required of freshmen and a prerequisite for other 
courses offered by the Department.) Staff 


L 12.2 Interpretation of Literature 

Continuation of L 12.1. Frequent critical papers. Permission. 


Spring 

Staff 

Fall 


L 20.1 Interpretation of Literature: An Historical Approach 
Views of the Hero in Epic and Romance § 

A course that will examine through lectures, discussion, and papers such 
works as Beowulf , Tristan and Iseult , Troilus and Criseyde , the Faerie Queen , 
Antony and Cleopatra , Troilus and Cressida , Paradise Lost. 

Mr. Martin and Staff 

L. 20.2 Interpretation of Literature: An Historical Approach Spring 
Views of the Hero in Literature from the Eighteenth to the 
Twentieth Century§ Mr. Martin and Staff 

L 24.1 The English Novel § Fall 

A study of the novel from Fielding to Hardy with particular emphasis on the 
novel of the nineteenth century. Authors read include Fielding, Jane Austen, 
Dickens, Thackeray, Emily Bronte, George Eliot, and Hardy. (Limited to 30 
students. Permission. Mr. Prigkitt 

L 24.2 The English Novel § Spring 

A study of the novel from E. M. Forster through Angus Wilson. Among the 
novelists will be Conrad, Joyce, Lawrence, Virginia Woolf, Huxley, Waugh, 
and Elizabeth Bowen. Limited to 50 students. (L 24.1 or permission.) 

Mr. Bahlke 

[L 27.2 Oral Interpretation of Literature] 

DL30.1B Shakespeare§ Fall 

A seminar in Shakespearean tragedy. (Juniors and seniors. Permission.) 

Mr. Cubeta 

DL 30.2A Shakespeare § Spring 

An intensive critical study of Romeo and Juliet , Troilus and Cressida , Hamlet , 
Othello , Macbeth , King Lear , Antony and Cleopatra , and The Tempest. (Limited to 
Juniors and Seniors.) Mr. Cubeta 

L 31.1 Poetry and Prose of Tudor England § Fall 

English Literature of the 16th Century: An introduction to the major non- 
dramatic genres of the period, including lyric, satire, biography, masque, 


54 


HUMANITIES 


allegory and prose narrative. Special attention will be devoted to the poetry 
of Spenser and Shakespeare. Mrs. Gohlke 

L 31.2 Poetry and Prose of the Age of Milton § Spring 

English literature from 1603 through Milton. A close examination of the 
poetry of Ben Jonson and John Donne and of their successors, especially 
Herrick, Garew, Herbert, and Marvell. The prose of Bacon and Browne also 
receives attention. The course culminates with the works of John Milton 
(L 31.1 or permission). Limited to 30 students. Mr. Kerrigan 

L 32.1 Poetry and Prose of the English Augustan Age§ Spring 

A critical investigation of the artistic achievement of major writers from 
1660 to 1745, conducted primarily in terms of their evaluation of the politi¬ 
cal, religious, social, moral, intellectual, and aesthetic activities of the 
times. Figures studied are Dryden, Addison and Steele, Swift, Pope, and Gay. 
Juniors and seniors. Limited to 30 students. Mr. Prickitt 

[L 32.2 Prose and Poetry of the Age of Johnson §] 

A study of the major writers of the second half of the eighteenth century as 
they reflect the changing and conflicting social, political, moral, intellectual, 
and aesthetic attitudes of the period. The major figures studied are Johnson, 
Boswell, Gray, Goldsmith, Sterne, Burke, and Burns. (L 32.1 or permission) 

L33.1 Classics of Literature: Greece § Fall 

A study in translation of ancient Greek epic, lyric, and drama. The Iliad 
and Odyssey of Homer; lyric and personal poetry of the 7 th and 6 th centuries; 
selected tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; selected comedies 
of Aristophanes; with corollary reading in Thucydides 5 Peloponnesian War and 
Plato’s Symposium . Mr. Harris, Mr. Littlefield 

[L 33.2 Classics of Literature: Rome§] 

A study in translation of Roman epic and satire. The Aeneid of Virgil; the 
Metamorphoses of Ovid; the Satires and Epistles of Horace; the Satires of 
Juvenal and Persius; with corollary reading in the lyrics of Catullus and 
Ovid and the Twelve Caesars of Suetonius. 

[L 34.1 Comparative Fiction: Shorter Works of Modern Fiction §] 

A seminar devoted to the analysis of a single work each week. The readings 
will include short stories and novellas selected from the works of: Flaubert, 
Chekhov, Gogol, Tolstoy, Kafka, Mann, Singer, James, Lawrence, Vorheer, 
Nabokov, Bellow, and Barth. 

L 34.2 Comparative Fiction § Fall 

A course focusing on 20th Century European literature, primarily prose, 
whose core is the work of Proust, Mann, Kafka, Gide and Camus. Other 
writers studied will include Rilke, Nabokov, Grass and Voznesensky. The 
aim is to try to arrive at a definition of what is “modem” about this literature, 
partly through an emphasis on the problems of knowing and the morality of 
knowledge. Mr. Stuart 



HUMANITIES 


55 


L 37.1 Prose and Poetry of the Romantic Period § Fall 

A study of the major writers of the Romantic Movement, especially Blake, 
Wordsworth, Coleridge, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, in an attempt to define 
the writers 5 characteristic concerns and their problems in expressing those 
concerns. Some attention will be paid to the traditions with which the 
Romantics were breaking, and to the forerunners of the movement. (Sopho¬ 
mores by permission.) Mr. Hill 

L 37.2 Prose and Poetry of the Victorian Period § Spring 

Reading in Tennyson, Browning, Arnold, and Swinburne. The purpose of 
the course will be to discover in these four major figures some of the main 
literary movements in the entire century. Other writers will receive some 
attention: in poetry, Hopkins, Hardy, and early Yeats; in prose, Carlyle, 
Mill, Arnold, Pater, Darwin, and Huxley; in the novel, Dickens and Joyce. 
(L 22.1, or permission on the basis of a knowledge of certain of the Romantic 
poets.) Mr. Cabot 

L43.1 Literary Criticism§ Fall 

This course will focus on the poetry of Wordsworth, Keats, and Stevens 
though aspects of Blake, Coleridge, and Shelley will also be considered. 
Selected poems will be analyzed in detail from several critical points of view. 
Also, these poets will be compared in respect to their attitudes toward 
“pleasure 55 and “paradise. 55 Permission. Mr. Pack 

L 45.2 Modern Poetry § Spring 

Through careful analysis of the style and thought of representative poems, 
this course will attempt to suggest ways of approaching the following poets: 
Hardy, Hopkins, Yeats, Robinson, Frost, Stevens, Eliot, Cummings, Crane, 
Auden, Roethke, Thomas, Wilbur, and Hughes. Open to seniors, juniors, 
and sophomores. Limited to 60 students. Mr. Pack 

[L 48.1 Literature in the Middle Ages§] 

L 48.2 Chaucer § Spring 

A seminar in The Canterbury Tales . Juniors and Seniors. Permission. 

Mr. Martin 

L49.1A Seminar: Yeats and Joyce§ Fall 

A seminar in which the relationship between form and content in the poetry 
of Yeats and the prose of Joyce will be carefully explored. Readings will 
include The Collected Poetry of W. B. Teats and Joyce’s Dubliners , A Portrait of 
the Artist as a Young Man ,, Ulysses , and selected passages from Finnegans Wake. 
Preference will be given to those who have completed the course in the 
English novel or in contemporary poetry. Juniors and Seniors. Permission. 

Mr. Bahlke 

L 49. IB Seminar: 19th Century Social and Political Fiction§ Fall 

An examination of the ways in which 19th-century English writers of fiction 
have come to grips with social and political realities in their time. These ways 
include comedy, satire, romance, and polemic. Readings are a selection of 


56 


HUMANITIES 


works by Godwin, Dickens, Disraeli, Trollope, Butler, Meredith, and H. G. 
Wells. Mr. Cabot 

L49.1C Seminar: Romance§ Fall 

Close study through discussion and papers so as to identify such aspects of 
romance as the religions of love, nature, and art in works from the Middle 
Ages to the twentieth century. Readings will be selected from among the 
following: Tristan and Iseult , Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde , Shakespeare’s 
Antony and Cleopatra and The Tempest , a group of poems by Herrick and 
Marvell, Bronte’s Wuthering Heights , Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter , Whitman’s 
Song of Myself , James’ The Portrait of a Lady , Conrad’s Lord Jim , Lawrence’s 
Sons and Lovers , Hemingway’s A Farewell to Arms, Fitzgerald’s The Great 
Gatshy , Faulkner’s Sanctuary , Malamud’s The Natural. Permission. 

Mr. Martin 

L 49.2A Seminar: Yeats§ Spring 

Extensive reading in most of Yeats’ works with intensive study of selected 
poetry. Works to be read or read in outside the required reading of all the 
poetry will include: The Autobiography, The Collected Plays, A Vision, Mythol¬ 
ogies, Irish Fairy and Folk Tales (ed. Yeats), Ideas of Good and Evil, Discoveries, 
Per Arnica, Silentia Lunae, The Cutting of an Agate. Juniors and Seniors. Per¬ 
mission. Mr. Hill 

L 49.2B Seminar: Milton§ Spring 

A study of the major poetry and selected prose of Milton. Particular attention 
will be given to an examination of how the poet expressed the major social, 
religious, and political concerns of his time within traditional forms. Juniors 
and Seniors. Permission. Mr. Littlefield 

L 49.2C Seminar: Advanced Studies in Literature^ Spring 

A group of students interested in exploring a particular body of material may 
organize a syllabus through conference with a faculty member. With the 
approval of the faculty member and the department, a seminar may then be 
established under the guidance of the faculty member. Staff 


Writing 

W 38.1 Advanced Imaginative Writing: Prose Fall 

A seminar course in advanced writing, in which students are encouraged to 
undertake writing projects, with advice and editorial assistance from the 
instructor, in order to discover where their talents may lie and to broaden 
their sense of technique and style. The course is designed for students in¬ 
terested primarily in prose, though some poetry will be welcomed. The 
student may choose to write short stories, novelettes, novels, plays or non¬ 
fiction, and the project may be continued through the fall and spring terms. 
Limited to twelve students. Permission. Mr. Clagett 

W 38.2 Advanced Imaginative Writing: Prose Spring 

Students who have performed creditably during the first term may continue 



HUMANITIES 


57 


their projects during the second. New members may be admitted by special 
recommendation of their advisors. Mr. Clagett 

W 39.1 Advanced Imaginative Writing: Poetry Fall 

A seminar course in advanced writing, in which students are encouraged to 
undertake writing projects, with advice and editorial assistance from the 
instructor, in order to discover where their talents may lie and to broaden 
their sense of technique and style. The course is designed for students inter¬ 
ested primarily in poetry, though all forms of writing and experimentation 
will be welcomed. The class will meet once a week to discuss samples of con¬ 
temporary writing and each other’s work. The student will also work in con¬ 
ference with the instructor. Limited to ten students. Permission. 

Mr. Stuart 

W 39.2 Advanced Imaginative Writing: Poetry Spring 

Students who have performed creditably during the first term may con¬ 
tinue their projects during the second. New members may be admitted by 
special recommendation of their advisors. Mr. Stuart 

Drama 

DL 22.2 English Drama to 1642§ Spring 

An intensive study of the development of the forms of English drama from the 
Quern Quaeritis trope to the closing of the theaters in 1642. Representative 
selections from the Medieval cycle and morality plays, Tudor and Jacobean 
comedy and tragedy, and Carolinian drama. Secondary studies in theatrical 
history and social ideas of the English Renaissance. Mr. DeLetis 

[DL 23.1 The Restoration and 18th Century§] 

DL 24.1 Greek and Roman Drama§ Fall 

An intensive study of the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Ar¬ 
istophanes, Plautus, Terence, and Seneca. Emphasis will be on the form of 
Greek and Roman drama, with secondary studies in theatrical and social 
history. Mr. DeLetis 

[DL 25.2 French Drama§] 

A survey of the forms of French drama from the beginnings to the present 
day. Emphasis on neo-classic tragedy and the comedies of Moliere. Plays 
will be studied as dramatic forms and as representatives of the era in which 
they were written. (To be offered in 1970-71.) 

TA 25.1 Style: Design (Stage and Scene) Fall 

A series of readings, discussions, exercises, and projects in which historical 
and contemporary approaches to mounting plays are examined. Emphasis 
is on stage and scenic forms as interpretive elements in production planning. 

Mr. Fregosi 


TA 25.2 Continuation of TA 25.1 


Spring 
Mr. Fregosi 


58 


HUMANITIES 


[TA26.1 Style: Design (Costume)] 

The relationships of contemporary costume planning and design to: the 
play, period dress, design principles and the other visual production ele¬ 
ments. (To be offered in 1969-70.) TA 25 or permission. 

[TA 26.2 Style: Design (Lighting)] 

A study of the principles, theories and methods of stage lighting and their 
application to various stage forms. (To be offered in 1969-70.) TA 25 or 
permission. 

[DL 26.2 German Drama§] 

A historical survey of German dramatic forms from Lessing to Brecht. 
Emphasis on plays as dramatic structures, with secondary studies in theatrical 
and social history. (To be offered in 1969-70.) 

[DL 28.1 19th Century Drama§] 

A study in moral, intellectual, and esthetic trends as reflected in the Romantic 
drama, in melodrama, and in the early efforts of the realists, naturalists, and 
symbolists of the 19th century. (To be offered in 1970-71.) 

DL31.1 Modern Drama: 1870-1920§ Fall 

A comparative study of dramatic forms developing on the Continent, in 
England, and the United States during the last decade of the 19th century 
and early in the 20th century. Mr. Volkert 

DL 31.2 Modern Drama: 1920 to the Present§ Spring 

A comparative study of recent dramatic forms of the Continent, in England, 
and the United States with emphasis on the influence of Strindberg, Brecht, 
Becket, Ionesco, Artaud, and others. Mr. Volkert 

[DL 32.1 American Drama§] 

A comparative study from Metamora to Scuba Duba , focusing on America’s 
commercial, eclectic heritage with emphasis on recent attempts to discover a 
special American idiom. (To be offered in 1969-70.) 

TA 33.1 Style: Acting and Directing Fall 

A seminar emphasizing acting and directing in which the theatres of Greece 
and Rome, of the Middle Ages, and of the Renaissance, including the Corn- 
media Dell ’Arte will be explored in the classroom, in laboratory sessions and 
in workshop productions. Open only to qualified juniors and seniors. From 
this course, 50’s projects or senior projects will be developed. Ideally, the 
student should have a project in mind before he enters the course. If the 
student does not plan to produce a 50’s project or senior project, he will 
nonetheless be permitted to take the course and participate in the laboratory 
exercises. Mr. Volkert 

TA 33.2 Style: Acting and Directing Spring 

A continuation of the above in which the various styles of the theatres of the 
17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries will be treated. TA 33.1 or permission. 

Mr. Volkert 



HUMANITIES 


59 


[DL 35.1 Comedy, Tragedy, Melodrama, and Farce§] 

An intensive study of genre using an approach such as that in Bentley’s The 
Life of the Drama as agent provocateur. (To be offered in 1970-71.) 

[DL 35.2 Comedy, Tragedy, Melodrama, and Farce§] 

Continuation of DL 35.1. (To be offered in 1970-71.) 

Production Seminars: 

The department offers a Production Seminar in conjunction with each 
major production. Students enrolled in these seminars take part in a two or 
three week period of intensive study of the play and then participate in the 
production of the play. Each student, with the approval of the department, 
defines the nature of his participation: actor, stage manager, critic, literary 
historian, or designer, etc. Participation may vary from playing a major 
role to writing an extended critical essay about the playwright. 


TA 41.1A Production Seminar: A Long Dafs Journey into Fall 

Night Mr. Volkert 

TA41.1B Production Seminar: Troilus and Cressida Fall 

Mr. Teush 

TA41.2A Production Seminar: The Balcony Spring 

Mr. Teush 

TA41.2B Production Seminar: The Skin of Our Teeth Spring 


Mr. Volkert 


FINE ARTS 

Professors: R. F. Reiff, A. Richard Turner ( chairman ); Assistant Professor: R. B. 
Muirhead; Instructor: D. A. Bumbeck 

In the belief that experience in both the practice and history of art constitutes the most 
rewarding major program, the department requires both 11.1, Introduction to the Fine Arts 
and 12.1, 12.2, Introduction to Design , of its beginning students. Satisfactory completion of 
these courses qualifies a student for the major. 

A student may complete his course requirements in either of two ways: 

Alternative A: six additional courses in the history of art. 

Alternative B: four additional studio courses, and four additional courses in the 
history of art, two of which shall have as their subject matter, art before 1800. 

Independent Study: under Alternative A, a student shall read on an historical or critical 
subject under the guidance of his advisor, and shall present a senior thesis by April 1. 
Under Alternative B, either the same plan shall be followed, or a creative project under¬ 
taken if, in the judgment of the faculty, a student has demonstrated exceptional creative 
ability. 

11.1 Introduction to the Fine Arts§ Fall and Spring 

An introduction to form and meaning in the arts of sculpture, architecture, 
and painting. Major figures and movements of western art will be considered 
in lectures, while the student will be encouraged to develop his own critical 


60 


HUMANITIES 


sense through preceptorial discussion and short papers on original works of art. 
Two lectures and one discussion period. Open to freshmen and sophomores, 
and to upperclassmen by permission. Fall: Mr. Turner and Staff 

Spring: Mr. Reiff and Staff 

12.1 Introduction to Design Fall 

Line, color, form, subject matter and composition are studied separately 
and together in projects related to picture making so as to increase the stu¬ 
dents’ comprehension of the picture as an expressive, visual language. Fee 
$10.00. Limited to 30 students. (F.A. 12.2 must be passed before credit for 
F.A. 12.1 will be given.) Mr. Bumbeck, Mr. Muirhead 

12.2 Introduction to Design Spring 

Design in the arts with special emphasis of sculptural and architectural 
problems. (F. A. 12.1) Fee $10.00. Limited to 30 students. 

Mr. Bumbeck, Mr. Muirhead 

20.1 Art of the Italian Renaissance§ Fall 

A selective survey of Italian art and architecture from 1250 to 1600, with an 
emphasis upon leading masters seen in their artistic, intellectual, and religious 
context. Mr. Turner 

21.2 Modern Painting and Sculpture§ Spring 

Major artists and movements of the last one hundred years, beginning with 
the Impressionists and concluding with art of the 1960’s. Stress will be placed 
on the evolution of twentieth century styles, and their relation to main cur¬ 
rents of contemporary thought. Open to freshmen who have taken 11.1. 

Mr. Reiff 

22.1 The Art of India§ Fall 

An historical survey of the architecture, painting, and sculpture from the 
Indus Valley Civilization to the close of the Mughal period. Buddhist and 
Hindu religious and philosophical thought, aesthetic theories, iconography, 
history, and social conditions are considered in relation to art. No previous 
knowledge of oriental culture is presumed. Mr. Reiff 

22.2 The Art of China§ Spring 

An historical and stylistic survey of the development of the sculpture, paint¬ 
ing, ceramics, bronzes, jades, and architecture of China. Religion, history, 
artistic theory, and technique are studied to provide a sufficient background. 
While no previous knowledge of Chinese culture is required, 22.1 is recom¬ 
mended. Mr. Reiff 

[23.1 Elementary Drawing] 

Study of the elements of drawing, including anatomy, linear perspective, and 
drapery. Instruction and practice in drawing from models by means of 
lectures and individual criticism. Division of teaching time approximately 
one lecture hour to two in practice. Fee $5.00 Not to be offered in 1968-69. 

[23.2 Elementary Drawing] (Not to be offered in 1968-69) 



HUMANITIES 


61 


30.1 Modern Architecture§ Fall 

A study of European and American architecture, its stylistic development, 
theory, and technical innovations from about 1780 to the present. The course 
will include concepts and problems of city planning. Mr. Reiff 

31.2 Baroque Art in Europe§ Spring 

Art and patronage in Europe from 1600-1750. Such artists as Bernini, 
Velasquez, Rubens, Rembrandt, and Poussin will be discussed in detail, and 
the patronage of the French and Papal courts examined in the light of artistic 
theory and practice. Mr. Turner 

[32.1 Northern Renaissance Art§] 

Northern European art from the fourteenth to the mid-sixteenth century. 
Problems of style and iconography will be discussed, with stress upon such 
figures as Claus Sluter, Jan van Eyck, Hugo van der Goes, Durer, and 
Bruegel. Offered on alternate years; not to be given in 1968-69. 

33.1 Art of the Nineteenth Century§ Fall 

A stylistic analysis of European painting and sculpture and a study of its 
development from the Rococo period through Impressionism. The art of such 
artists as Watteau, Goya, David, Delacroix, Friedrich, Constable, Courbet, 
Manet, the Pre-Raphaelites, the French Academicians, the Macchiaioli, 
as well as such sculptors as Rodin, Rude, Medardo Rosso, and many others 
will be considered. Mr. Reiff 

34.2 The Will to Abstraction§ Spring 

An inquiry into the nature and variety of abstraction in art. After a brief 
consideration of aspects of twentieth century art and the art of children, the 
course will explore the art of pre-historic man, ancient Egypt and early 
Greece, and the Middle Ages. Mr. Turner 

35.1 Painting Fall 

An introductory course in the practice of painting. The first semester will be 
exploratory in character. The student will use various media (charcoal, 
pencil, ink, and paint) in order to establish a working familiarity with the 
forms of composition and picture-making. Fee $5.00. Limited to 30 students. 
(F.A. 12.1, 12.2 or permission.) Mr. Muirhead 

35.2 Painting Spring 

A continuation of 35.1. Emphasis will be placed on the possibility and capacity 
of one medium, oil paint, to give substance to the student’s sensory images of 
sight and touch. Limited to 30 students. (F.A. 12.1, 12.2, 35.1 or permission. 
Add. $5.00 fee.) Mr. Muirhead 

[36.1 Art of the Americas§] 

History of painting, sculpture, and architecture from pre-Columbian period 
and the art of the American Indian to that of the present. Not to be given 
1968-69. 

38.1 Printmaking Fall 

Studio instruction in traditional and contemporary methods of intaglio and 



62 


HUMANITIES 


relief printmaking. Critical emphasis on the union of the printmaking craft 
with problems of drawing, painting and design. Fee $10.00. Limited to 20 
students. (F.A. 12.1, 12.2, or permission.) Mr. Bumbeck 

38.2 Printmaking Spring 

A continuation of 38.1. Same fee, size limitation and prerequisites. 

Mr. Bumbeck 

40.2 Seminar in Renaissance Art§ Spring 

A consideration of a major figure or important moment in Renaissance art, 
with an emphasis on art as an aspect of cultural history. In 1968-69 the sub¬ 
ject will be Michelangelo. Offered in alternate years; to be given in 1968-69. 
Permission. Mr. Turner 

[41.2 Seminar in Art Criticism and Connoisseurship§] 

An inquiry into the nature of style, quality in the arts, relations of art to 
everyday life, to morality, to religion. Readings will include Charles Bau¬ 
delaire, John Ruskin, Oscar Wilde, and selected twentieth century critics. 
Emphasis will be upon the relevance of critical theories to the deepened 
understanding of original works of art. Several papers. Offered in alternate 
years; not to be offered in 1968-69. 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts 

Supervised independent work in art history or studio. Staff 

MUSIC 

Professor: A. Carter (chairman); Assistant Professors: E. Fanning, G. B. Todd 

The offerings of the Music Department focus on three areas of the discipline: 1) the 
vocabulary and theory of music, 2) its historical development, and, 3) its creative aspects— 
performance and composition. The relative emphasis on any of these three will vary for the 
individual music major according to his talents, interests and needs. It is generally assumed 
that the major will take Music Survey (13), two years of theory (25 and 35 and under 
special conditions 11 and 25), four semesters of courses devoted to specific historical periods 
and styles (37, 38, 41, 42, or 44) and some form of applied music, though any of these 
requirements may be waived or changed if the department feels the best interests of the 
student are served. 


11.1 Materials of Music§ Fall and Spring 

An introduction to the fundamentals of music, its notation and vocabulary. 
The course is designed to establish an understanding of such terms as har¬ 
mony, counterpoint, rhythm, dynamics, and form through the study of 
numerous works in the literature. Music 11.1 takes as its primary focus the 
problems of intelligent listening. One semester course given each semester. 
Two lectures weekly. Fee $7. Mr. Todd 

[12.1 History and Performance of Western Choral Literature §] 

Study and performance of sacred and secular choral music from Gregorian 
chant to the middle Baroque period. Basic theory, voice production and sight¬ 
singing. Audition required. Two hours lecture, three hours lab. Fee $7. 



HUMANITIES 


63 


[12.2 History and Performance of Western Choral Literature§] 

Study and performance of sacred and secular choral music from the late 
Baroque to Modern period. (Music 12.1) Fee $7. 

13.1 Music Survey: A History of Musical Style § Fall 

A study of music history and literature from Gregorian Chant through 
Beethoven with emphasis on required listening of twenty representative 
works from J. S. Bach through Beethoven. Listeners 5 equipment includes 
basic theory, and the understanding of the various forms of each period as 
applied to the work studied. Fee $7. Mr. Garter, Mr. Fanning 

13.2 Music Survey: A History of Musical Style § Spring 

A study of music history and literature from Schubert through twentieth 
century composers and techniques with emphasis on required listening of 
twenty representative works from Schubert through present day composers. 
Fee $7. Mr. Garter and Mr. Fanning 

25.1 Theory Fall 

The study of constructing music. Basic compositional procedures are studied 
using works from the literature as models. Problems in harmony, counter¬ 
point, rhythm, orchestration and analysis. Two meetings weekly. Fee $7. 

Mr. Todd 


25.2 Theory 

Continuation of 25.1 Fee $7. 


Spring 
Mr. Todd 


35.1 Advanced Theory Fall 

A continuation of Beginning Theory with greater emphasis on more recent 
compositional procedures and analysis. Course writing and performing of 
original short pieces. One meeting weekly. Fee $7. Mr. Todd 

35.2 Continuation of 35.1 Fee $7. Spring 

Mr. Todd 

37.1 Opera § Fall 

A history of the lyric theatre and its literature from Gluck through Verdi 
presented through a study of recorded works. (Music 12 or 13 or by permis- 
sian, juniors and seniors) Fee $7. Mr. Carter 

37.2 Opera § Spring 

A history of the lyric theatre and its literature from Puccini through Berg 
presented through a study of recorded works. (Music 12 or 13 or 37.1 or by 
permission, juniors and seniors) Fee $7. Mr. Carter 

38.1 Music of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance § Fall 

A study of the music literature in western civilization from the beginning of 
the Christian era to ca. 1450. Comparative analysis of style and form; dis¬ 
cussion of elementary modal theory. (Music 12 or 13) Fee $7. Mr. Fanning 

38.2 Music of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance § Spring 

A study of western music from ca. 1450 to 1600. Specific works of Ockeghem, 




64 


HUMANITIES 


Josquin, Willaert, Lassus, etc., are used as focal points for the development 
of style. (Music 38.1) Fee $7. Mr. Fanning 

[41.1 Music of the Baroque Era§] 

A study of the late Renaissance developments that lead to the emergence of 
Baroque styles; and analysis of these styles to the time of J. S. Bach. (Music 
12 or 13) Fee $7. 

[41.2 Music of the Baroque Era§] 

The culmination of Baroque styles as seen in the works of J. S. Bach and his 
contemporaries. Analysis of representive instrumental and vocal works of 
Bach. (Music 41.1) Fee $7. 

[42.1 Music of the Classical Era§] 

Study of the music of the Classic era as exemplified by Haydn. (Music 12 or 
13) Fee $7. By permission, junior & seniors. 

42.2 Music of the Classical Era§ Spring 

A seminar focusing on the works of Mozart with particular emphasis on his 
role as a composer of operas. (Music 12 or 13) Fee $7. By permission, juniors 
& seniors. Mr. Todd 

44.1 Music of the 20th Century § Fall 

A study of musical literature of the late 19 th and 20th centuries from the 
Post Romantic and Impressionistic composers through Bart ok, using re¬ 
corded works and scores and occasional trips to hear performances. (Music 
12 or 13. Juniors and seniors by permission) Fee $7 Mr. Carter 

44.2 Music of the 20th Century § Spring 

A study of musical literature of the 20th century of the American and 
European continents, using recorded works and scores and occasional trips 
to hear performances. (Music 13, 44.1. Juniors and seniors by permission) 
Fee $7. Mr. Carter 

50.1 Research and Special Work Fall 

50.2 Research and Special Work Spring 

Applied Music 

The aim of this Department is to present music for its value as literature and as a 
record of one aspect of human achievement, not as professional training. We strongly 
encourage students to improve performing techniques as a necessary means of cultivating 
the art. The College will assist the student as far as possible in securing adequate instruction 
when not provided by the regular staff. 

Students who wish private instruction in piano, organ, harpsichord, voice, violin, 
viola, violoncello should enroll with the Chairman of the Department. 

Fees are to be paid to the Cashier’s office at the beginning of each semester. No 
rebate is allowed for lessons missed except in the case of continued illness. Students may be 
accepted for less than a full semester, in which case fees will be prorated. 

M-l Private Instruction in Piano. 

1 lesson weekly, use of piano 1 hour daily. Fee $105 per semester. 



HUMANITIES 


65 


M-2 Private Instruction in Voice 

1 lesson weekly. Fee $105 per semester. 

M-3 Private Instruction in Organ 

1 lesson weekly; use of organ 1 hour daily. Fee $105 per semester. 

M-4 Private Instruction in Violin and Viola 

1 lesson weekly. Fee $90 per semester. 

M-5 Private Instruction in Harpsichord 

1 lesson weekly, use of harpsichord 1 hour daily. Fee $105 per semester. 

Music Library 

The department equipment includes several thousand records, scores, and a 
chamber music library. The collection kept in the Christian A. Johnson 
Memorial Building is available for both class work and student use at 
hours set by the head of the department. Special listening equipment is 
available. 

Music Organizations 

The College Chamber Orchestra is open to all students who play an orchestral 
instrument and who qualify after auditions. The group holds weekly re¬ 
hearsals and prepares concerts. Advanced instrumentalists who can qualify 
may have the opportunity of playing with the Vermont State Symphony 
Orchestra. Mr. Carter 

The College Choir sings at Chapel Services and special concerts on and off 
campus. In keeping with the educational intent of the choral program, 
repertoire for all performing groups is as historically inclusive and demanding 
as possible. Performance in languages other than English is stressed. Audition 
required; open to all students without prerequisite. Mr. Fanning 

Playing in small ensembles is encouraged. Those interested should see Mr. 
Carter. The Choir and Orchestra work together on oratorios from time to 
time. Works given in recent years include: Mozart and Brahms Requiems; 
Handel Messiah, and Bach Mass in B minor; St. Matthew Passion and 
Magnificat; Berlioz L’Enfance du Christ; Haydn Masses, Heilig and Lord 
Nelson; Schubert G. Major Mass; Faure Requiem. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor: J. T. Andrews {chairman); Associate Professors: *L. C. Bigelow, G. D. O’Brien; 
Instructors: E. S. Dalrymple, Jr., E. D. Sapadin 

The basic course for the Major Program in Philosophy is Philosophy 23.1 and 23.2, 
which is a survey of dominant philosophical ideas and their development in the western 
world, from the time of the early Greeks to the 20th Century. This course should be 
taken in the sophomore year; a satisfactory grade in it will constitute qualification for 
acceptance as a major in the department. Other course requirements for the major are: 
Philosophy 22.1 (Introduction to Logic), Philosophy 32.1 (Ethics), Philosophy 38.1 and 
38.2 (20th Century Philosophy), and Independent Study. To complete the Major in 


*On leave 1968-69 



66 


HUMANITIES 


Philosophy a total of eight courses (including Independent Study) is required as a mini¬ 
mum. Students may find it to their advantage to elect one or two courses above the 
minimum in order to be better prepared for their general examinations. 

The General Examination is both written and oral. The written examination consists 
of two parts. The first part is historical and it is required of all students. Moreover, each 
student must be specially prepared to deal with two important philosophers, one from 
the ancient period and one from the modern. In the ancient period the choice is between 
Plato and Aristotle. In the modern period the choice is from: Descartes, Locke, Hume, 
and Kant. Students make their choices individually. The second part of the examination 
is systematic. Each student may choose any two of the following topics: Metaphysics and 
Theory of Knowledge, Ethics, Logic. 


Required for the Major: 22.1, 23.1, 23.2, 32.1, 38.1, 38.2; Independent Study. 

11.1 Introduction to Philosophy § Fall 

An introduction to the problems of ethics, dealing with such basic notions 
as “good,” “right,” “obligation,” “responsibility,” and “validity of moral 
judgments.” Selected readings from the moral philosophers. The course 
meets in small sections. (Limited to freshmen and sophomores.) Staff 

11.2 Introduction to Philosophy § Spring 

A general systematic introduction to problems in metaphysics and theory 
of knowledge, dealing with such questions as the nature of reality, knowledge 
and meaning. Selected readings from the philosophical literature. Staff 

22.1 Logic Fall 

Introduction to the principles of valid inference, deductive and inductive. 
Topics dealt with are: logical functions of language, definition, syllogistic 
reasoning, truth-functional arguments, and the elements of scientific method. 

Mr. Andrews 

[22.2 History of Science §] 

Offered in alternate years: Not to be given in 1968-69. 

23.1 History of Western Philosophy (Ancient) § Fall 

Main themes of philosophic thought from the beginning through the Hellen¬ 
istic period. Concentration on principal figures and on critical discussion of 
the ideas involved, with an eye to their relevance to modern questions. 
Authors read: Pre-Socratics, Plato, Aristotle, Lucretius. (Two lectures, one 
discussion section per week) Mr. Sapadin, Mr. Dalrymple 

23.2 History of Western Philosophy (Modern) § Spring 

Development of philosophic thought from the medieval period to the 20th 
century. Principal emphasis on theory of knowledge and metaphysics and 
their connections with developments in science. Among the authors read: 
Bacon, Descartes, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant. (Two lectures, one dis¬ 
cussion section per week) Mr. Sapadin, Mr. Dalrymple 

27.1 Philosophy of Religion § Fall 

An investigation of the philosophical problems raised by the claims of reli¬ 
gious belief. Extended analysis will be undertaken of the problem of God: 




HUMANITIES 


67 


does He exist? what does it mean to say that He exists? why is His existence a 
matter of concern? In addition, religion itself will be considered as a phenom¬ 
ena in its interrelations to science, ethics and art. Mr. O’Brien 

29.2 Symbolic Logic Spring 

A course designed to introduce the student to the field of symbolic logic. 
The course will deal with the following topics: Truth Functions, Quantifica¬ 
tion Theory and Deductive Method, Relations, Descriptions and Classes. 
(Phil. 22.1 or permission) Mr. Andrews 

32.1 Ethics § p a ll 

This course will center around the problem of how the individual finds 
norms for his activity and the question as to how such norms may be deter¬ 
mined within a social and political framework. Readings from both classical 
and modem authors. Mr. Dalrymple 

33.2 Esthetics § Spring 

A study of the philosophical problems raised by the nature and functions of 
art: the esthetic experience and the creative process; the work of art and the 
esthetic value; the appreciation of art and the problem of criticism; the rela¬ 
tion of art to society. (One semester of Philosophy and permission. Limited 
t0 15.) Mr. Sapadin 

36.2 Philosophy of Science § Spring 

Principles which underlie the experimental method, the nature of hypotheses 
and scientific explanation, criteria by which empirical hypotheses are evalu¬ 
ated, scientific laws, causation, the uniformity of nature. Concrete illustra¬ 
tions from the sciences. Mr. Andrews 

37.2 The Nineteenth Century § Spring 

A study of the major philosophical trends in the nineteenth century, with 
particular emphasis on the rise of Classical German Idealism (Hegel or 
Schopenhauer) and the existentialist revolt (Kierkegaard or Nietzsche). 
(Phil. 11.2 or Phil. 23.2 or permission) Mr. Dalrymple 

38.1 20th Century Philosophy § Fall 

Seminar: Topics in Contemporary Analytic Philosophy. Authors will include 
Russell, Ryle, Austin, and Wittgenstein (one year of Philosophy.) 

Mr. Sapadin 

38.2 20th Century Philosophy § Spring 

Topics in Contemporary Continental Philosophy. (One year of Philosophy.) 

Mr. Dalrymple 


50.1 and .2 Special Research 


Fall and Spring 
Staff 


RELIGION 

Professor: C: P: Scott {chairman)] Assistant Professor: V. L. Nuovo; Instructor: G. K: 
Pullapilly; Lecturer: N. G. Nelson 



68 


HUMANITIES 


In the conviction that a liberally educated person will wish to understand the place of 
religion in the cultural history of mankind, the College offers its students a number of 
elective courses designed to present the subject matter within the context and purposes 
of the Humanities. 

The Major program in Religion is so arranged that the student becomes aware of the 
subject matter as it is related to culture in the broadest sense. To foster this objective a 
person will elect to complete his major work in one of two programs: Philosophy of 
Religion or History of Religions. 

Requirements for these programs are as follows: Philosophy of Religion: 11.1, 11.2; Phi¬ 
losophy 27.1; two one-semester seminars (Religion 36); four departmental or approved 
one-semester courses; a demonstrable knowledge of the history of philosophy; Independent 
Study (equivalent to 2 courses) and Comprehensive Examination (equivalent to 1 course). 
History of Religions: 11.1, 11.2; History 39; two one-semester seminars (Religion 36); four 
departmental or approved one-semester courses; Independent Study and Comprehensive 
Examination. 

All majors in Religion must demonstrate a knowledge of Biblical Literature: 

Courses in other departments numbered 20 and above will be credited toward a religion 
major on approval by the department of Religion and the consent of the instructor of the 
course in question. 


11.1 Introduction to the Study of Religion § Fall 

An introduction to the concepts and methods employed in the critical 
investigation and interpretation of religion. Application to selected materials 
from the history of religion: primitive and folk religion; the dynamics and 
structure of the so-called great religious traditions and their relation to 
popular religious life. (Not open to juniors and seniors except by permission) 

Staff 

11.2 Introduction to Religious Thought § Spring 

Critical reading of selected authors, classic and contemporary, eastern and 
western, e.g. Plato, Plotinus, Maimonides, Al-Ghazali, Shankara, Spinoza, 
William James, Tagore, Tillich. An attempt will be made to interpret 
religious thought in its socio-cultural setting, to determine the forms of 
religious speculation, and the structure and meaning of religious thought. 
(Not open to juniors and seniors except by permission) Staff 

21.1 The Old Testament § Fall 

The history, literature, and faith of the Hebrew people from the Patriarchal 
age to the Maccabean revolt. Attention will be given to the methods of 
historico-literary criticism and the contribution of archaeology to biblical 
history and interpretation. Mr. Scott 

21.2 The New Testament § Spring 

A study of the documents of the New Testament, their message, and the 
history of Christian beginnings which they disclose. Emphasis will be 
given to the Jewish and Graeco-Roman influences in the emergence of the 
Christian tradition. Mr. Scott 

31.1 The Principles of Christian Theology§ Fall 

An investigation into the possibilities of theology in contemporary culture. 
The inquiry will focus on the following problems: theology and speculative 





HUMANITIES 


69 


and critical reason, theology and existentialism, theology and the history of 
religions, theology and social consciousness, theology and aesthetic con¬ 
sciousness. An attempt will be made to evaluate and reestablish the Christian 
theological tradition in the light of these problems. Mr. Nuovo 

31.2 Approaches to Christian Ethics§ Spring 

A critical examination of various approaches to Christian ethics as they are 
developed in Biblical, classical and contemporary sources; their patterns of 
reflection and action; and their relation to contemporary moral issues such 
as sex and family life, race relations, and the problem of war and peace. 

Mr. Nelson 


33.1 A study of the great traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and 
Islam. § Fall 

An attempt will be made to view them against the ancient near eastern 
background, in the light of the hellenistic influence on all, and in terms of 
their repeated interaction. Mr. Nuovo 


33.2 The Religious Traditions of India§ Spring 

A study of the religious traditions of India in their historical development: 
Vedic beginnings, Brahmanical Orthodoxy, Bhagavatism, the Orthodox 
Systems of Vedanta, Popular Hinduism. The response of these traditions to 
the challenges of Buddhism, Islam and Christianity, and most recently to 
Secularism. The influence of Indian religious traditions outside of India. 

Mr. Nuovo 

Religion 34.1 History of Christianity § Fall 

A study of the thought and institutions of Christianity from the beginnings 
through the fifteenth century. Mr. Pullapilly 


Religion 34.2 History of Christianity§ Spring 

A study of the thought and institutions of Christianity from the sixteenth 
century to the present. Mr. Pullapilly 


36.1 Seminar in the History of the Reformation and Counter-Reforma- 

tion § Fall 

A systematic study of the reformation movements which culminated in the 
Protestant Reformation in the Sixteenth Century and the consequent re¬ 
vitalization of the Catholic Church. Emphasis will be given to the study of 
primary sources: works of Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Loyola, Neri, Baronius, 
Borromeo, Bellarmine, and others. Permission. Mr. Pullapilly 

36.2 Seminar: Indian Religious Thought§ Spring 

Analysis and discussion of Indian religious texts. Selections from the Upani- 
shads, epic literature, Puranas, and from the writings of Shankara, Ramanuja, 
Sri Aurobindo, Radhakrishnan, etc. Permission. Mr. Nuovo 


50.1 and 50.2 Fall and Spring 

Independent study for advanced students. Staff 

Note also: Philosophy 27.1, Philosophy of Religion. 




Division of the Foreign Languages 

Associate Professor M. Kimberly Sparks, Chairman 


CLASSICS 

FRENCH 

GERMAN 


RUSSIAN 

SPANISH AND ITALIAN 


The Sunderland Language Center contains the offices of the several departments of t e 
Division of the Foreign Languages, the Language Laboratory classrooms, listening room 
equipped with tape recorders and playbacks, and libraries of recordings for practice in 
hearing and speaking the foreign language. Students are urged, and in some courses 
required, to use these facilities to supplement then- classwork. 

Special Area Studies 

A. French Language, Culture, and Area Studies 
Administered by the French Department 

Required for a Major: French 25.1 or 25.2, 28.1 or 28.2; two courses from the following: 
French 46.1, 46.2, 47.1; Independent Study and General Examination; also eog- 
raphy 10.1, 10.2; one year sequence from the following: History 28.1, 28 2 or Po . 
Sci 20.1, 20.2; also: one year sequence from the following: Economics 11.1, 11.2; or 
Poli. Sci. 22.1, 22.2; or Sociology 12.1, 12.2. Cognate courses in the Humanities and 
the Social Sciences will be recommended. 

B. Spanish Language, Culture, and Area Studies 
Administered by the Spanish Department 

Required for a Major: Spanish 31 .1,31.2,43.1,43.2,44.2 and four additional sem^ter Courses 
in literature; Independent Study and General Examination; Geography 35.1, History 
45.1, 45.2, American Literature 21.1, 21.2 or History 36.1, 36.2; Economics 21 1, 
21.2; Political Science 20.1,20.2; Sociology 23.1,23.2. Cognate courses in Geography, 
Political Science, History, and the Humanities are recommended. 

Literature in Translation 

The Division of Foreign Languages would like to call attention to the follow¬ 
ing courses which present the Classics and Modern European Literature in 
translation. Three of the courses are offered by the Department of English and 
Drama, the fourth by the Department of Classics. 

(Eng.) L 33.1 Classics of Literature: Greece§ Fal ] 

A study in translation of ancient Greek epic, lyric, and drama. The Iliad 
and Odyssey of Homer; lyric and personal poetry of the 7th and 6th centuries, 
selected tragedies of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides; selected comedies 
of Aristophanes; with corollary reading in Thucydides’ Peloponnesian War 
and Plato’s Symposium. Mr. Harris, Mr. Littlefield 

[(Eng.) L 33.2 Classics of Literature: Rome§] 

(Eng.) L 34.2 Comparative Fiction§ Fal1 

A course focusing on 20th Century European literature, primarily prose, 
whose core is the work of Proust, Mann, Kafka, Gide and Camus, t er 


70 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


71 


writers studied will include Rilke, Nabokov, Grass and Voznesensky. The 
aim is to try to arrive at a definition of what is “modern” about this litera¬ 
ture, partly through an emphasis on the problems of knowing and the 
morality of knowledge. Mr. Stuart 

[(Classics) 25.2 Greek Tragedy§] 

CLASSICS 

Professor: J. I. Armstrong; Associate Professor: W. Harris ( chairman ); Assistant Pro¬ 
fessor: Miss U. M. Heibges 

The principal aims of courses in the Classics are to enable the student to attain a rapid and 
accurate reading knowledge of Greek or Latin, and then to read broadly while developing 
critical skill and a sense of the art of language. Greek and Latin literatures are understood 
to be an embodiment of deep spiritual and artistic concern, and the major literary achieve¬ 
ments are studied in this light. 

The four basic approaches to a Degree in Latin or Classics are: 

1) Latin 10, 21, 31, 41, Independent Study, History 13, and the passing of the General 
Examination. 

2) For students entering with higher qualifications: Latin 21, 31, 41, 50, History 13 and 
the passing of the General Examination. (Reductions of some parts of these requirements 
may be considered in the case of students doing a joint program with another language. 
Classics and English or Classics and Philosophy.) 

The courses listed above constitute the basic major program which confers the degree of 
A.B. in Latin. 

3) Upon completion of Greek 15 and Greek 24, the student enters the fuller Classical 
Curriculum and is a candidate for the A.B. in Classics. Greek is necessary for an 
understanding of the fused Greco-Roman civilization, and the student is advised to 
begin Greek as early as possible, certainly not later than the sophomore year. This 
program would lead naturally to advanced study of any of the European literatures or 
to Comparative Literature. Requirements: 2) above and Gr. 15, 25, and 32. 

4) For the student planning later professional work in the Classics it is important to begin 
Greek in the freshman year in order to allow time for advanced work in the junior and 
senior years. Serious study of French and German should be started as these are basic, 
required ancillary disciplines for graduate study in the Classics. Most universities now 
require at least one of these languages on entrance to the graduate program. A student 
engaged in this full program may be exempted from History 13 in favor of work outside 
the immediate area of study. 


Classics in Translation 

[25.1 Greek Intellectual History §] 

[25.2 Greek Tragedy §] 

Latin 

[10.1 Introduction to Latin] 

This course presupposes no previous knowledge of Latin, but those with a 
weak background may enter with the instructor’s permission. An inductive 
method is used and the synthetic concept of grammar is elicited from careful 
reading of texts of literary worth, rather than presented paradigmatically at 
the outset. A great part of the work is oral and tapes for the study of frequen- 




72 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


cy-graded vocabulary are used. By the end of the first term the student should 
be able to read a text of intermediate difficulty with aid of the dictionary, and 
should be able to begin Augustan literature. 

[10.2 Vergil and Livy] 

During the first month the student is introduced to Vergil’s language and 
style. He is then given a large reading assignment in Vergil, which he will 
complete in great part on his own by the end of the term. The next month 
provides him with a similar introduction to Livy’s prose, with occasional 
class periods devoted to questions in Vergil that may arise. During the last 
month the student reads on his own parts of Vergil and Livy, while the meet¬ 
ings turn to the bases of structural analysis of creative art, with poems of 
Catullus, Horace and Propertius studied in class. 

The first term provides a basic reading technique; the second term 
should bring the student to the threshold of college level work in Latin. The 
course serves as an introduction to prospective majors who have had no 
Latin or poor training, in which case it should be taken in the freshman year. 
For students in the Humanities who wish to minor or take a joint program 
with Latin, the course should be taken not later than the sophomore year. 

21.1 Introduction to Authors in a Social Context Fall 

This course provides a wide selection of examples from Roman Literature, 
both prose and poetry, which will be used to demonstrate the various dimen¬ 
sions in which a document can be perceived in relation to the social and 
historical mise-en-scene. The theory of this process will be fully discussed in 
class; in addition the student must prepare himself in ability to read Latin 
with an eye toward increased fluency and ultimate development of a reading 
knowledge. (Latin 11.2 or three to four years of high school preparation, in 
which case confer with the instructor.) Miss Heibges 

21.2 Introduction to Poetry f Spring 

The course is directed toward a perception of the creative and artistic use of 
Latin, and will investigate the spiritual qualities which make the poet as well 
as the formal and structural dimensions which are observable in poetic dis¬ 
course. The poetry will be studied with no reference to historical actuality 
in order to focus the student’s attention more fully on the inner structure of 
the poem as an artifact of words drawn through time. Mr. Harris 

Latin 21.1 and 21.2 serve for the language requirement. They can be taken 
in either order. 

31.1 and 31.2 The Earlier Literature § Fall and Spring 

Of the following areas and topics one will be chosen to be given in the fall 
term and one in the spring term. Choice will depend on the needs of the 
students and special sequences will be determined from year to year. 

a) Plautus and the early drama 

b) Lucretius and Roman Philosophy 

c) Love poetry: Catullus, Propertius, Tibullus 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


73 


d) Cicero and his world 

e) Lyric: Catullus and Horace 

The work is conducted in small groups in which the student participates 
actively. Papers and seminar reports introduce the student to the secondary 
literature, while he develops his sense of the language by reading large sec¬ 
tions of texts. The actual understanding of the language is at this point the 
student’s responsibility, and the classwork turns to historical, social and 
esthetic considerations. Staff 

41.1 and 41.2 The Later Period § Fall and Spring 

One of the following topics will be offered in the fall and one in the spring 
term. Choice will involve students’ interest and the optimum effect of the 
sequence continuing from Latin 31; these two years’ work are conceived as a 
single program working intensively with some of the most important works 
from the two critical centuries in Roman culture. 

a) Ovid 

b) Satire: Horace, Persius, Juvenal 

c) Tacitus 

d) The Novel: Petronius and Apuleius 

e) The Christian authors from Minucius Felix to Augustine. Miss Heibges 

50.1 and 50.2 Fall and Spring 

Special projects studied independently in greater detail. Staff 


Greek 

15.1 Introduction to Greek Fall 

No previous knowledge of the language is required. The first term will cover 
basic structure and vocabulary of Ancient Greek as a preparation for a read¬ 
ing knowledge of ancient Greek literature. Miss Heibges 

15.2 Introduction to Homer’s Iliad Spring 

Starting with very careful reading of small portions of the text with gram¬ 
matical analysis in class, the student will proceed with the aid of graded 
vocabulary tapes to a fairly fast pace of reading, and will cover approximately 
four books of the Iliad . Miss Heibges 

24.1 Homer: Iliad and Odyssey Fall 

Fast reading of a considerable portion of the Iliad and Odyssey with intro¬ 
duction to the critical literature and secondary materials. Much of the class- 
work will be devoted to formation of an esthetic appreciation of Homer’s 
wor k* Mr. Harris 

24.2 Introduction to Greek Drama f Spring 

Carefully guided reading in Euripides leading to one play of Sophocles, with 
sufficient reference to the intellectual history of the Greeks to make this 
singularly beautiful and difficult area meaningful. Mr. Harris 

[32.1 Pindar and Aeschylus §] 




74 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


[32.2 Plato and Thucydides §] 

This course serves as an introduction to four difficult authors. In the first 
term the choral tradition and the highly choral drama of Aeschylus are 
studied. Glasses will be devoted to detailed exegesis of the historical material 
necessary to understand the text, and to analysis of the unusually involved 
form of the poetry. In the second term Plato will serve as an introduction to 
Attic prose; as soon as the student can work with the text with some facility, 
extensive readings will be assigned, and attention will turn to Thucydides. 

50.1 and 50.2 Independent study Fall and Spring 

Students will select an author or area not previously studied and work largely 
on their own, conferring weekly with the staff about problems in language 
and interpretation as they arise. Staff 

FRENCH 

Professor: C. L. Bourcier {chairman ); Associate Professor: *J. M. Watkins; Visiting 
Assistant Professor: J. Kr^wChi; Instructors: Mlles. V. Baa®, M. EDErtsTEiN, V. Zyns- 
zajn,; Visiting Associate: Mme. J. Kj^otJCHi 

The French Department aims at developing in its majors the following skills: 

1. A command of the French language in its oral and written forms so that students may 
exchange information and ideas in French on any topic of normal concern to cultivated 
people and appreciate fully any piece of French writing, be it a literary text or a 
document of definite import in any field (arts, sciences, etc.). 

2. A grasp of the essential geographical, historical, sociological and cultural factors that 
make an understanding of France, her people and her civilization more significant. 

3. An intimate acquaintance with the major French literary personalities and their 
work as representatives of a typical culture within the Western World. 

To achieve such aims, the following courses of study are prescribed: “Composition and 
Introduction to Literature” (French 25), designed to improve the students’ command of 
the language while initiating them into the basic techniques of literary criticism; Stylistics 
and Literary Analysis” (French 28), to give them the flair for literary expression and style; 
“French Civilization” (French 46), to give them a systematic insight into the geographical 
and historical factors that made France and the French; and four semester courses in the 
literature of various periods. 

Required for the Major: 25.1, 25.2, 28.1, 28.2, 46.1, 46.2; General Examination; four 
semesters chosen from: 34.1 or .2, 35.1 or .2, 36.1, 36.2, 37.1, 37.2, 38.1, 38.2, 39.1, 
39.2. For women, at least one year in residence at Le Chateau. 

Language 

11.1 Beginners’ French Fall 

Oral inductive approach aimed at mastering the patterns of simple spoken 
French. Reading, writing, and grammar. Intensive use of the Language 
Laboratory for individual exercises. Laboratory fee: $10.00 (French 11.2 
must be passed before credit is given for 11.1.) 

11.2 Beginners’ French Spring 

Oral inductive approach combined with more emphasis on the reading and 
writing aspects of the language. Students are asked to participate more 
actively. Language Laboratory still intensively used. Laboratory fee: $10.00. 

♦Director of Graduate School in France, 1968-69 




FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


75 


15.1 Intermediate French Fall 

A course open to students who have had one year of French in secondary 
school, or an otherwise poor preparation in the language. Grammar review, 
with emphasis on reading, writing and oral understanding. (Students who 
wish to prepare for the Qualification Test to pass their Language degree 
requirement are advised to take this course. French 15.1 and 15.2 may not be 


taken after French 11.2.) Staff 

15.2 Intermediate French Spring 

Composition and conversation are emphasized to prepare the students for 
more advanced work in the Department if they so choose. Staff 

21.1 Syntax, Reading, Oral Practice and Writing Fall 


The usual freshman course for students with two or three years of average 
preparation in the language. Systematic review of grammar and graduated 
training in pronunciation, reading of modern material, and essay writing. 
Introduction to French versification, and the “explication de textes” method. 
Individual practice in the Language Laboratory. Laboratory fee: $10.00. 

Staff 

21.2 Syntax, Reading, Oral Practice and Writingf Spring 

Continuation of 21.1, with emphasis on reading, essay writing, discussing, 
and “explication de textes .” Laboratory fee: $10.00. Staff 

25.1 Composition and Introduction to Literature Fall 

Critical reading of modern French texts, with emphasis on the techniques of 
literary criticism: plot, psychological characterization, symbolic meaning. 
Continuation of the “explication de textes 55 method, introduction to the literary 
“dissertation.” (Permission) Staff 

25.2 Composition and Introduction to Literature Spring 

Continuation of 25.1, with emphasis on literary dissertation, and the study 
of modem poetry. (21.1 or permission) Staff 

28.1 Stylistics and Literary Analysis Fall 

A theoretical and practical approach to the problems of composition and 
style. The study of syntax, sentence structure, and style is pursued through 
the thorough analysis of selected passages from French writers (Permission) 

M. Krouchi 

28.2 Stylistics and Literary Analysis Spring 

Continuation of 28.1, with emphasis on composition, imitative and free. 
(28.1 or permission) M. Krouchi 

[31.1 or .2 Advanced Oral Practice, Diction and Elocution] 

To develop fluency in speaking French, with all proper shades of expression. 
Study of verse and prose patterns, organized vocabulary development and 
oral composition on the basis of topics of all definitions (Permission) 



76 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


Literature 

All literature courses will be given with a seminar approach and within each 
period the emphasis will be on some authors or works at the discretion of the 
instructor. (21.2 or permission) 

[34.1 or .2 Studies in the Life and Literature of the Middle Ages§] 

The general spirit, the political and artistic developments of medieval 
France will form the background against which various literary productions 
of the age will be studied. 

35.1 or .2 Studies in the Life and Literature of the 16th Century § 

Fall or Spring 

The Age of the Renaissance and Reformation. The mood and temper of the 
time, its expression in the works of leading authors of the period. Emphasis 
on Rabelais and Montaigne. (To be given in the Fall of 1968-69, as 35.1) 

[36.1 Studies in the Life and Literature of the first half of the 17th 
Century §] 

The preparation of the age of Classicism; the advent of “absolute monarchy ; 
the development of baroque art and literature, romanesque and preciosite , and 
the great authors of the period: Corneille, Descartes, Pascal. 

[36.2 Studies in the Life and Literature of the second half of the 17th 
Century §] 

The age of Classicism; the political, social, and cultural implications of the 
“Century of Louis XIV; 55 the great classicists: Racine, Boileau, Moliere, La 
Fontaine; the first rumblings of a new age. 

37.1 Studies in the Life and Literature of the first half of the 18th 

Century § ^all 

The age of Enlightenment in France; the political and social upheaval under 
the Regency and Louis XV; the rise of the “philosophical spirit 55 and the 
critique of the established order: Montesquieu, Voltaire, Diderot and the 
Encyclopedic. 

37.2 Studies in the Life and Literature of the second half of the 18th 

Century § Spring 

The origins of the French Revolution and the reign of Louis XVI; Rousseau 
and the pre-romantic attitudes: Chenier, Bernardin de Saint-Pierre, Beau¬ 
marchais. 

[38.1 Studies in the Life and Literature of the first half of the 19th 
Century §] 

From the French Revolution to the Second Republic: the impact of the 
industrial revolution on French society; the development of French Ro¬ 
manticism: Chateaubriand, Lamartine, Vigny, Musset-and Hugo; from 
Romanticism to Realism: Balzac and Stendhal. 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


77 


[38.2 Studies in the Life and Literature of the second half of the 19th 
Century §] 

From the Second Empire to the Third Republic: the rise of the new, “mod¬ 
ern” world, its artistic and literary implications: Realism, Naturalism, 
Symbolism and the germs of contemporary sensitivity and thought. From 
Baudelaire to Apollinaire. 

39.1 Studies in the Life and Literature of the 20th Century: Andre 

Malraux. § Fall 

A study of one of the most important personalities of contemporary France 
through a detailed analysis of his life and works: essays, novels, aesthetic 
writings, memoirs; his political career. Mme Kroughi 

39.2 Studies in the Life and Literature of the 20th Century: Camus and 

Sartre. § Spring 

Through selected works of these authors, the course will study two of the 
most important figures of contemporary France and analyze their impact on 
modern literature and thought. 


Civilization 

46.1 French Civilization Fall 

The geography of France, its physical and human aspects; the development 
of her political, social, intellectual and artistic history, from the origins to the 
end of the 16th century. (21.2 or permission) M. Bourcier 

46.2 French Civilization Spring 

The development of the French State and the French Nation from the 17th 
century to the present; the main features of contemporary French ciivlization 
and culture. (46.1 or permission). M. Bourcier 

47.1 Problems of Contemporary France Fall 

A seminar on the present situation in France: her political, economic, social, 
religious, and cultural life, and the problems facing her. (Permission) 

M. Bourcier 

50.1 and .2 Advanced Studies in Language, Civilization and Literature 

Fall and Spring 

Candidates for the Master’s degree, and qualified undergraduates, may be 
permitted to undertake a special project in reading and research under the 
direction of some member of the Department. Staff 

GERMAN 

Associate Professor: *K. Sparks ( chairman ); Assistant Professors: T. Huber, V. H. Vail; 
Instructor: W. M. Hurley, Jr.; Assistants: Miss Jakobi, Miss Sutter 

Departmental students are required to take all of the eight courses which presently con¬ 
stitute the Major in German Literature. Since all higher courses will be conducted in 


^Director of Graduate School in Germany Spring 1968-69 



78 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


German, completion of 21.2 or its equivalent is prerequisite to acceptance into the depart¬ 
ment. In their junior and senior years qualified students may undertake approved in¬ 
dependent research. 

11.1 and 11.2 Beginners’ German Fall and Spring 

The course consists of three lectures, three drills and a laboratory hour. 

Lectures. All grammatical explanations are given during the lecture hours. 
The lectures also pre-drill the student, which is to say, the student is guided 
through the exercises that he is to prepare for the following day’s drill. 

Drills . Drilling is done in groups of approximately ten students. Since they 
have been guided through the exercises in lecture, students are expected to 
display absolute and automatic control of drill assignments. Laboratory fee 
$10.00 per semester. Mr. Vail, Mr. Sparks and Staff 

21.1 Intermediate German Fall 

The course meets three hours a week in sections of approximately ten 
students. It begins with a comprehensive grammar review; this is followed by 
a phase in which literary texts are used as the basis of further language 
instruction and for the acceleration of reading speed. In the final phase of the 
course, progress in the language is supplemented by guided essay writing 
and textual interpretation. Laboratory fee $10.00. Staff 

21.2 Advanced Germanf Spring 

The course meets three times a week in sections of approximately ten stu¬ 
dents. Modern German texts will be read and interpreted, and the student 
will be introduced to the methods of literary analysis. The course will further 
increase the student’s fluency in spoken German and his facility in reading. 
Additionally, the student will be trained in the writing of interpretive essays. 

Staff 

31.1 Modern German Literature § Spring 

The course is designed to accommodate interested non-majors as well as 
majors. It will examine the development of German Literature since Na¬ 
turalism, focusing on works by Hauptmann, Mann, Hofmannsthal, Kafka, 
Brecht and others. Considerable attention will also be devoted to repre¬ 
sentative post-war writers. Offered in alternate years; to be given in 1968-69. 

33.1 The German Novelle§ Fall 

This course will follow one genre, the Novelle , as it evolves through a century 
and a half of German writing. The aim of the course is to acquaint the stu¬ 
dent not only with the development of a form, but with the companion 
development of the critical concepts which serve it. Readings will range from 
Goethe to Kafka. Offered in alternate years; to be given in 1968-69. 

Mr. Vail 

[35.2 German Lyric Poetry §] 

Like the course in the Novelle , this course directs the student’s attention to the 
evolution of a single genre through several “schools” and periods. Readings 
will cover major poets from the eighteenth century to the present. Offered in 
alternate years; not to be given in 1968-69. 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


79 


[41.1 The Eighteenth Century §] 

From Late Baroque up to and including Sturm und Drang . In addition 
to dealing with selected literary works of the early and mid-eighteenth 
century as objects interesting in themselves, the course will study these 
works as background for Goethe and Schiller, whose early works will be 
represented. Offered in alternate years; not to be given in 1968-69. 

[41.2 The Age of Goethe and Schiller §] 

A representative selection of Goethe’s early and mature works will provide 
the frame of the course. The student will be given insight into the artistic 
development of a single great figure. Readings will include an early and a 
late novel of Goethe’s, lyrics from throughout his career and several plays, 
one of which will be Faust I. A selection of Schiller’s poems, essays and plays 
will be used to counterpoint Goethe’s development and his interests. Offered 
in alternate years; not to be given in 1968-69. 

43.2 Romanticism § Spring 

This course will provide the student with the techniques for examining a 
period in depth. The emphasis will be on narrative forms, but some primary 
criticism (e.g. Novalis and the Schlegels) will be read as well. The course 
will give the student a basis from which to understand romantic themes and 
forms as they are carried forward into the twentieth century. Readings will 
include works by Wackenroder, Tieck, Novalis, the Schlegels, Eichendorff, 
Brentano, von Arnim, and E.T.A. Hoffman. Offered in alternate years; to 
be given in 1968-69. 

45.2 Seminar in German Drama § Fall 

The theme of this seminar will be the development of social and political 
criticism in the German theater. Readings will include tragedies, comedies 
and satires and will range from Buchner’s Woyzeck to Brecht’s Mahagonny . 
Offered in alternate years; to be given in 1968-69 Mr. Huber 

[47.2 Seminar: The German Novel §] 

The tentative theme of this seminar is the development of the Bildungsroman 
from Goethe forward. Readings will include novels by Goethe, Keller, 
Mann and Kafka. Offered in alternate years; not to be given in 1968-69. 

RUSSIAN 

Associate Professor: R. L. Baker {chairman ); Instructors: S. D. Cioran, G. R. Motolanez; 
Associate: Mrs. A. Baker 

The major in Russian consists of a series of courses leading systematically to a high degree 
of proficiency in the spoken and written language and to a general knowledge of Russian 
literature and cultural history from its beginnings to the present day. 

While more and more students enter Middlebury College with two or three years of 
high school Russian, the majority of freshmen enrolling in Russian are just beginning 
their study of the language. A minimum of about two years of study of the language is 
necessary before one can effectively apply it to the study of literature and civilization. In 
order to introduce the major to Russian culture as soon as possible and while he is still 
learning the language, the Department offers the following course conducted in English: 










80 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


25.1 and 25.2 Russian Literature and Culture. This course is also open to students who are 
majors in other departments. Students from other departments are also welcome in the 
following courses, which require no knowledge of Russian: 35.1 Dostoevsky, 36.2 Tolstoy, 

37.1 The Russian Short Story, and 38.2 20th Century Russian Literature. 

Admission to the major program is attained through satisfactory grades in 21.2 and 

25.2 or through satisfactory scores on the qualifying examination. The qualifying examina¬ 
tion will cover all language skills and a general knowledge of Russian literature and 
culture from its beginnings to the present day. 


Required for the major: 31.1—2 and three courses chosen from the following: 33.1,33.2,41.1, 
41.2, 42.1, and 43.2. Although not required for the major, the following courses may 
count toward the major provided the total number of courses taken in Russian does 
not exceed 14: 35.1, 36.2, 37.1, and 38.2. Normally a student will be advised to take 
two winter program courses in the Department during his four years. 

The Senior Program will consist of Independent Study (the equivalent of two 
courses) and General Examinations (the equivalent of one course). Independent 
Study will consist of the writing of a thesis under the direction of a faculty member 
and of periodic review seminars to prepare students for the General Examinations. 
Honors work will be integrated with the research project and thesis included in 
Independent Study. 

11.1 and 11.2 Beginners’ Russian Fall and Spring 

Oral inductive approach to provide a firm control of the sound system and 
the structure of the language. Although the emphasis is on the spoken col¬ 
loquial language, reading, writing, and the fundamentals of grammar are 
gradually introduced in order to provide a solid foundation for work in 
advanced courses or for reading in specialized fields. Five class meetings per 
week (two in lecture sections, three in drill sections) and intensive use of the 
language laboratory. (Russian 11.2 must be passed before credit for 11.1 is 
given.) Laboratory fee $10.00 per semester. Mr. Baker and Staff 

21.1 Intermediate Russian Fall 

Continuation of the oral approach used in 11.1 and 11.2 with increasing 
emphasis on reading and writing. Four class meetings per week (one in lec¬ 
ture, three in drill sections). Intensive use of the language laboratory. (Rus¬ 
sian 11.2 or equivalent) Laboratory fee $10.00. Mr. Baker, Mrs. Baker 

21.2 Intermediate Russian f Spring 

Reading and conversation in Russian based on contemporary texts, both 
literary and non-literary. Intensive use of the language laboratory. (Russian 

21.1 or equivalent). Laboratory fee $10.00. Mr. Baker, Mrs. Baker 

25.1 and 25.2 Russian Literature and Culture (in English) § 

Fall and Spring 

A survey of Russian cultural history and literature from its beginning to the 
present day. In the first semester the main emphasis will be on the 19th 
century. In the second semester the main emphasis will be on the literature 
and culture of Soviet Russia. No knowledge of Russian is required. 

Mr. Cioran, Mr. Motolanez 

31.1 Russian Phonetics, Diction and Conversation Fall 

Intensive work in establishing correct Russian pronunciation and intonation. 




FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


81 


Development of oral fluency and freedom in self-expression. Intensive use of 
language laboratory. (Russian 21.2 or equivalent) Laboratory fee $5.00. 

Mr. Baker 

31.2 Russian Conversation and Composition Spring 

Continuation of development of oral fluency together with review of grammar 
and study of some of the more intricate elements of Russian grammar. In¬ 
tensive use of language laboratory. (Russian 31.1 or equivalent) Laboratory 
fee $5.00. Mr. Baker 

33.1 and 33.2 Russian Prose and Drama of the 19th Century § 

Fall and Spring 

Reading in the original of works of some of the major 19th century writers. 
Classroom discussions in Russian. (Russian 21.2 or equivalent) 

Mrs. Baker 

35.1 Dostoevsky (in English) § Fall 

A study of the major works of one of the masters of Russian literature who 
has had a great influence on world literature, particularly on the Existen¬ 
tialists. No knowledge of Russian is required. Offered in alternate years. 
Will not be given in 1969-1970. Mr. Cioran 

36.2 Tolstoy (in English) § Spring 

A study of the major works of one of the giants of Russian and world litera¬ 
ture. No knowledge of Russian is required. Offered in alternate years. Will 
not be given in 1969—1970. Mr. Motolanez 

[37.1 The Russian Short Story (in English §] 

A study of some of the major Russian writers of short stories, with particular 
emphasis on Chekhov. No knowledge of Russian is required. Offered in 
alternate years. Will not be given in 1968-1969. 

[38.2 20th Century Russian Literature (in English) §] 

A study of 20th century writers more in depth than is possible in 25.2 and 
including some authors not included in that course. Greater emphasis on 
poetry than in 25.2. No knowledge of Russian is required. Offered in alternate 
years. Will not be given in 1968-1969. 

41.1 and 41.2 Advanced Language Study Fall and Spring 

Continued development of spoken and written skills, including stylistic 
analysis of various types of material. Entails use of the language laboratory. 
(Russian 31.2 or equivalent) Mrs. Baker 

[42.1 Russian Prose and Drama of the 20th Century §] 

A study in the original of some of the major 20th century writers of prose 
and drama. Classroom discussions in Russian. Will not be given in 1968-1969. 

[13.2 Russian Poetry §] 

Study in the original of Russian poetry from the 18th century to the present 
day. Classroom discussions in Russian. Will not be given in 1968-1969. 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Studies in Language and Literature 

Fall and Spring 



82 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


Students who have the proper qualifications may undertake a special problem 
in reading and research under the supervision of a faculty member. Staff 

SPANISH AND ITALIAN 

Professor: S. Castiglione {chairman ); Assistant Professor: E. Worthen; Instructors: Mr. 
H. Albor; Miss N. S. Wright; Lecturer: *Mrs. G. Centeno; Associate in Italian: Mrs. 
P. B. Castiglione 

The Major in Spanish consists of a body of courses which leads systematically to the 
perfection of the ability to read, speak and write Spanish, and to a general knowledge of the 
broad aspects of Spanish and Spanish American Literatures and Civilizations. A com¬ 
prehensive examination is required of all majors in May of the senior year, covering in 
breadth and depth the cumulative materials of the four years of course work. 

A study of Spanish literary style, of literary and historical movements is designed to 
lead the student to an appreciation of the creative genius of the various civilizations which 
make up the Spanish speaking world. The detailed study and discussion of the great 
literary creations will be further enhanced by studies in artistic movements affecting 
developments in painting, sculpture and architecture, as well as in music. 

Required for a Major: Spanish 31.1, 31.2, 43.1, 43.2, 44.2, and 4 additional semester 
courses in Literature in the Department, Independent Study, and the General 
Examination. Women majoring in the Spanish Department are required to live in the 
Spanish corridor of Allen Hall for one year. 

Students will have the opportunity to concentrate in Spanish or Spanish American 
Literature in the Independent Study program. The General Examination and 
Independent Study Programs will carry 3 course credits. 

Spanish 

11.1 Beginners’ Spanish Fall 

Elements of pronunciation; fundamentals of grammar; reading of cultural 
materials; dictations; vocabulary building. (Spanish 11.2 must be passed 
before credit for 11.1 is given.) Laboratory fee $10.00. 

Miss Wright, Mr. Albor 

11.2 Beginners’ Spanish Spring 

A thorough study of regular, irregular, radical changing, and orthographic 
changing verbs; the subjunctive in noun, adjective and adverbial clauses; 
laboratory work to perfect pronunciation, with tape recordings and listening 
exercises. Laboratory fee $10.00. Miss Wright, Mr. Albor 

21.1 Advanced Grammar and Reading Fall 

A review of grammatical principles; readings in Spanish and Spanish 
American Literature. Designed for students with two or three years of high 
school Spanish and some training in understanding and speaking Spanish. 

Mr. Worthen, Miss Wright 

21.2 Advanced Grammar and Reading t Spring 

A systematic review of Spanish grammar with particular emphasis on the 
most difficult points of syntax. Written and oral work in addition to extensive 
reading. Mr. Worthen, Miss Wright 

31.1 Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature Fall 
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the main authors and 


*Director of Graduate School in Spain 1968-69 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


83 


currents of the literature of the Spanish speaking world up to the XVIII 
Century. Intensive aural and oral training will be combined with extensive 
reading. Suitable for students who are not Spanish majors. (Spanish 21 or 
permission) 

31.2 Introduction to Spanish and Spanish American Literature § Spring 
Major literary trends and authors from the XVIII Century up to the present 
day. (Spanish 31.1 or permission) 

40.1 Spanish Literature from the Middle Ages to the XVI Century § 

Fall 

Based on the reading of unabridged works. Books to be read will include 
Poema de Mio Cid , Libro de Buen Amor , El Conde Lucanor , La Celestina , Amadis 
de Gaula , La Diana , El Lazarillo de Tormes , and the poetry of Garcilaso, 
Fray Luis and San Juan de la Cruz. Offered in alternate years. To be given 
in 1968-69. 

40.2 Spanish Literature of the XVII and XVIII Centuries § Spring 
Based on the reading of significant literary works such as El Buscon, Fabula 
de Polifemo y Galatea , La Dorotea , El Si de las ninas , Cartas Marruecas , and 
selected essays by Feijoo and Jovellanos; popular poetry of the Golden Age 
will also be analyzed. This course will be complemented by Course 45.2. 
Offered in alternate years. To be given in 1968-69. 

[41.1 Spanish American Literature §] 

A study of the major literary trends and currents in Spanish America from 
the colonial chronicle to the contemporary novel, with special emphasis on 
those writers who must clearly reflect the unique aspects of Spanish Ameri¬ 
can culture and civilization. Ricardo Palma’s Tradiciones , the political 
essayists, and Indianist and Gauchesque literature are among the authors 
and literary movements studied. Offered in alternate years. Not to be given 
in 1968-69. 

[41.2 Spanish American Literature §] 

The second semester is dedicated to Modernist and Post Modernist poetry, 
literature of the Mexican Revolution, and such other currents as the psycho¬ 
logical novel. Offered in alternate years. Not to be given in 1968-69. 

42.1 The Spanish American Novel § Fall 

A study of the main currents of the Spanish American Novel from the XIX 
Century up to the present. A dozen of the works of the outstanding authors 
will be read and analyzed. Offered in alternate years. To be given in 1968-69. 

Mr. Worthen 

[43.1 Spanish Civilization] 

Study of the Spanish character and of Spain’s contribution to world civiliza¬ 
tion; the geographical, ethnical, historical, political, and artistic evolution 
of Spain, together with a study of its traditions and customs. Offered in 
alternate years. Not to be given in 1968-69. 


84 


FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


[43.2 Spanish American Civilization] 

With a similar method and parallel subject matter to Spanish 43.1, this 
course will study Spanish America and its contribution to America’s culture. 
Offered in alternate years. Not to be given in 1968-69. 

[44.2 Advanced Language Study] 

A course in composition. Designed to give a good preparation in written 
Spanish to students planning to teach. The idiomatic use of the Spanish 
language will be especially stressed, as it applies to the written and spoken 
language. (Spanish 21.2 or permission.) Offered in alternate years. Not to be 
given in 1968-69. 

[15.1 Cervantes §] 

A study of the most important works by Cervantes, including Don Quijote , 
samples of his comedias and entremeses , and novelas ejemplares, plus El viaje del 
Parnaso. Offered in alternate years. Not to be given in 1968-69. 

45.2 Spanish Theatre of the XVI and XVII Centuries § Spring 

A thorough review of some of the most relevant dramatic pieces of this 
period. Authors studied will include Gil Vicente, Torres Naharro, Lope de 
Rueda, Lope de Vega, Tirso de Molina, Rojas, Alarcdn, Velez de Guevara, 
Moreto, and Calderdn. Offered in alternate years. To be given in 1968-69. 

46.1 Spanish Literature of the XIX and XX Centuries § Fall 

Romanticism, Realism, Naturalism and the Generation of ’98 as reflected 
in the works of the major authors of the period. Offered in alternate years. 
To be given in 1968-69. Mr. Worthen 

[46.2 Spanish Literature of the XIX and XX Centuries §] 

A continuation of the generation of ’98. Aspects of the generation of ’27 and 
contemporary literature. Offered in alternate years. Not to be given in 
1968-69. 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Studies in Language and Literature 

Fall & Spring 

The student will work on an independent research project in consultation 
with a member of the staff. 

Italian 

11.1 Beginners’ Italian Fall 

Training in pronunciation; vocabulary building; a study of the funda¬ 
mentals of the grammar and syntax; pattern drills; readings. Laboratory 
exercises are an integral part of the course. Five class meetings per week (two 
in lecture sections, three in drill sections). (Italian 11.2 must be passed before 
credit for 11.1 is given.) Laboratory fee $5.00 Mr. Castiglione 

11.2 Beginners’ Italian Spring 

This course is devoted to a review and application of the basic principles 
presented during the first semester. Readings; compositions; reports; labora¬ 
tory assignments. Five class meetings per week (two in lecture sections, three 
in drill sections). Laboratory fee $5.00 Mr. Castiglione 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 


85 


21.1 Intermediate Italian Fall 

A thorough review of the structure of the language, combined with the 
reading of selections from contemporary Italian prose. Compositions; oral 
reports; laboratory assignments. Laboratory fee $5.00. Mr. Castiglione 

21.2 Advanced Italianf Spring 

Reading of works by modem and contemporary Italian authors. Discussions; 
compositions; laboratory assignments. Laboratory fee $5.00. 

Mr. Castiglione 

31.1 Literature § Fall 

The aim of this course is to acquaint the student, through classroom dis¬ 
cussions and oral reports on representative works, with the principal cur¬ 
rents and authors of Italian literature. The first semester will be devoted to 
the study of the development of Italian literature from the Sicilian School 
to the Renaissance. Mr. Castiglione 

31.2 Literature § Spring 

During the second semester a study will be made of the main trends of Italian 
literature from the 16th century to the present. Discussions; reports. 

Mr. Castiglione 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Studies in Language and Literature 

Fall & Spring 
Mr. Castiglione 



Division of the Social Sciences 


(Chairman to be appointed) 


ECONOMICS 

HISTORY 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 


PSYCHOLOGY 

SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 
TEACHER TRAINING 


ECONOMICS 


Professor: D. K. Smith (< chairman ); Associate Professors: J. V. Craven, K. H. Wolff; 
Assistant Professors: D. M. Bechter, T. H. Hibbard, J. T. Wenders. 

The Economics Department seeks fundamentally to develop the student’s capacity for 
economic analysis. This goal seems ever more appropriate as economic problems become 
more numerous and more complex. The departmental program is structured to provide a 
solid grounding in the discipline of Economics. This structuring, the Department is 
convinced, serves equally well the needs of both the terminal major and the graduate school 
candidate. 

The Principles course, open to members of all four classes, provides a review of 
modern Economics with insights into its policy applications and a foundation for more 
advanced work. The increased use of quantitative methods in the work of the economist 
calls for the study of Accounting, Statistics, and Mathematics by the major, hence, the 
Department urges that the Mathematics requirement, Mathematics 11.1 and 12.1 be 
attended to in the Freshman year. Statistics and Accounting are usually taken during the 
Sophomore year. Economics 33.1 is also suggested for that year since a continuing exposure 
to theoretical Economics is deemed wise. The normal program for the Junior year is 
Economics 38.1 and .2 and 42.2. The background work in theory and quantitative methods 
described above is the basis for two terms of Independent Study and one term of General 
Examination preparation in the Senior year. The Independent Study consists of a series of 
projects carried out under departmental direction. The General Examination preparation 
is carried out with a minimum of supervision and direction. This Examination is the 
natural culmination of the integrated program of the major in Economics. 

The Department serves as a clearing house for information on Graduate Schools in 
Business and Economics. Students planning to do graduate work in Business or in Eco¬ 
nomics should take Mathematics 11.1 and 12.1 and Economics 49.2. Non-economics 
majors going to Business School should take at least Economics 11.1 and .2, 26.1 and 27.1 
in addition. Any student planning to do graduate work in Mathematical Economics or in 
Econometrics should take Mathematics 34.2 and 35.2. 


Required for a Major in Economics: 11.1, 11.2, 26.1, 27.1, 33.1, 38.1, 38.2, 42.2, In¬ 
dependent Study, and the General Examination. One other elective course in 
Economics is required for majors of the Class of 1969. This course may be a Winter 
Course. For the Class of 1970 and subsequent classes, one Winter Course is required. 
Mathematics 11.1 and 12.1 or their equivalent are requirements for the Class of 1970 
and thereafter. 

Cognate Courses Strongly Recommended: Mathematics and History 
Cognate Courses Recommended: Geography and Political Science 

11.1 Principles of Economics Fall 

A study of the scope of Economics; economic systems; price theory; foreign 
trade; income distribution. Staff 


86 








SOCIAL SCIENCES 


87 


11.2 Principles of Economics Spring 

A study of the determination of income and employment; the banking system 
and monetary policy; fiscal policy; aspects of foreign trade not covered in 
11.1. (The two semesters of 11 may be taken in either order but credit for one 
semester is withheld until the other has been successfully completed.) Staff 

26.1 Economic Statistics Fall and Spring 

Theory and interpretation of statistics. Introduction to probability theory, 
statistical inference, regression analysis, decision theory, index numbers, time 
series analysis. Computer number fee, $5.00. Mr. Bechter 

27.1 Principles of Accounting Fall and Spring 

The philosophy of Accounting; accounting procedures with maximum em¬ 
phasis on the theoretical considerations involved; proprietorship, partnership 
and corporate accounting. (This course is strongly recommended for all 
students planning for graduate study in law or business.) Mr. Smith 

[27.2 Principles of Accounting] 

Cost accounting; financial analysis; theory of accounting, with emphasis 
on society’s interest in accounting practices and the possible alternatives to 
those practices. (Econ. 27.1) 

33.1 The Theory of the Firm and the Consumer Fall 

A detailed analysis of the pure theory of consumption and production em¬ 
ploying indifference curve techniques throughout. Particular attention is 
given to the derivation of supply and demand functions in both product and 
factor markets from the maximizing behavior of firms and consumers. A 
general equilibrium model is presented as a unifying element. Relevant 
mathematical tools are developed as needed. (Econ. 11.1 and 11.2, Econ. 

26.1 or Mathematics 11.1 or 12.1 or permission) Mr. Bechter 

[34.2 The Corporation and the Economy] 

A study of corporate financing; the corporation as an object of public policy; 
the corporation viewed as a major influence in the economy. (Econ. 11.1 and 
11 . 2 ) 

[36.1 Labor Problems] 

The history of the labor movement; union structure and government; eco¬ 
nomics of the labor market; labor legislation. (Econ. 11.1 and 11.2) 

38.1 The National Economy Fall 

A detailed analysis of the determinants of the level, growth, and fluctuations 
of national income, employment, and prices. The contributions of both the 
Classical and Keynesian theories are presented in a general equilibrium con¬ 
text. Modern theories of economic growth and business cycles are discussed. 
(Econ. 11.1 and 11.2, Econ. 26.1 or Mathematics 11.1 or 12.1, or permis¬ 
sion.) Mr. Hibbard 

38.2 The National Economy Spring 

A study of public policies affecting aggregate output, employment, prices, 






88 


SOCIAL SCIENCES 


fluctuations and growth. The emphasis is upon fiscal and monetary measures 
as employed in the United States. (Econ. 38.1) 

[40.1 Economic Growth] 

A study of the attempts to broaden economic theory beyond static analysis 
toward a theory of dynamic change and growth. (Econ. 11.1 and 11.2; Econ. 

38.1 or permission.) 

40.2 Economic Development Spring 

An analysis of history, theory, and competing contemporary policies for 
economic development. (Econ. 11.1 and 11.2) Mr. Wolff 

42.2 Public Policy Toward Business Spring 

A detailed analysis of the behavior of the firm under varying market struc¬ 
tures and the public policy implications. In each case, the relevant theoretical 
tools are developed and applied to a particular industry in the United States. 
Emphasis is placed on modifications and extensions of the traditional theory 
of the firm as a tool for the analysis of existing market structures. Considera¬ 
tion is given to the dimensions of public policy throughout. (Econ. 11.1 and 
\\2) Mr. Wenders 

43.1 International Trade Fall 

A study of the economic basis of international trade and investments. The 
emphasis throughout is upon theoretical analysis. Consideration is given to 
questions of public policy toward trade and finance and to the operation and 
efficacy of institutional arrangements. (Econ. 11.1 and 11.2) 

[44.2 Government Finance] 

Principles and practices relating to government revenues, budgeting and ex¬ 
penditures, incidence and effects of taxation; fiscal policy; the use of public 
credit. 

[45.2 Comparative Economic Systems] 

An analysis of the alternative methods proposed and used for solving the uni¬ 
versal economic problems under different social and political philosophies and 
forms of government. 

[48.1 and 48.2 Economic Thought and Modern Economic Tendencies] 

A study of the great thinkers in Economics against the background of their 
times. 

49.2 Mathematical Economics Spring 

A study of selected topics in economic analysis with the use of mathematical 
and statistical methods. (Econ. 11.1 and 11.2 and permission.) Computer 
number fee, $5.00. Mr. Bechter 

50.1 and 50.2 Special Individual Research Fall and Spring. 

To be arranged for qualified students as the need arises. Staff 

HISTORY 

Professors: *W. B. Catton, P. E. Tillinghast ( chairman ); Visiting Professor: H. M. 
Jones; Associate Professor: N. B. Clifford; Visiting Associate Professor. W. W. 


*On leave 1968-69 





SOCIAL SCIENCES 


89 


Schmokel; Assistant Professors: *A. J. Knoll, *M. E. Lamberti; Instructors: J. S. 
Freidin, T. B. Jacobs, G. G. Murray, E. R. Stehle; Lecturer: Mrs. D. E. Crowley 

Miss U. M. Heibges, Mr. G. D. O’Brien 

The History major combines an introduction to several areas of historical knowledge and 
extensive study in two of these areas with intensive training and practical work in historical 
research. All History majors are required to take History 12 (or its equivalent), and four 
other semesters from among the lecture-courses in History. In their junior year, they take 
one pro-seminar in fall and History 46.2 and 47.2 in spring. These constitute the Junior 
Qualifying Program. All senior majors write a senior thesis for their Independent Study 
project and prepare for the Comprehensive Examination. 

The cognate fields most usually recommended are: foreign languages, Economics, 
Political Science, Geography, and English and American Literature. Religion 34 (History 
of Christianity) will be counted as a History course for those who wish to do so. 


Required for all History majors: History 12 or its equivalent; four semesters of other 
lecture-courses in History; one pro-seminar; History 46.2 and 47.2; the senior thesis; 
and preparation for the Comprehensive. 

12.1 European Civilization Fall 

The development of European ideas and institutions in the Middle Ages, 
Renaissance and Reformation; the first impacts of Europe on the rest of the 
world; baroque statesmanship and the beginnings of the Enlightenment. 
(Primarily for freshmen and sophomores; juniors and seniors admitted by 
permission only.) Mr. Tillinghast and Staff 

12.2 European Civilization Spring 

Continuation of 12.1. From the 18th century to the present. 

Mr. Tillinghast and Staff 

13.1 Ancient History Fall 

The Near East and Greece to the rise of Macedonia. Miss Heibges 

13.2 Ancient History Spring 

Continuation of 13.1 The Hellenistic Near East and Rome. Miss Heibges 

[22.1 American History 1607-1877] 

History 22 is organized on the assumption that most students will have pre¬ 
viously done work in American History and have a knowledge of the basic 
narrative material of this field of study. Accordingly lectures and reading will 
stress interpretations and will be topical in nature. History 22 is the normal 
introduction to further work in American History. The first semester analyzes 
the development of distinctive American institutions through the Civil War. 
The lectures, readings and discussions emphasize the political and economic 
structure of the nation. To be offered 1969-70. 

[22.2 American History 1865-1960] 

Continues the approach of 22.1. This course emphasizes the responses to the 
crisis of industrialization, the changing relationship between government 
and the economy, social and intellectual developments and the emergence of 
the United States as a major world power. To be offered 1969-70. 


*On leave 1968-69 






90 


SOCIAL SCIENCES 


23.1 English History, 1485-1760 Fall 

Tudor, Stuart and early Hanoverian England: frequent variations on a 
limited set of themes in a basically stable society. Mr. Tillinghast 

23.2 British History since 1750 Spring 

A survey of the period since the Industrial Revolution. The focus will be on 
social and intellectual change, and on the growth of reform movements to 
meet those changes. Mr. Clifford 

28.1 European Social and Intellectual History, 1789-1890 Fall 

An analysis of European thought and culture from the French Revolution 
to the Fin de Siecle. Primary emphasis will be placed on the interaction be¬ 
tween intellectual developments and social and cultural patterns. Students 
will be assigned intellectual source documents and interpretive readings. 

Mr. Stehle 


28.2 European Social and Intellectual History, 1890-1945 

Continuation of 28.1. 


Mr. 


Spring 

Stehle 


29.1 Revolution and Romanticism Fall 

A study of possible relations between the revolutionary movements in Ameri¬ 
ca and Europe from 1775 through 1830 and the development of romanticism 
in philosophic thought and the major arts. Mr. Jones 

[32.1 Economic History of the United States] 

An analysis of American economic development from the 17th century to 
1860, with frequent attention to European influences and emphasis on the 
relationship between economic activity and social, political and intellectual 
History. (History 22 or permission.) (Given in alternate years; to be offered 
in 1969-70) 

[32.2 Economic History of the United States] 

A study of industrial development and its consequences from the Civil War 
to the present. (History 32.1 or permission.) (Given in alternate years; to be 
offered in 1969-70) 

[33.1 The Middle East and Africa—an historical study] 

33.2 The Middle East and Africa—an historical study Fall 

Traces the rise of European influence in Africa. Special attention to the de¬ 
colonization process and to the problems of nation-building. Mr. Schmokel 

[34.1 History of Modern Europe, 1815-90] 

[34.2 History of Modern Europe, 1890-1950] 

35.1 Medieval History Fall 

Western Europe from 1000 to 1300. The development of feudalism, the 
growth of the papacy as an administrative institution, and the consolidation 
of the first national monarchies. Mr. Tillinghast 

35.2 The Renaissance and Reformation Spring 

Western Europe from 1300 to 1600. Political and social changes in the north, 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 


91 


the growth of humanism in the south, the religious revolts and the Catholic 
Reformation. Mr. Tillinghast 

36.1 American Intellectual History to 1865 Fall 

Extensive reading in primary and some secondary material dealing with 
major currents in American thought. Lectures and class discussions are 
aimed at defining views and interpretations. Topics include Puritanism, the 
American Enlightenment, 19th century democratic thought, reformers and 
their critics, and pro-and anti-slavery writers. Mr. Murray 

36.2 American Intellectual History since 1865 Spring 

The impact of industrialism and science on American thought and values. 
Topics include conservatism, Social Darwinianism, naturalism, pragmatism, 
imperialism and America’s mission in the 20th century, progressivism, New- 
Dealers, the idea of mass culture, the problem of loyalty, and the role of in¬ 
tellectuals in a democratic state. Mr. Murray 

37.1 Twentieth-Century America Fall 

A study of the political and social forces in America, concentrating on the 
1890’s, America’s rise to world power, the Progressive era, the first World 
War, and the 1920’s. Mr. Jacobs 

37.2 Twentieth-Century America Spring 

A study of the political and social forces in America, concentrating on the 
Great Depression, the New Deal, the Second World War, postwar America 
from the Fair Deal to the New Frontier, and the Cold War. Mr. Jacobs 

38.1 East Asia to 1800 Fall 

Surveys the development of China and Japan from their beginnings until 
the eve of the impact of western Imperialism. The focus will be on the 
development of traditional social and political institutions, and on their 
intellectual background. Mr. Clifford 

38.2 East Asia since 1800 Spring 

Continuation of 38.1, stressing the process of change following increased 
contact with the West, the challenges to traditional society, and the Asian 
responses. Mr. Clifford 

[40.1 Philosophy of History] 

40.2 Philosophy of History Spring 

An investigation of the two basic trends on the philosophy of history: critical 
and speculative. Readings from Eliade, Hegel and Toynbee will approach 
the problem of “the meaning of history.” Contemporary readings from var¬ 
ious authors will analyze the nature of historical knowledge in its relation to 
the natural sciences. Mr. O’Brien 

41.1,42.1,43.1 Pro-Seminars Fall 

The purpose of the pro-seminars is to teach students how to put together a 
research paper. About the first four weeks are spent in covering the area of 
the course in class, and the reading stresses bibliography. During the rest 


92 


SOCIAL SCIENCES 


of the course students write a long paper using class time to report their 
progress. Research topics are chosen to improve the knowledge of the whole 
class in the subject area. Required of majors in their junior year, and open to 
others by permission. Staff 

American History: 

41a. 1 The Era of the American Revolution 

Readings and discussion will aim at an understanding of the nature of 
society and politics in 18th century America, and the nature of the 
American Revolution: was it a social revolution, did it have ideological 
connections with the Enlightenment and the French Revolution? 

41d.l The New Deal and World War II, 1930-45 

An analysis of political, social and economic forces during the New Deal, 
the American response to the international crises of the 1930’s, and the 
diplomacy of the American leaders during World War II. 

41e.l Education in America 

Reading emphasizes developments in schools and colleges during the 19th 
century and parts of the late 18th and early 20th centuries. Students may 
write either on informal educational influences such as those of the family, 
mass media, and other social institutions, or on formal education. (This 
course will also receive credit for Teacher Education.) 

European History: 

42a. 1 Europe in the Fin de Siecle, 1890-1914 

Emphasis will be on dissident trends in European thought and culture 
immediately prior to World War I. 

Non-Western History: 

43a. 1 The Age of Imperialism 

The diplomatic, administrative, and economic foundations and develop¬ 
ment of 19th and 20th century imperialism. The stress will be on Asia, 
but students who wish to work in other areas will be encouraged to do 
so. 

[45.1 Intellectual History of Europe] 

[45.2 Intellectual History of Europe] 

46.2 The Literature of History Spring 

Extensive directed reading in the field of the student’s choice designed to 
give him a thorough grounding in the secondary literature and major 
interpretive problems of a particular area of history. The course will be 
divided into four sections: American, European, Asian and African history. 
(Required of junior majors; open to others by permission.) Staff 

47.2 Historical Writing and Research Spring 

During the first five weeks students will re-write their pro-seminar papers. 
For the last eight weeks they will do preliminary research on the background 





SOCIAL SCIENCES 


93 


of their senior thesis. There will be an examination at the end on the period 
of the thesis. Staff 

50.1 and 50.2 Fall and Spring 

Special research projects. (Permission only) Staff 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professors: C. L. Hoag, *H. E. Thurber; Associate Professor: R. B. Carroll; Assistant 
Professors: R. J. Leng (<acting chairman ), P. Nelson; Instructors: M. Dry, O. F. Logoglu 

The Major in Political Science provides a broad background of knowledge of government 
and politics and supplies a framework within which individuals may view national and 
international affairs. Essentially the major program provides an understanding of political 
phenomena through the study of policy-making and its implementation which stresses 
the theoretical structure and its close relationship to practical politics. The Department 
offers a selected core curriculum with an opportunity to pursue the discipline further 
through independent study and research. Cognate courses for the Political Science major 
may range over a broad field and may be planned variously to meet differing purposes 
of the students. It is recommended that at least one course in Political Science be elected 
each year. 

Required for a Major: 11.1, 11.2, or a qualifying examination, Independent Study and the 
General Examination. A total of 10 courses in Political Science must be completed 
in order to satisfy major requirements. 

11.1 Introduction to Political Science Fall 

A study of the classics in political science from Plato to Marx, involving an 
analysis of fundamental political problems and the basis of their solutions 
as well as a consideration of the different approaches to the study of politics. 
Two lectures and one discussion section per week. (Open only to freshmen) 

Staff 

11.2 American Goverment Spring 

An examination and analysis of the principles of liberal democracy and their 
embodiment in the American Constitution and an analysis of the basic issues 
of American politics. (Open only to freshmen) Staff 

American Political Institutions 
[21.1 State and Local Government] 

33.2 Administration and Policy Development Fall 

Administrative officials and the determination of public policy with emphasis 
on the problem of securing responsible government through Congressional 
supervision, judicial review, and Presidential control. Mr. Carroll 

40.1 American Politics and Legislation Fall 

The American political process; the theory and practice of politics; the 
functions and activities of political parties and interest groups and their 
role in the initiation and control of governmental policies, including a 
consideration of crucial political issues and practical politics. Mr. Dry 


*On leave 1968-69 






94 


SOCIAL SCIENCES 


40.2 President and Congress Spring 

Constitutional examination of how and why American Government has 
been characterized at different times as both Congressional and Presidential 
Government. Proposals for reform evaluated in terms of purpose of American 
politics. Mr. Dry 

45.1 American Constitutional Law Fall 

The study of the origins and framing of the Constitution and Supreme Court 
decisions and other writings dealing with problems of separation of powers 
and federalism. (Open to juniors and seniors, sophomores by permission) 

Mr. Carroll 

45.2 American Constitutional Law Spring 

The study of the Bill of Rights and the Fourteenth Amendment as interpreted 
by Supreme Court decisions and related documents. (P.S. 45.1 and permis¬ 
sion) Mr. Carroll 


International Relations and Foreign Policy 

20.1 International Politics Fall 

A conceptual framework for the study of international politics. The focus 
is on foreign policy decision-making, evaluation of capabilities, and inter¬ 
state relations from the viewpoint of the international system. Mr. Leng 

20.2 International Politics Spring 

A study of international strategy and bargaining techniques, and major 
factors of conflict and cooperation in the contemporary international system, 
including an exercise in inter-nation simulation. (20.1) Mr. Leng 

36.1 and 36.2 American Foreign Policy Fall and Spring 

Analysis of policy in the postwar period as reflecting the response of the 
United States to the requirements of leadership in a changing world. Em¬ 
phasis upon the relation of policy to the political process. Evaluation of 
American policy in the Cold War by means of special case studies in particular 
problem areas. Mr. Hoag 

42.1 International Politics: Theory Fall 

An examination of international politics as a discipline. Emphasis will be on 
major contemporary approaches, methodological trends, and analysis of the 
international system. Mr. Leng 

42.2 International Politics: Theory Spring 

An investigation of contemporary approaches to the analysis of foreign 
policy-making. Approaches will be considered in relation to different aspects 
of the policy-making process. Socio-psychological and communication theo¬ 
ries, game theory, content analysis, and inter-nation simulation will be 
considered as research tools. (Permission) Mr. Leng 

Comparative Government 

22.1 The Study of Comparative Politics Fall 

An introduction to the field of comparative politics. The history of the 








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comparative method, its advantages and limitations in the study of politics 
will be examined. There will be a survey of the major theoretical approaches 
used in comparative political analysis as well as a statement of the sub¬ 
stantive concerns of the field. Mr. Logoglu 

22.2 Political Systems of Europe Spring 

A comparative analysis of selected political systems in Europe. Emphases 
will be on variations in political structures and functions as well as on the 
relationship of the polity to the economy, the society, and the international 
community. Major concentration will be on Britain, the Soviet Union, and 
Sweden. Mr. Logoglu 

35.1 Governments and Politics of the Far East Fall 

A study of the governmental systems of selected countries of the Far East. 
Attention given to ideology, political institutions, social and economic 
development as well as foreign relations. Emphasis upon the postwar period 
as influenced by nationalism and communism. China and Korea. Mr. Hoag 

35.2 Governments and Politics of the Far East Spring 

Continuation of 35.1 Japan and India Mr. Hoag 

41.1 The Politics of Developing Areas Fall 

A study of the political processes and structures of the developing areas. The 
most salient problems facing the new nations, their capabilities in coping 
with these tasks, and their future prospects will be analyzed. The approach 
will be comparative and empirical data will be drawn from a wide range of 
geographical and temporal contexts. Mr. Logoglu 

41.2 The Politics of Modernization in the Near East and North Africa 

Spring 

A comparative analysis of social change in Islamic societies from Morocco to 
Pakistan, with particular emphasis on Turkey, Iran and Egypt. Topics 
covered will include the transformation of ruling elites, social classes, and 
ideologies, the question of Israel, and problems for U.S. policy. Mr. Logoglu 

Political Philosophy and Behavior 

38.1 Political Philosophy Fall 

An examination of contemporary theoretical positions in or affecting 
political science, followed by study of the writings of selected Greek, Roman, 
Christian, Jewish and Muslim political philosophers. The period covered in 
the historical part of the course is roughly from Plato to Machiavelli. 

Mr. Nelson 

38.2 Political Philosophy Spring 

A continuation of 38.1 from Machiavelli to the present. (38.1 or permission). 

Mr. Nelson 

43.1 Political Behavior Spring 

A study of contemporary empirical political science in terms of its relation 


96 


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to classical or traditional political science, its theoretical presuppositions, its 
methods and concepts, and some of its applications to American political 
phenomena. Mr. Nelson 

43.2 Seminar on Political Theory Fall 

Intensive study of a theme, or epoch, or author of political thought to be 
announced. By permission. Mr. Nelson 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Projects in Research Fall and Spring 

Staff 


PSYCHOLOGY 

Professor: A. H. Ewell {chairman)’. Associate Professor: D. L. Prouty; Assistant Pro¬ 
fessors: D. E. Crowley, J. T. Polefka; Research Assistant: E. M. Burrill. 

For the student who majors in psychology engagement with experimental data lays the 
basis for an empirically-founded and objective formulation of principles of human be¬ 
havior. He may encounter the data in published research reports, in his regular laboratory 
work, and in connection with his own research along lines that he finds important. The 
revelant observations may involve human subjects or sometimes infra-human subjects 
for the better experimental control that they may permit. Whatever the source of his 
observations, the student comes to see them as products of the experiments that generated 
them, and thus he evaluates their importance for hypothesis or generalization. 

As a psychology major the student takes a program of elective and required courses 
in psychology and related disciplines. By the end of his sophomore year, through work in 
Psychology, in Mathematics, and in Biology and/or Chemistry, he has acquired familiarity 
with many of the data, concepts, and research procedures essential to an understanding of 
human behavior. During his last two years he makes use of his accumulated knowledge and 
skills in his deep involvement with several areas of central importance to psychology. 

Students generally choose to complete as much as possible of their formal course work 
toward the major by the end of the junior year so that their work in psychology as seniors 
can be devoted to independent reading and study and to individual research in Psychology 
70, the Senior Research Program. Participation in this Program may lead to the award of 
Departmental Honors. 


Required for a Major in Psychology: 11.1, 11.2, 23.1, 34.1 and at least four additional fall 
or spring term courses in psychology, Qualification in Psychology, Senior Independent 
Study and the General Examination in Psychology; a year of college mathematics; 
and at least two one term courses in the Natural Sciences Division, these courses to be 
chosen in consultation with the Psychology Department. 

Qualification in Psychology must ordinarily be accomplished by the end of the 
student’s sophomore year and is achieved by completion of Psychology 11.2 with a 
grade of at least 70, by completion of Psychology 23.1 with a grade of at least 70, and 
by completion of the extra-departmental major requirements as stated above. A 
student who has not met Qualification by the end of his sophomore year may be 
granted exception to the requirements on action of the Department in response to his 
written request. 

Senior Independent Study involves conferences with staff and preparation of 
several papers and presentation of these papers to a seminar during the fall and spring 
terms of the student’s senior year. Preparation for the General Examination, given 
yearly in May, will involve independent reading by the student. This preparation may 
be done as the equivalent of one course during the fall or winter or spring term of 
the student’s senior year at his choice. 



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11.1 and 11.2 Fundamentals of Psychology Fall and Spring 

To acquaint students with the foundations of psychology and also to serve as 
basis for advanced work in the field, this course deals with the scientific 
study of human behavior. The lectures and discussions constitute a detailed 
examination of the major topics of psychology on the behavioral, cognitive, 
and biological levels, and explore the nature and variety of behavior with 
a view to providing a set of explanatory principles. The final examination in 
Psychology 11.2 will cover the year’s work. (Open to freshmen and sopho¬ 
mores without permission. Open to juniors and seniors with permission.) 

Staff 

23.1 Principles of Research Fall and Spring 

This course introduces the student to psychological experimentation partic¬ 
ularly as it relates to the variables influencing human performance. The 
student comes to grips with problems of the design and conduct of experi¬ 
ments as well as the proper procedures for analyzing and reporting the ex¬ 
perimental results. (Psych. 11.1; one term of college mathematics) 3 hrs. 
lecture, lab. Calculator fee, $6. Mr. Ewell 

23.2 Psychophysics Spring 

Lectures deal with the nature, definition, and measurement of the sensory 
unit, the relations of stimulus parameters to this unit, and classical and 
modern formulations of the psychophysical law including those of Fechner, 
Stevens, Helson, and the quantal theorists. Consideration is also given to the 
fundamentals of information theory and decision theory as they apply to 
signal detection. Laboratory work includes representative experiments in 
the above fields. (Permission). 3 hrs. lecture, lab. Laboratory fee $5. 

Mr. Ewell 

28.1 Developmental Psychology Fall 

The purpose of this course is to examine human development in terms of the 
principles and methods of psychology. The course will consider in turn such 
topics as: the nature of the developmental process, the methodology of child 
study, perceptual-motor development, the development of language and 
intellectual skills, and the development of gender role. (Psych 11.2) 

Mr. Prouty 

29.1 Social Psychology Fall 

After a brief review of the implicit assumptions, both historical and con¬ 
temporary about “the nature of human nature,” this course proceeds to a 
critical examination of the basic experimental literature in the field. At the 
same time it also examines a number of areas within social psychology (e.g. 
communications, attitudes, group dynamics) from the point of view of the 
relation between empirical data and theory. The emphasis throughout is on 
the individual in the social situation, and the basic principles from general 
psychology underlying his behavior. (Psych. 11.1, 11.2, and permission) 

Mrs. Polefka 

31.2 Experimental Psychology: Learning Spring 

The course involves a detailed examination of research in the area of learning 




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with respect to problems of experimental design and theoretical interpreta¬ 
tion. The topics studied include Pavlovian conditioning, instrumental train¬ 
ing, discrimination, transfer of training, and verbal learning. The laboratory 
work in this course centers around conditioning and training techniques with 
human and animal subjects. (Psych. 23.1) 3 hrs. lecture, lab. Laboratory 
fee $5. Mr. Prouty 

32.2 Experimental Psychology: Sensory Processes Spring 

The sensory processes in humans are studied in terms of the interactions 
among physical stimuli, receptor organs, and naural coding mechanisms 
in the light of behavioral, cognitive, and physiological research findings 
that delineate their characteristics. Consideration is given to the simulation 
of sensory processes by computer. Laboratory work considers quantitative 
description of these processes. (Permission) 3 hrs. lecture, lab. Laboratory 
fee $5.00, Computer fee $5.00. Mr. Crowley 

[33.1 Measurement of Human Performance] 

34.1 Physiological Psychology Fall 

Lectures deal with the ways in which underlying neurophysiological, neuro- 
anatomical, and endocrinological processes affect behavior. In laboratory 
work the student learns electrode implantation, histological methods for the 
examination of neural structures, and other techniques for direct study of 
brain-behavior relationships in living organisms. (Psych. 11.1, 11.2, and 
permission. Permission will be granted to students having strong backgrounds 
in psychology, biology, or chemistry.) 3 hrs. lecture, lab. Laboratory fee $10. 

Mr. Crowley 

38.2 Personality Spring 

This course emphasizes the scientific conceptualization of the unique indi¬ 
vidual personality. Various historical and contemporary formulations are 
critically examined in the light of both the available experimental evidence 
and the criteria for acceptable hypotheses. On the basis of these considera¬ 
tions, the course attempts to specify appropriate approaches to, and con¬ 
ceptualizations of, the individual. (Psych. 11.1, 11.2, and permission) 

Mrs. Polefka 

46.2 Psychopathology Fall 

An initial series of lectures deals with the symptomatology and nosology of 
mental illness. The research literature on the etiology of mental illness, and on 
selected topics in psychopathology (e.g., epilepsy, experimental neurosis, 
psychotomimetics) is reviewed and assessed by student panels or through 
student research papers presented to the seminar. (Psych. 11.1, 11.2, and 
permission) Mr. Ewell 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Study 

A program of research arranged to meet the needs of advanced students 

majoring in psychology. (Permission) Staff 


SOCIAL SCIENCES 


99 


70.1 and 70.2 Senior Research Program 

Students participating in this program engage, under the sponsorship of a 
staff member, in extended independent, original research in addition to their 
required Senior Work. The program is open to any senior psychology major 
with permission from the department. Students whose work in this program 
is of outstanding quality and who also meet College-wide requirements for 
Departmental Honors (See p. 19) will after presentation of, and examina¬ 
tion on, their work be awarded Honors, High Honors, or Highest Honors in 
Psychology upon graduation. Work in this program may be substituted as the 
equivalent of a course in any two of the three terms of the student’s senior 
year. Staff 

Senior Work: Independent Study and General Examination 

In Independent Study the student chooses over the year one or a small num¬ 
ber of topics in the literature of psychology to pursue deeply on his own. He 
reports to his fellow students several times on this work. He is expected also 
to work independently throughout the year in preparation for the General 
Examination which covers the field of psychology rather than specific course 
material. Staff 


SOCIOLOGY-ANTHROPOLOGY 

Associate Professors: D. H. Andrews, R. K. Haerle, Jr. ( chairman ); Instructors: B. A. 
Parks, Jr., and Jean J. Kliman (Miss). 

The major in Sociology-Anthropology will provide the student with a significant per¬ 
spective for the systematic analysis and understanding of human behavior resulting from 
cultural and societal forces: Based on the empirical findings of the closely related disciplines 
of sociology and anthropology, this perspective is inherently comparative, such that the 
department is concerned with the interrelations between culture and society in various 
settings. Although both of these disciplines share common concern about human behavior, 
each in addition has its own history, concepts, and theoretical commitments. Anthropology 
essentially focuses on the role of culture in human experience and sociology is concerned 
primarily with the role of social interaction and the social structure in human experience. 

To achieve the requisite understanding of human behavior in the sociocultural 
context, the major in Sociology-Anthropology is exposed to the theoretical and empirical 
literature through a coordinated series of required and elective courses. During the 
beginning course (12.1 and 12.2), the student is introduced to the basic concepts, theories, 
and findings of both sociology and anthropology* There follows a set of required courses 
designed to unfold the key aspects of the organizational life of non-literate (34.2) and 
American (28.2) societies, along with some of the theoretical underpinnings (40.1). For 
his elective courses, a student is free to pursue the study of those problem areas or special 
interests which best suit his future career plans. This formal course work leads naturally to, 
and serves as the foundation for, the more complex reading and scholarly research and 
writing required of the senior major in the Senior Program. The work of the major 
culminates in the General Examination. 

Required for the major in Sociology-Anthropology: Soc. 12.1, 12.2, 28.2, 34.2, 40.1, The 
Senior Program, The General Examination, plus a minimum of five but not more 
than nine Fall and Spring Courses in the Department (to include the Senior Program 
courses) and a minimum of one but not more than two Winter courses in the Depart¬ 
ment (one of which may be part of the Senior Program). The selection of cognate 
courses will be planned with the major’s advisor, taking into consideration the stu¬ 
dent’s aims and purposes in the department. 


100 


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The Senior Program will consist of the Senior Thesis and the General Examina¬ 
tion. With the exception of Honors candidates (to be discussed below), the program 
will carry three course equivalents, two of which will be allocated to the Senior Thesis 
and the remaining one to the General Examination. For every student, the Spring 
term will be devoted to preparation for the comprehensives. The two course equi¬ 
valents designated as the Senior Thesis will normally be taken, one each, in the Fall 
and Winter terms. 

For the Honors candidate, the new Senior Program will consist of the Honors 
Thesis and the General Examination. This program will carry four course equivalents, 
three of which will be allocated to the Honors Thesis and one to the General Examina¬ 
tion. As above, the Spring term will be devoted to preparation for comprehensives, 
with a course credit of one. The three courses assigned to the Honors Thesis, along 
with the comprehensive preparation, will normally be handled in a 2-1-1 pattern. 

Consult the Department bulletin for further details on the Senior Program. 

Strongly recommended courses: Econ. 26.1, Pol. Sci. 43.1, Rel. 33.1, 33.2, Am. Lit. 21.1, 
21.2, 46.2, Hist. 36.1, 36.2, Psy. 29.1, 38.2. 

12.1 Introduction to Anthropology Fall 

An introduction to the major sub-fields of anthropology—physical anthropol¬ 
ogy, archaeology and social anthropology. To be examined is the evolution 
and contemporary variation of man and culture, using data from human 
paleontology and biology, the archeological record and ethnographic studies. 
(Not open to juniors and seniors except by permission). 

Mr. Andrews and Staff 


12.2 Introduction to Sociology Spring 

A systematic study of society and social organization. Major theoretical con¬ 
cepts of sociological analysis presented and applied to the basic institutions of 
man and areas of specialized interest. Emphasis on American society. (Not 

open to juniors and seniors except by permission). 

Mr. Haerle and Mr. Parks 


[23.1 Physical Anthropology] 

28.1 Peasant Society and Culture Fall 

Comparative analysis of contemporary peasant societies and cultures. Exam¬ 
ination of the social position of the peasants in the wider society of which 
they form a part. Study of the distinctive folk traditions and customs of 
peasant societies. Analysis of the impact of twentieth century political and 
economic changes on the cultural values and social systems of differing types 
of peasant societies. (Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2, or permission) Staff 


28.2 American Community Studies Spring 

An examination of representative communities and subcommunities, within 
the framework of the folk-urban continuum. The structure of social class, 
status and power, and the relationship among institutions within the com¬ 
munity. Assessment of methodological approaches. (Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2, 
required; 28.1 recommended) Mr. Haerle 

32.2 Socio-cultural Change Fall 

An examination of socio-cultural change with emphasis on evolution, ac- 



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101 


culturation and the development process, using data primarily from non- 
Westem peoples. (Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2, or permission) Mr. Andrews 

[33.1 The Family] 

34.1 Majority-Minority Relations Fall 

Focus on the causes, purposes, and consequences of prejudice, discrimination, 
and segregation, especially as they are manifested in various institutional 
contexts. Problems of self-conception, adjustment patterns, social movements, 
community organization, and styles of life. Special emphasis on the Negro 
American. (Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2, or permission) Mr. Haerle 

34.2 Social Organization Spring 

Analysis and comparison of the organized social behavior and institutions of 
non-literate societies. Detailed examination of the structure, functions and 
development of social organization in non-literate society. Special emphasis 
on kinship and legal systems of representative tribal societies. (Soc.-Anthro. 
12.1, 12.2, or permission) Mr. Andrews 

36.2 American Indian Spring 

An analysis of the major culture areas of native North America. Representa¬ 
tive groups of Indians will be discussed in terms of ecology, racial and lin¬ 
guistic affiliation, social organization and values orientation. The diffusion of 
culture traits from Meso-America, Oceana, and Asia as well as intra-diffusion 
will be analyzed, along with the development of institutions. (Soc.-Anthro. 
12.1, 12.2, or permission) Mr. Andrews 

[37.1 Public Opinion and Mass Communication] 

[37.2 Problems in Ethnography] 

38.2 Work and Society Spring 

The study of work as a social and organizational phenomenon from two 
complementary points of view: (a) the sociology of occupations and profes¬ 
sions, stressing the process of professionalization, career selection, and col¬ 
league and client relationships, and (b) industrial sociology, with emphasis 
on the conflict of formal and informal structures in industrial and bureau¬ 
cratic organizations. (Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2, or permission) Mr. Haerle 

39.2 Social Stratification Spring 

The nature and functions of stratification in American society. Theories and 
evidence examined. Comparative analysis of the nature of the social classes 
and the influence of stratification on behavior, status, prestige, and institu¬ 
tionalized social roles. (Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2, or permission; 34.2 recom¬ 
mended) Mr. Parks 

40.1 Sociological Theory Fall 

A critical analysis of the major sociological theorists who have or are in¬ 
fluencing contemporary American sociology, through the use of original 
sources. Emphasis will be given to Marx, Weber, Durkheim, Simmel, and 
Parsons. Implications and applications of their ideas to contemporary theory 
and research. (Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2 and permission) Mr. Haerle 



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SOCIAL SCIENCES 


40.2 Research Design Spring 

The relationship of concepts, hypotheses, and theories to general principles 
of research. The systematic procedures of design and measurement used by 
sociologists to obtain and analyze data about human groups and institutions. 
Research projects will be designed, tested, and the gathered data analyzed. 
(Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2, 40.1, and permission) Staff 

42.1 Personality and Culture Fall 

Perspectives on the relation between culture, social structure, and the in¬ 
dividual : the individual in society and society in the individual; the problem 
of freedom and constraint. Contemporary sociological conceptions of so¬ 
cialization, self or identity, and interaction. Special attention given to the 
quality of social life as experienced by the individual person: his involve¬ 
ment with the roles, other persons, and symbols of different institutions. (Soc.- 
Anthro. 12.1, 12.2 or permission) Mr. Parks 

[43.2 Criminal and Delinquent Behavior] 

44.1 Urban Society and Social Disorganization Fall 

Conceptions of disorganization in urban society, stressing its culture, insti¬ 
tutions, and the roles of poverty, power and vested interest. Perspectives on 
the problem: social problems, social pathology, social disorganization; the 
relevance of psychoanalytic perspectives. Special attention given to the inter¬ 
dependence of social and personal disorganization; norms and self images in 
deviant behavior; disorganization in the various classes and institutions of 
urban society; the role of crime, insurrection, and other forms of deviant 
behavior in promoting conformity and change. (Soc.-Anthro. 12.1, 12.2 or 
permission) Mr. Parks 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Individual Study Fall and Spring 

Open to qualified students, by permission. Staff 

TEACHER EDUCATION PROGRAM 

Director: J. S. Freidin; Assistants: Mrs. R. W. Gleason, Miss K. A. McGlynn, Mrs: 
R. G. Sholes 

Teacher Education at Middlebury (for elementary and secondary school teachers) is 
based on two beliefs: first that the most important part of a teacher’s education is the 
development of his intellectual skills and knowledge in the subject(s) he will teach and in 
the liberal arts and sciences; and second that certain pedagogical studies can help a 
student learn how he can best teach his subject. Some students prepare themselves in both 
respects while undergraduates; others prefer to complete their preparation after gradua¬ 
tion. The TEP offers students advice on graduate programs in education such as the 
M.A.T. as well as its own program of courses designed to prepare undergraduates as 
teachers and to qualify them for state certification. The Program also helps students secure 
teaching positions. 

Any student planning to teach should major in a discipline related to the subject(s) 
he intends to teach. His major should be broad (e.g., several kinds of history or literature, 
not just American), for as a teacher he will be responsible for teaching a broad field. His 
general education must also be broad. These are matters of first priority; they should not 
be obstructed by studies in the TEP. Consequently students interested in teaching should 
speak with the TEP Director as soon as possible in order to decide the most effective pro- 



SOCIAL SCIENCES 


103 


gram for them. (In this respect students should note that TEP courses in history and 
psychology satisfy Degree-Group B Distributional Requirements.) 

With the exception of “Problems and Methods of Education” (TEP 32.2 and 33.2) 
and “Practice Teaching” (TEP 42.1-2 and 43.1-2), TEP courses are open to all students 
who have fulfilled the departmental prerequisites for them. “Problems and Methods” and 
“Practice Teaching” are open only to students admitted to them by the TEP. There are no 
rigid criteria for admission to these courses, but the following standards are used as guides: 
the breadth and strength of a student’s academic performance in secondary school and 
college, his verbal skill, and his commitment to a career as a teacher. Students are expected 
to argue their own cases for admission in respect to these criteria and any others they con¬ 
sider relevant. 

Students who complete all the courses listed below will encounter little difficulty 
gaining provisional certification in most major states. (Provisional certification is the 
normal license granted to beginning public school teachers.) Students who complete only 
some of these courses will usually have to take course work during their first year or two as a 
teacher or extend their full-time studies into a fifth, graduate year. 

The courses below should usually be taken during the years under which they are 
listed. 

Freshman or Sophomore year: 

Psychology 11.1-11.2 Fundamentals of Psychology Fall and Spring 
(See description p. 97) A prerequisite for advanced courses in psychology. 

Psychology Staff 

Sophomore or Junior year: 


Psychology 28.1 Developmental Psychology Fall 

(See description p. 97) Mr. Prouty 

[Psychology 33.1 Measurement of Human Performance] 

Psychology 38.2 Personality Spring 

(See description p. 98) Mrs. Polefka 

History 41e.l Education in America Fall 

(See description p. 92) Mr. Freidin 


32.2 Problems and Methods Seminar—Elementary Spring 

Lectures, discussion and readings pertinent to the general background, 
current trends, problems and methods of contemporary elementary educa¬ 
tion. Includes observation and teacher aide work at the local elementary 
school. Miss McGlynn 

33.2 Problems and Methods of Education—Secondary Spring 

Will meet approximately two-thirds of the term as a seminar, led by Mr. 
Freidin, to study important educational issues of the past and present and to 
do mock-teaching. During the rest of the term the class will divide into small 
colloquia composed of students planning to teach the same subjects. Led by 
experienced teachers, these colloquia will discuss curricula; testing; texts, 
books, and other educational materials; and methods of teaching the partic¬ 
ular subject or various aspects of it. (Permission) Mr. Freidin 




104 


SOCIAL SCIENCES 


Senior year: 

42.1 and 42.2 Practice Teaching—Elementary Fall and Spring 

Usually taken concurrently, these courses comprise a practicum consisting 
of teaching at an assigned grade level 15 hours per week for 8 weeks, followed 
by a three day period in which full class control is assumed. Supervised by 
school and college personnel. (TEP 32.2 and permission.) 

43.1 and 43.2 Practice Teaching—Secondary Fall and Spring 

Students spend between two and three hours a day at Middlebury Union 
High School. Under close supervision by an experienced teacher in the stu¬ 
dent’s field, each student observes classes for a minimum of 20 hours and 
teaches his own classes for 75 to 90 hours. Late in the course student teachers 
observe each other, assist with some extra-curricular activities, and attend 
faculty meetings. Students also meet in weekly seminars with their master 
teachers and college faculty members to discuss both practical and theoretical 
aspects of teaching. Usually taken concurrently and counted as two courses. 
(TEP 33.2 and permission) 


Division of the Natural Sciences 


Professor Grant H. Harnest, Chairman 


BIOLOGY 
CHEMISTRY 
GEOGRAPHY, GEOLOGY 


MATHEMATICS 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
PHYSICS 


BIOLOGY 


Professor: G. B. Saul, II {chairman); Visiting Professor: D. J. McDonald; Associate 
Professors: D. B. Van Vleck, H. E. Woodin; Assistant Professor: C. D. Watters; 
Instructor: M. S. Greenwood; Lecturer: F. G. Lane; Assistant: Mrs. H. M. Munford 

The Department of Biology offers students the opportunity to learn about living organisms. 
The department approaches the subject through lectures, correlated with and illustrated 
by laboratory and field observations and experimentation. 

The General Biology course presents to first-year students a broad spectrum of bio¬ 
logical concepts, ranging from life processes at the molecular level to the interrelationships 
of whole organisms and their environments. The Biology major is designed to provide a 
liberal background sufficient to enable the student to understand the nature of the world 
and man’s role in it, as well as to prepare students for graduate and professional schools. 
Courses required in the major are considered essential in providing a basic foundation 
upon which more specialized knowledge may be built. 

Biological functions are results of chemical interactions; thus knowledge of chemistry 
is important to a biologist. Biology majors are required to take two semesters of organic 
chemistry. Biology has become a science of exact measurements; majors therefore should 
have an understanding of mathematics. Students are encouraged to take one year of 
mathematics and physics. 

Master of Science in Biology. A limited number of graduate students are admitted as 
candidates, as indicated on page 46. Research, a thesis and oral examination are depart¬ 
mental requirements in this program. 

The geographical location of Middlebury College, with thousands of acres nearby 
owned by the College or within the Green Mountain National Forest, provides an excellent 
outdoor laboratory for the ecological studies. 

A separate, joint major with Chemistry has been developed to enable a student to 
become proficient in both fields without having to take all the required courses prescribed 
for a pure major in either field. The Department also participates in the interdisciplinary 
major in Environmental Studies. (See page 26) 

Courses designated with an asterisk* may be taken without laboratory under the 
following conditions: (1) Only students who have satisfied the Group C requirements are 
eligible. (2) The stated prerequisites for the course must be met. (3) Students majoring in 
Biology or jointly in Biology and other subjects may not count such courses toward the 
fulfillment of the major. 


Required for a Major: 11, 20.1 or 21.1, 22, 37.2, 42.2, 44.1 and one elective; Chemistry 
11.1, 13.1, 23.2; Independent Study and General Examination. 

Recommended: Mathematics 11.1 and 12.1; one year College Physics. 

Required for a Joint Major in Biology and Chemistry: Biology 11, 21.1, 44.1 and one 
elective; Chemistry 11.1, 13.1, 17.1, 19.1, 23.2 or 36.1, and one other semester course; 
Mathematics 12; Physics 15; Independent Study (Chemistry first semester, Biology 
second semester) and the General Examination. Joint majors in Biology and Chem¬ 
istry must have a reading knowledge of French, German or Russian. This requirement 
may be met by the completion of the normal second-year college language course or 
by a reading test set by the language department. 


105 








106 


NATURAL SCIENCES 


11.1 General Biology Fadl 

A course designed to be the prerequisite for all biology courses as well as to 
satisfy the science requirement for non-science majors. General principles of 
biology, the animal kingdom, including fine cell structures, tissues, organ 
systems, physiology and some biochemistry are covered. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. 
laboratory. Lab. fee $10. Staff 


11.2 General Biology Spring 

Essentially a continuation of 11.1 but covering the topics of botany, ecology, 
genetics, embryology and evolution. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. Lab. fee $10. 
(Biology 11.1) Staff 

*20.1 Invertebrate Biology Fall 

The invertebrate phyla, which include the great majority of animals, will be 
discussed partly from an evolutionary standpoint based on their morphology 
and embryology, and partly from a functional viewpoint which will empha¬ 
size adaptions of living forms in terms of their physiology, ecology and be¬ 
haviour. The laboratory will concentrate on the former aspect through the 
examination of living and preserved specimens, the lectures on the latter. A 
term paper will be required from each student, and will form the basis of a 
class presentation. Some field collection will be expected from the students; 
and a week-end field trip to the Atlantic coast may be sponsored by the De¬ 
partment on a voluntary basis. (Biology 11.2). 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. laboratory. 
Lab. fee $10. Mr. McDonald 


*21.1 Biology of Vertebrates fall 

The evolution of organs and organ systems in Phylum Chordata, with em¬ 
phasis on the higher vertebrates. Brief treatment of comparative embryology. 
Laboratory study of shark, Necturus, and cat, designed to supplement lectures 
and develop skill in dissection; term paper or special laboratory exercise. 
(Biology 11.2) 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab. Lab. fee $10. Mr. Van Vleck 

*22.1 Plant Anatomy and Taxonomy Fall 

A detailed study of cell and tissue structure is presented with an emphasis on 
vascular plants. A number of weeks are spent in the field collecting and clas¬ 
sifying woody plants and later learning the techniques of herbarium mounting. 
A year-length project is begun in this course, to be continued in 22.2. The 
project is on an individual basis and must be written up as if for publication 
in a biological journal. One of the two laboratories assigned to this course 
is devoted solely to this independent work. (Biology 11) 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. 
lab. Lab. fee $10. Mr. Greenwood 


*22.2 Plant Morphology and Physiology Spring 

Includes a comparative survey of the structure and evolutionary relationships 
of the major plant phyla for half the semester. General physiology of the 
vascular groups. Considerable time spent in radioactive isotope tracer work in 
laboratory. (See 22.1 for reference to year-length project and paper.) (Biology 
22.1) 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab. Lab. fee $10. Mr. Greenwood 



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107 


24.2 Developmental Biology 


Spring 


The normal development of organisms, including fertilization, differentiation 
and morphogenesis, as well as the phenomena of regeneration and carcino¬ 
genesis. Laboratory will include observation of living and preserved, sec¬ 
tioned embryos, and experimental approaches to various developmental 
problems. (Biology 21.1 or Biology 20.1) 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab. Lab. fee 
$10. Mr. Watters 

[34.1 Histology and Histological Techniques] 

The microscopic structure of animal cells, tissues and organs is correlated 
with their function. Strong emphasis is placed on identification of tissues. 
Students are taught standard techniques for preparing tissues for study and 
prepare many of their own slides. Students elect individual problems. The 
course will prove most useful to those contemplating careers in research 
biology. (Permission of instructor. Biology 21.1, 24.2 recommended) 2 hrs. 
lecture, 6 hrs. lab. Lab. fee $10. Not to be offered in 1968-69. 

36.1 General Ecology Fall 

The organism in relation to the abiotic environment. A critical investigation 
of how the physical and chemical attributes of fresh-water, marine and terres¬ 
trial habitats affect the position and number of organisms. Laboratory exer¬ 
cises include mostly field trips to study environmental parameters with one 
or more weekend trips to study a lake as a sample ecosystem. Each student 
will write a paper, as if for publication, dealing with independent research 
carried on throughout the semester. (Biology 11) 3 hrs. lecture, 6 hrs. lab.: 
includes 3 hrs. arranged for individual research problem. Lab. fee $10. 


Mr. Woodin 
Spring 


36.2 General Ecology 


The organism in relation to the biotic environment. The inter- and intra¬ 
specific reactions of an organism to other organisms at all levels of social 
organization. Laboratory exercises include field trips to study animal be¬ 
havior and organization using infra-red, radiotelemetry devices, and con¬ 
trolled laboratory use of radioactive tracers to study food chains. Each student 
will write a paper, as if for publication, dealing with independent research 
carried on throughout the semester. (Biology 36.1 or permission) 3 hrs. 
lecture, 6 hrs. lab. includes 3 hrs. arranged for individual research problem. 
Lab. fee $10. Mr. Woodin 

*37.2 Genetics Spring 

Lecture topics include the nature and action of hereditary material, statistical 
analysis, linkage, mutations, chromosome aberrations and polyploidy, and 
population genetics. Developmental aspects and evolutionary implications 
are stressed. Laboratory study is designed to introduce some major organisms 
and techniques used in research, and includes training in analyzing and re¬ 
porting data. (Biology 11) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. Lab. fee $10. Mr. Saul 

*38.2 Animal Behavior Spring 

A review of recent developments in the field of the behavior of invertebrates 


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and vertebrates, with particular emphasis on the evolution and ontogeny of 
behavioral patterns, and some consideration of the physiological and neuro¬ 
logical mechanisms underlying them. The laboratory will include both set 
experiments and independent investigations, the latter with fish and with 
local animals. (Biology 11.2 or permission.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. Lab. fee 
$10. Mr. McDonald 

41.1 Advanced Genetics 

A seminar course, involving discussion of selected topics of current interest 
in various aspects of genetics, and based on assigned readings and student and 
faculty presentations of relevant journal literature. (Biology 37.2 and per¬ 
mission.) Mr. Saul, Mr. Lane, and Mr. McDonald 

42.2 Comparative Physiology Spring 

The principal physiological processes of animals, with emphasis on the 
diversity of mechanism between and within different groups of animals. 
Consideration of function primarily at the level of organs and organ systems. 
Laboratory designed to acquaint students with diversity of quantitative 
techniques. (Biology 44.1. Seniors or permission) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. 
Lab. fee $10 and breakage. Mr. Van Vleck 

44.1 Cell Biology Fall 

The cell as organism. Emphasis on the integrative organization of cellular 
structure and function: maintenance, growth, reproduction and specializa¬ 
tion. Laboratory will include both observational and experimental studies of 
cellular activity. (Biology 11, Chemistry 13.1, 23.2 or permission of instruc¬ 
tor.) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. Lab. fee $10. Mr. Watters 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Study Fall and Spring 

For honors students, majors and graduate students in Biology. (Permission) 
Fee of $10 per semester if laboratory work is involved. Staff 

55.1 and 55.2 Research and Thesis Fall and Spring 

Open to properly qualified students. Required for all candidates for the 
Master’s degree. Lab. fee $10 if laboratory work is involved. Staff 

CHEMISTRY 

Professors: G. H. Harnest {chairman), W. A. Moyer, E. K. Roberts; Associate Professors: 
R. W. Gleason, E. L. Pool; Assistant Professors: D. B. Ledlie, *R. D. Nelson, G. W. 
Scaife 

Majors offered in the Department of Chemistry are described below. Students who plan a 
professional career in this field should elect the Certified Major because it provides a 
thorough training in the fundamentals of Chemistry and its relation to other scientific 
fields, medicine, engineering and related subjects. The Chemistry Department is ac¬ 
credited by the Committee on the Professional Training of Chemists of the American 
Chemical Society, and majors who wish to be accredited by the Society should have their 
programs approved by the Chairman of the Department early in their college career. 


*On leave 1968-69 




NATURAL SCIENCES 


109 


Required for a Major: 11.1**, 13.1, 17.1, 19.1, 23.2, 36.1, and two other courses in the 
department; Mathematics 12; Physics 15; and Senior Work (Independent Study 
and the General Examination.) The Senior Work will consist of one course in each 
term during the Fall, Winter, and Spring sessions. 

Required for a Certified Major: Students who wish to be certified by the American 
Chemical Society may complete a Major in Chemistry with the following courses: 
11.1**, 13.1, 17.1, 19.1, 23.2, 36.1, 36.2, 37.2, 49.1, and one other semester course in 
the department; Mathematics 12 and 21; Physics 15; a junior year winter session, 
topics in organic analysis; and Senior Work, as described for the general major. A 
reading knowledge of German or Russian is required. The Certified Major is designed 
to qualify a student for advanced work in graduate schools or for positions in the 
chemical industry. 

Joint Major in Biology and Chemistry. Required for a Major: Biology 11, 21.1, 44.1, and 
one elective; Chemistry 11.1 **, 13.1, 17.1, 19.1, 23.2, 36.1, and one elective; Mathe¬ 
matics 12; Physics 15; Senior Work (Independent Study, Chemistry first semester 
and Biology second semester, and the General Examination). Joint Majors in Biology 
and Chemistry must have a reading knowledge of French, German, or Russian. 

Masters Degree in Chemistry. A Program leading to the Master of Science degree is 
offered for a limited number of qualified students holding a B.A. or B.S. degree. 
Refer to page 46 of this catalogue for general regulations concerning graduate work. 
Each candidate for the Master’s Degree in Chemistry must pass qualifying examina¬ 
tions in the fields of Physical Chemistry, Analytical Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, 
and Inorganic Chemistry. In addition, each candidate must complete a Thesis 
Research Program and successfully defend this work in an oral examination. Programs 
are arranged through consultation with the Chairman of the Department. 

A deposit fee to cover cost of broken apparatus is charged in each laboratory course, to be 
paid at the beginning of each term. 

11.1 Fundamentals of Chemistry Fall and Spring 

Fundamental principles of Chemistry. Atomic theory and atomic structure, 
chemical bonds, stoichiometry, kinetic theory and the states of matter. 
Problem drill, conferences. Laboratory work deals with the testing of theories 
by various quantitative methods. Students with adequate secondary school 
preparation are encouraged to consult the Department for permission to 
elect Chemistry 13.1, 17.1, or 19.1 in place of this course. Two sections in 
Fall; one in Spring. 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab. Laboratory fee, $10 and breakage. 

Mr. Gleason, Mr. Ledlie, Mr. Scaife 

13.1, 23.2 Organic Chemistry I and II Fall and Spring 

An introduction to the study of the compounds, both aliphatic and aromatic, 
of carbon. The approach is based on the properties of functional groups with 
considerable emphasis on electronic theory and reaction mechanisms. 
Laboratory exercises involving the synthesis of organic compounds, the 
analysis of various classes of compounds and the identification of unknowns 
complement the lecture material. (Chem. 11.1 or permission; Chemistry 13.1 
must precede Chemistry 23.2) 3 hrs. lect., 6 hrs. lab. Laboratory fee $12 and 
breakage. Mr. Harnest, Mr. Ledlie 

**Chemistry 11.1 is the normal introductory course in Chemistry. However, students may 
qualify for permission to omit 11.1 and begin their studies in Chemistry with 13.1, 17.1, or 

19.1. Consult the Chairman of the Department. 




110 


NATURAL SCIENCES 


17.1 Analytical Chemistry I 


Fall and Spring 


Extensive treatment of mass action theory (ionic equilibrium) concerned 
mainly with ionization of strong and weak electrolytes, buffers, hydrolysis, 
solubility of difficultly soluble substances, complex formation, oxidation- 
reduction systems, and quantitative measurements involving these phenom¬ 
ena. Laboratory work is mainly titrimetric analysis with some gravimetric 
methods. (Chem. 11.1 or permission) 3 hrs. lect., 6 hrs. lab. Laboratory fee 
$10 and breakage. Mr. Pool 

19.1 Systematic Inorganic Chemistry Fall and Spring 

A systematic study of the elements and their compounds based on the 
Periodic Table. The isolation of the elements from their natural sources, and 
the synthesis of some important types of inorganic compounds. The prop¬ 
erties of selected elements and their compounds are discussed in class and/or 
studied in the laboratory using various analytical methods. (Chem. 11.1 
or permission) 3 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. Laboratory fee $10 and breakage. 


Mr. Moyer, Mr. Scaife 


36.1 Physical Chemistry I 


Fall 


A basic study of thermodynamics and the properties of the gaseous and 
liquid states. The laws of thermodynamics are developed and applied to 
chemical equilibria and electrochemistry. The physical properties of gases, 
liquids, and solutions are discussed and interpreted through thermodynam¬ 
ics. Chemical kinetics is treated empirically. (Chem. 17.1; Mathematics 12; 
Physics 15.1 or permission) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab., 1 hr. conf. Laboratory fee 
$10 and breakage. Mr. Roberts 

36.2 Physical Chemistry II Spring 

An introduction to the Schrodinger equation is followed by a treatment of a 
particle in various types of potential wells. The valence bond, molecular 
orbital, and ligand field theories are illustrated with examples from organic 
and inorganic chemistry. Spectroscopy and photochemistry serve to illustrate 
quantum effects. The solid state and solid-liquid equilibria are discussed. 
Finally the kinetics of complex reactions are analyzed. (Chem. 19.1, 23.2, 
36.1; Mathematics 21.1; Physics 15.2) 3 hrs. lect., 4 hrs. lab. Laboratory fee 
$10 and breakage. Mr. Roberts 

37.2 Analytical Chemistry II—Qualitative and Quantitative Separa¬ 
tions Spring 

Principles and theory of separations, both qualitative and quantitative, 
involving chemical and physical methods: separations by precipitation, 
distillation, extraction, chromatography, ion exchange, and others. In¬ 
strumental methods for separation and analysis. Sampling, dissolution, 
errors, and atomic weight determination. Laboratory work in qualitative 
and quantitative inorganic analysis, selected instrumental methods, and 
an individual project involving separation. (Chem. 36.1, co-req. 36.2) 3 hrs. 
lect., 6 hrs. lab. Laboratory fee $10 and breakage. Mr. Pool 



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111 


42.1 Biochemistry Spring 

A study of the chemistry of the carbohydrates—Classification and nomen¬ 
clature, syntheses, and carbohydrate derivatives. Enzyme nomenclature and 
classification and general characteristics of enzymes. Biological oxidation 
systems and bioenergetics. Digestion, absorption, and metabolism of the 
carbohydrates. (Chem. 23.2; 36.1, or permission; Biology 11.2 is recom¬ 
mended) 3 hrs. lect. Mr. Moyer 

[42.2 Biochemistry] 

A study of the chemistry and structure of lipids and proteins. Digestion, 
absorption, and metabolism of lipids and proteins. The enzyme systems in¬ 
volved in these processes, and the interrelationships between lipid, protein, 
and carbohydrate metabolism. (Chem. 42.1 or permission) 3 hrs. lect. 

[43.1 Organic Chemistry III—Qualitative Organic Analysis] 

Methods of identification of organic compounds taking advantage of char¬ 
acteristic reactions of various functional groups are considered in some 
detail in connection with the first several laboratory assignments. Heavy 
reliance on modern methods of analysis, infrared, ultraviolet, nuclear 
magnetic resonance and mass spectroscopy will be encouraged as the course, 
proceeds. The course culminates in the separation and identification of the 
components of a mixture containing three to five compounds. (Chem. 17.1, 
23.2) 1 hr. lect., 6 hrs. lab. Laboratory fee $12 and breakage. 

44.1 Advanced Organic Chemistry Spring 

An introduction to physical organic chemistry in which an extensive treat¬ 
ment of polar displacement and elimination reactions is included. Also 
considered are the relationship of structure to reactivity (the Hammett 
equation), general and specific acid and base catalysis, the mechanism of 
electrophilic and nucleophilic aromatic substitution reactions. (Chem. 23.2, 
36.1) 3 hrs. lect. Offered in alternate years; not to be given in 1969-70. 

Mr. Gleason 


[44.2 Advanced Organic Chemistry] 

A study of some of the more important special topics of organic chemistry 
including advanced synthesis in general with specific treatment of the 
following: reactions of active methylene compounds; structure determination 
of complex natural products; peptide synthesis and sequential analysis; 
introduction to the steroids; selected name reactions and rearrangements. 
(Chem. 23.2) 3 hrs. lect. Offered in alternate years; to be given in 1969-70. 

46.1 Physical Chemistry III Fall 

A more detailed investigation of the interaction of matter and energy on the 
molecular level. The bases of statistical thermodynamics are developed and 
illustrated with ideal systems and theories of chemical kinetics. An advanced 
study of the electromotive force and the thermodynamics of solutions follows, 
making extensive use of chemical potential and activity. (Chem. 36.2) 3 hrs. 
lect. Mr. Roberts 



112 


NATURAL SCIENCES 


[47.2 Analytical Chemistry III] . 

Principles and theory of analysis by instrumental methods. Topics include 
basic electronics, instrumental design, ultra-violet, visible, and infra-red 
spectrophotometry; refractometry; potentiometric titration methods; polar- 
ography; conductance methods; differential thermal analysis; x-ray fluor¬ 
escence; and others. Laboratory work involves electronic circuits and se¬ 
lected methods of instrumental analysis. (Chem. 37.2) 2 hrs. lect., 3 hrs. lab. 
Laboratory fee $10 and breakage. 

49.1 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Atomic structure; molecular structure by valence bond and molecular or¬ 
bital treatment; transition metal complexes according to valence-bond, 
molecular orbital, crystal field, and ligand field theories. Relations of atomic 
and molecular structure to chemical and physical properties. Other topics 
such as crystal chemistry, acid-base theories, solvent systems, and nuclear 
chemistry. (Chem. 19.1, 23.2; 36.2; Physics 15). 3 hrs. lect. Mr. Scaife 


55.1 and 55.2 Research '’ a ^ and Spring 

Open to properly qualified students. Required of all candidates for the 
Master’s degree. Permission. Laboratory fee $12 per semester and breakage. 

a. Analytical Chemistry 

b. Inorganic Chemistry 

c. Physical Chemistry 

d. Organic and Biochemistry Staff 


Independent Study Fal1 and S P rin S 

Required of all seniors. Breakage. Staff 


GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 


Professor: J. R. Illick {chairman)'. Associate Professors: B. Baldwin, V. H. Malmstrom; 
Assistant Professors: P. J. Coney, R. Laurent; Instructor: R. A. Simko 


Geography 

Geography is concerned with the “where 59 and “why 55 of human activities In its attempt 
to explain the differences which exist from place to place over the earth’s surface, it collects, 
analyzes, and integrates data from both the physical and social sciences. It examines such 
physical elements as landforms, climate, soils, and vegetation and interprets them in 
terms of the distribution of people, their ways of making a living, and the social and political 
patterns they have developed. Because the interaction of man and his environment is 
constantly changing, geography seeks to understand how present world patterns have 
evolved from the past and how they might be modified further m the future. 

The Department also participates in the interdisciplinary major, Environmenta 

Studies. (See page 26) 


Required for a Major: 10.1 and 10.2, 25.1 and 25.2, 38.1,40.1 and 40.2, Geology 11.1 and 
one regional course; Independent Study and the General Examination. 

Cognate courses for a Major in Geography range over a broad field and should be seated 
from other departments according to one’s interest in Geography, and with the 
approval of the adviser. 




NATURAL SCIENCES 


113 


10.1 and 10.2 World Regional Geography Fall and Spring 

A survey of the physical and cultural factors which influence the distribution 
of man and his activities on the surface of the earth. Regional differences 
will be analyzed in relation to various aspects of the natural environment and 
human affairs. (Geog. 10.2 must be passed before credit for 10.1 is given and 
cannot precede 10.1.) (Counts as group B course.) Staff 

25.1 Physical Geography Fall 

A systematic examination of the elements of the physical environment. Land- 
forms, climates, soils, vegetation, minerals and water resources will be 
studied by means of field trips, maps, and photo-interpretation. 3 hrs. lect., 
3 hrs. lab. Field Trip fee, $5. (Geog. 10) Mr. Illick 

25.2 Economic Geography Spring 

An analysis of the origins, nature, and distribution of man’s economic 
activities over the world. The evolution of subsistence, commercial and 
planned economies will be studied in a regional context. Field trips. (Geog. 
10) Field Trip fee, $3. Mr. Malmstrom 

30.1 Geography of Africa Fall 

A study of the emerging nations of Africa and the special role they play in 
world economic and political affairs. The geographic bases of their nation¬ 
hood, their problems and outlook for the future will be assessed. (Geog. 10) 
Alternates with Geog. 36.1; to be given in 1968-69. Mr. Simko 

[35.1 Geography of Latin America] 

A consideration of the individual countries of Middle and South America, 
their resources, problems, and prospects. Special attention is given to their 
relations with the United States and to their significance in world affairs. 
(Geog. 10) Alternates with Geog. 37.1; to be given in 1969-70. 

35.2 Geography of Europe Spring 

A study of the economic, social and political patterns of present-day Europe. 
Emphasis will be placed on the distinctive personalities of the individual 
countries and on their role in regional and global affairs. (Geog. 10) 

Mr. Malmstrom 

[36.1 Geography of Asia] 

A systematic examination of the regions and nations of Asia (excluding the 
Soviet Union), with special emphasis on their problems and potentialities as 
they relate to world economic and political patterns. (Geog. 10) Alternates 
with Geog. 30.1; to be given in 1969-70. 

36.2 Geography of Anglo-America Spring 

A regional analysis of the United States and Canada, giving special attention 
to the physical, historical, and economic factors which contribute to areal 
differentiation. (Geog. 10) Mr. Illick 

37.1 Geography of the Soviet Union Fall 

An intensive systematic and regional analysis of the world’s largest country. 



114 


NATURAL SCIENCES 


The problems and potentialities of the Soviet Union will be critically evalu¬ 
ated in terms of the challenge it poses for world leadership. (Geog. 10) 
Alternates with Geog. 35.1; to be given in 1968—69. Mr. Malmstrom 


38.1 Research in Geography . 

A course designed to provide the major in geography with systematic training 
in the collection, analysis, and presentation of geographic data. Observa¬ 
tion and measurement in the field will be complemented by statistical, carto¬ 
graphic, and air photo interpretation in the laboratory. Field Trip fee $5. 
(Geog. 10) SlA " 

40.1 Political Geography Fall 

The study of the state as a geographic phenomenon, with emphasis on the 
spatial, cultural, and economic factors that influence its emergence, growth, 
and relationships with other states. The present world situation will be 
analyzed in terms of geopolitical principles. (Geog. 10) Mr. Simko 

40.2 Cartography . Spring 

An introduction to the compilation, design, and construction of maps. 
Training is given in the techniques of preparing maps from field surveys, 
aerial photographs, library, and statistical sources, and in the evaluation 
and construction of map projections. Special attention will be given to 
representing the third dimension through block diagrams and models. Two 
hours of lecture and one laboratory a week. (Limited to 20 students) (Geog. 
IQ, Mr. Illick 

50.1 Individual Research Fall and Spring 

A course arranged to fulfill the research needs of students majoring in 
Geography. StafF 


Geology 


The environs of Middlebury College afford an excellent introduction to the discipline of 
earth science, because Vermont has become a classic area for the study of the geology oi 
mountain systems. The geology curriculum takes advantage of this setting by stressing fie d- 
oriented problems and by relating all geologic processes and their results to the origin and 

evolution of mountain systems. _ 

Principles of Geology (Geology 11), which fulfills the Group C requirement presents 
the terminology, processes, and materials of geology, woven in the framework of the tec- 
tonic cycle. The courses in mineralogy, petrology, and structural geology (Geology zl.l, 
22.2 23.2, and 33.1) complete the core of the major in geology. Elective advanced courses 
are offered in stratigraphy, geomorphology, geochemistry, and geophysics (Geo ogy • * 
34.2, 42.2, and 43.2). Independent work at the sophomore or junior level can be elected 


G Three long-term departmental research programs (detailed structural and geophysi¬ 
cal studies of the Champlain thrust—Middlebury synclinorium—Green Mountain front; 
nature and origin of granites and gneisses in Vermont; and sedimentology in the Taconic 
sequence) are integrated in the field and laboratory work of formal courses. Moreover, 
each senior selects a project in one of these three programs, devoting the fall semester of the 
Senior Program to research, and completing the thesis in the winter session. The spring 
semester of the 3-unit Senior Program is spent in preparation for the General Examination. 

The department also participates in the Environmental Studies program: (See page zo; 



NATURAL SCIENCES 


115 


Required for a Major: 11, 21.1, 22.2, 23.2, 33.1 and two elective courses in Geology; 
Independent Study and the General Examination; two semester courses in Mathemat¬ 
ics and in Chemistry and in Physics. 

Students planning on graduate school and a professional career in the earth sciences 
should take Physics 15, Mathematics 12, and Chemistry 36.1. They should attend a 
summer field camp in geology. A reading knowledge of German, and French or 
Russian, is recommended. 

11.1 Principles of Geology Fall 

Geologic processes that are responsible for different types of rocks, deforma¬ 
tion, and landscape, viewed in terms of the tectonic evolution of mountain 
systems. Laboratory: field problems, description of rocks, structural analysis 
of topographic and geologic maps. 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. Field trip fee $6. 

Mr. Coney 

11.2 Principles of Geology Spring 

The interior of the earth and the origin of the crust, in the light of geophysical 
data and the nature of mountain systems; evolution of the Appalachian and 
Cordilleran mountain systems of North America. Laboratory: regional syn¬ 
thesis and term paper, based on analysis of detailed geologic maps; field 
problems. (Geology 11.1) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. Field trip fee $6. 

Mr. Coney 

21.1 Theoretical and Optical Mineralogy Fall 

The crystalline structures and the concept of symmetry in crystallography; 

crystal chemistry and phase equilibria of rock-forming minerals. Laboratory: 
theory of polarized light in anisotropic minerals applied to the identification 
of minerals in thin sections, using petrographic microscope; parallel study of 
minerals in hand specimens. (Geology 11.1 or Chemistry 11.1) 3 hrs. lecture, 
3 hrs. lab. Laboratory fee $6. Mr. Laurent 

22.2 Igneous and Metamorphic Petrology Spring 

The chemical and mineral composition of igneous rocks (petrochemical 
calculations and classifications), their structures and associations; the problem 
of crystallization of magmas. The metamorphic rocks, their fabric, mineral 
facies, and metamorphic processes. Laboratory: description of sequences of 
igneous rocks in thin sections and hand specimens; field problem (mapping 
and structural study of a small intrusive pluton). (Geology 21.1) 3 hrs. 
lecture, 3 hrs. lab. Field trip fee $6. Mr. Laurent 

23.2 Sedimentary Petrology and Paleontology Spring 

Textures, mineralogy, and primary structures of sedimentary rocks, as a 
response to physical and chemical processes, and as a reflection of environ¬ 
ment of deposition; first 5 weeks on main invertebrate fossil groups. Labora¬ 
tory : 5 weeks on fossils; hand specimen and thin section study of sedimentary 
rocks; field problems. (Geology 11.1 and permission) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. 
lab. Field trip fee $6. Mr. Baldwin 

31.1 Stratigraphic Analysis Fall 

Geochronology, facies, correlation, and tectonic association of sedimentary 



116 


NATURAL SCIENCES 


rocks; case studies of selected formations; independent project and report 
on stratigraphic analysis of a formation, from the literature. Laboratory. field 
and laboratory problem in the Taconic sequence. (Geology 23.2 and permis¬ 
sion) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. Field trip fee $6. Mr. Baldwin 


33.1 Structural Geology 

Geometric, kinematic, and dynamic analysis of deformational structure in 
sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous terrane; introduction to rock 
mechanics; regional tectonics. Laboratory: quantitative analysis and in¬ 
terpretation of deformation, as shown on topographic-geologic maps and 
aerial photographs; detailed mapping and interpretation of complex struc¬ 
ture in the field. (Geology 11.1 and permission) 3 hrs. lecture, 3 hrs. lab. 
Field trip fee $6. ^ r * Coney 


[34.2 Geomorphology] . . 

An analysis and interpretation of landscape, including quantitative studies 
of slope as developed under different controls of process, structure, climate, 
and stage of development. Particular attention paid to fluvial and glacial 
processes, and to relief that is characteristic of mountainous terrain. Labora¬ 
tory: quantitative analysis and interpretation of landscape as shown on 
topographic-geologic maps and aerial photographs; detailed mapping of 
geomorphology in the field. (Geology 11.1 or Geography 25.1)3 hrs. lecture, 
3 hrs. lab. Field trip fee $6. Offered in alternate years; to be offered in 1969- 
70. 

42.2 Advanced Petrology and Geochemistry Spring 

An integrated approach to the “ granite problem” and associated ultra¬ 
metamorphism, and thermodynamics of equilibrium reactions; study of 
experimental data and comparative study of classical areas. Laboratory: 
investigations of metamorphic and plutonic rocks of the Green Mountain 
region; field trips. (Geol. 22.2, Math. 12, Chem. 19.1; or permission). 2 hrs. 
lecture, 3 hrs. lab., and field trips. Field trip fee $6. Mr. Laurent 


43.2 Advanced Tectonics and Geophysics Spring 

Principles of tectonic analysis and regionalization; discussion of regiona 
tectonic processes in space and time; introduction to methods and results 
of geophysics (seismic, gravity, magnetic) and the bearing of these results 
on crustal tectonic evolution. Laboratory: compilation and interpretation of 
regional tectonic maps; geophysical investigation of field problems. (Geol. 
33.1 Math. 12, Phys. 15; or permission). 1 hr. lecture, 6 hrs. lab. Offered in 
alternate years; to be given in 1968-69. Mr. Coney 


50.1 and 50.2 Student Research 

Independent laboratory or field project at sophomore or junior level. Staff 
Independent Study and General Examination 

In the 3-unit Senior Program, the fall and winter units are assigned to re¬ 
search and writing of a senior thesis on a field-oriented problem. The spring 
unit is assigned to preparation for the General Examination. 



NATURAL SCIENCES 


117 


MATHEMATICS 

Professors: D. H. Ballou {chairman), P. W. Carruth; Associate Professors: R. R. Bielli, 
B. B. Peterson; Assistant Professor: P. K. Hooper; Lecturer: F. G. Lane 

The Major includes work in analysis through advanced calculus, a year of modern algebra, 
and selected topics from number theory and modern geometry. Other courses provide an 
introduction to the fields of probability and statistics, to topology, to complex variables, 
and to the use of digital computers. Opportunity for further work in algebra, number 
theory, topology, or real or complex analysis is afforded through individual study in 50 
projects. Advanced placement is offered freshmen whose secondary training indicates they 
can successfully take the sophomore course. 


Required for the Major: 12.1, 12.2, 21.1, 21.2, 32.1, 32.2,43.1,43.2, one other course in the 
Department or Physics 27.2, 37.2; Physics 15.1, 15.2; Independent Study, and the 
General Examination. 

11.1 Introduction to Finite Mathematics Fall 

Selected topics from areas of finite mathematics; designed for students who 
have had only three years of secondary school mathematics. Elements of 
mathematical logic and of the theory of sets; partitions, binomial coefficients; 
introduction to probability theory, conditional probability; matrices, solu¬ 
tion of linear equations. Staff 

[11.2 Introduction to Mathematical Analysis] 

Elements of mathematical analysis; designed for students who have not had 
trigonometry in secondary school and who wish an introduction to the cal¬ 
culus. 

12.1 Mathematical Analysis — I Fall and Spring 

Introductory analytic geometry and calculus; designed for students with four 
years of secondary school mathematics. Analytic geometry of the line and 
conic sections; the differential calculus of algebraic functions and applica¬ 
tions; the indefinite and definite integral, area under a curve, volumes of 
revolution. Staff 

12.2 Mathematical Analysis—II Fall and Spring 

A continuation of Mathematics 12.1; may be elected by freshmen who have 
had an introduction to analytic geometry and calculus in secondary school. 
Applications of integration to length of arc, surface of revolution, pressure, 
and work; the calculus of the elementary transcendental functions; hyperbolic 
functions; polar coordinates; determinants. (Math. 12.1 or permission) 

Staff 

21.1 Mathematical Analysis—III Fall and Spring 

The calculus of functions of more than one variable. Introductory vector 
analysis, analytic geometry of three dimensions, partial differentiation, 
multiple integration and applications. (Math. 12.2 or permission) 

Mr. Ballou 

21.2 Mathematical Analysis—IV Spring 

Infinite series and an introduction to ordinary differential equations. Con- 




118 


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vergence of numerical series; Maclaurin and Taylor series; first and second 
order differential equations, linear differential equations with constant 
coefficients, applications. (Math. 12.2 or 21.1) Mr. Ballou 

[22.2 Mathematics of Finance] 

32.1 Linear Algebra Fall 

Topics from modern linear algebra including the algebra of matrices, de¬ 
terminants, rank and equivalence of matrices, linear dependence, systems 
of linear equations, vector spaces and linear transformations. (Math. 12.2) 

Mr. Peterson 

32.2 Abstract Algebra Spring 

An introduction to the study of groups, rings, and fields. Algebraic structure; 
transformations and permutations, cosets and quotient groups, ideals, 
quotient rings; field characteristics, extension fields. (Math. 21.2 or per¬ 
mission) Mr. Peterson 

35.1 Probability Fall 

An introduction to the concepts of probability, mostly in finite sample spaces. 
Discrete probability distributions; independent events, conditional prob¬ 
ability, Bayes 5 Theorem; expectation, variance, covariance and correlation; 
joint probability distributions; Chebyshev’s Theorem; Bernoulli trials; 

applications. (Math. 12.1) Mr. Lane 

35.2 Statistics Spring 

An introduction to the mathematical concepts and methods used in the 
statistical analysis of data, mostly with continuous random variables. 
Moments; convolutions and convolution integrals; functions. of random 
variables; sampling distributions (chi square, F and t distributions), prop 
erties of estimators; confidence intervals; tests of hypotheses, Neyman- 
Pearson lemma, method of maximum likelihood; regression and correlation; 
applications. (Math. 12.2 and 35.1) Computer fee, $5.00 Mr. Lane 

38.1 Introduction to Digital Computers Fall 

An introduction to digital computers and computer languages. The organiza¬ 
tion of electronic digital computers; programming in FORTRAN and 
assembler languages; applications in numerical analysis. Fee $20. (Math. 

21.1 and permission. Limited to 20 students) Mr. Ballou 

43.1 and 43.2 Advanced Calculus Fall and Spring 

Further topics in the calculus and real analysis. Fundamental concepts of 
real function theory, divergence and curl, line integrals, Green’s theorem, 
the Stieltjes integral, infinite series, power series, Fourier series, improper 
integrals. (Math 21.2) Mr. Bielli 

44.1 Elementary Topology Fall 

An introduction to the concepts of topology. Theory of sets, topology of the 
real line, continuous functions and homeomorphisms, compactness, con¬ 
nectedness, metric and function spaces, selected topics from the topology o 
Euclidean space. (Math 21.2 or permission) Mr. Hooper 



NATURAL SCIENCES 


119 


44.2 Complex Analysis Spring 

An introduction to functions of a complex variable. Mappings of the complex 
plane, analytic functions, Cauchy-Integral Theorem, and related topics. 
(Math. 43.1 or permission) Mr. Bielli 

50.1 and 50.2 Advanced Study Fall and Spring 

Individual study for qualified students in more advanced topics in algebra, 
number theory, real or complex analysis, topology. Particularly adapted 
for those who enter with advanced standing. (Permission) Staff 

Independent Study 

The required program of Independent Study includes selected topics from 
number theory and modem geometry. Mr. Carruth 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (MEN) 

Professors: J. J. Kelly (chairman), W. J. Nelson; Assistant Professors: J. G. Alaimo; 
W. Forbes, E. W. Mackey, J. J. Morrone, Jr.; Instructor: J. F. Bower 

All physically fit freshmen and sophomores are required to participate in organized activi¬ 
ties at least two periods a week. Two years of physical education are required for gradua¬ 
tion. No academic credit is given for 11.1, 11.2, 21.1, 21.2. 

11.1 and 11.2 Physical Training (Instruction) Fall, Winter, Spring 

Instruction in rules and techniques in team and individual sports. Lacrosse, 
touch-football, volleyball, basketball, trampoline, swimming, badminton, 
soccer, tennis, golf, softball, skiing and skating. Squad members of freshman 
sports reporting regularly are excused from class for season. Required of 
freshmen. Staff 

21.1 and 21.2 Physical Training (Activity) Fall, Winter, Spring 

Individual exercise. Individual sports. Weight lifting, tennis, golf, swimming, 
skiing, skating, badminton, bowling. Emphasis placed on carry-over sports 
and games. Team games in intramural athletics. Required of sophomores. 

Staff 

33.1 Safety in Physical Education Fall 

Safety factors; schools, communities, industry, highways, physical education, 
recreation and sports. Liabilities, defenses, insurances. (Permission) 

33.2 Minor Sports Spring 

Fundamentals, rules and techniques of running a complete high school sports 
program. Schedules, officials, tournaments. (Permission) 

[34.1 Methods and Principles] 

Comparison of U.S. physical education with training in other countries. 
Calesthenics and combative exercises. Not to be offered in 1968-69. (Per¬ 
mission) 

[34.2 Organization of Play] 

The world history of physical education with emphasis on the influence of 



120 


NATURAL SCIENCES 


athletics; youth fitness. Gaines of low organization. Not to be offered in 
1968-69. (Permission) 


PHYSICAL EDUCATION (WOMEN) 

Associate Professors: Miss M. E. Lick {chairman). Miss J. L. Towne; Assistant Professor: 
Miss F. Gulick; Instructor: Miss J. L. Dorman 

The Department of Physical Education for Women provides a two-year instructional 
program in physical education which is required of all freshmen and sophomore women. 
Freshman Physical Education (15.1, Winter Term, and 15.2) and Sophomore Physical 
Education (25.1, Winter Term, and 25.2) are required for graduation but carry no 
academic credit. A yearly medical examination is required of each woman participating 
in departmental programs. Women provide themselves with apparel appropriate for the 
courses undertaken. 

The physical education program is planned to promote women’s competence, interest, 
and participation in physical activities both during and after the college years. Students 
will undertake courses in each of the three areas of aquatics, movement and dance, and 
sports and will work toward achievement of the intermediate or higher level in at least 
one activity in order to meet department requirements for breadth and depth in physical 
education courses. Having met these requirements, students will elect courses of their 
choosing to complete the two-year requirement. Independent and special programs are 
available for those students of outstanding ability who have been approved by the entire 
department faculty. 

Instruction is given in the following activities in appropriate seasons: archery, bad¬ 
minton, basketball, body mechanics, conditioning exercises, field hockey, golf, horseback 
riding, ice skating, lacrosse, modern dance, skiing, swimming, synchronized swimming, 
tennis, volleyball, and American Red Gross courses in Senior Life Saving and Water 
Safety instruction. 


15.1, Winter Term, and 15.2 Physical Education Fall, Winter, Spring 
Courses in aquatics, movement and dance, and sports. 

Required of Freshmen. Staff 


25.1, Winter Term, and 25.2 Physical Education Fall, Winter, Spring 
Courses in aquatics, movement and dance, and sports. 

Required of Sophomores. Staff 


PHYSICS 

Professor: B. F. Wissler; Visiting Professor: *N. F. Ramsey; Associate Professor: R. K. 
Gould {chairman)'. Assistant Professor: J. G. Penley; Assistant: R. S. Grimes 

The course offerings in the Department of Physics are designed to fill the needs of a 
liberal arts curriculum. The offerings are suitable for three categories of students. ( ) 
Students who have no intention to specialize in science, but have an interest in science; 
(2) Students who desire a basic introduction to physics as an adjunct to a major in another 
science; and (3) Students who wish to major in physics, either as an end in itself, or as 
preparation for graduate study in physics. Students in category (3) should begin their 
study of physics in their freshman year with Physics 15 (General Physics). In very exception¬ 
al cases, however, entering students with excellent secondary school training may, with 
the permission of the chairman of the physics department, be permitted to enroll in 
Physics 22.1 (Atomic Physics). 


* Winter and Spring 1969 




NATURAL SCIENCES 


121 


Physics 11 (Introductory Physics) is designed for students in category (1) above. It 
is a self-contained course which provides a broad insight into the field of physics and an 
understanding of how a natural scientist works. Physics 11 provides non-scientists with a 
background in science which is essential for liberal arts students. Physics 33.2 (Astronomy) 
may also be elected by students in category (1). 

Physics 15 (General Physics) and Physics 22.1 (Atomic Physics) are designed as a 
three-semester sequence of courses covering at an elementary level the complete spectrum 
of general physics from Newton to the present. These courses are essential to students in 
both categories (2) and (3). Students in category (2) may wish to take further physics 
courses according to their individual interests. 

Students intending to major in physics (category (3) above) will find that the de¬ 
partment offers a full complement of both theoretical and experimental courses. The basic 
core curriculum, required of all majors, includes a year each of General Physics (this may 
be omitted in very exceptional cases), mechanics, electricity and magnetism, and con¬ 
temporary physics. In addition, there are five other semester courses, of which the student 
is to select at least two. In this area the physics major may choose subjects in which he is 
most interested; certain courses emphasize the experimental aspects of physics, others 
emphasize the theoretical aspects. In their senior year two semesters of Independent Study 
culminating in the Comprehensive Examination are required of all majors. 


Required for the Major: 15.1, 15.2, 22.1, 27.2, 32.1, 36.2, 37.2, 44.1 and two semester- 
courses chosen from 31.2, 33.2, 43.1, 45.1, and 46.2; Independent Study; and Mathe¬ 
matics 21.1, 21.2. Two semesters of Chemistry are also recommended. 


11.1 and 11.2 Introductory Physics Fall and Spring 

This course is designed to give an understanding of the subject matter, 
methods, purposes, and philosophy of physics as an example of a physical 
science. The complementary nature of experiment and theory in the building 
of a science is emphasized. Topics to be covered include force and motion, 
molecular theory, electrical energy, atomic physics, and several aspects of 
modern physics. This course will permit the student to better understand 
contemporary developments in physics, as well as to place such developments 
in historical perspective. Laboratory experiments are treated as investiga¬ 
tions, rather than as routine technical measurements. This course is not 
designed for science majors. No calculus is required. Three hours of lecture 
and one three-hour laboratory—Lab. fee $5.00 per semester. Mr. Penley 

15.1 and 15.2 General Physics Fall and Spring 

A course, including laboratory, which comprises a study of mechanics, heat, 
waves and oscillatory motion including optics and acoustics, electricity and 
magnetism, and modern physics. A sound background in algebra and 
geometry is supposed and Mathematics 12 or 21 is suggested as a concurrent 
course. 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory—Lab. fee, $5.00. Mr. Gould 

22.1 Atomic Physics Fall 

Special relativity, photoelectric effect, Compton scattering, pair production 
and annihilation; Bohr theory of hydrogen atom, vector model, optical 
spectra, X-rays; radioactivity, nuclear reactions, fission and fusion, elemen¬ 
tary particles. This course is well suited to students majoring in all of the 
physical sciences. (Physics 15.2) Three hours of lecture. Staff 




122 


NATURAL SCIENCES 


27.2 Intermediate Mechanics Fall 

Principles of Newtonian Mechanics; vector algebra and calculus; motion of a 
particle in two and three dimensions; statics and dynamics of a system of 
particles and of rigid bodies; moving and rotating coordinate systems; 
potential theory; an introduction to the mechanics of continuous media. 
(Physics 15.2, Mathematics 21.1) Three hours of lecture. Staff 

[31.2 Physical Optics] 

An intermediate course using the principle of superposition to study inter¬ 
ference, diffraction, and polarization in waves. Phase and group velocity, 
absorption and dispersion are treated. (Physics 15.2, Mathematics 21.2 and 
permission) 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory—Lab. fee $5.00. Offered in 
alternate years; will not be given in 1968-69. 

32.1 Electricity and Magnetism Fall 

Electrostatic field; conductors; dielectric theory; simple d.c. and a.c. 
circuits; Thevenin’s theorem; magnetic field; electromagnetic induction; 
magnetic materials; Maxwell’s equations. (Physics 15.2, Math 21.2) Three 
hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory—Lab. fee $5.00. 

Mr. Wissler 

33.2 Astronomy Spring 

An introduction to astronomy for students with a background of college 
mathematics and physics. The solar system, motions of the heavenly bodies, 
coordinate systems and the information gathered from the analysis of light 
are studied. The college observatory is used for observational work. (Physics 

11.2 or 15.2) 3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory. Lab fee $5.00. Offered in 

alternate years; will be given in 1968-69. Mr. Wissler 

36.2 Electromagnetic Theory Spring 

Maxwell’s equations; electromagnetic waves in free space and in media; 
reflection and refraction; wave guides; electromagnetic radiation; Lienard- 
Wiechert potentials; covariant formulation. (Physics 32.1) Three hours of 
lecture. Staff 

37.2 Advanced Mechanics Spring 

Kinematics and dynamics in inertial and accelerated frames; variational 
principles; Lagrange’s equations for holonomic and non-holonomic systems; 
Hamilton’s canonical equations; normal coordinates; angle and action 
variables; Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Staff 

43.1 Thermodynamics—Kinetic Theory—Statistical Mechanics 

The first, second, and third law of thermodynamics; thermodynamic 

potentials; velocity distributions; transport phenomena; fluctuations; en¬ 
sembles; Liouville’s theorem; Maxwell-Boltzmann, Bose-Einstein, Fermi- 
Dirac statistics. (Physics 15.2 and Math 21.2) Three hours of lecture. Offered 
in alternate years; will be given in 1968-69. Staff 

44.1 Modern Physics 

An introduction to modern physics, providing a framework for further study 



NATURAL SCIENCES 


123 


in several fields. Topics to be covered include Special Relativity, Quantum 
Mechanics (with applications), Atomic Structure and Atomic Spectroscopy, 
and Molecular Properties of Matter. The laboratory experiments will fa¬ 
miliarize the student with the tools of modern physics as well as illustrate the 
subject matter of the course. (Physics 22.1 and 27.2 and Math 21.2, or special 
permission) Three hours of lecture and one three-hour laboratory—Lab. 
fee $5.00. Will be given in 1968-69. Staff 

45.1 Quantum Mechanics Fall 

Operators, eigenfunctions, eigenvectors, and eigenvalues; Schroedinger’s 
equation and matrix representations; perturbation and variation method; 
applications to atomic, nuclear, and molecular systems. (Physics 15.2 and 
Math 21.2) Offered in alternate years; will be given in 1968-69. Staff 

46.2 Advanced Modern Physics 

A continuation of Physics 44.1. Topics to be covered include Solid State, 
Nuclear, and Elementary Particle Physics, and an introduction to modern 
cosmology. In the laboratory each student will pursue one extended experi¬ 
mental investigation in modern physics during the semester. This will involve 
all phases of experimental work, including the design and construction of the 
apparatus as well as the usual recording of the measurements and inter¬ 
pretation of the results. (Physics 44.1, or special permission) Three hours of 
lecture and one three hour laboratory—Lab. fee $5.00. Will be given in 
1968-69. Staff 



Department of Military Science 

Professor: Lt. Col. J. C. Hefti; Assistant Professors: Capt. H. E. Koenigsbauer, Jr., 
Gapt. A. A. Myer, Gapt. A. R. Villasenor; Assistants: SGM. T. G. Harper, SSG. 
H. L. Carpenter, SSG. R. L. Cummins, SP5 L. A. Edwards, Civ. O. P. Broughton, Jr. 

The objective of a senior ROTG unit, organized under the provisions of the National 
Defense Act of 1916 and amendments thereto, is to qualify students for a commission in the 
Regular Army and the Army Reserve in assigned branches of the Army. A two-year basic 
course is offered to freshmen. A two-year advanced course is offered to juniors who either 
successfully complete the basic course, served on active duty in the Armed Forces for one 
year, or successfully complete a six-week basic summer camp prior to their junior year of 
college. 

The Basic Course 

A two-year basic course is available to all male students who voluntarily 
enroll in the freshman year. Draft deferments are provided members of the 
basic course. 

a. Veterans 

(1) A student who has served on active duty in the Armed Forces for six 
months will be excused from the Freshman Basic Course. 

(2) A student who has served on active duty in the Armed Forces for one 
year will be excused from the Basic Course as a prerequisite for the 
Advanced Course. 

b. Former ROTC students 

(1) A student who has successfully completed three or more years of the 
Junior ROTC program at an accredited ROTC institution will be 
admitted to the Sophomore Basic Course upon presentation of a 
military training certificate. 

(2) A student who has successfully completed the first year of the ROTC 
Basic Course at another accredited ROTC institution will be admitted 
to Sophomore Basic Course. 

The class meets three periods each week during the fall and spring 
semesters. Uniforms, arms, and equipment are furnished by the Department 
of the Army at no cost to the student. 

11.1 and 11.2 Freshman Basic (Military Science I) Spring semester only. 
The United States Defense Establishment. Two hours of class and one hour 
Leadership Laboratory. One semester credit of ROTC II for appropriate 
academic subject. 

21.1 and 21.2 Sophomore Basic (Military Science II) Fall and Spring 
American Military History; Introduction to Tactics and Operations. Two 
hours of class and one hour of Leadership Laboratory. 

The Advanced Course 

This is an elective two-year course and carries full credit each of two semesters. 
Both semesters must be successfully completed before credits are awarded 


124 



MILITARY SCIENCE 


125 


except for special cases which will be ruled on by proper college officials. 
Members of the advanced course are selected by the President of the College 
and the PMS from the students in the sophomore class who either success¬ 
fully complete the basic course, or a six-week basic summer camp prior to 
their junior year of college. Draft deferment will be authorized for those who 
qualify. 

Students enrolled in this course will receive a retainer allowance of $50 
per month. The class meets four periods per week for two semesters. Credit 
is given for two semesters of Advanced ROTC for appropriate academic 
subjects. 

Advanced Course students wear a regulation Army Officer uniform 
which is retained by the student upon his graduation. The Government pays 
$149.00 toward the cost of the uniform and any remaining amount is paid 
by the student. 

Attendance at one summer camp of six weeks duration is mandatory. 
During such attendance the student is paid $120.60 per month. Mileage rate 
is paid from home to camp and return. Students will attend camp between 
the junior and senior academic years, but deferment from the junior to the 
senior year may be made, for a cogent reason, when approved by the Pro¬ 
fessor of Military Science. 

The Department participates in the ROTC Flight Program. This pro¬ 
gram is available to selected cadets in their senior year at no cost to the stu¬ 
dent. The student is given thirty-five hours of ground school and thirty- 
eight hours of flight instruction. Successful completion of this program 
qualifies the individual for a Federal Aviation Agency Private Pilot’s License. 

On successful completion of the Advanced Course, the student is com¬ 
missioned as a Second Lieutenant, U. S. Army Reserve. Outstanding 
military students are eligible for direct commission in the Regular Army upon 
graduation. Graduates then report to active duty within the first twelve 
months following their commissioning; however, those who desire to attend 
graduate school may be deferred from active duty for the duration of their 
graduate study. The ROTC student is given a general military science course 
which does not emphasize any one branch or service. Prior to commissioning, 
assignment to a branch will be made based upon the needs of the Service and 
the individual’s desires and capabilities. Training is directed primarily toward 
a commission in one of the combat arms—Infantry, Artillery, Armor, Signal 
Corps, or Engineer Corps. Students whose academic program has particularly 
qualified them may be offered a commission in one of the technical services— 
Chemical Corps, Ordnance, Finance, and others. 

Students who enroll in the Advanced Course are required to complete 
both years, and when tendered a commission, are required to accept it, as a 
prerequisite for graduation from the College. 

31.1 and 31.2 First Year Advanced Course (Military Science III) 

Spring semester only. Leadership and Management I; Fundamentals and 
Dynamics of the Military Team I. Three hours of class, one hour of Leader¬ 
ship Laboratory. One semester credit of Advanced ROTC for appropriate 
academic subject. 



126 


MILITARY SCIENCE 


41.1 and 41.2 Second Year Advanced Course (Military Science IV) 

Fall semester only. Leadership and Management II; Fundamentals and 
Dynamics of the Military Team II. Three hours of class, one hour of Leader¬ 
ship Laboratory. One semester credit of Advanced ROTC for appropriate 
academic subject. 



General Information 


NAMED AND ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS 

The following is a list of endowed and other named scholarships offered 
to Middlebury students. Candidates for financial aid are cautioned that they 
should not make application for specific named grants. By applying for 
financial aid, an applicant will be considered for an award from the scholar¬ 
ships listed below or from the general scholarship fund. 

The Charles A. Dana Scholarships are available to qualified 
sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The purpose of these scholarships is to 
identify and encourage students of good character with strong academic 
backgrounds who have given evidence of potential leadership traits during 
the freshman year. The scholarships range from an honorarium of $100.00 
for those without financial need to the cost of tuition for those requiring 
such support. Each year approximately twenty new Charles A. Dana 
Scholars are selected. The Charles A. Dana Foundation was established in 
1950 with the scholarship program as one of its significant activities. These 
scholarships are among the highest honors which are awarded to students. 

State Scholarships. Through an annual appropriation of the Vermont 
Legislature, scholarships from $100 to $300 each are granted to State residents 
attending seven Vermont colleges of which Middlebury is one. The thirty 
Vermont senators are each privileged to award a number of scholarships at 
their discretion to undergraduates in the different institutions. The scholar¬ 
ships are for one year only but may be renewed. Application must be made 
in the spring directly to the Office of Financial Aid. 

The Cecile Child Allen Student Aid Fund. $85,910.00. The income to be awarded 
to one or more junior or senior women who need financial aid, and who are “the kind of 
women that Middlebury would be proud to see represent the College in the outside world.” 
Awards are made under the authority of the women members of the Board of Trustees. 

The Cornelia W. Bailey Fund. $33,500. Established in 1929 under her will for 
students of the Protestant faith, residing in Vermont. 

The Baldwin Fund. $28,122. Received in 1871 from the estate of John C. Baldwin, 
Esq., of Orange, N.J., for men. 

The Cesare Barbieri Endowment Fund. $45,000. 

The Joseph Battell Scholarships. $500 annually, for young women of Addison 
County; 

Edward L. Bond Jr. Memorial Scholarship. $11,200.00. Established in 1962 in 
memory of Edward L. Bond Jr. ’62 by his parents and friends. 

The Ezra Brainerd Scholarship. $5,010. Established in 1961 by gift of Ezra 
Brainerd, Jr. in memory of his father, Ezra Brainerd, Class of 1864, President of Middle¬ 
bury from 1885-1908. Income is used to aid a deserving student, preferably one who is a 
resident of Vermont. 

The Elbert S. and Anna H. Brigham Scholarship Fund. $474,505.58. Established 
in 1953. Income to be used for scholarship awards to deserving men or women students 
who are residents of the State of Vermont. Tenable for four consecutive years. 

The Charitable Society Fund. $4,012. Established in 1832, for men. 

Kay Corrigan Scholarship Fund. $1,000.00. Established in 1966 by a bequest under 


127 



128 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


the will of Miss Agnes T. Danehy. Income to be used for scholarship awards to deserving 
women students in the College who exemplify the character of Kay Corrigan, ’56; first 
preference being given to members of the Delta Delta Delta Sorority. 

The Annie L. Cox Scholarship Fund. $2,500. Established for “a worthy student 
manifesting decided ability in some line of study, preferably a student of Italian parentage.” 

George C. Dade T5 Memorial Scholarship Fund. $25,000. Established in 1965 
by the gift of Mrs. George C. Dade to provide scholarship aid for worthy young men and 
women. 

The Wilfred E. Davison Scholarship Fund. $1,632. Established in 1936 by 
bequest of Frank P. Davison of Cabot, for men. 

The Dr. Ralph B. DeLano Scholarship Fund of $10,000. Established in 1950. 
Subject to a reservation of life income. 

Delta Kappa Epsilon Scholarship Fund. $5,723.05. The income to be awarded to 
a member of the Delta Kappa Epsilon Fraternity at Middlebury College. 

Constance Barker Diss Student Aid Fund. $201,487.00. Established in 1967 by a 
bequest under the will of Mrs. Constance Barker Diss, 1900. Income to be used for financial 
aid to deserving students. 

The Erwin Ewald Drost Memorial Fund. $636.40. Established in 1944 by Mrs. 
Marguerite Jahr, Mrs. Winnie Wiesenthal, Mrs. Clara Comstock, and Miss Emma C. 
Drost, in memory of their brother, Erwin Ewald Drost, class of 1924. 

Dean S. Edmonds Scholarship Fund. $38,198.02. Established in 1953. “Income 
from fund to be used by Middlebury College as it shall determine as financial aid to students 
at Middlebury College, giving preference to male students and to students of the sciences, 
more particularly physics, including electronics.” 

Grace M. Ellis Scholarship Fund. $3,334.12. Established in 1966 by the Worcester 
County Alumnae Association in memory of Grace M. Ellis. Income to be used each year 
for a scholarship award to a woman undergraduate with preference to a woman from 
Worcester County, Massachusetts. 

The Fairbanks Scholarships. $2,000. Established by Thaddeus Fairbanks, Esq., 
of St. Johnsbury, for men. 

Rollo J. Francisco Scholarship Fund. $17,919.70. Established under the will of 
the late Rollo J. Francisco of Rutland, Vermont, in 1951. 

E. Chester “Ben” Franklin ’21 Scholarship. $20,000. Established in 1962 by 
Miss Helen A. Franklin in memory of her brother. First preference is to be given to de¬ 
scendants of Ernest Chester Franklin and then to undergraduates maintaining high 
academic standards and participating in the athletic program of the College. 

Eben J. Full am Scholarship. $10,000. Given in memory of Eben J. Fullam of the 
class of 1895 by Mrs. E. J. Fullam of Springfield, Vermont. 

Alice Brooks Fuller Scholarship Fund. $15,000, “to aid worthy women preferably 
from Worcester County, Massachusetts.” 

John Hamilton Fulton Scholarship Fund. $314,784.88. Established in 1964. Income 
to be awarded as named scholarships for young men who are graduates of Athens College, 
Greece, and for young men of Scottish parentage who are graduates of schools located in 
Scotland. 

The William W. Gay Fund. $5,000. Established in 1929 by the gift of Mrs. Frederic 
F. Van de Water, Jr., in memory of her father, William W. Gay, class of 1876. 

Edward N. Gosselin Scholarship Fund. $4,078.92. Established in 1966 by Edward 
N. Gosselin, ’15. Income to be used for scholarship awards to a senior or junior, or both, 
with priority to candidates from first: Rutland County, Vermont, second: State of Ver¬ 
mont, and third: State of Illinois. 

Charles Emerson and Nellie Blakely Harris Memorial Scholarship Fund. 
$2,000.00. Established in 1965 by H. Blakely Harris in memory of his grandparents. 
Income to be used for scholarship awards to worthy students. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 


129 


The Homer and Katherine Harris Fund. $3,000.00. Established in 1965 by Mr. 
and Mrs. Homer B. Harris, 5 20 and T8, subject to reservations of life income, after which 
principal will be added to the Charles Emerson and Nellie Blakely Harris Memorial 
Scholarship Fund and the income used by and in support of the College for scholarship 
awards to worthy students. 

Joel B. Harris Scholarship Fund. $23,000. Made available in 1937 under an 
annuity contract with Charles P. Harris, for the benefit of male students of the College. 

Benjamin L. Haydon Scholarship Fund. $56,831.12. Bequest under the will of 
Elsie Haydon Cornell. “Income to be used by Middlebury College for scholarships.” 
Benjamin L. Haydon graduated from Middlebury College in 1897. 

The Charles B. R. Hazeltine Fund. $14,043.35. Established in 1923 “for assisting 
worthy students.” 

Richard A. Heine Memorial Scholarship Fund. $3,775.00. Established in 1964 in 
memory of Richard A. Heine ’64 by his parents and friends to assist a deserving under¬ 
graduate at Middlebury to complete his education. 

The Waldo H. Heinrichs Scholarship Fund. $9,885.50. Established in 1956, the 
income to be awarded to a man or woman in the sophomore year for use in the junior year. 

Frank B. Hickcox Memorial Scholarship Fund. $5,110.40. Established in 1965 
by Miss Charlotte Hickcox, *45, in memory of her father. Income to be used for scholarship 
awards as a part of the general scholarship program until the principal reaches $10,000.00. 
Thereafter, scholarship awards will be identified as being in memory of Mr. Hickcox. 

The John A. Howe Scholarships. $3,000. Bequeathed by John A. Howe, Esq., 
class of 1853; the income first available for his descendants, and then under certain 
conditions for students from Poultney. 

Christian A. Johnson Memorial Scholarship Fund. $50,000. Established in 1964, 
for upperclass students with preference being given to those majoring in Economics. 

The Frederica V. Jones Scholarship. $10,000. Established in 1950. The gift of 
Vanderbilt Webb and Cyril H. Jones. Income to be annually used as a scholarship for the 
benefit of any man or woman who may in the judgment of the college authorities “be 
deserving of this award.” 

The Kappa Delta Rho Scholarship Fund. $4,008.76. For worthy male students of 
the two upper classes majoring in science or mathematics, with preference being given to 
members of the Kappa Delta Rho Fraternity. 

Joseph P. Kasper Scholarship. $25,235.00. Established in 1962 by the directors of 
the Associated Merchandising Corporation to honor Joseph P. Kasper ’20 on occasion of 
his retirement from that Company as Chairman of the Board. Income awarded annually in 
equal amounts to an undergraduate man and woman with the provision that 60% of the 
award be a scholarship and 40% be a student loan repayable after graduation: 

The Sanford H. Lane Memorial Scholarship Fund. $2,000. Established in 1945, 
for men students. 

The Ted Lang, Jr. Memorial Scholarship Fund. $16,000. Established in 1945 by 
Mr. and Mrs. Fred P. Lang of the Classes of 1917 and 1915, in memory of their son who 
lost his life on the battlefield in France during World War II. Income to be awarded 
annually to a man in his Senior year who has had to work to assist himself in acquiring his 
education and who has made a contribution to his College in extra-curricular activities, 
preferably athletics. It is the donors’ intent that the award permit less financial burden on 
the awardee in his senior year in recognition of his determination to obtain his Middle¬ 
bury degree as evidenced by his own effort and initiative. 

The Literary Fund. $740. Established in 1835, for men. 

Robert J. Marony Fund. $122,925. Income to be used annually for the support of 
education at Middlebury for underprivileged young men and women of the United States. 

Gertrude Cornish Milliken Scholarship Fund. $13,398.57. Established in 1964 
by gifts of the Middlebury Alumnae Association and Alumnae clubs to honor Mrs. 
Gertrude Cornish Milliken ’01. Income to be awarded to undergraduate women. 



130 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


The Levi P. Morton Scholarship. $2,000. Established by Hon. Levi Parsons 
Morton of New York City, for men. 

The New Jersey Student Aid Fund. $400. For men from New Jersey: 

Sidney Nordenschild, Sr., Scholarship Fund. $4,725.00. Established in 1967 by 
the partners of Sidney Nordenschild, Sr., to honor his fifty years with the company and 
his sixty-fifth birthday. Income to be used for scholarships. 

The Hewitt Page Scholarship Fund. $1,419.77. Established in 1964 by the gift of 
Hewitt E. Page ’33. Income to be added to principal for first five years, after which it shall 
be used with restrictions under the direction of designated college officials. 

The Penfield Scholarship. $1,000. Established by Allen Penfield, Esq., of Bur¬ 
lington, for men. 

The Dana G. Pierce Scholarship Fund. $8,012.50. Established in 1951. “For men 
students from Rutland High School.” 

William H. Porter Memorial Scholarship. $10,000. Income to be used for a 
tuition scholarship. Established by Helen Porter Pryibil in 1950. 

The President’s Purse. $33,272.71. Established by the late Charles M. Swift, Esq., 
the income to be disbursed at the discretion of the President. 

The Fredrika Proctor Fund. $25,000. Established in 1956, the income to be 
awarded as a named scholarship, to an undergraduate studying French, by the Scholarship 
Committee. 

Justin Ricker Funds #1, #2, #3, #4, #5, #6, #7, #8, #9, #10, and #11. Established by 
Justin M. Ricker ’06 subject to reservations of life income, after which the income of these 
funds is to be used for scholarships for male students from Bridgeport, Connecticut, or 
Waterbury, Vermont, or both. 

The Richard A. Rosbeck Memorial Scholarship Fund. $6,136.50. Established in 
1968 by gifts of his family and friends in memory of Richard A. Rosbeck ’61 who was 
killed on military service in Vietnam. Income to be used each year for scholarship aid to a 
worthy, qualified athlete who, in addition to financial need, displays drive and deter¬ 
mination for personal as well as team excellence in Middlebury athletics. 

The Eleanor S. Ross Scholarship Fund. $11,157.95. Established by Middlebury 
Alumnae Association in memory of Dean Eleanor S. Ross Thomas. Awarded annually to 
a Middlebury senior woman and based equally on the scholarship, need, and all-around 
merit of the recipient. 

The John W. Rowell Fund. $2,000. Established by the late Chief Justice Rowell. 

The A. Bayard Russ Memorial Scholarship Fund. $5,140.00. Established in 1968 
by gifts of Louise Tunnicliff ’67, his parents and friends in memory of A. Bayard Russ ’66 
who was killed in military action in Vietnam. Income to be used each year for a scholarship 
award to a deserving boy showing athletic ability, willing to serve his campus in at least 
two non-scholastic activities, maintaining at least a 70 average and representing Middle¬ 
bury with the distinctive qualities of leadership and service exemplified by A. Bayard 
Russ ’66. 

The Henry W. Schuettauff Scholarship Fund. $500. Established in 1968 by 
Henry W. Schuettauff ’27. 

George Robert White Scott (Class of 1864) Scholarship. $99,491.76. Established 
by bequest of Dr. George Dow Scott, Class of 1895, for students of high character, ir¬ 
respective of creed, color, race, or scholarship standing, preference to be given first to a 
student or students belonging to Alpha Mu, Chi Psi, and then to a student or students of 
North American Indian, Chinese or Japanese descent. 

The Lynde Selden Scholarship Fund. $27,500. Established in 1967 by the bequest 
of Mrs. Lynde Selden to honor her husband, Lynde Selden LL.D. (Hon.) 1961. 

The Bezeliel Smith Fund. $1,000. Established in 1893, for men. 

Lucy S. Smith ’18 Scholarship. $39,800.00. Established in 1961 for needy and 
deserving students. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 


131 


The Jonathan Coleman Southmayd Scholarship Fund. $28,600. Established by 
the late Hon. Redfield Proctor, in 1922, its income first available for students (men or 
women) from Proctor. 

The A. P. Stafford Fund. $1,000. Established “to assist needy students from 
Wallingford to an education.” 

The John Wolcott Stewart Fund. $25,000.00. Established in 1956 by the late 
Philip B. Stewart in memory of his father, the income to be awarded to one or more male 
students in need of financial aid who, having completed one or more years’ courses, have 
shown themselves to be of good character and worthy of continued enrollment in college. 

The W. J. Stone Fund. $50,000. Established in 1965 by bequest of Wilfred J. Stone, 
’02, the income to be used to assist Vermont male students at Middlebury College with 
preference to graduates of Vergennes High School or Vermont Academy. 

The Subscription of 1852. $25,000. For men. 

Agnes Warner Sunderland Fund. $3,000. Established by Edwin S. S. Sunderland, 
Esq., class of 1911, the income from which is first available for the assistance of students 
from Cornwall. 

The Arthur Gould Tasheira Fund. $25,000, the income to be used as far as pos¬ 
sible to provide scholarships for worthy and deserving students. 

Thomas G. Thompson Scholarship Fund. $3,500. In memory of Frank Genung 
Thompson and Mrs. Alma C. Dow to provide two equal scholarships, one for a young 
man preparing for the protestant Christian ministry, and the other a young woman. 

The Ludgar J. Toussant Fund. $420.41. Established by the class of 1920 in memory 
of their classmate—Ludgar J. Toussant—killed in World War I. 

The Herbert K. Twitchell Fund. $2,000. Established in 1929 by a bequest received 
under the will of Mr. Twitchell for students from Vermont, preferably Addison County. 

The James M. Tyler Fund. $1,000. For students from Vermont. 

Bessie Clarinda Verder ’98 Memorial Fund for Women Students. $1,000. 
Established by Blanche Avaline Verder in memory of her sister. 

The Voter Memorial Scholarship Fund. $1,325.00. The income to be used for 
scholarship purposes, in memory of Profesor P. C. Voter, formerly Chairman of the 
Chemistry Department. 

The Waldo Fund. $10,010.00. Established in 1864 by bequest of Mrs. Catherine E. 
Waldo of Boston, for men. 

The Phoebe Kasper Wallach ’49 Memorial Scholarship Fund. $3,660.00. 
Established in 1968 by gifts of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph P. Kasper *20, and friends 
in memory of Phoebe Kasper Wallach ’49. Income to be used each year for scholarship 
award to an able and deserving girl. 

The Warren Fund. $3,000. Given in 1835 by bequest of Deacon Isaac Warren of 
Charlestown, Mass., and its income applied in payment of college bills of those who are 
preparing for the Gospel ministry. 

The Asa Wheelock Scholarships Fund. $5,000. Established under the will of 
Charles B. R. Hazeltine of Arlington, Mass., the income first available for protestant 
students from the town of Wardsboro, and then from other small country towns in the 
State. 

The Albert Henry Wiggin Memorial Scholarship Fund. $27,500. Established in 
1967 by the bequest of Mrs. Lynde Selden in memory of her father, Albert Henry Wiggin, 
trustee of Middlebury from 1922-1950. 

The Emma Willard Scholarship. $2,000, established in 1895 by the Emma Willard 
Association, for the benefit of deserving young women. The holder of this scholarship 
receives a supplementary scholarship bringing the total up to $350. For seniors only. 

The Windham County Congregational Scholarship Fund. $2,000. Established 
in 1951. “Income first available for students proposed by the Conference.” 

The Harriet B. Winsor Scholarship Fund. $10,000. Established under the will of 



132 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


Harriet B. Winsor, of Springfield, Mass., in 1950. One-half income to provide a scholarship 
for men and one-half income to provide a scholarship for women. 

The Charles Baker Wright Scholarships. $50,000. Established in 1949. Income 
from fund to provide two full tuition scholarships to be awarded annually to a man and a 
woman in the senior class. 

The Marion L. Young Scholarship Fund. $10,000.00. Established by the Middle- 
bury Alumnae Association in 1940. Income awarded annually to the freshman woman 
outstanding in scholarship, personality and athletics. 

General Student Scholarship Fund. $25,915.00. The aggregate of gifts from friends 
to be used in making loans to students, originating with a gift from Prof. Wm. W. Eaton of 
$25 in 1911. Income from Fund may be used for scholarships. 


The Henry Francis Barrows Scholarship Fund. $1,050. Annually from the 
Boston Safe Deposit and Trust Company as trustee under the will of Fanny Barrows Reed. 

The Charles A. Dana Scholarships. See page 127. 

The French Government Scholarship. $250. Awarded annually to a student 
maioring in French and living at the Chateau or Men’s French Residence on the basis of 
scholarship, character and personality. 

The Huguenot Society Scholarship. $1,000 annually. Available to students, on 
recommendation by the College, whose Huguenot ancestry meets the requirements of the 
Sponsoring Society. Special application forms are available from the Office of Financial 
Aid. 

The Kemper Foundation Scholarships. $1,000 awarded to a man in each class 
by the Kemper Foundation to aid worthy students interested in careers in insurance. 

The Agnes M. Lindsay Awards. $8,000. Annually from the Agnes M. Lindsay 
Trust, allocated by the College Trustees to scholarships for men and for women. 

The Wilhelmina C. Siegert Scholarship. $500 annually. May be awarded to 
either a man or a woman of good citzenship who is in need of assistance. 

The Albert Henry Wiggin Memorial Scholarship. $2,400. Established by the 
Albert H. and Jessie D. Wiggin Foundation. A four-year full tuition scholarship awarded 
to deserving students. 

The Sylvia Westin Wurts Memorial Scholarship. Awarded each year to a 
woman student from the Hartford, Connecticut, area. Apply to: Alumnae Secretary, 
Middlebury College. 

LOAN FUNDS 

Alpha Sigma Phi Memorial Fund. $11,974.54. Established in 1966 as a revolving 
loan fund for worthy and needy male students at the College, in memory of those brothers 
in Alpha Sigma Phi of Middlebury College who lost their lives in World Wars I and II: 

Reid L. Carr and Eleanora F. Carr Revolving Loan Fund. $11,237.22. “To help 
deserving students.” 

Joel B. Harris Student Loan Fund. A revolving fund of $7,345.39 for loans to 
Middlebury students. 

Hazeltine Student Loan Fund. $2,500, received in 1923 under the will of Chas. 
B. R. Hazeltine and his sister, Harriet S. Hazeltine, of Arlington, Mass., “the income only 
to be used as a loan fund in assisting students in Middlebury College.” 

Elam R. Jewett Student Loan Fund. $3,000, received in 1923 from a friend. “The 
principal to be safely invested, the income and accretions to be loaned, under certain 
conditions, to men students of the College.” 

Martha Jewett Nash Student Loan Fund. $3,000, received in 1923 from a friend. 
“The principal to be safely invested, the income and accretions to be loaned, under certain 
conditions, to women students of the College.” 




GENERAL INFORMATION 


133 


William H. Porter Student Loan Fund. $10,140, an unconditional legacy received 
in 1927 under the will of William H. Porter of New York. By action of the trustees it was 
made the William H. Porter Student Loan Fund, the principal to be safely invested and 
kept intact, the interest therefrom and accretions thereto to be used for making loans to 
worthy men students from Vermont—first consideration being given to those from Addison 
County. 

Justin M. Ricker Fund. $3,387.91. Established in 1956 by Justin M. Ricker, 5 06. 

Emma Hardy Slade Student Loan Fund. $3,083.47. A revolving loan fund for both 
men and women, but with preference given to women. Established in 1961 by the Na¬ 
tional Society of New England Women, in honor of its founder. 

PRIZES AND AWARDS 

There are many generous prizes and awards for which students may 
compete in various ways. 

Charles B. Allen Memorial Prize. In memory of “Corky” Allen, ’62. Income from 
$3,980.75. Awarded to the senior man who has excelled in the fields of biology, chemistry 
and/or physics, and who by his participation in athletics and other student activities 
has contributed to the spirit of Middlebury. 

Bishop Atwood Historical Prize. Income from $304.77. Awarded to the man who 
does the most distinguished work in history. Established in 1938 by Julius W. Atwood, 
1878, Bishop of Arizona, 1910-1925. 

Byron E. Bermas, Jr., Prize. Income from $500. Awarded to a man or woman in the 
senior class who has done outstanding work in Geography. 

Berwick Memorial Trophy. In memory of John Frederick Berwick, Jr., Class of 
1954, given by Beta Pi of Phi Kappa Tau. “An honor voted annually to the most valuable 
male intramural athlete who has shown outstanding qualities in performance, leadership, 
and good sportsmanship.” 

Deacon Boardman Peace Prize. Income from $2,174.62. Awarded to a member of 
the junior class submitting the most creditable literary essay of at least 2,000 words in 
favor of peace and in opposition to war as a method for settling international differences. 
In memory of Samuel Ward Boardman, Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature, 
1859-1861. 

The Blue Key Trophy. An honor voted annually to the freshman who, by his 
performance, example, and influence as an athlete and as a man has done the most to 
advance the cause of sportsmanship, and the spirit of his class and College. Established by 
Blue Key, 1948. 

Barbara Buchanan Memorial Award, in memory of Barbara J. Buchanan ’62. 
Income on $1,633. Awarded to the senior woman who most fully represents Barbara 
Buchanan’s academic excellence and ideal of service. 

Reid L. Carr Prize. Income from $1,500. Awarded to the male member of the senior 
class who has shown the greatest proficiency in English Literature. 

George H. Catlin Prize. The annual income, not exceeding $1,000, on a fund 
established by the will of George H. Catlin in 1930, awarded annually to the student who 
completes the full A.B. “classical” course, showing the highest grade for scholarship and 
deportment. Established in 1918 by George H. Catlin, Hon. LL.D. 1920, Pennsylvania 
banker. 

George H. Catlin Classical Prize Fund. Income from $1,000. Awarded to a man 
in the senior class whose college work in Greek and Latin is adjudged worthiest of dis¬ 
tinction. 

George H. Catlin Fund. Income from $7,615.74. Established by the will of George 
H. Catlin, in 1951. Awarded each year to the student who has completed with the highest 



134 


GENERAL INFORMATION 


average the full four-year “classical” course, including preferably some study of Latin 
and Greek. 

Eaton Prize. Income from $1,000. Awarded to the student who in the opinion of the 
President and the Faculty has maintained the highest standing in the Classics. 

George Ellis Fellowships. Two fellowships, each with an annual value of over 
$2,000, were established at Columbia University in 1931, under a provision in the will of 
George W. Ellis, to be open primarily to residents of Vermont or to the graduates of 
Middlebury, Norwich, and the University of Vermont. The fellowships are awarded to 
qualified men or women for pursuing advanced or graduate study in any of the faculties 
or schools at Columbia. Information on this fellowship may be secured from the President’s 
Office. 

Harry M. Fife Memorial. Income from a fund of $862.77, established in memory 
of Harry M. Fife, Professor of Economics, 1925-50. 

Maude Violet Graybar American History Prize. Established in 1966 by Lloyd J. 
Graybar ’60 in memory of his mother, Maude Violet Graybar. Income on $500 awarded 
annually to the student who writes the best honors thesis in American History since 1860 or, 
at the discretion of the departmental chairman, to the Senior student who has displayed the 
greatest proficiency in American History since 1860 during the four undergraduate years. 

Hazeltine-Klevenow Cup. Awarded to a man in any of the four classes who has 
best combined ability in athletics and excellence in scholarship. The name of the recipient 
is placed on the cup as a permanent record, and a replica of the cup is presented to the 
winner. Established by Marshall M. Klevenow, Middlebury coach, 1925-1928, and Burt 
A. Hazeltine, Dean of Men, 1926-1938. 

Kellogg Latin English Prize. $25. and $15. Awarded for the two best examina¬ 
tion papers on Horace. Established by Brainerd Kellogg, Professor of Rhetoric and 
English Literature, 1861-1868, and trustee, 1885-1920. 

Edwin Winship Lawrence Prizes. Income from $13,140.34. Awarded to three 
students adjudged by the English Department to exhibit the greatest proficiency in 
debating. Established in memory of the donor’s father, George Edwin Lawrence, 1867, 
Vermont lawyer. 

Edwin Winship Lawrence Prizes. Income from $2,000. ($1,000 of this fund is 
held by the University of Vermont.) Awarded to four debaters participating in the annual 
debate between the University of Vermont and Middlebury. The winners are the best 
four in the two teams. Established by E. W. Lawrence. 

Edwin Winship Lawrence Prize. $120. Awarded annually to the freshman or 
sophomore showing the greatest improvement in debating proficiency. Appropriated from 
the income of the Edwin Winship Lawrence Fund For Developing and Improving De¬ 
bating to encourage freshman and sophomore students to engage in debating. 

Rose Martin Spanish Prize of $25. Awarded to that woman graduating with a 
Spanish Major, named by the Department of Spanish for her outstanding performance 
in the major area. Established in May 1961 by the Manhattan Middlebury Alumnae 
Association. 

Merrill Prizes. $30, $25, $20, $15. Awarded to four students adjudged best speakers 
in a contest of students. Established in 1882 by Thomas A. Merrill, Middlebury pastor, 
1805-1842, and trustee, 1806-1852 

Mortar Board Cup. Awarded to a sophomore woman who in the opinion of the 
Chapter has shown the greatest interest in College by participation in extracurricular 
activities and by attainment of high scholarship. Established by Mortar Board. 

Optima Prize $200. Awarded to the junior woman who by vote of her class is con¬ 
sidered most typical of Middlebury, as shown in character, scholarship, and personality. 
The winner also receives a gold emblem. Established in 1929 in memory of Henry Hobart 
Vail, 1860, trustee 1893-1925, by Mr. and Mrs. Roger S. Baldwin in appreciation of the 
benefits derived by their daughter Catherine (Mrs. Catherine Baldwin Blanke) during her 
undergraduate years at Middlebury; 



GENERAL INFORMATION 


135 


Mildred Virginia Osher History Prize. Established in 1963 by Lloyd J. Graybar 
*60 in memory of his aunt, Mildred Virginia Osher. Income of $500. Awarded annually 
to the student who writes the best honors thesis in history or, at the discretion of the 
departmental chairman, to the senior student who has displayed the greatest proficiency 
in the study of history during the four undergraduate years. 

Parker Prizes. $50 divided. Awarded to students, adjudged best speakers in a contest 
of students. Established in 1807 by gift of Daniel Parker, French merchant and landlord, 
and by Frederick Hall, Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy, 1806-1824. 

John P. Stabile Memorial Gup. Awarded to the athlete who best exemplifies the 
Middlebury spirit. Established in memory of Lt. John P. Stabile, *40, killed in action, 
Guadalcanal. Established by Lt. John F. Hogan, ’41. 

Mary Dunning Thwing Prize. Income of $1,500. Awarded to a woman student who 
in her junior and senior year has done the best work in English composition, prose and 
poetry. Established by Charles F. Thwing, President of Western Reserve, in memory of his 
wife, Mary Dunning Thwing. 

Alice J. Turner Memorial Trophy. Awarded each year to a member of the 
varsity basketball team. 

Wetherell Prizes. Income from $1,248.99. Awarded to the two men showing the 
greatest interest and proficiency in debating. Established by friends in 1922 as a memorial 
to Archibald D. Wetherell, Assistant Professor of History, 1908-1916. 

Franklin G. Williams T3 and Sara H. Williams T2 Memorial Award. Income 
from $ 1,000 to be awarded to a young man or woman in the sophomore class, on the basis 
of deep human qualities of natural kindness, perceptivity of the needs and feelings of 
others, and an abiding sense of personal responsibility. 

Woolsey Prizes. Income from fund of $1,274.69. Awarded to the two undergraduates 
writing the best examinations in Bible. Established in 1933 by Theodore S. Woolsey, 
trustee, 1922-23. 



Attendance Statistics 


First Semester 1967-68 


GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION 


United States and 





Men 

Women Total 

Possessions 

Men Women Total 

Bahamas. 

1 

0 

1 

New York. 

. 189 

107 

296 

Belgium. 

. 0 

1 

1 

Massachusetts . . . 

. 156 

81 

237 

Brazil. 

1 

0 

1 

Connecticut . . . 

. Ill 

64 

175 

Colombia .... 

. 0 

1 

1 

New Jersey .... 

. 64 

57 

121 

Chile. 

1 

0 

1 

Vermont. 

. 45 

30 

75 

Germany. 

. 0 

1 

1 

Pennsylvania . . . 

. 35 

33 

68 

Honduras .... 

. 1 

0 

1 

Ohio . 

. 30 

13 

43 

Hong Kong, B.C.C. 

1 

0 

1 

Maryland .... 

. 13 

21 

34 

Japan . 

1 

0 

1 

Maine. 

. 19 

12 

31 

Kuwait. 

. 0 

1 

1 

California .... 

. 23 

7 

30 

Mali. 

. 0 

1 

1 

New Hampshire . . 

. 20 

9 

29 

Mexico . 

. 0 

1 

1 

Minnesota .... 

. 16 

5 

21 

Panama. 

1 

0 

1 

Colorado. 

. 8 

12 

20 

Philippines .... 

. 0 

1 

1 

Virginia. 

• 7 

12 

19 

Sweden. 

. 0 

1 

1 

Illinois. 

. 9 

6 

15 

Thailand. 

1 

0 

1 

Rhode Island . . . 

. 9 

6 

15 

British West Indies 

• _2 

1 

1 

Washington .... 

. 10 

5 

15 


841 

570 

1411 

Michigan. 

. 6 

5 

11 





Wisconsin .... 

. 6 

3 

9 

ATTENDANCE 

BY CLASSES 


Florida. 

5 

3 

8 





Missouri. 

4 

4 

8 

U ndergr aduates 

Men 

Women Total 

Iowa . 

. 3 

4 

7 

Seniors. 

. 181 

119 

300 

Texas. 

. 2 

4 

6 

Juniors. 

. 206 

122 

328 

District of Columbia 

1 

4 

5 

Sophomores . . . 

. 199 

158 

357 

Indiana. 

3 

2 

5 

Freshmen .... 

. 244 

168 

412 

North Carolina . . 

1 

4 

5 


830 

567 

1397 

Oklahoma .... 

1 

4 

5 


Tennessee .... 
Arizona. 

1 

. 3 

4 

1 

5 

4 

Special Students . . 
Graduate Students . 

. 1 
. JO 

3 

0 

4 

10 

Hawaii. 

4 

0 

4 




— 

Alabama. 

. 0 

3 

3 


841 

570 

1411 

Kansas. 

0 

3 

3 





Louisiana ..... 

1 

2 

3 

GENERAL SUMMARY 


Delaware ..... 


1 

2 

Regular Session 



Total 

Nebraska. 

1 

1 

2 



1397 

Alaska 

o 

1 

1 

Undergraduates . . 



Georgia. 

New Mexico . . . 

. 0 

1 

1 

0 

1 

1 

Special Students . . 
Graduate Students . 



4 

10 

South Carolina . . 

1 

0 

1 




1411 

South Dakota . . . 

. 0 

1 

1 

Graduate School of French in France, 


Virgin Islands . . . 

. 1 

0 

1 

1967-68 .... 



72 




Graduate School of German in Ger- 






many, 1967-68 . 



43 





Graduate School of Italian in Italy, 


Outside United States 




1967-68 .... 



23 

Canada . 

. 11 

15 

26 

Graduate School of Spanish in 

Spain, 


England. 

Italy. 

Africa. 

1 

3 

4 

1 

5 

4 

1967-68 . 

Language Schools, Summer 1967 . . 

80 

1071 

3 

0 

3 

Bread Loaf School of English, 



Greece. 

3 

0 

3 

Summer 1967 . . . 



224 

Lebanon . 

. 1 

1 

2 

Writers’ Conference, Summer 1967 . . 

189 

Nigeria . 

1 

1 

2 




3113 

Saudi Arabia . . . 

. 0 

2 

2 

Less: Counted twice 



-165 

Switzerland .... 

. 0 

2 

2 




2948 

































































1761 Nov. 2 


1766 June 
1773 June 
1777 Jan. 15 


1778 

Nov. 

1783 

Apr. 3 

1791 

Mar. 4 

1796 

Oct. 25 

1797 

Nov. 8 

1798 

Sept. 30 

1800 

May 


Nov. 1 


Nov. 4 


Nov. 5 

1802 

Aug. 18 

1806 

Aug. 21 

1807 

July 

1809 

May 31 


Aug. 16 

1810 

Aug. 15 

1811 

Sept. 

1816 

Mar. 


Aug. 22 

1817 

Oct. 6 


Oct. 7 

1819 

May 21 

1820 

Aug. 16 

1822 

Dec. 

1824 

Aug. 18 

1827 

Dec. 4 

1830 

Oct. 28 

1833 

July 

1835 

Aug. 20 

1836 

Aug. 

1839 

Jan. 


Mar. 18 


Sept. 4 

1840 

Apr. 20 

1841 

May 18 

1842 

Dec. 2 


HISTORICAL EVENTS 

Charter of the town of Middlebury granted irom New Hamp¬ 
shire. 

John Chipman clears first “pitch” in Middlebury. 

First log house built in town by Benjamin Smalley. 

Vermonters make Declaration of Independence from New 
Hampshire. 

Settlement of Middlebury completely plundered by British. 
First permanent settlement made in town. 

Vermont admitted to the Union. 

Present site of College Campus annexed from town of Cornwall. 
Addison County Grammar School chartered by the State 
Legislature. 

Timothy Dwight visits Middlebury and a plan for starting 
Middlebury College is discussed. 

Female Academy established. 

College charter granted by State Legislature and Jeremiah At¬ 
water elected first President. 

First Trustees’ Meeting. 

First students admitted. 

First College Commencement. One student, Aaron Petty 
graduated. 

Professorships of Natural Philosophy and Law created. 

Emma Hart elected Principal of the Female Academy. 
Congregational Church dedicated. 

Jeremiah Atwater resigns; Henry Davis elected President. 

First Professorship of Languages established. 

Great religious revival in College. 

Painter Hall opened to students. 

Professorship of Divinity established. 

President Henry Davis resigns. 

Joshua Bates elected President. 

Gamaliel Painter dies, bequeathing most of his estate to Middle¬ 
bury. 

Middlebury adopts Castleton Medical School. 

Private French School opened in Middlebury by John B. 
Meilleur. 

Alumni Association formed. 

Mechanical Association for “promoting systematical bodily 
exercise” started. 

First issue of The Undergraduate published. 

The Philomathesian , undergraduate literary magazine, first pub¬ 
lished. 

Chair of English Literature and Education founded. 

Old Chapel completed. 

Great religious revival ends disastrously. 

Inauguration of the Professors. 

President Joshua Bates resigns. 

Morning chapel is changed from 5:30 to 5:00. 

Benjamin Labaree inaugurated President. 

First Forefather’s Day celebrated at Middlebury. 


137 





HISTORICAL EVENTS 


138 


1843 

Nov. 26 

1859 

Apr. 15 

1860 

Nov. 1 

1861 

Mar. 


Apr. 

1864 

Dec. 25 

1865 

Aug. 8 

1866 

Jan. 2 


June 

1868 

Aug. 7 

1873 

July 

1875 

June 8 

1876 

Mar. 

1880 

Aug. 23 

1881 

Sept. 27 

1883 

Sept. 13 

1885 

July i 

1886 

Apr. 17 

1888 

Mar. 16 


Nov. 24 

1889 

Nov. 

1890 

June 

1891 

Sept. 10 

1893 

Oct. 21 

1895 

June 

1897 

July 13 

1900 

July 3 

1902 

Dec. 4 

1908 

Oct. 17 

1909 

May 


July 7 

1911 

June 

1912 

Mar. 9 


May 

1915 

Feb. 23 


June 29 

1916 

July 8 

1917 

May 6 


June 30 


Sept. 26 

1918 

Oct. 25 

1920 

June 30 


Sept. 20 

1921 

Jan. 28 


July 28 

1922 

Nov. 22 


Middlebury Chapter of Chi Psi founded. 

First athletic field planned. 

Cornerstone for Starr Hall laid. 

Gymnasium opened for College and town. 

Full company of students enlist. 

Starr Hall burned. 

President Benjamin Labaree resigns. 

Harvey D. Kitchel elected President. 

Bread Loaf Inn opened. 

Phi Beta Kappa charter granted to Middlebury. 

President Harvey Kitchel resigns. 

Calvin B. Hulbert elected President. 

First issue of the “second” Undergraduate published. 

Cyrus Hamlin elected President. 

Formal opening of Library in North Painter Hall. 

First women enter Middlebury. 

President Cyrus Hamlin leaves office. 

Ezra Brainerd elected President. 

College snowbound in 10 to 15 foot drifts. 

State Legislature gives first financial assistance to College- 
Si 200 for scholarships. 

First Glee Club formed. 

Elective system established. 

Battell Hall, first women’s dormitory, opened. 

First organized College football practice. 

Board at Battell Hall raised to $3.50 per week. 

Fund for Chair of Political Economy and International Law 
established. 

Starr Library dedicated. 

Women’s College at Middlebury established. 

President Ezra Brainerd resigns and John Thomas elected 
President. 

Joseph Battell donates women’s campus. 

First Summer School session opened. 

Pan-Hellenic council is created. 

Alumnae Association formed. 

Women’s Athletic Association organized. 

Joseph Battell dies, leaving to the College a mountain campus 
of over 30,000 acres. 

German Summer School opened. 

French Summer School opened. 

College closes to permit students to enlist. 

Spanish Summer School opened. 

Campus becomes a weekly newspaper. 

S.A.T.C. programs for Artillery, Air, Chemical Warfare, and 
Transport Service adopted. 

Bread Loaf School of English opened. 

Maison Francaise, one of the first in America, opened at 
Logan House. 

President John Thomas resigns. 

Paul D. Moody elected President. 

Black Panther adopted as College mascot. 



HISTORICAL EVENTS 


139 


1923 

Feb. 

22 


Sept. 


1926 

June 

5 


Aug. 

16 

1931 

May 

6 


June 

14 


July 

6 

1932 

July 

1 

1941 

Aug. 


1942 

Feb. 



June 

1 

1943 

Jan. 

6 


July 

1 


July 

1 

1945 

June 

29 

1947 

July 

1 


Nov. 

7 

1949 

June 

11 


Oct. 

1 

1950 

Sept. 

30 


Sept. 

30 


Nov. 

25 

1951 

Oct. 

1 

1952 

Feb. 

25 


Sept. 

18 

1953 

Dec. 

23 

1954 

Mar. 

18 

1957 

July 

1 

1959 

Oct. 

15 

1960 

Sept. 

19 


Oct. 

1 

1963 

Sept. 

1 


Nov. 

8 

1964 

June 

25 

1965 

Sept. 

27 

1966 

June 

11 


June 

22 

1968 

Sept. 

16 


Middlebury’s first winter carnival. 

Department of American Literature established. 

First Alumni News Letter published. 

First Writers 5 Conference opened. 

General examination system adopted by faculty. 

Bread Loaf fire. 

German Summer School reopened. 

Italian Summer School opened. 

Old Chapel becomes Administration Building. 

College goes on wartime schedule. 

President Paul D. Moody retires; Dr. Freeman Acting President. 
Samuel S. Stratton inaugurated as President. 

College adopts an accelerated three-term calendar. 

Navy V-12 unit of 500 men established at the College. 

Russian Summer School opens. 

First women elected to the Board of Trustees. 

Fifty meter ski jump at Snow Bowl completed. 

World War II Memorial Field House dedicated in honor of the 
62 men killed in action and the 1390 men and women who 
served in the Armed Forces. 

Graduate School of French in France established in Paris. 
Sesquicentennial Celebration 
Dedication of Lang Field. 

The hurricane. 

Graduate School of Spanish in Spain established in Madrid. 
Pres. Stratton leaves for a year as Point Four Director in 
Saudi Arabia. Vice President Freeman in charge. 

R.O.T.C. unit established. 

College Playhouse destroyed by fire. 

Gifts from Wilks Estate total $2,454,399. 

Endowment and Accomplishment Grants from Ford Foundation 
total $549,500. 

Graduate School of German in Germany established at Mainz. 
Ford Foundation Grant of $111,500 for Teacher Training 
Program. 

Graduate School of Italian in Italy established at Florence. 
President Stratton retires; Dr. James I. Armstrong becomes 
twelfth President of the College. 

James I. Armstrong inaugurated as President. 

Notification of Challenge Grant of $1,700,000 by Ford Founda¬ 
tion contingent on the College’s matching it with $3,400,000 in 
new gift funds by June 30, 1967. 

Sunderland Language Center and Dana Auditorium dedicated. 
Middlebury Challenge Fund total of $8,039,722 announced. 
Chinese Summer School opens. 

4-1-4 Curriculum goes into effect. 



ALUMNI AND ALUMNAE 

The Associated Alumni, one of the oldest organizations of its type in America, 
was established in 1824. The preamble to the constitution stated the purpose of the 
organization in 33 words that could not be better chosen today: “To revive the pleas¬ 
ing recollections of academic life—to cherish a laudable zeal for the advancement of 
literature and science and particularly for the prosperity of our Alma Mater this 
association is formed.” A separate Alumnae Association for women graduates was 
formed in 1912. 

The business of the Associated Alumni and Alumnae Association is conducted 
through the offices of the respective secretaries at the College. Biographical informa¬ 
tion and addresses may be secured through them. The NEWS LETTER, the Middle- 
bury quarterly magazine, is mailed to all alumni and alumnae. 

NATIONAL ALUMNI OFFICERS 1968-69 
President: Lewis G. Ensinger, 5 42 (elected 1968) 

8 Forbes Boulevard, Eastchester, New York 10709 
Secretary: Gordon C. Perine, ’49 22 South Street, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 

ALUMNI TRUSTEES 
(Term Five Tears) 

Region 1 

Chester H. Clemens, 5 33 (elected 1966) 36 Mill Lane, Hingham, Mass. 02042 

Region II 

Adrian C. Leiby, ’25 (elected 1965) 138 West Church St., Bergenfield, N. J. 07621 

Region III 

Dr. Raymond A. Ablondi, 5 52 (elected 1968) 

2761 Lamplighter Lane, Bloomfield Hills, Michigan 48013 

T RUSTEE-AT-LARGE 

Frederick W. Lapham, ’43 (elected 1967) 

177 Summit St., Burlington, Vt. 05401 

ALUMNI DISTRICT PRESIDENTS 
(Term Three Tears) 

Region I 

Northern New England —Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont 

John B. Cadwell, ’44 (elected 1966) Box 347, Rutland, Vermont 05701 

Massachusetts 

David E. Thompson, ’49 (elected 1966) 44 Brookside Rd., Needham, Mass. 02192 

Connecticut and Rhode Island 

John F. Bates, ’42 (elected 1966) 4 Brook Drive, Simsbury, Conn. 06070 

Region II 

New Tork State —Other than area around New York City 
Philip W. Robinson, Jr., ’42 (elected 1968) 

410 Buffington Road, Syracuse, New York 13244 
New Tork City —New York City, counties around City, and Long Island 
Ernest H. Lorch, ’54 (elected 1968) 

200 East End Avenue, New York, New York 10028 

140 



ALUMNI AND ALUMNAE 


141 


New Jersey and Pennsylvania 

Roberts M. Roemer, ’49 (elected 1968) 

310 East Pine Street, Millville, New Jersey 08332 

Region III 

Washington —Delaware, Maryland, D. C., Virginia, West Virginia, and all southern 
states east of Mississippi 
Julian A. Pollak, Jr., 5 49 (elected 1967) 

1129 No. Ivanhoe St., Arlington, Va. 22205 
Midwest —Illinois, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Wisconsin, Minnesota, Iowa 
William S. Brackett, Jr., } 53 (elected 1967) 

2214 Kenilworth Ave., Wilmette, Ill. 60091 

Western 

Philip W. Hoffmire, ’49 (elected 1967) 

232 Mt. Shasta Dr., San Rafael, Calif. 94901 

NATIONAL ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION OFFICERS 1968-69 

President: Mrs. Donald W. Jeffries (Paula Knight, 5 45) 

3104 Q Street N. W., Washington, D. C. 20007 
Vice President: Mrs. George F. Bickford (Louetta Haynes, T9) 

7 Oak Street, Grafton, Massachusetts 01519 
Delegates-at-Large: Mrs. Willard Jackson (Martha Belden, ’52) 

Bridle Path Lane, Riverside, Connecticut 06878 
Mrs. A. William Calder (Marilyn Knust, ’45) 

660 Forest Lane, Franklin, Pennsylvania 16328 
Secretary: Mrs. John L. Diaz, Jr. (Janet Deakins, 5 53) 

R.F.D. 3, Middlebury, Vermont 05753 

ALUMNAE TRUSTEE 
(Term Five Tears) 

Miss Marian G. Cruikshank, 5 30 (elected 1964) 

52 William Street, Worcester, Massachusetts 01606 

PRESIDENTS OF REGIONAL ALUMNI/AE CLUBS 

Boston: Mr. Robert E. Seixas, ’49 

97 Fisher Street, Westwood, Massachusetts 02090 
Mrs. Richard J. Makin (Patricia Hinman, ’55) 

31 Ethan Allen Drive, Acton, Massachusetts 01720 
Capitol District {N.T.): Dr. Mark Benz, ’56 

11 Parkwood Drive, Burnt Hills, New York 12027 
Chicago: Mrs. Norman R. Attwood (Barbara Counsell, ’43) 

900 Oakton Street, Evanston, Illinois 60202 
Cleveland: Mrs. William C. Garrett (Nancy Finley, 5 47) 

15485 Russell Road, Chagrin Falls, Ohio 44022 
Hartford: Mrs. Robert Nickerson (Nancy Whittemore, ’54) 

52 Farmingdale Road, Wethersfield, Connecticut 06109 
Long Island: Mrs. John C. Trask (Frances-Jane Hayden, 5 41) 

36 Melbourne Lane, Old Bethpage, New York 11804 
Manhattan: Mrs. Ian G. M. Brownlie (Marian Moran, ’56) 

28 East Fifty-fifth Street, New York, New York 10028 
Montreal: Mr. Kenneth Kouri, 5 59 


13 Greenwood Street, Ste. Therese, Quebec 



142 


ALUMNI AND ALUMNAE 


New Jersey: Mrs. Don Phillips (Susan Daniell, ’58) 

23 Oak Hill Road, Short Hills, New Jersey 07078 
Philadelphia: Mrs. David Stebbins (Irmgard Nierhaus, 5 48) 

5 Brennan Drive, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010 
Rochester: Mrs. John G. Heurtley (Eleanor Bliss, 5 59) 

1258 Wildflower Drive, Webster, New York 14580 
Twin State: Mrs. Laurence P. Folsom (Irma Willey, ’29) 

1 Highland Avenue, Claremont, New Hampshire 03743 
Washington, D.C.: Mrs. Edmund B. Cronin, Jr. (Leslie Dearborn, ’62) 

5312 McKinley Street, Bethesda, Maryland 20014 
Worcester: Mrs. Francis A. Ives (Evelyn Jones, ’29) 

139 Holden Street, Holden, Massachusetts 01520 
Mr. Hadley G. Spear, ’22 

39 Westwood Drive, Worcester, Massachusetts 01609 



Honorary Degrees 
Conferred by Middlebury College 


August 15, 1967 

DOCTOR OF LAWS 
John Brademas 

June 10,1968 

DOCTOR OF LAWS 
Egbert Charles Hadley 

DOCTOR OF LETTERS 
Alfred Conway Edwards 

DOCTOR OF MUSIC 
Milton Byron Babbitt 

DOCTOR OF SCIENCE 
Charles Julius Lyon 


143 



144 


DEGREES CONFERRED 


DEGREES CONFERRED IN MIDDLEBURY SUMMER SCHOOLS 

SUMMER 1967 


MASTER OF ARTS 


English School—August 12 , 1967 

Kathleen Ann Barran 
Warren Richard Bid well 
Robert Edward Bourdette, Jr. 
Linda Robin Burnett 
Richard George Caram 
Peter Moffett Cole 
William Francis Coughlin, Jr. 
Michael Francis Drummey 
Jack L. Easterling 
Peter Shelley Fagan 
Mary Feher 

Elliot Watkins Fenander 
Margaret Wooster Freeman 
Ann Lyons Fry 
Robert James Gallagher 
Kenneth Neil Geiersbach 
David Gordon Griffiths 
Diana Hines Heard 
Deatt Hudson 
Charles Michael Hegarty 
Anne St. Glair Kelley 
Thomas Byrne Kelly 
Nancy Carol Kolbe 
Barbara Southern Meeker 
James Boyd Percival 
Vera Louise Powell 
Christian Ravndal 
Hallye Lucile Redman 
Peter Lawrence Sanders 
Diane Stephanie Tabor 
Joan Elizabeth Venditto 
Geraldine Louise Wagstaff 
Vaughn Ramsey Ward 
Carolyn Lee Wile 
David Charles Wilson 
Carlene Ruth Wooster 

French School—August 15, 1967 

Teresa Jean Alessi 
Mira Elena Baciu 
Geraldine Norma Ballestrini 
Bernard Hayck Bichakjian 
Claire Elaine Bolduc 
Brother Brendan Fitzgerald 


Brother Daniel Benedict Gilroy 
Brother Declan Kane 
Kathleen Graham Bryce 
Charles Byron 
Richard Nelson Camper 
Patricia Joan Clifford 
Elizabeth Young Condon 
Claudine Renee Coulanges 
Edward Craig Couture 
Frances Marie Cullinan 
Olwen Davies 

George Lord DeSchweinitz, Jr. 
Paul Patrick Dugal 
Alton Blinn Earle 
June Knight Edwards 
Judy Trent Ellis 
Andrea Vivian Ferretti 
Marie Consuelo Guerrero 
Arthur J. Hebert, Jr. 

Frances Gibbs Lamb 
Norma Lee 
Conrad Levesque 
Denise Limouze 
Roland Longtin 
Joan Marie McCabe 
Martha Malerba 
Audrey Wouters Meader 
Eileen Marie Mengali 
Lloyd Albert Mountain 
Peter Anthony Rosazza 
Louise Eddy Rossmann 
Regine Catherine Servet 
Edwina Genevieve Severin 
Lois Kathryn Shook 
Frank Silberman 
Sister Mary Celeste Boyle 
Sister Marie de Lourdes 
Sister Maria del Rey Cherry 
Sister Marie Denise Kopp 
Sister Mary Joel Zobro 
Sister Patrice Hughes 
Stanley George Thom 
Marylou Ashline Travis 
Jack Dale Troupe 
Howard Jerry Weiss 
James Esterly Yorgey 




DEGREES CONFERRED 


145 


Graduate School of French in France — 
August 15, 1967 

Kathleen Perry Anderson 
Terry Gardner Avery 
Elizabeth Payne Benjamin 
Jane Mary Barrett 
Jack Edward Bohman 
Rosemary Jane Brown 
Rodger Joseph Brunelle 
Claire Olive Carpenter 
Julie Beth Carpenter 
Frances Mary Castilone 
Martha Louise Chadwick 
Judith Ann Chamberlin 
Darlene Elisabeth Cooper 
Monica Carole Dennis 
Vivien Kathleen Despotopulos 
George Macnamara Dix 
Michele Dougherty 
Arlene Marion Dubiel 
Eileen Emily Epstein 
Edward Fedak 
Kathryn Ann Fletcher 
Kathryn Anne Gallagher 
Pamela Gartshore 
Mary Louise Gautier 
Linda Rae Good 
Ruth Grossman 
Regina Rose Gunthorpe 
M. Penelope Gust 
Mary Catherine Ham 
Marion Vera Heacock 
Hilde Lynn Herkstroeter 
Mary Margaret Holland 
Elizabeth Louise Johnston 
George Eleftherios Kanganis 
Lorna Kettaneh 
Rosemarie Angela LaVilla 
Diane Vivian Lewis 
Marguerite Beth Lowe 
Linda Mary Lundberg 
Patricia Ann McGroder 
John Charles McIntyre 
William Henry Marshall 
Enid Paul Mayberry 
Barbara Lynne Micks 
Les Robert Mintz 
Dale Camille Muller 
Oksanna Nahnybida 
Margaret Grey Newman 


Marie-Claire Antoinette Picher 
Evelyn Wayland Pinkerton 
Leslie Barbara Posner 
Marc Richard Prensky 
Joseph George Reish 
Beverley Robinson 
Gilda Carmen Sesti 
Irene Samuel Shoa 
Michael Boris Skapa 
Diane Carol Smallen 
Margaret Leigh Smith 
Sandra Eve Steinglass 
Jack Barron Studstill 
Sheldon Braddock Sturges 
Sylviane Apel Tschudin 
Ana Maria Olga Urrutia 
Marilyn Irene Vail 
Thomas Raymond Vosteen 
Sandra Jane Walters 
Christopher Wearing 
Genevieve Alcenta Wilson 
Persis Abbot Woodman 
Wendy A. Wright 

German School—August 15, 1967 
Karla Maria-Zech Berndt 
Brother Berchmans 
Jean Christenson Brown 
Manfred Drews 
Elizabeth Howard Echols 
Charlotte L. Freeland 
Judith Ellen Gup till 
Mary Heinz 
Use Hildebrandt 
Siegfried Bruno Jucknies 
Robert James Klem 
Ingeborg Klemperer 
Erika Lietz 

Clare Dorothea McMahon 
John Daniel Marr 
Renate Mayes 

Patricia Turley Nighswander 
Peter Hugo Osterroth 
John Pardo 
Gertrud Johanna Peter 
Frederick Alcott Pratt 
Sister Maria Carmel Wirsching 
Sister Marie Paula Holdman 
Gottfried Stevahn 
Beverly Heather Taff Watson 
Andre John Worobec 




146 


DEGREES CONFERRED 


Graduate School of German in Germany 
—August 75, 7967 

Maria Schultis Abrams 
Irina Azar 
Barbara Ruth Bailey 
Amelia Ida Bartz 
Carolyn Ann Bauman 
Gary Loyd Bevington 
Mary Lou Bieri 
Marcelle Lois Braunstein 
Virginia Lee Brooks 
Else Hildegard Busse 
Jacqueline Anne Cady 
William Phillips Clary, Jr. 

Larry Lloyd Collins 

Barbara Joy Maria Cons 

Wayne Burton Culberson 

Frederic Charles Curry 

Reinhard Czeratzki 

Annelie Lisbeth Dimmlich 

Barbara Joan Drygulski 

Susan Kay Edwards 

John Jeffries Eells 

Maxine L. Ehrenkonig 

Regina Hadassah Eis 

Nancy Porter Ferguson 

Anne Judith Finch 

Patricia Grier Gillespie 

Janet Ruth Hamly 

Jessica Bailey Henderson 

Susanne Wusthoff Henkel 

Beatrice Margaret Henselmann 

Allen Edward Hye 

Anna Katherina Kuhn 

Jeanne Ann Kutscher 

Doris Gail Leeney 

Ruth Ann Lehman 

James Francis Lynch 

Richard Hale Olson 

Catherine Ruth Polley 

James Richard Feeley Francis Quir 

Carol Eileen Reed 

Pamela Jane Rohrmann 

Nancy Boettcher Rummel 

Robert John Schiemann 

Gertrude Schultz 

Roberta Jean Tracy 

Renata von Baeyer 

Virginia Ruth Woods 


Italian School—August 75, 7967 

Nicholas Francis DiArenzo 
Cynthia Munro Pyle 
Matteo Rovetto 

Graduate School of Italian in Italy — 
August 75, 7967 

Deborah Martha Bliss 

Katherine Coralee Burch 

Fedora Louise Cozzi 

John Mario DiNicola 

Anne Madlyn Esposito 

Susan Mary Gass 

Judith Grossman 

Leslie Dustin Hinz 

Silvana Bastianutti Kukuljan 

Josephine Lonero 

Mary Theresa Matos 

Lidia Domenica Maria Resteghini 

Jeanne Robertson 

Viena Louise Katainen Spinello 

Gloria Viola Vaglio 

Russian School—August 75, 7967 

Katherine Stopbetzova Bible 
Lee Melford Corrigan 
Anna Globe 
Walter Gabriel Holden 
Stella Kuziniec 
Bernardo Loeffke 
Irina Karagodov McKay 
Peter Shields Meckel 
John Michael Mohan 
Sophie Andrew Offenberg 
Richard William Parendes 
Olga Phares 
Anna Basalska Samofal 
Serafim Robert Shapley 
Major E. Joe Shimek, II 
Mary Swediuk 
Emily Tall 

Miriam Orelova Wilson 

Spanish School—August 75, 7967 

Rafael Angel Aguirre 
Eleanor Fiske Bailey 
Lloyd William Baulch 
James Martin Bodine 
Donald Richard Conway 
Priscilla Nieves Cordero 



DEGREES CONFERRED 


147 


William Delaney 
Errol Bernard Dos Santos 
James Joseph Doyle 
Donald Joseph Edwards 
Richard G. Esler, II 
Nancy Jane Feller 
Brenda Scott Franklin 
Rosa Marie Fuoco 
Edith Nell Goggins 
Joanna Gregory 
John Frederic Harps 
Alfredo Crisanto Incera 
Linwood Stanley Kemp 
Dorothy Koruga 
Jon Peter Littig 
Margaret Florence Metzger 
Mary Catherine Murphy 
Joseph Allen Nissley 
Alice Pardal 

Joseph Paul Parham, Sr. 

Louis Joseph Parlato 
Carlos Jose Penalver 
William Michael Price 
Allen Edward Shinn 
Sister Francis Xavier Holland 
Sister Joseph Catherine Santos 
Sister Mary Francis Mason 
Sister Mary Raymond 
Sister Mary Teresita Venegas 
Anne D. Smith 
Rosemary Anne Suarez 
Martha Maxine Urioste 
Ernier Vidal 

Graduate School of Spanish in Spain — 
August 15 , 1967 

Joseph Alvin Agee 

Connie Victoria Alarcon 

Helen Armstrong 

Karen Odell Austin 

France-Marie Trepanier Ballantyne 

Robert Slade Ballantyne 

Ernesto Santiago Ballesteros 

Carole Virginia Barcus 

Ludmila Bratina 

Rosario Vincent Cambria 

Rilla Louise Carter 

Pete Bonciani Cothran 

Mary Adams Danos 

Joan Lynn DeBakcsy 

Bonnie Frances DuBato 


Frances Eldred 
Ellen Sue Engelson 
Wilma Eileen Farina 
Sharon Elizabeth Ferguson 
Katherine Mae Fife 
Patricia Jean Fisher 
James Arlington Fraser 
Francis Joseph Frattalone 
Eugene John Friedlander 
Nicholas Peter Georges 
Edward Gerald Gingold 
Candido Gonzalez 
Louis Victor Hightower, III 
Elaine Elizabeth Hoffler 
Pamela Horowitz 
Harriet Evelyn Hutchinson 
Dorothy Jane Joba 
Barbara Jean Kailing 
Mary Catherine Kapp 
Judith Marian King 
George David Krall 
Patricia Elizabeth Lewis 
Stephanie Roberta Lutgring 
Malcolm Kent MacDonald 
Julie Bryce McFarland 
Linda Ruth Machin 
Frances Yvonne MacKenzie 
Stella Christine McKnight 
Maris Elizabeth Maier 
Maria Maniaci 
Helen Mitchell 
Regina Anne Mongelli 
Nancy Lynne Morse 
Patricia Ann Novak 
Bernice Maria Nuhfer 
Brian John O’Dwyer 
Shirlee Ann Owens 
Harold John Pearson 
Ruth Clara Pearson 
Jane Coates-Cartwright Pepper 
Oscar M. Perez 
Laura Rosa Pfarr 
Suzanne Louise Read 
Nancy Ann Roberts 
Leticia Romanacce 
Helen Lenore Ryan 
Joan Salassa 
John Bernard Sampson 
Robert Christopher Sanchez 
Marcy Ann Scott 



148 


DEGREES CONFERRED 


Serita G. Spadoni 
Donald James Strange 
Maria Toy 

James Maude Warburton 
Philena Bishop Werden 
Lyman Gerard White, Jr. 
Stanley Davis Woodworth 
Gary Donald Wright 
Barbara Combe Young 
Helen Claire Zeo 


DOCTOR OF MODERN 
LANGUAGES 

French School—August 15 , 7967 

Sister Mary Rosenda Gill 
Maria Demers 

Italian School—August 15 , 1967 
Aldo Finco 




Middlebury College 


DEGREES IN COURSE 


February 1, 1968 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Lucy Smith Allouchery (Mrs.), A.B. (Trinity College) 1964 Asnieres, France 

Honore Jac Ashcraft (Mrs.), B.S. {Northern Illinois University) 1963 Chicago, III. 

Patricia Blanchfield Foley, A.B. {Newton College of the Sacred Heart) 1966 Waban, Mass. 
Flora Diane Franconi, A.B. {Mount Holyoke College) 1966 Harveys Lake , Pa. 

Marilynn Sue Grollman, A.B. {Douglass College) 1966 Lakewood , N.J. 

James Lindsey Ivey, A.B., M.Ed., {University of North Carolina) 1954, 1955 

Norwood , N. C. 

Roy Nelson Jacobs, A.B. {Wayne State College) 1962 Austin, Texas 

Judyth Louise Schaubhut, A.B. {Mount Holyoke College) 1965 Hingham, Mass. 

Douglas Ijams Smink, Jr., A.B. {Washington and Lee University) 1959 

M.A.T. {Duke University) 1961 South Byfield , Mass. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS 


Edwin Michael Alexander 
Bruce Alan Beers 
Jonathan Webster Coffin 
Mary Jane Cooper 
Steven Dudley Cornwell 
Richard Crosby Douglas 
George Joseph Glacey 
Peter Brooks Jackson 
Peter Harrow Lebenbaum 
Nancy Alexander Mead 
David Andrew Nicholson 
David Duncan Tura 
Vera Margaret Ward 
Peter Noble Weeks 
David Ward Williams 


Wilmette, III. 
Chatham, N.J. 
Needham, Mass. 
Tenafiy, N.J. 
Traverse City, Mich. 
Wilton, Conn. 
Burlington, N. J. 
St. Thomas, Virgin Islands 
Garden, City, N. T. 
Highland Park, III. 
Gladwyne, Pa. 
South Duxbury, Mass. 
Yankton, S. D. 
Scituate, Mass. 
Oberlin, Ohio 


DEGREES CONFERRED WITH DISTINCTION 


Cum Laude 


Vera Margaret Ward 


June 10, 1968 

MASTER OF ARTS 

Jan Timmerman Abbott (Mrs.), A.B. (Middlebury College) 1963 Essex Junction, Vt. 
Cynthia June Bethune, A.B. (New York University) 1963 Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Roger Anthony Castiglione, A.B. (Columbia University) 1958 Palisade, N. Y. 

Alfred Donat Duhamel, A.B. (St. Mary’s College) 1955 Holliston, Mass. 

Willard John Eschenbrenner, B.S. (Central Connecticut State College) 1965 

Plainville, Conn. 


149 




150 


DEGREES CONFERRED 


Gene Ellen Harrison, A.B. ( North Texas State University) 1965 
Joan Chungchih Hu, A.B. ( University of California) 1966 
Lisa Phillippe Loeb, A.B. {Drew University) 1966 
Robert Curtis Parker, A.B. {University of North Carolina) 1961 
Richard Sokolowski, A.B. Equivalent in Poland and France 


Dallas , Texas 
Oakland , Calif. 
Newton Center , Mass. 
Groton , Mass. 
Potsdam , N. T. 


MASTER OF SCIENCE 

Edward Ronald Davis, B.S. {Bates College) 1965 
Richard Dickran Krikorian, A.B., {Boston University) 1965 
Henry Paul Stoebenau, Jr., A.B. {LaSalle College) 1966 
Charles Edwin White, B.S. {Norwich University) 1966 


Lakeville , Conn. 
Middlebury , Vt. 
Ambler , Pa. 
Gary , Ind. 


BACHELOR OF ARTS 


Larry Alden Abbott 
James Robert Addison 
John Stewart Allen 
Louis Conrad Ambrette, Jr. 
Steven Mark Amster 
Carol Susan Anderson 
Patricia Jeanne Annett 
Mehala Anne Arnot 
Elizabeth Austin 
Severance Babcock 
Elizabeth Jane Bacon 
Barbara Elizabeth Barrett 
Walter Aloysius Becker 
Roy Daniel Beebe 
Dwight Elbert Bellows, Jr. 
Ruth Phillips Benziger 
Sidney Andree Blanchet 
Kenneth Morgan Blount, Jr. 
Susan Ann Blume 
Richard Allan Bornhurst 
Michael James Boughton 
Carol Suzanne Bowdish 
Louise Spencer Bredehorn 
Daniel Brown 
Laurie Lizbeth Brown 
Sally Ann Brown 
Lawrence Hunt Bruce, Jr. 
William Ray Brummett 
Richard Leighton Brush 
Paige Inman Bryan 
Kathleen Ann Bugni 
Clifford Nelson Buikema 
Linda Jay Burley 
Nancy Ann Cahill 
Richard Joseph Callahan, Jr. 
Stephen John Callahan 
Cynthia Hickcox Camp 
Ruthann Carman 
Susan Lindley Caughman 


Catherine Anne Salud Centeno 
Lydia Penelope Clark 
Steven Courtney Conn 
Gloria Joy Crawley 
Louise Anne Crowley 
Sarah Katherine Crum 
Daniel Francis Curry 
Glenn Eldon Curtis 
Candace Dame Cushman 
Margaret Lane Dale 
Sally Arlene Danz 
Steven Bruce Darling 
Charles Hines Daugherty 
John Mathieson Davidson, Jr. 
Robert Lowell Dietz 
Christopher Francis D’Elia 
Sheila Emilie Deming 
George Arthur Devine 
Christopher Shaun Diamond 
Richmond Durgin Dickerson 
Gregory Thomas Dickinson 
Jean Dithmar 

Magna Leffler Dodge (Mrs.) 
Michael Kenny Donovan 
Michael Henry Dooley 
Ann Staunton Draper 
Robert Emmett Driscoll, Jr. 
Dwight Whitmore Dunning 
Jeffrey David Dworkin 
Sally Jane Eastman 
Bennett Montgomery Edson 
Carolyn Doris Edwards 
Roger Thad Egan 
Xavieria Katherine Eichholtz 
Arthur Benoit Eklof 
Barbara Ann Ellison 
Janis Brown Ells 
David Allen Emerson 
Barbara Gail Ensminger 



DEGREES CONFERRED 


151 


Robert Donald Epstein 
Barbara Ruth Faelten 
Rhoda Marie Farr 
Paul S. Fava 

Susan Darnell Fava (Mrs.) 
Russell Miller Fellows, II 
Thomas Cooper Fisher 
Rebecca Fitts 
Terence Francis Flahive 
Robert Sutton Flaws 
Claudette Nicole Fourchtein 
Robert Jeffrey Frank 
Frances Karen Bell Fredericks 
Robert Irwin Friedman 
Frederick Miles Fritz 
Kennedy Francis Furey 
Susan Marie Gallagher 
Sharon Jane Galligan 
Philip Merritt Giuntini 
Nordis Annette Glasoe 
Jonathan Dexter Glidden 
Edward Martin Goldberg 
Gerry Elbridge Goodrich 
Kvetoslava Maria Gora 
William Benjamin Graham 
William Earl Graper 
Julia Ellen Gratiot 
Linda Tobin Gray 
Bentley Crowther Gregg 
Roberta Elizabeth Hamblen 
Stuart Phipps Hamilton 
Reed Loomis Harman 
Janet Joyce Harris 
Gary Eugene Hartman 
Susan Elizabeth Hastings 
Lynn Long Henry (Mrs.) 

Carl Jeffrey Herre 
Curtiss Bronson Hickcox, Jr. 
Ronald Wesley Hoag 
Allen Clair Hoffacker 
Elliot Russell Hoffman 
Charles Kostya Honsberger 
Richard Allen Horovitz 
Robert Kistler Hower 
David Noris Hubbard 
Mary Elizabeth Hubbard 
Peter Jeffrey Hull 
Gail Lee Hyde 
Barbara Alice James 
James George Jardine 
Philip Hamilton Johnson 
Shelley Elizabeth Johnson 
Richard Scott Joslin 


Peter Colin Jurmain 
Cleveland Paul Kapala 
Robert Andrew Kelman 
George Duncan Kendall 
Herbert Rawlett Kent, Jr. 

Douglas Walter Kilts 
Renate Anna Kind 
John Kenelm David Kirby 
Peter Fordyce Kirkpatrick 
Peter Stephen Knobler 
Stephen Newbury Krichels 
Cynthia Susan Krieble 
Paul John Kruesi, III 
Stephanie Robin Laird 
Peter Anthony Laudati, III 
Susan Jean Lauf 
Alison Smith Lauriat (Mrs.) 

Peter McLean Lauriat 

Jeannine Kay Laverty 

Rita Dale Lavin 

Paul Vincent Leary 

Richard Mark Lebeaux 

Samuel Eldridge Levin 

Stephen Maurice Limon 

Alan Bruce Lindsey 

Kathy Mason Lindsey (Mrs.) 

Marcia Ellen Lipsett 

John Michael Lyman 

Linda MacArthur 

Michele Carver MacKellar 

Sheila Janet MacLean 

Barney Maier 

Merrily Manchester 

Linda Suzanne Mason 

Ann Giles Masotti 

Elizabeth Edna Maxham 

Keith Ann McCausland 

William Alexander McCollom 

Betsy McElvein 

Gale Anne McFedries 

Martha Lynn McGill 

Philip Robert McLoughlin 

Richard Frederick McMahon 

Suzanne Alice McMahon 

Donna Lee McNeil 

Mary Louise Meyer 

Dorothy Ann Miller 

Asheleigh Edward Moorhouse, Jr. 

William Sentenne Morse 

John Michael Morton 

Helen Winsor Mountain 

George Gay Mowry 

Ransdell Mulligan 



152 


DEGREES CONFERRED 


Robert McLean Mygatt 
Stephanie Sue Neal 
William Harry Newcomb 
Cheryl Frances Nissan 
Karen Wise Olander (Mrs.) 
Wendy Linde Olinder 
Guy Williamson Oliver, III 
John James O’Malley, Jr. 
Stephen Arthur Orndorf 
Sara Anna Osborne 
Peter Crozer Page 
Charles Rogers Park 
Barry Edward Parker 
Joseph Martin Patute 
Isabel Cushing Perkins 
Leslie Anne Peterson 
Robert Webster Phelps 
Ann Arline Philips 
Edwin Andrews Potter, Jr. 
Robin Lindsey Pratt 
Lawrence Edward Raab 
Michael Jeffrey Rabinowitz 
Michael Dennis Reagan 
Robert Whitman Reed 
Mary Ann Riggie 
Robert Jeffrey Riotte 
Edward Raymond Robinson, Jr. 
Perry Douglas Roehm 
Robert Alton Rostand 
Susan Jo Roush 
David Charles Ruberg 
Glenn Julian Rubin 
Jeffrey Warren Russell 
Robert Winsor Ryder 
Robert Jerome Sagor 
Stephen Jonathan Salley 
William Henry Salzillo, Jr. 

John Winslow Sawyer 
Donna Kathleen Scripture 
Mary Lee Seeman 
David Arthur Severance 
Bruce Berner Shafiroff 
Barbara Beatrice Shean 
North Arthur Shetter 


Charlotte Elaine Sibley 
Marilyn Frances Simon 
Greenfield Sluder 
David Kingsbury Smith, Jr. 
Jeremy Lawrence Smith 
Kenneth Wayne Smith 
Robert Jerrold Smith 
Sharon Lynn Smith 
Charles F. Spalding, Jr. 

Mildred Spillane 
Jane Victoria Standard 
Charles Churchill Starr, II 
Roger Alexis William Stephens 
Charles Francis Sullivan 
David Preston Symonds 
Stephen Peter Syriala 
Joan Margaret Tasker 
Katherine Gail Tepperman 
James Thomas Trombetta 
Carolyn Grace Toloczko 
James MacDonald Valby 
Karen Sue VanHooft 
David Earl Vanier 
Susan Walker 
Joan Waltermire 
William Stewart Warren 
John Newbold Watt, Jr. 

Robert Glen Wehrwein 
David Nelson Weinstein 
Robert Charles Weiser 
Clifford William Whall, Jr. 

Elliot Goodwin Wheelwright 
Margery Bassett White (Mrs.) 
Edward Wilson Whittier 
Bonney Whittington 
Carol Jean Wikstrand 
Clark Benjamin Wiley 
Thomas Williamson Winstead, Jr. 
Nancy Lynne Wolfe 
Frank Pierce Wolff, Jr. 

Paige Wolgamot 
Joseph Sutherland Wood 
Louise Marie Wright 
Barbara Ann Zuck 


Bachelor of Arts, having completed the requirements for the degree of Doctor of 
Dental Medicine from Harvard School of Dental Medicine, under the Combined 
Professional School Plan: 

Steven Malcolm Roser Boston , Mass . 

Bachelor of Arts, having received the degree of Bachelor of Architecture from The 
Cooper Union, under the Combined Professional School Plan: 

Carl Joseph Stein New York, N. Y. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 


153 


June 10, 1968 

DEGREES CONFERRED WITH DISTINCTION 


Summa Gum Laude 
Richard Mark Lebeaux 


Magna gum Laude 
Elizabeth Austin 
Karen Sue VanHooft 
Joan Waltermire 


Daniel Brown 
Kathleen Ann Bugni 
Ruthann Carman 
Susan Lindley Caughman 
Glenn Eldon Curtis 
Margaret Lane Dale 
Sally Arlene Danz 
Robert Lowell Deitz 
Sheila Emilie Deming 
Sally Jane Eastman 
Arthur Benoit Eklof 
Barbara Ruth Faelten 
Claudette Nicole Fourchtein 
Kennedy Francis Furey 
Julia Ellen Gratiot 


Cum Laude 

Richard Allen Horovitz 
Douglas Walter Kilts 
Stephanie Robin Laird 
Susan Jean Lauf 
Jeannine Kay Laverty 
Martha Lynn McGill 
Cheryl Frances Nissan 
Ann Arline Philips 
Lawrence Edward Raab 
Mary Ann Riggie 
David Charles Ruberg 
Charlotte Elaine Sibley 
Joan Margaret Tasker 
James Thomas Trombetta 
William Stewart Warren 


Department Honors 

American Literature —High Honors: Bennett Montgomery Edson 

American Literature — Honors: Ann Staunton Draper 

Biology —High Honors: Katherine Gail Tepperman 
Carol Jean Wikstrand 

Biology — Honors: Barbara Gail Ensminger 

Chemistry — Honors: Sheila Janet MacLean 

Economics —High Honors: Cynthia Hickcox Camp 
Thomas Cooper Fisher 



154 


DEGREES CONFERRED 


Economics — Honors: Ruthann Carman 

Peter McLean Lauriat 

English — Highest Honors: Lawrence Edward Raab 

English — High Honors: Robert Lowell Deitz 

Kennedy Francis Furey 
Herbert Rawlett Kent, Jr. 
Stephanie Robin Laird 
James Thomas Trombetta 

English — Honors: Perry Douglas Roehm 

French — Honors: Charlotte Elaine Sibley 

History — Highest Honors: Arthur Benoit Eklof 

History — High Honors: Mehala Anne Arnot 
Kathleen Ann Bugni 
Susan Lindley Caughman 
Margaret Lane Dale 
Richard Allen Horovitz 
Martha Lynn McGill 

History — Honors: Elizabeth Jane Bacon 
Susan Ann Blume 
Sheila Emilie Deming 
Barbara Ann Ellison 
Sharon Jane Galligan 
John Kenelm David Kirby 
Roger Alexis William Stephens 
Susan Walker 
David Nelson Weinstein 
Clark Benjamin Wiley 
Frank Pierce Wolff, Jr. 

Political Science — Honors: Gerry Elbridge Goodrich 

Philip Robert McLoughlin 

Psychology — High Honors: Sally Ann Brown 

Mary Ann Riggie 

Russian — Highest Honors: Ann Arline Philips 



DEGREES CONFERRED 


155 


Appointments to Phi Beta Kappa 


Elizabeth Austin 


Richard Mark Lebeaux 
Martha Lynn McGill 
Lawrence Edward Raab 
Mary Ann Riggie 
Joan Margaret Tasker 
James Thomas Trombetta 
Karen Sue VanHooft 
Joan Waltermire 


Kathleen Ann Bugni 
Robert Lowell Deitz 
Sheila Emilie Deming 
Arthur Benoit Eklof 
Barbara Ruth Faelten 


Kennedy Francis Furey 


Douglas Walter Kilts 
Susan Jean Lauf 


Commencement Honors 


{For students who have graduated since June 1967) 


Men 


Valedictory Honors —Richard Mark Lebeaux 
Salutatory Honors —Lawrence Edward Raab 


Women 


Valedictory Honors —Elizabeth Austin 
Salutatory Honors —Joan Waltermire 

UNITED STATES ARMY COMMISSIONS 

Second Lieutenants , United States Army Reserve 

Steven Mark Amster, Military Security 
Roy Daniel Beebe, Signal Corps 
*Kenneth Morgan Blount, Jr., Armor 
Lawrence Hunt Bruce, Jr., Quartermaster Corps 
William Ray Brummett, Artillery 
Clifford Nelson Buikema, Engineers Corps 
* **Stephen John Callahan, Adjutant Generals Corps 
**Glenn Eldon Curtis, Adjutant Generals Corps 
*Steven Bruce Darling, Adjutant Generals Corps 
Charles Hines Daugherty, Armor 
John Mathieson Davidson, Jr., Armor 
* *Christopher Francis D’Elia, Military Security 
Christopher Shaun Diamond, Signal Corps 
Richmond Durgin Dickerson, Armor 
**Dwight Whitmore Dunning, Engineers Corps 
Bennett Montgomery Edson, Signal Corps 



156 


DEGREES CONFERRED 


Roger Thad Egan, Quartermaster Corps 
**Thomas Cooper Fisher, Signal Corps 
Terence Francis Flahive, Armor 
*Frederick Miles Fritz, Adjutant Generals Corps 
Philip Merritt Giuntini, Adjutant Generals Corps 
Jonathan Dexter Glidden, Armor 
Bentley Crowther Gregg, Armor 
Gary Eugene Hartman, Signal Corps 
Carl Jeffrey Herre Armor 
Curtiss Bronson Hickcox, Jr., Armor 
Philip Hamilton Johnson, Armor 
Peter Colin Jurmain, Engineers Corps 
Cleveland Paul Kapala, Armor 
John Kenelm David Kirby, Military Intelligence 
**Peter Fordyce Kirkpatrick, Engineers Corps 
Samuel Eldridge Levin, Signal Corps 
**William Sentenne Morse, Armor 
* **John Michael Morton, Infantry 
**Ransdell Mulligan, Military Intelligence 
*Robert McLean Mygatt, Engineers Corps 
William Harry Newcomb, Military Intelligence 
Guy Williamson Oliver, III, Engineer Corps 
John James O’Malley, Armor 
**Stephen Arthur Omdorf, Military Intelligence 
Charles Rogers Park, Military Security 
Robert Webster Phelps, Military Intelligence 
Edwin Andrews Potter, Jr., Signal Corps 
Michael Jeffrey Rabinowitz, Armor 
Glenn Julian Rubin, Signal Corps 
*Jeffrey Warren Russell, Military Security 
North Arthur Shetter, Military Security 
Greenfield Sluder, Chemical Corps 
**Jeremy Lawrence Smith, Infantry 

Charles Francis Sullivan, Adjutant Generals Corps 
**Stephen Peter Syriala, Signal Corps 
James Thomas Trombetta, Military Intelligence 
David Earl Vanier, Armor 
Robert Glen Wehrwein, Signal Corps 
Clifford William Whall, Jr., Military Intelligence 
Elliot Goodwin Wheelwright, Military Intelligence 
Thomas Williamson Winstead, Jr., Artillery 
Frank Pierce Wolff, Jr., Armor 
Joseph Sutherland Wood, Engineers Corps 

* Distinguished Military Graduates 
** Receive Commission upon completion of ROTC Summer Camp 



Corporation Committees 

(The first person listed is the Chairman) 

Prudential 

L. Douglas Meredith*, President James I. Armstrong*, Stewart Ross, Elbert G. Cole, 
Robert D. Proctor, Paris Fletcher, Arnold R. LaForce, William S. Youngman, Fred P. 
Lang, Leon S. Gay (Emeritus), Egbert G. Hadley (Emeritus) 

Finance 

Carleton H. Simmons, Arnold R. LaForce, L. Douglas Meredith, Raymond J. Saulnier, 
William S. Youngman, Fred P. Lang, Horace S. Ford (Emeritus) 

Auditing 

Paris Fletcher, John Kruesi, Frederick W. Lapham, Jr., Horace S. Ford (Emeritus) 

Summer Schools 

L. Douglas Meredith, Mrs. J. Howard Howson, Foster R. Clement, Jr., Marian G. 
Cruikshank, Elbert G. Cole, Raymond A. Ablondi 

Instruction 

Elbert G. Cole, L. Douglas Meredith, Carleton H. Simmons, Mrs. J. Howard Howson, 
Raymond J. Saulnier 


Buildings and Grounds 

L. Douglas Meredith, Robert D. Proctor, Foster R. Clement, Jr., Alexander Hamilton 
Fulton (Alternate), President James I. Armstrong*, Carroll Rikert, Jr.*, Leon S. Gay 
(Emeritus) 


Battell Forest and Park 

Stewart Ross, John Kruesi, Alexander Hamilton Fulton, Raymond A. Ablondi, Walter H. 
Cleary (Emeritus) 

Law 

Paris Fletcher, William S. Youngman, Adrian C. Leiby, Walter H. Cleary (Emeritus) 

Budget 

L. Douglas Meredith*, President James I. Armstrong*, Carroll Rikert, Jr. *, Paris Fletcher, 
Arnold R. LaForce, Fred P. Lang 


Honorary Degrees 

Raymond J. Saulnier, Joseph P. Kasper, Carleton H. Simmons, William S. Youngman, 
Mrs. Joseph K. Milliken (Emerita) 

New Trustees 

Carleton H. Simmons, Arnold R. LaForce, Stewart Ross, L. Douglas Meredith, Fred P. 
Lang 


Scholarships and Student Loans 

Joseph P. Kasper, Raymond J. Saulnier, Foster R. Clement, Jr., Chester H. Clemens, 
Raymond A. Ablondi 


Conference 

Elbert C. Cole, Mrs. J. Howard Howson, Joseph P. Kasper, Robert D. Proctor, Chester H. 
Clemens 


157 



158 


COMMITTEES 


Athletics 

Stewart Ross, Joseph P. Kasper, Garleton H. Simmons, John Kruesi, Frederick W. 
Lapham, Jr., Fred P. Lang (Alternate) 

Porter Hospital 

Stewart Ross, Elbert G. Cole, Marian G. Cruikshank, Frederick W. Lapham, Jr., President 
James I. Armstrong*, Carroll Rikert, Jr.*, Walter E. Brooker* 

Committees 

L. Douglas Meredith*, President James I. Armstrong*, Fred P. Lang, Paris Fletcher 

Library and Abernethy Collection and Flanders Ballad Collection 

Mrs. J. Howard Howson, Adrian G. Leiby, Alexander Hamilton Fulton, Chester H. 
Clemens, Marian G. Cruikshank 

Walker Furlough and Emergency Fund 

President James I. Armstrong*, Carroll Rikert, Jr.*, Paul M. Cubetaf 
*Ex-officio -{-Member of the Faculty 


Academic Administration and Staff 

{Calendar year indicates first date of appointment) 

James Isbell Armstrong, ph.d., ll.d., l.h.d., litt.d. 

President (1963) 3 South Street 

Walter Eric Brooker, a.b. 

Vice President and Director of the Development Program (1956) South Main Street 

Paul M. Cubeta, ph.d. 

Dean of the Faculty (1967) 39 Seminary Street 

George Dennis O’Brien, ph.d. 

Dean of the College (1967) R.D. 3, Middlebury 

Stephen Albert Freeman, ph.d., ll.d., l.h.d., litt.d. 

Director of the Language Schools (1946) 

Vice President Emeritus (1943) 

Mrs. Elizabeth Baker Kelly, a.b. 

Dean of Women (1946) 

Bruce B. Peterson, ph.d. 

Dean of Men (1967) 

Mrs. Erica B. Wonnacott, a.b., m.a. 

Assistant Dean of Women (1968) 

Fred F. Neuberger, a.b. 

Director of Admissions (1955) 

Edward Sommers, a.b. 

Assistant Director of Admissions (1963) 

Frances Rodgers Hall, a.b. 

Assistant Director of Admissions (1964) 


24 South Street 
5 College Street 
40 South Street 
33 Weybridge St. 
Gorham Lane 
R.D. 2, Middlebury 
1 Chipman Heights 



ADMINISTRATION 


159 


Carolyn Estabrook, a.b. 

Assistant to the Director of Admissions 

James Carey, Jr., a.b. 

Assistant to the Director of Admissions 

Marion Elizabeth Holmes, a.b. 

Registrar (1937) 

Mrs. Flora Mitchell Barton 
Assistant Registrar (1968) 

Lynn W. Hinman, a.b. 

Coordinator of Student Activities (1960) 

Gordon Condit Perine, a.b. 

Director of Alumni Relations and Placement (1951) 

Mrs. Janet Deakins Diaz, a.b. 

Assistant Director of Alumni Relations (1965) 

Charles D. Brakeley, a.b. 

Assistant Director of Development (1964-67) 
Director of Financial Aid (1967) 

Gregor Hileman, a.b., b.d. 

Assistant Director of Development (1967) 

Editor, News Letter (1968) 

Patricia J. Hokanson, a.b. 

Executive Secretary to the President (1963) 

Barbara Anna Wells, a.b., m.a. 

Secretary of the College (1968) 

George F. Parton, Jr., m.d. 

Medical Director (1967) 

Wilton Warner Covey, a.b., m.d. 

Psychiatric Consultant (1966) 

Mrs. Elizabeth Bristol, r.n. 

Head College Nurse (1958) 

George Hambre Hub an, b.s. 

Editor, News Letter (1946-68) 

Editor, Publications (1940) 

Horace Palmer Beck, ph.d. 

Director of the Flanders Ballad Collection (1956) 

Mrs. Barbara Filan 

Secretary of the Language Schools (1955) 

Max P. Petersen, a.b. 

Editor, Information Service (1962) 

Robert H. Steeves, b.s. in ed. 

Chief of Security (1960) 


Chipman Heights 
R.D. 3, Middlebury 
54 High Street 

Pittsfield 

R.D. 3, Middlebury 
22 South Street 

R.D. 3, Middlebury 

5 South Street 

R.D. 1, Middlebury 
3 College Street 
R.D. 3, Middlebury 
R.D. 1, Middlebury 

Cornwal 

Infirmary 

Washington Street Extension 
Ripton 
55 Seminary Street 

50 Shannon Street 


R.D. 3, Middlebury 



160 


ADMINISTRATION 


The Library Staff 

John R. McKenna, a.b., b.l.s. 

Librarian (1964) 6 Ghipman Park 

Richard Serena, b.s., m.s. 

Assistant Librarian (1965) 12 Weybridge Street 

Lockwood Merriman, a.b., m.a. 

College Archivist (1965) 12 Hillcrest Road 

E. Anne Eberle, b.a., m.l.s. 

Head Gataloger (1965) 6 Benedict Lane 

Lila E. Williams, a.b., m.l.s. 

Assistant Gataloger (1967) Battell Block 17 

Helen M. Davis, a.b. 

Assistant Reference Librarian (1961) Ripton 

Ralph W. Franklin, ph.d. 

Curator of the Abemethy Library (1968) Middlebury 


Business Administration and Staff 

Carroll Rikert, Jr., a.b., m.b.a., c.p.a. 

Treasurer (1952) 7 Green Mountain Place 

James D. Ross, m.b.a. 

Business Manager (1956) Cornwall 

Luther Van Ummersen, a.b., c.p.a. 

Comptroller (1965) 104 South Main Street 

J. Wilber Smith 

Assistant Comptroller (1926) Cornwall 

Norman D. Hadley, a.b. 

Assistant Comptroller (1965) 112 South Main Street 

Richmond G. Littlefield, b.s., m.b.a., c.p.a. 

Assistant Comptroller (1967) 8 Chipman Park 

Thomas A. LaFountain 

Assistant Cashier (1966) Middlebury 

Robert S. Huttenlock 

Accountant (1967) Middlebury 

Mrs. Ruth E. Leonard 

Secretary to the Treasurer (1957) 33 Gorham Lane 


Harvey N. Drink wine 
Plant Engineer (1956) 

George A. Wishart 
Purchasing Agent (1965) 


Salisbury 


South Street Ext. 




ADMINISTRATION 


161 


Ralph O. Myhre 

Golf Course and Snow Bowl Manager (1951) 

18 Gorham Lane 

Henry P. Glook 

Superintendent of Maintenance and Operations (1965) 

Brandon 

Robert D. Lincoln 

Assistant to the Superintendent of Maintenance and Grounds (1967) 

Middlebury 

Gordon G. Holden 

Grounds Foreman (1965) 

Wallingford 

George E. Hammond 

College Printer (1954) 

Bristol 


Gordon B. Bridges, Jr. 

Director of Dining Halls and Dormitory Operations (1955) 

7 Gorham Lane 

Carl Peabody, b.s. 

College Store Manager (1962) 

East Middlebury 

Joseph C. Doria 

Assistant to Director of Dining Halls (1965) 

South Street Ext. 

George J. Commins 

Supervisor of Custodial Personnel (1963) 

63 Court Street 

Lois G. Thorpe, b.s. 

Dietitian (1950) 

Economics House 

Bruce H. Young 

Assistant Manager, College Store (1965) 

R.D. 1, Middlebury 


The Coaching Staff 

Walter J. Nelson, b.s. 

Director of Intercollegiate Athletics, varsity football coach, varsity and freshman golf coach (1932) 

Erkki W. Mackey, b.s. 

Assistant varsity football coach, freshman hockey coach, varsity track coach (1956) 

Joseph J. Morrone, Jr., b.s., ed.m. 

Varsity soccer coach, freshman basketball coach, varsity lacrosse coach (1959) 

Wendell F. Forbes, a.b. 

Assistant varsity football coach, varsity hockey coach, varsity baseball coach (1962) 

James G. Alaimo, a.b. 

Freshman soccer coach, varsity basketball coach, freshman lacrosse coach (1964) 

John F. Bower, a.b., m.ed. 

Varsity cross country coach, varsity and freshman ski coach, assistant track coach (1968) 


Richard W. Waterman 
Athletic Trainer (1956) 




162 


ADMINISTRATION 


Faculty 

James Isbell Armstrong, a.b., ph.d. and ll.d., princeton; 
L.H.D., bates; litt.d., grinnell 

President, and Professor of Classics (1963) 

3 South Street 

Paul Marsden Cubeta, a.b., williams; ph.d., yale 

Dean of the Faculty (1967) 

Professor of English (1952) 

Director of the Bread Loaf School of English (1964) 

.39 Seminary Street 

J. Gerald Alaimo, a.b., brown 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men (1964) 

Stewart Hall 

Hugo Rafael Albor, dipl. metodelogfa de la ensenanza, 

INSTITUTE CARO Y CUERVO, BOGOTA; M.A., UNIVERSITY 

OF IOWA 

Instructor in Spanish (1968) 

David H. Andrews, a.b., ohio wesleyan; m.a., ph.d., Cornell 


Associate Professor of Anthropology (1968) 

35 South Street 

John Thayer Andrews, a.b., amherst; m.a., harvard 

Professor of Philosophy (1936) 

57 South Street 

Vivie G. Babb (Miss), license de lettres modernes, diplome 
d’etudes superieures de lettres modernes 

Instructor in French and Assistant 

Directress of the Chateau (1968) 

Le Chateau 

George W. Bahlke, a.b., university of Chicago and 

swarthmore; m.a., university of Chicago; ph.d., yale 
Assistant Professor of English (1961) 

R.D. 2, Middlebury 

Robert L. Baker, a.b., Colorado; m.a. and ph.d., Michigan 
Associate Professor of Russian (1967) 

Director of the Russian Summer School (1967) 

R.D. 3, Middlebury 

Brewster Baldwin, a.b., williams; m.a., ph.d., Columbia 
Associate Professor of Geology (1958) 

R. D. 1, Middlebury 

Donald Henry Ballou, a.b., yale; ph.d., harvard 

Beman Professor of Mathematics (1942) 

27 Weybridge Street 

Old Dominion Professor (1968-69) 

Dan M. Bechter, b.s., iowa state; m.a., yale 

Assistant Professor of Economics (1965) 

81 Weybridge Street 

Horace P. Beck, a.b. and ph.d., 

UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA 

Associate Professor of American Literature (1956) P. O. 

Box 442, Middlebury 

Ronald R. Bielli, b.s. and m.a., 

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 

Associate Professor of Mathematics (1956) 

8 Hillcrest Road 

Leslie Cole Bigelow, a.b. and ph.d., harvard 

Associate Professor of Philosophy (1952) 

15 Ghipman Heights 

On leave 1968-69 

Claude L. Bourcier, agrege de l’universite, paris 

Alumni Professor of French (1937) 

Dean of the French Summer School (1947) 

11 Adirondack View 



ADMINISTRATION 


163 


John F. Bower, a.b., middlebury 

Instructor in Physical Education for Men (1968) R.D. 1, Middlebury 

David A. Bumbeck, b.f.a., rhode island school of design; m.f.a., 

SYRACUSE 

Instructor in Fine Arts (1968) 18 College Street 

Frederick G. Cabot, a.b. and ph.d., harvard 
Assistant Professor of English (1966) 

Assistant Director of the Bread Loaf School of English (1967) 32 Gorham Lane 

Felix Carrasco, licenciado en f. y. letras, university of Madrid 
Assistant Professor of Spanish (1968) 

R. Bruce Carroll, a.b., university of Vermont; 

M.A., WAYNE STATE; PH.D., UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Associate Professor of Political Science (1965) 6 Hillcrest Road 

Philip W. Carruth, a.b., Hamilton; m.a., Syracuse; 

PH.D., UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS 

Professor of Mathematics (1966) 1 Adirondack View 

Alan Carter, mus. d., university of Vermont 

Professor of Music (1939) 36 Seminary Street 

Salvatore J. Castiglione, a.b. and ph.d., yale 
Jean Thomson Fulton Professor of Italian (1966) 

Director of the Italian Summer School (1947) R.D. 2, Middlebury 

William B. Catton, a.b., m.a., university of Maryland; 

PH.D., NORTHWESTERN 
Professor of History (1964) 

Old Dominion Professor (1968-69) R.D. 3, Washington Street Ext. 

On leave 1968-69 

Catherine Centeno (Mrs.), b.s. and m.a., middlebury 
Lecturer in Spanish (1949) 

Director of the Graduate School of Spanish t Madrid ( 1968-69 ) 105 South Main Street 

Samuel D. Cioran, a.b., mcmaster; m.a., Indiana university 

Instructor in Russian (1968) 7 Weybridge Street Apt. 1 

John H. Clagett, b.s., u. s. naval academy; ph.d., yale 

Associate Professor of English (1955) Locust Lane 

Nicholas R. Clifford, a.b., Princeton; m.a. 

AND PH.D., HARVARD 

Associate Professor of History (1966) R.D. 2, Middlebury 

Peter J. Coney, a.b., colby; m.s , university of 

MAINE; INGENIEUR, ECOLE NATIONALE SUPERIEURE 
DU PETROLE; PH.D., UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO 

Assistant Professor of Geology (1964) 38 College Street 

Reginald L. Cook, a.b., m.a., litt.d., middlebury; 

A.B., OXFORD 

Charles A. Dana Professor of American Literature (1929) Pulp Mill Bridge Road 

John V. Craven, a.b., bowdoin; m.a., university of 

COLORADO; PH.D., SYRACUSE 
Associate Professor of Economics (1956) 


Gorham Lane 



164 


ADMINISTRATION 


David E. Crowley, a.b., middlebury; m.a., 

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT; PH.D., PRINCETON 
Assistant Professor of Psychology (1966) 

*Helene Crowley (Mrs.), a.b., hunter 
♦Part-time Lecturer in History (1968) 

E. Stuart Dalrymple, Jr., a.b., Manhattan college; 

M.PHIL., YALE 

Instructor in Philosophy (1968) 

Dale DeLetis, a.b., catholic university; m.a., Stanford 
Instructor in English (1967) 

Jacquelyne L. Dorman (Miss), b.s., douglass 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women (1968) 

Murray P. Dry, a.b., m.a., university of Chicago 
Instructor in Political Science (1968) 

Michele Juliette Edelstein (Miss), a.b., 
sweet briar; m.a., middlebury 
Instructor in French and Directress of the Chateau (1966) 

Albert Hunter Ewell, Jr., a.b., haverford; 

PH.D., NEW YORK UNIVERSITY 
Professor of Psychology (1952) 

Emory M. Fanning, b.m., oberlin; m.m., Illinois; 

MUS. A.D., BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
Assistant Professor of Music (1967) 

Wendell F. Forbes, a.b., middlebury 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men (1962) 

William A. Fregosi, b.f.a., boston university; 

M.F.A., BRANDEIS 

Instructor in Drama and Acting Designer for the Theatre (1968) 

John S. Freidin, a.b., Columbia; m.a., yale 

Director of Teacher Education and Instructor in History (1968) 

Robert Willard Gleason, a.b., middlebury; ph.d., m.i.t. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry (1960) 

Madelon S. Gohlke (Mrs.), a.b., bryn mawr; m.a., yale 
Instructor in English (1968) 

Robert K. Gould, b.s., university of maine; 

M.S., PH.D., BROWN 

Associate Professor of Physics (1968) 

Michael S. Greenwood, a.b., brown; m.f., m.s., yale 
Instructor in Biology (1968) 

Faith Gulick (Miss), a.b., Connecticut; m.a., mills 
Assistant Professor of Physical Education (1967) 

Rudolf K. Haerle, Jr., a.b., Dartmouth; m.a. and ph.d., 

CHICAGO 

Associate Professor of Sociology (1962-66, 1967) 


45 South Street 

45 South Street 

46 Shannon St. 

Starr Hall 
R.D. 3, College Farm Road 
2 Adirondack View 

Le Chateau 

28 Weybridge Street 

Cornwall 
R.D. 3, Halladay Road 

77 Main Street, Apt. 2 
R.D. 2, Bristol 
31 Weybridge Street 
116 South Main Street 

118 South Main Street 

43^ South Street 

3 College Street 
UNIVERSITY OF 

41 Gorham Lane 


♦Part-time 



ADMINISTRATION 


165 


Grant H. Harnest, a.b., knox; ph.d., university of Virginia 

John G. McCullough Professor of Chemistry (1943) 125 South Main Street 

Old Dominion Professor (1968-69) 

William Harris, a.b. and ph.d., harvard 

Associate Professor of Classics (1956) R-D- 1, Seymour Street 

Lt. Col. James G. Hefti, a.b., st. lawrence 

Professor of Military Science (1968) 37 Chipman Park 

Ursula Margarete Heibges (Miss), a.b., catholic university 

OF AMERICA; M.A., COLUMBIA; PH.D., BRYN MAWR 

Assistant Professor of Classics (1961) 10^ Weybridge Street 

Thomas H. Hibbard, a.b., pomona; ph.d., Claremont 

Assistant Professor of Economics (1966) 43 South Street 

Robert Webber Hill, Jr., a.b., m.a., ph.d., harvard 

Assistant Professor of English (1966) 135 South Main Street 

Charles Leonard Hoag, a.b., albion; m.a., Michigan; 

PH.D., CLARK 

Alumni Professor of Political Science (1947) 89 Weybridge Street 

Philip K. Hooper, a.b., Hamilton; m.a. and ph.d., harvard 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics (1966) 3A College Street 


Thomas Huber, m.a., university of Vermont; m.a. and ph.d., 
Assistant Professor of German (1966) 


PRINCETON 

85 Weybridge Street 


Walter M. Hurley, Jr., a.b., Berkeley; m.a., Cornell 

Instructor in German (1967) R.D. 1, Middlebury 

J. Rowland Illick, a.b., Syracuse; ph.d., harvard 

Professor of Geography (1946) 18 Springside Road 

Travis Beal Jacobs, a.b., princeton; m.a., Columbia 

Instructor in History (1965) 3A College Street 

Howard Mumford Jones, a.b., litt.d., university of 

WISCONSIN; M.A., UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO; LITT.D., 

HARVARD, UNIVERSITY OF COLORADO, WESTERN RESERVE, 

CLARK; L.H.D., TULANE, OHIO STATE, HEBREW UNION, 

NORTHWESTERN, CLARKSON; LL.D., COLBY, UNIVERSITY OF UTAH 

Visiting Professor of American Literature and History (Fall 1968) 15 Chipman Heights 

Elizabeth B. Kelly (Mrs.), a.b., mount holyoke 

Dean of Women (1946) 5 College Street 

John J. Kelly, a.b. and m.a., middlebury 

Professor of Physical Education for Men (1936) 3 College Street 

William W. Kerrigan, a.b., Stanford; m.a., Columbia 

Instructor in English (1968) R-D- 3, Munger Street 

Jean J. Kliman (Miss), a.b., university of Manitoba; m.a., Minnesota 
Instructor in Anthropology (1968) 

Arthur J. Knoll, a.b., bates; m.a., new york university; 

PH.D., YALE 

Assistant Professor of History (1966) 19 Chipman Park 

On leave 1968-69 

Capt. Herbert E. Koenigsbauer, Jr., a.b., bowdoin 
Assistant Professor of Military Science (1967) 


41 Chipman Park 



166 


ADMINISTRATION 


Jacques Krouchi, licence-es-lettres, 

DIPLOME D’ETUDES SUPERIEURES, C.A.P.E.S. 

Visiting Assistant Professor of French (1967) Pulp Mill Bridge Road 

Marjorie E. Lamberti (Miss), a.b., smith; 

M.A. AND PH.D., YALE 
Assistant Professor of History (1964) 

On leave 1968-69 

Frank G. Lane, b.s., m.i.t.; m.d., university of Vermont 
Lecturer in Mathematics and Biology (1949-51, 1962-63, 1964) 

Roger Laurent, licence es sc. geologiques 

ET MINERALOGIQUES; DIPLOMA D’iNGENIEUR, GENEVA; 

PH.D., GENEVA 

Assistant Professor of Geology (1967) 

David B. Led lie, a.b., middlebury; ph.d., m.i.t. 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1967) 

Russell J. Leng, a.b., middlebury; ph.d., American university 
Assistant Professor of Political Science (1966) 

Mary E. Lick (Miss), a.b., lake erie; m.s., smith 

Associate Professor of Physical Education for Women (1956) 125 South Main Street 

David J. Littlefield, a.b., spring hill; 

M.A. AND PH.D., YALE 

Associate Professor of English (1953-56, 1959) Charlotte 

Osman Faruk Logoglu, a.b., brandeis; m.a., princeton 
Instructor in Political Science (1968) 

Erkki W. Mackey, b.s., Springfield 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men (1956) 

Vincent Herschel Malmstrom, a.b. and ph.d., 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 
Associate Professor of Geography (1956-57, 1958) 

Edward Alexander Martin, a.b., princeton; 

M.A. AND PH.D., COLUMBIA 
Associate Professor of English (1961) 

Assistant Director of the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference (1964) 

Duncan J. McDonald, b.s., mcgill; m.a., harvard 
Visiting Professor of Biology (1967) 

John Redmond McKenna, a.b., queens; b.l.s., mcgill 
Librarian (1964) 

Lockwood Merriman, a.b., harvard; m.a., Columbia 
Associate Professor (1947) 

College Archivist (1965) 

Joseph J. Morrone, b.s., university of Massachusetts; 

ED.M., WORCESTER STATE 

Assistant Professor of Physical Education for Men (1958) 

Assistant Director of Intercollegiate Athletics (1967) 

Assistant to the Chairman of Physical Education for Men (1967) 

George R. Motolanez, a.b., mcmaster; m.a., new york 
Instructor in Russian (1968) 


45 Seminary Street 

R.D. 3, Middlebury 

33 Seminary Street 
East Middlebury 
6 Chipman Park 

12 Hillcrest Road 

70 Court Street 

UNIVERSITY 

5 Storrs Avenue 


7 Weybridge Street 
1 Porter Field Road 


R.D. 2, Cornwall 


44 Shannon Street 



ADMINISTRATION 


167 


Walter A. Moyer, Jr., b.s., Philadelphia college 

OF PHARMACY; PH.D., UNIVERSITY OF DELAWARE 
Professor of Chemistry (1951) 

Robert B. Muirhead, m, b.f.a., rhode island school 

OF DESIGN; M.F.A., BOSTON UNIVERSITY 
Assistant Professor of Fine Arts (1964) 

Howard McCoy Munford, b.s., middlebury; ph.d., harvard 
Julian W. Abernethy Professor of American Literature (1941) 

Craig C. Murray, a.b., Stanford; m.a., Columbia 
Instructor in History (1967) 

Capt. Allan A. Myer, a.b., university of omaha 
Assistant Professor of Military Science (1968) 

Norman C. Nelson, a.b., westmont; b.d., san 

FRANCISCO THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY; TH.M., 

PRINCETON THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 
Lecturer in Religion (1967) 

Assistant Chaplain (1967) 

Paul E. Nelson, a.b., augustana; m.a., 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 

Assistant Professor of Political Science (1963) 

Ralph D. Nelson, Jr., a.b., colby; ph.d., princeton 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1965) 

On leave 1968-69 

Walter J. Nelson, b.s., middlebury 
Professor of Physical Education for Men; 

Director of Intercollegiate Athletics (1932-36, 1946) 

Fred F. Neuberger, a.b., middlebury 
Director of Admissions (1955) 

Victor Lawrence Nuovo, a.b., hope; b.d., new Brunswick 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY; PH.D., COLUMBIA 
Assistant Professor of Religion (1962) 

George Dennis O’Brien, a.b., yale; ph.d., 

UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 
Associate Professor of Philosophy (1965) 

Dean of the College (1967) 

Robert Pack, a.b., Dartmouth; m.a., Columbia 
Associate Professor of English (1964) 

Half-time Leave 1968-69 

Barton A. Parks, Jr., a.b., rice; m.a., state university 

OF NEW YORK AT BUFFALO 
Instructor in Sociology (1968) 

James G. Penley, a.b., pomona; m.a., brandeis; 

PH.D., NOTRE DAME 

Assistant Professor of Physics (1968) 

Bruce Bigelow Peterson, a.b., middlebury; ph.d., Syracuse 
Associate Professor of Mathematics (1962) 

Dean of Men (1967) 


9 Adirondack View 

4 Hillcrest Road 

41 South Street 
East Middlebury 

34 South Street 

105 South Main Street 

19 Gorham Lane 

Pulp Mill Bridge Road 
Gorham Lane 

66 Shannon Street 

R.D. 3, Halladay Road 

Cornwall 

8 Seminary Street 

R.D. 2, Middlebury 


40 South Street 



168 

Judith Turner Polefka (Mrs.), a.b., radcliffe; ph.d., 

STANFORD 

Assistant Professor of Psychology (1968) 

Edwin L. Pool, b.s. and ph.d., iowa state 
Associate Professor of Chemistry (1954) 

Chandler Armstrong Potter, a.b., amherst; m.f.a., yal 
Associate Professor of Drama and Designer for the Theatre (1956) 
On leave 1968-69 

Henry Beall Prickitt, a.b., amherst; ph.d., harvard 
Professor of English (1948) 

David Langdon Prouty, a.b., Colgate; ph.d., tulane 
Associate Professor of Psychology (1959) 

CYRIAC K. PuLLAPILLY, A.B., ST. THOMAS (INDIA) ; 

M.A., DEPAUL 
Instructor in Religion (1967) 

Norman F. Ramsey, a.b., ph.d., Columbia; a.b., m.a., 

D.SC., CAMBRIDGE; M.A., (HON.) HARVARD 
Visiting Professor of Physics 
(Winter, Spring 1969) 

Robert F. Reiff, a.b., university of Rochester; 

PH.D., COLUMBIA 
Professor of Fine Arts (1958) 

Old Dominion Professor (1968-69) 

E. Kirk Roberts, a.b., earlham; ph.d., harvard 
Professor of Chemistry (1952) 

Old Dominion Professor (1968-69) 

Eugene Sapadin, a.b., middlebury; m.a., harvard 
Instructor in Philosophy (1965-66 2nd Sem., 1967) 

George B. Saul, n, a.b., m.a. and ph.d., university of 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Irene Heinz and John LaPorte Given Professor in Pre-Medical 
Sciences (1967) 

Professor of Biology (1967) 

Charles W. J. Scaife, a.b. and ph.d., Cornell 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry (1967) 

*WOLFE W. SCHMOKEL, A.B., UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND; 
M.A., PH.D., YALE 

Visiting Associate Professor of History (1968) 

Charles Powell Scott, a.b., ohio state; b.d., princeton 

THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

Chaplain and Professor of Religion (1951) 

Robert A. Simko, a.b., m.a., rutgers 
Instructor in Geography (1968) 

David K. Smith, a.b., middlebury; ph.d., harvard 
Alumni Professor of Economics (1950) 

♦Part-time 


ADMINISTRATION 

77 Main Street, Apt. 1 
R.D. 3, Rogers Road 
20 Springside Road 

Blinn Lane 
“The Barn”, Cornwall 

19 Chipman Park 

15 Chipman Heights 

20 Gorham Lane 

46 High Street 
Gifford Hall 

R.D. 3, Munger Street 
126 South Main Street 

Star Route, Essex Junction 

95 Main Street 

4 Storrs Avenue 
Chipman Heights 













ADMINISTRATION 


169 


Kimberly Sparks, a.b. and ph.d., princeton 

Jean Thomson Fulton Associate Professor of German (1966) 
Director of the Graduate School of German , Mainz (Spring 1969) 

Edward R. Stehle, a.b., university of Pittsburgh; m.a., 

COLUMBIA 

Instructor in History (1968) 


R.D. 2, Middlebury 


105 South Main Street 


Dabney Stuart, a.b., davtdson; m.a., harvard 

Visiting Assistant Professor of English (1968) R.D. 1, Pulp Mill Bridge Road 


Bart F. Teush, a.b., swarthmore 

Instructor in English (1967) 40 College Street 

Harris E. Thurber, a.b., university of Vermont; 

PH.D., PRINCETON 

Professor of Political Science (1947-49, 1951) 14 Elm Street 

On leave 1968-69 


Pardon E. Tillinghast, a.b., brown; ph.d., harvard 
Professor of History (1947) 

George B. Todd, a.b., amherst; m.b.a., Stanford; 

M.F.A., PRINCETON 

Assistant Professor of Music (1965) 

Joan L. Towne (Miss), b.s., skidmore; m.s., smith 
Associate Professor of Physical Education for Women (1960) 

A. Richard Turner, a.b., m.f.a., ph.d., princeton 
Professor of Fine Arts (1968) 

Old Dominion Professor (1968-69) 

Van Horn Vail, a.b., university of Washington; 

M.A. AND PH.D., PRINCETON 
Assistant Professor of German (1966) 


6 Adirondack View 


R.D. 3, Halladay Road 


East Middlebury 


R.D. 1, Middlebury 


R.D. 2, Middlebury 


David B. Van Vleck, a.b., princeton; m.s., ph.d., Cornell 

Associate Professor of Biology (1968) R.D. 1, Middlebury 

Capt. Antonio R. Villasenor, a.b., u.c.l.a. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science (1967) R.D. 3, Middlebury 

Erie T. Volkert, a.b., Lawrence; m.a., northwestern 

Professor of Drama and Director of the Theatre (1941) 54 North Pleasant Street 


James Mayer Watkins, a.b., Pennsylvania state; 

M.A., MIDDLEBURY; C.A.E.F.E., PARIS 
Associate Professor of French and 

Director of the Language Laboratory (1958) Pulp Mill Bridge Road 

Director of the Graduate School of French , Paris ( 1968-69 ) 

Christopher D. Watters, b.s., notre dame; m.a., 

PH.D., PRINCETON 

Assistant Professor of Biology (1968) 5 Green Mountain Place 

John T. Wenders, a.b., amherst; m.a., university of Hawaii; 

M.A. AND PH.D., NORTHWESTERN 

Assistant Professor of Economics (1963) 33 Ghipman Park 

Benjamin Franklin Wissler, b.s., Muhlenberg; 

M.A., COLUMBIA; D.SC., MUHLENBERG 

Alumni Professor of Physics (1930) 23 Weybridge Street 











170 


ADMINISTRATION 


Klaus Heinrich Wolff, a.b., wabash; 

PH.D.j UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO 
Associate Professor of Economics (1956) 


Locust Lane 


Howard Eugene Woodin, b.s., union; ph.d., purdue 
Associate Professor of Biology (1953) 


R.D. 3, Middlebury 


Edward Henry Worthen, a.b., m.a., ph.d., 

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN 
Assistant Professor of Spanish (1966) 


86 Shannon Street 


Nora Scott Wright (Miss), a.b. and m.a., middlebury 
Instructor in Spanish (1967) 


Allen House 


Victor Zynszajn, b.s., m.a., Colorado 
Instructor in French (1968) 


Assistants and Associates in Instruction 

*Alexandra Baker (Mrs.), a.b., hunter; m.a., Indiana 

UNIVERSITY 

Associate in Russian (1967) R.D. 3, Middlebury 

Evelyn M. Burrill (Mrs.), a.b., mount holyoke; m.s., 

UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT 

Research Assistant in Psychology (1967) Shoreham 

PlERINA B. CASTIGLIONE (Mrs.), M.A., SMITH; 

DOTORRE IN LETTERE, UNIVERSITY OF FLORENCE 

Associate in Italian R. D. 2, Middlebury 

*Betsy H. Gleason (Mrs.), a.b., middlebury 

Assistant in Teacher Education (1963) 31 Weybridge Street 

Ralph Grimes, b.s., Muhlenberg 

Assistant in Physics (1968) Battell Block, Apt. 13 

*Regina Jakobi (Miss) 

Assistant in German (1968) 

Frank Edward Kaufman, b.f.a., art institute of Chicago 

Associate in Theatre and Technical Director (1967) 7 Court Street 

Jacqueline S. Krouchi (Mrs.), licence-es-lettres, 

DIPLOME D’ETUDES SUPERIEURES, C.A.P.E.S. 

Associate in French (1967) Pulp Mill Bridge Road 

*Katharine A. McGlynn (Miss), b.s., skidmore; m.ed., university of Vermont 
Assistant in Teacher Education (1967) East Middlebury 

Marion Jones Munford (Mrs.), b.s., middlebury 


Assistant in Biology (1959) 


41 South Street 


*Faith N. Sholes (Mrs.), b.a., m.s., Washington 

UNIVERSITY 

Assistant in Teacher Education (1968) 


10 Adirondack View 


*fMoNiKA Sutter (Miss), 
Assistant in German (1966) 


Battell Block, Apt. 23 


♦Part-time 
jSpring Term 



ADMINISTRATION 


171 


Emeriti 

Samuel Sommerville Stratton, ph.d., ll.d., d.g.i. 
President Emeritus (1943) 

John Gerald Bowker, ed.m., l.h.d. 

Baldwin Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (1926) 

Dean Emeritus of the Faculty (1953) 

Douglas Stowe Beers, ph.d. 

Hudson Professor Emeritus of English (1925) 

Lea Zoe Binand, brevet superieur 

Assistant Professor Emerita of French (1929) 

Walter Thompson Bogart, ph.d. 

Jermain Professor Emeritus of Political Science (1937) 

Arthur Milton Brown, a.b. 

Professor Emeritus of Physical Education (1918) 

Stephen Albert Freeman, ph.d., ll.d., l.h.d., litt.d. 
Professor Emeritus of French (1925) 

Vice President Emeritus (1943) 

Mischa Harry Fayer, ph.d. 

Professor Emeritus of Russian (1943) 

Burt Alden Hazeltine, m.a. 

Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (1924) 

Arthur Kelly David Healy, a.b., m.f.a. 

Professor Emeritus of Fine Arts (1943) 

Harold Bradford Hitchcock, a.b., ph.d. 

Mead Professor Emeritus of Biology (1943) 

Robert Dugald Hope, ll.b. 

Assistant Treasurer of the Corporation, Emeritus (1914) 

Laila Adelaide McNeil, a.b. 

Librarian Emerita (1913) 

Werner Neuse, ph.d. 

Professor Emeritus of German (1932) 

Perley Chesman Perkins, a.b., m.a. 

Professor Emeritus of English (1923) 

James Stuart Prentice, m.a. 

Professor Emeritus of Economics (1931) 

Bruno Moritz Schmidt, m.a. 

Professor Emeritus of Geology (1925) 

Russell George Sholes, m.a. 

Professor Emeritus of Sociology (1927) 

Phelps Nash Swett, b.^., m.a. 

Professor Emeritus of Geography & Drafting (1909) 

Ruth Wood Temple, a.b. 

Assistant Dean Emerita of Women (1922) 

Viola Chittenden White, ph.d. 

Curator Emerita of Abemethy Library (1933) 


Rutland 

Middlebury 
Middlebury 
France 
Middlebury 
Sarasota, Florida 

Middlebury 
Lexington, Kentucky 
Wellfleet, Massachusetts 
R.D. 1, Middlebury 
1 Locust Lane 
Middlebury 
St. Johnsbury 
New Brunswick, New Jersey 
Middlebury 
Carlisle, Pennsylvania 
Middlebury 
Middlebury 
Middlebury 
Rutland 
Middlebury 






Calendar for 1969-70 

( Tentative) 


1969 

SEPTEMBER 

10— Wednesday, Freshman Week begins 

14— Sunday, Freshman Convocation 

(10:45 a.m.) Mead Chapel 

15— Monday, Fall Term classes begin 

(8:00 a.m.) 

OCTOBER 

11— Saturday, Alumni Homecoming Day 

(College in Session) 

18— Saturday, Parents’ Weekend (College 

in Session) 

NOVEMBER 

26— Wednesday, Thanksgiving Recess 

begins (12 noon) 

DECEMBER 

1—Monday, classes resume (8 a.m.) 

13—Saturday, Fall Term classes end (12 
noon) 

15—Monday, Final examinations begin 

19— Friday, Final examinations end 

1970 

JANUARY 

5—Monday, Winter Term begins (8 
a.m.) 

FEBRUARY 

4— Wednesday, Winter Term ends (5 

p.m.) 

5— Thursday, Winter Recess begins 

9—Monday, Spring Term classes begin 
(8 a.m.) 

MARCH 

28—Saturday, Spring Recess begins (12 
noon) 

APRIL 

6— Monday, classes resume (8 a.m.) 

MAY 

15— Friday, Spring Term classes end (12 

noon) 

16— Saturday, Senior Comprehensive 

Examinations begin 

21— Thursday, Senior Comprehensive 

Examinations end 

22— Friday, Final Examinations begin 

27— Wednesday, Final Examinations end 
31—Sunday, Baccalaureate 

JUNE 

1—Monday, Commencement 


1969-70 1970 



SEPTEMBER 




MARCH 



s 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 


1 

2 3 4 

5 

6 

1 

2 

3 4 5 

6 

7 

7 

8 

9 10 11 

12 

13 

8 

9 

10 11 12 

13 

14 

14 

15 

16 17 18 

19 

20 

15 

16 

17 18 19 

20 

21 

21 

22 

23 24 25 

26 27 

22 

23 

24 25 26 

27 

28 

28 

29 

30 .. .. 



29 

30 

31 .. .. 




OCTOBER 





APRIL 



S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 



.. 12 

3 

4 



.. 12 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 8 9 

10 

11 

5 

6 

7 8 9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 15 16 

17 

18 

12 

13 

14 15 16 

17 

18 

19 

20 

21 22 23 

24 

25 

19 

20 

21 22 23 

24 

25 

26 

27 

28 29 30 

31 


26 

27 

28 29 30 




NOVEMBER 




MAY 



S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 





1 




1 

2 

2 

3 

4 5 6 

7 

8 

3 

4 

5 6 7 

8 

9 

9 

10 

11 12 13 

14 

15 

10 

11 

12 13 14 

15 

16 

16 

17 

18 19 20 

21 

22 

17 

18 

19 20 21 

22 

23 

23 

24 

25 26 27 

28 

29 

24 

25 

26 27 28 29 

30 

30 





31 






DECEMBER 




JUNE 



S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 


1 

2 3 4 

5 

6 


1 

2 3 4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 10 11 

12 

13 

7 

8 

9 10 11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 17 18 

19 

20 

14 

15 

16 17 18 

19 

20 

21 

22 

23 24 25 

26 

27 

21 

22 

23 24 25 

26 

27 

28 

29 

30 31 .. 



28 

29 

30 .. .. 




JANUARY 




JULY 



S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 



.. .. 1 

2 

3 



.. 12 

3 

4 

4 

5 

6 7 8 

9 

10 

5 

6 

7 8 9 

10 

11 

11 

12 

13 14 15 

16 

17 

12 

13 

14 15 16 

17 

18 

18 

19 

20 21 22 

23 

24 

19 

20 

21 22 23 

24 

25 

25 

26 

27 28 29 

30 

31 

26 

27 

28 29 30 

31 



FEBRUARY 




AUGUST 



S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 

S 

M 

T W T 

F 

S 

1 

2 

3 4 5 

6 

7 





1 

8 

9 

10 11 12 

13 

14 

2 

3 

4 5 6 

7 

8 

15 

16 

17 18 19 

20 

21 

9 

10 

11 12 13 

14 

15 

22 

23 

24 25 26 

27 

28 

16 

17 

18 19 20 

21 

22 






23 

24 

25 26 27 

28 

29 






30 

31 





173 


























































Index 


Page 

Abernethy Library.... 29 

Academic Honors .... 25 

Academic Requirements . 22 

Academic Administration 

and Staff. 158 

Admissions 12 

Advanced Placement. . 12 

Early Decision .... 13 

Examinations, College 

Board. 12 

Health Certificate ... 12 

Procedure. 12 

Requirements. 12 

Transfers. 13 

Advisers. 18 

Alumni, Alumnae .... 140 

Magazine. 45 

Organizations. 140 

Officers. 140 

Trustees. 11, 140 

American Literature .... 50 

Applications 

Admissions. 12 

College Boards .... 12 

Athletics 

Facilities. 34 

Program. 44 

Attendance. 40 

Attendance Statistics. . . 136 

Auditing. 40 

Awards. 133 

Bequests. 37 

Biology. 105 

Buildings & Facilities . . 29 

Business Administration & 

Staff. 159 

Calendar (1968-69) . . . Back Cover 
Calendar (1969-70) ... 173 

Change of Course .... 38 

Chapel Services. 42 

Chemistry . 108 

Choir. 65 

Classics . 71 

Coaching Staff. 161 

The College. 7 


Page 


History. 7 

Historical Events ... 137 

Educational Purpose. . 8 

Location. 9 

Commencement Honors . 25 

Commissions: U.S. Army 

Reserve. 155 

Computer Facility. ... 29 

Comprehensive Level . . 21 

Corporation Committees . 157 

Courses: 49 

Explanation & Symbols 49 

Courses of Instruction 

American Literature ... 50 

Biology . 105 

Chemistry . 108 

Classics . 71 

Drama . 57 

Economics . 86 

English . 51 

Fine Arts . 59 

French . 74 

Geography . 112 

Geology . 114 

German . 77 

Greek . 73 

History . 88 

Italian . 84 

Latin . 71 

Mathematics . 117 

Military Science . 124 

Music . 62 

Philosophy . 65 

Physical Education 

Men. 119 

Women. 120 

Physics . 120 

Political Science . 93 

Psychology . 96 

Religion . 67 

Russian . 79 

Sociology-Anthropology . . 99 

Spanish . 82 

Teacher Education. ... 102 

Critical Languages 

Program. 27 

Curriculum. 17 


174 





























































INDEX 


175 


Page 

Dean’s List. 24 

Degrees Awarded .... 143 

Doctor of Modern 

Languages. 148 

Honorary. 143 

Masters of Arts .... 144, 149 

Master of Science ... 150 

Bachelor of Arts. . . . 149,150 

Conferred with 

Distinction. 153 

Degree Requirements . . 22 

Bachelor of Arts.... 22 

Master of Arts .... 46 

Master of Science ... 46 

Doctor of Modern 

Languages. 48 

Departmental Honors 

Program. 19 

Departmental Program. . 20 

Departmental Scholars. . 21 

Development Program . . 36 

Directory of 

Correspondence.... Front Cover 

Dismissal. 39 

Dispensary. 43 

Distribution Requirements 22 

Divisions 

Foreign Languages. . . 70 

Humanities. 50 

Natural Sciences ... 105 

Social Sciences .... 86 

Dormitories 

(See Residence Halls) 

Drama . 57 

Economics . 86 

Emeriti Faculty. 171 

Emeriti Trustees .... 11 

English . 51 

Endowed Chairs. 36 

Endowed Lectureships . . 42 

Environmental Studies. . 26 

Expenses and Fees. ... 14 

Extracurricular Activities. 40 

Athletics. 44 

Concert-Film. 44 

Conference. 44 

Organizations. 45 

Publications. 45 

Radio Station. 44 

Religion Conference . . 44 


Page 

Winter Carnival.... 45 

Facilities. 29 

Faculty, List of. 162 

Failure. 39 

Fees. 14,15 

Financial Aid. 15 

Fine Arts . 59 

French . 74 

Freshman Program ... 17 

Freshman Week. 42 

Geography . 112 

Geology . 114 

German . 77 

Gifts. 37 

Grades. 24, 38 

Graduate Schools Abroad. 48 

Graduate Study. 46 

Master of Arts .... 47 

Master of Science ... 46 

D.M.L. Degree .... 48 

Greek . 73 

History . 88 

Historical Events: 

Middlebury 137 

Honor Code. 24 

Honors, Academic. ... 25 

Hospital. 43 

Insurance. 14 

Italian . 84 

Junior Year Abroad. . . 27 

Language Schools .... 47 

Latin . 71 

Library. 29 

Library Staff. 160 

Loan Funds. 132 

Major Program. 18 

Master of Arts. 47 

Master of Science .... 46 

Mathematics . 117 

Medical Facilities .... 43 

Motor Vehicles. 41 

Military Science . 124 

Music . 62 
























































INDEX 


176 


Page 


Orchestra. 65 

Organizations. 45 

Phi Beta Kappa. 25 

Philosophy . 65 

Physical Education . 119 

Physics . 120 

Placement, Vocational . . 46 

Political Science . 93 

Pre-Medical/ Pre-Dental 

Program. 26 

President and Fellows . . 10 

Prizes and Awards. ... 133 

Probation. 39 

Professional School 

(3-2 Program) .... 26 

Publications 

Alumni News Letter. . 45 

Bulletin. 45 

New Faces. 45 

Your Family and 

Middlebury. 45 

Campus. 45 

Kaleidoscope. 45 

Middlebury Handbook. 45 

Psychiatric Adviser ... 43 

Psychology . 96 

Qualifying Level .... 21 

Radio-WRMC. 44 

Readmission. 39 

Regulations. 

Attendance. 40 

Auditing. 40 

Course Changes. ... 38 

Grades. 38 

Extracurricular 

Activities. 40 

Failure. 39 

Motor Vehicles .... 41 

Probation. 39 

Readmission. 39 


Page 

Transfer of Credit. . . 38 

Warning. 39 

Religion . 67 

Religion Conference ... 44 

Residence Halls. 41 

Requirements 

Academic. 22 

Admission. 12 

Attendance. 40 

Graduate Work.... 46 

Graduation. 23 

Groups A, B, C, D, . . 22 

Honors. 20 

Physical Education . . 22 

Residence. 41 

Science. 22 

Residence Halls.... 41 

R.O.T.C. 28, 124 

Russian . 79 

Scholarships. 127 

Senior Program. 19 

Sociology-Anthropology . . . 99 

Spanish . 82 

Special Instructional 

Programs. 26 

Study Abroad. 48 

Summer Schools. 47 

Teacher Education . 28,102 

Theatre-Wright Memorial 34 

Transcripts. 15 

Transitional Regulations: 

4-1-4. 23 

Transfer Students .... 13 

Transfer of Credit. ... 38 

Tuition. 14 

Valedictorian and 

Salutatorian. 25 

Warning, Academic ... 39 

Winter Term. 18 


























































Calendar for 1968-69 


1968 

SEPTEMBER 

11—Wednesday, Freshman Week begins 

15— Sunday, Freshman Convocation 

(10:45 a.m.) Mead Chapel 

16— Monday, Fall Term classes begin 

(8:00 a.m.) 

OCTOBER 

5— Saturday, Alumni Homecoming Day 

(College in Session) 

26— Saturday, Parents’ Weekend (College 

in Session) 

NOVEMBER 

27— Wednesday, Thanksgiving Recess 

begins (12 noon) 

DECEMBER 

2—Monday, classes resume (8 a.m.) 

14—Saturday, Fall Term classes end (12 
noon) 

16—Monday, Final Examinations begin 
20—Friday, Final Examinations end 

1969 

JANUARY 

6— Monday, Winter Term begins (8 

a.m.) 

FEBRUARY 

5— Wednesday, Winter Term ends (5 

p.m.) 

6— Thursday, Winter Recess begins 

10—Monday, Spring Term classes begin 
(8 a.m.) 

20—Thursday, Winter Carnival Recess 
begins (5 p.m.) 

24—Monday, classes resume (8 a.m.) 

MARCH 

29—Saturday, Spring Recess begins (12 
noon) 

APRIL 

6—Easter 

8—Tuesday, classes resume (8 a.m.) 

MAY 

16— Friday, Spring Term classes end (12 

noon) 

17— Saturday, Senior Comprehensive 

Examinations begin 

22— Thursday, Senior Comprehensive 

Examinations end 

23— Friday, Final Examinations begin 
28—Wednesday, Final Examinations end 

JUNE 

1— Sunday, Baccalaureate 

2— Monday, Commencement 


1968-69 


SEPTEMBER 

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OCTOBER 

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1969 


MARCH 


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MAY 

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JULY 


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AUGUST 


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24 25 26 27 28 29 30 
31.