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ONE HUNDRED AND 

SECOND YEAR 



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ENCE 


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WARNER SCIENCE HALL 















Catalogue 


OF 

Middlebury Colle 


MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT 


One Hundred and Second Year 


1901-1902. 


Published for the College 



JN this place the intellectual life of fifteen hundred 
graduates has been formed* Upon this College the 
eminent achievements of many of them have reflected 
charm and luster* They were once here* They went 
out to large and earnest service in all the world* Most 
of them are not, and yet they live and will ever live, 
here and in the many fields of their active life-work* 

President Samuel W* Boardman, D, D*, 

Centennial Address. 


HISTORICAL 



HE charter of Middlebury College bears the date of 


JL November i, 1S00. The educational impulse of 
which this charter was an outgrowth was felt in the very 
infancy of the commonwealth. As Vermont was settled 
by emigrants from the older New England States, especially 
Connecticut and Massachusetts, it is natural that her civil, 
religious, and educational institutions should, in many ways, 
have been duplicates of theirs. The settlers brought with 
them a strong belief in the church, the schoolhouse, and the 
college as essential elements of healthy, permanent growth. 
As soon as a village became populous, a grammar school 
or an academy was projected. The political situation, 
however, was for many years extremely unfavorable for 
educational development. The controversies in which the 
inhabitants were so long involved for autonomy and the 
Revolutionary war both bade fair to annihilate Vermont as 
an independent State and turned all thoughts toward pres¬ 
ervation rather than toward culture. It is, then, very cred¬ 
itable that before the close of 1800 twelve grammar schools 
had been established. 

Among the latter was the Addison County Grammar 
School, located at Middlebury. It had been given its 
charter in 1797, and its prospects were exceptionally good. 
The act of incorporation had required $1,000 for building 
purposes, but more than $4,000 had been raised, of which 
the inhabitants of Middlebury were the principal donors. 

The plan for better education assumed larger growth. 
In 1798, while the building was being erected, Dr. Timothy 
Dwight, president of Yale College, visited Middlebury 
and encouraged the project of establishing a college there. 
“ The local situation, the sober and religious character 
of the inhabitants, their manners and various other circum- 







4 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


stances ” rendered the village, in his judgment, a very 
desirable center for such an institution. The people needed 
little urging. Indeed they had been for some time roused 
to a desire for greater educational facilities. Much incon¬ 
venience had already resulted in consequence of the fact 
that young men must leave the State to obtain a college 
education. It is related that the father of Jeremiah Evarts, 
when on his way to New Haven to place his son in Yale, 
visited friends in Middlebury and expressed his regret at 
being forced to send his son so far because there was no 
college in Vermont. 

Everything conspired to make the plan feasible. The 
building provided for the Grammar School was amply large 
for both school and college purposes. The founders of 
the school had u procured books, appointed an instruc¬ 
tor, and collected a number of students.” Jeremiah At¬ 
water, from the younger members of the Yale faculty, 
had been recommended to the principalship of the Gram¬ 
mar School by Dr. Dwight with a view to the presidency 
when a college charter should be secured. 

Only the necessary action of the legislature was now 
lacking. Two causes, however, operated to delay the 
granting of the desired charter: the direct efforts of the 
opponents of such incorporation, and, to a less extent, the 
political agitations of the time, which appear to have been 
of absorbing interest to the successive legislatures. That 
of 1S00, however, was more deeply concerned in the ad¬ 
vancement of the interests of the State through the en¬ 
couragement of education and literature, and the efforts of 
those who had been so repeatedly advocating a Middlebury 
charter were in that year rewarded with success. The 
following summary from the journals of the general assem¬ 
bly of the State of Vermont will show in detail the legisla¬ 
tive action : 



HISTORICAL 


5 


Wednesday, October 31, 1798: A petition of Gamaliel Painter, 
and others, trustees of the Addison County Grammar School, 
stating that the petitioners and others, inhabitants of Middlebury, 
induced by an ardent desire to promote and encourage the edu¬ 
cation of youth by establishing and carrying into immediate 
operation a college or university within the State, have erected 
large and convenient buildings suited to the purposes of a college, 
and praying the legislature to establish a college in Middlebury 
and to grant a charter of incorporation to such trustees as shall 
be appointed, vesting in such trustees such rights and privileges 
as are enjoyed and exercised by such bodies—was referred to a 
committee consisting of one member from each county, to be 
nominated by the clerk of the house. Referred, Monday, Novem¬ 
ber 5, 1798, to the next session of the legislature. 

Saturday, October 12, 1799: Petition received from last session 
of the legislature referred to a committee to join a committee from 
the council, and on Monday, November 4, 1799, referred again to 
the next session of the legislature. 

Saturday. October 11, 1800 (two days after the opening of the 
session at Middlebury): Petition referred from the last session of 
the general assembly referred to a committee to join with one 
appointed on the part of the council. 

Tuesday, October 28, 1800: Committee reported a bill entitled 
“An act incorporating and establishing a college at Middlebury, 
in the county of Addisonthe incorporation being declared ex¬ 
pedient by the house in committee of the whole, Wednesday, 
October 29, 1800. 

Friday, October 3 t, 1800: Bill read a second time, and ordered 
engrossed and sent to the governor and council for revision and 
concurrence or proposal of amendment; yeas 117, nays 51. The 
governor and council concurred, without amendment, in a mes¬ 
sage to the house, Saturday, November 1, 1800. 

The first meeting of the corporation was held November 
4, 1800, when Joel Doolittle, of the Class of 1799, Yale, 
was appointed tutor, and Seth Storrs, secretary. President 
Atwater and Tutor Doolittle thus constituted the entire fac¬ 
ulty. On the following day, November 5, seven students 
were admitted to the college, one of whom graduated in 









6 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


iS02. The next class consisted of three members, the 
next of twelve, the third of sixteen, and in 1808 twenty- 
three men received degrees. 

For ten years all of the work of the College was done in 
a large wooden building, erected on a small plot belonging 
to the Grammar School. In 1S10 Col. Seth Storrs, one of 
the trustees, gave to the corporation thirty acres of land 
44 beautifully situated in an elevated part of the village,” an 
area which now comprises part of the college campus. 
The institution was still totally deficient in funds. Private 
benefactions, however, enabled the young college to weather 
its financial storms. For a> number of years the tutors 
were wholly supported by the open-handed contributions of 
the people of Middlebury, and salaries were from time to 
time increased by amounts subscribed and guaranteed by 
them. The generous loyalty of the citizens toward the 
institution seemed to be appreciated by the students. 
44 There was a readiness to engage and to persevere in lit¬ 
erary labor that compensated to some degree for the defi¬ 
ciencies in the means of instruction. The privileges were 
not numerous and, as an offset to this, they were not 
neglected. Many of the students were in moderate cir¬ 
cumstances and of mature age, and hence there was an 
economy in their expenses and a sobriety in their manners 
that were favorable to the reputation of the College.” 

In 1809 President Atwater accepted the presidency of 
Dickinson College and was succeeded by Rev. Henry 
Davis, a graduate of Yale in the Class of 1 79 ^’ wh° was, 
at the time of his election, Professor of Greek at Union 
College. The number of students slowly increased and 
Painter Hall was built on the land given by Col. Storrs in 
1815, largely by funds provided by citizens of the town. 
Gamaliel Painter, after whom the building was named, 
and who had been one of the most generous of patrons, 





HISTORICAL 


7 


subsequently left all of his property to the college. The 
legislature, on the appeal of the corporation for aid, passed 
a vote highly complimenting the new college on its suc¬ 
cess, but afforded no assistance. A few years later five 
thousand acres of wild land and $14,000 came to the Col¬ 
lege from various parties, and other signs of prosperity are 
recorded. On the death of Dr. Dwight, of Yale, in 1817, 
Dr. Davis was offered the presidency of that institution but 
declined, though he accepted the charge of Hamilton Col¬ 
lege in the same year. 

Rev. Joshua Bates, of the Class of 1800, Harvard, suc¬ 
ceeded Dr. Davis in March, 181S, coming from a pro¬ 
fessorship at Phillips Andover Academy, and for twenty- 
one years toiled with great vigor and determination to ad¬ 
vance the interests of the College. During his administra¬ 
tion an entrance class numbering sixty-five shows how suc¬ 
cessful were his efforts to win students. For six years the 
College conferred the degree of M. D. upon the graduates 
from the Medical School at Castleton, and for four years 
upon those graduating from Woodstock. Funds, although 
in small amounts, began to be bestowed, the Chapel was 
built, and books and apparatus were provided. 

Rev. Benjamin Labaree, of Dartmouth and Andover 
Theological Seminary, came to the presidency in 1840. 
The tide of prosperity seemed to have turned. Two of 
the faculty died, others were resigning, and students were 
scattered to other institutions, partly because of an epidemic 
which fell upon them. In 1847 the Faculty consisted of 
the President and one professor, and an incubus of debt 
seemed to stand in the way of both material and scholastic 
advancement. With what undaunted courage that Faculty 
of two must have faced the task before them is evidenced 
from the fact that within seven years from this time the 
vacant chairs had been filled, students had returned, and 






8 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


more than $50,000 had been paid in as the beginnings of 
an endowment fund. Starr Hall, named in honor of its 
donors, Charles and Egbert Starr, was built in 1861, and 
when burned on Christmas day, 1864, was at once re¬ 
placed by the same generous benefactors of the College. 
The civil war took away, as it did from all of the New 
England colleges, its quota of volunteers. The instance 
of a graduate of the Class of 1862, who on Commence¬ 
ment morning rode in from a neighboring recruiting camp 
and in uniform delivered his oration, is typical of the spirit 
of those exciting times. 

On the resignation of President Labaree in 1866, Rev. 
Harvey D. Kitchel was called to be the head of the College 
and administered its affairs with great judgment for nine 
years. Extensive improvements were made in class-room 
facilities and the library and the cabinets enlarged. 

After an interim of a year, Dr. Calvin B. Hulbert as¬ 
sumed the charge in 1875. A number of contributions to 
the funds are recorded and important changes in the cur¬ 
riculum took place. 

Through the years 1880 to 1885, Rev. Cyrus Hamlin 
filled the president’s office. He came equipped with much 
experience, having been prominent in extending Christian 
education in foreign lands, notably in founding Robert 
College, Constantinople, from the presidency of which 
he resigned in 1877 to become professor of theology in 
Bangor Theological Seminary. He attacked the college 
problems with vigor and left many improvements as re¬ 
minders of his faithful service. Women were first admitted 
to the College in 1883 during his administration. 

During the present administration, extending from 1885, 
the average attendance of students has increased more than 
one hundred per cent, beyond that of the previous fifteen 
years, a liberal course of elective studies has been provided, 







HISTORICAL 


9 


the standard of scholarship has been raised, the Starr Lib¬ 
rary and the Warner Science Hall have been erected, and 
gifts, including these buildings, of more than $450,000 
have been bestowed. The encouraging liberality of the 
last few years leads to the hope that, at no far distant day, 
the endowment may become ample enough to meet the 
growing expenses of the institution. 

Statistics recently compiled show that of the i, 55 ° g ra d“ 
uates, 538 have been clergymen and, of the latter, 70 have 
chosen the missionary field. Of those who have engaged 
in the work of teaching, 100 have been professors in col¬ 
leges and theological seminaries, and 32 have become presi¬ 
dents of such institutions. There are 366 lawyers, includ¬ 
ing over 50 judges of courts. The physicians number 93. 
Among the members of Congress have been found 15 grad¬ 
uates and 9 have been governors of States or Territories. 
Of these graduates over fifty per cent, of those living came 
together at the Centennial in 1900 to express most generous 
and loyal affection for the College at her turning of the 
years. 











CORPORATION 


EZRA BRAINERD, LL. D., ex-officio, 
P 7'e side fit ,. 

Hon. JOHN W. STEWART, LL. D. 
RUFUS WAIN WRIGHT, Esq., A. M. - 
Hon. JOSEPH BATTELL, A. M. - 
Prof. BRAINERD KELLOGG, LL. D. 
Hon. DAVID K. SIMONDS, A. B. 

Rev. CHANDLER N. THOMAS, A. B. 
Rev. WILLIAM S. SMART, D. D. 
ERASTUS H. PHELPS, Esq., A. M. - 
Hon. JOHN A. MEAD, A. M,, M. D. 


Middlebury. 
Middlebury. 
Middlebury. 
Middlebury. 
Brooklyn , N. Y* 
Manchester. 
Bristol. 

Brandon. 

Fair Haven. 
Rutland. 


HENRY H. VAIL, Esq., LL. D. - New York , N. Y.. 
Hon. E. B. SHERMAN, LL. D. - - Chicago , III . 

GEORGE M. WRIGHT, Esq., A. B. - New York , N. Y. 


Rev. JAMES L. BARTON, D. D. - 
M. ALLEN STARR, M. D., Ph. D., LL. D. 
JAMES M. GIFFORD, Esq. LL, D. - 
Hon. JOHN G. McCULLOUGH, LL. D. 


Boston , Mass. 
New York , N. Y. 
New York , N. Y. 
Bennington. 


JULIAN W. ABERNETHY, Ph. D. - Brooklyn , N. Y. 

JOHN A. FLETCHER, A. B. - - - Middlebury. 

JOHN A. FLETCHER, Secretary and Treasurer. 


PRUDENTIAL COMMITTEE 

President EZRA BRAINERD, ex-officio , 

Hon. JOHN W. STEWART, RUFUS WAIN WRIGHT, Esq. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

GEORGE M. WRIGHT, Esq., Chairman , 

Hon. JOHN W. STEWART, RUFUS WAIN WRIGHT, Esq.„ 
Hon. JOHN A. MEAD, JAMES M. GIFFORD, Esq. 









FACULTY AND OFFICERS 


EZRA BRAINERD, LL. D., President, 

Professor of Mental and Moral Science. 

HENRY MARTYN SEELY, A. M., M. D., 

Professor Emeritus of Natural History. 

WILLIAM WELLS EATON, A. M., 

Professor of the Greek Language and Literature. 

WALTER EUGENE HOWARD, LL. D., 

Jermain Professor of Political Science and Professor 
of History. 

CHARLES BAKER WRIGHT, A. M., 

Professor of Rhetoric and English Literature. 

MYRON REED SANFORD, A. M., 

Professor of the Latin Language and Literature, 

WILLIAM WESLEY McGILTON, A. M., 

Professor of Chemistry. 

THEODORE HENCKELS, S. B., 

Morton Professor of Modern Languages. 









12 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


ERNEST CALVIN BRYANT, S. B., 

Professor of Physics and Mathematics. 

EDWARD ANGUS BURT, Ph. D., 

Burr Professor of Natural History. 

CHARLES W. PAUL, 

Instructor in Elocution. 


CHARLES B. WRIGHT, A. M., 

Librarian. 

CHARLES EDWARD PRENTISS, A. M., M. D., 
Assistant Librarian. 

ERNEST C. BRYANT, S. B., 

Secretary of the Faculty. 








TERMS OF ADMISSION 



'OR the two courses offered by the College, the one 


A leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, the other 
to that of Bachelor of Science, the following requirements 
will be necessary for admission to the Freshman Class: 


COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF 
BACHELOR OF ARTS 


GREEK 


Xenophon’s Anabasis , Books I—III, and 35 additional 
pages of Attic prose. 

Homer’s Iliad , Books I and II, 1-493, and 450 additional 
lines of Homer. 

Greek Composition (Woodruff’s, Collar and Daniell’s, 
or Harper and Castle’s Greek Prose Composition will 
indicate the amount required). 


The requirement in Greek recommended by the Com¬ 
mission of Colleges in New England on Entrance Exam¬ 
inations is as follows, and may be substituted for the above 
by those who take the examination at the College. The 
Elementary and the Advanced portions may be taken 
together, or, if it is found desirable, in different years: 
















14 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


I. Elementary. 

The Elementary Examination will be adapted to the proficiency 
of those who have studied Greek in a systematic course of five 
exercises a week, extending through at least two school years. 
It will consist of two parts (which, however, cannot be taken 
separately): 

( a) The translation at sight of passages of simple Attic prose. 

(b) A thorough examination on Xenophon’s Anabasis , Book 
II, directed to testing the candidate’s mastery of the ordinary 
forms, constructions, and idioms of the language; the test to con¬ 
sist, in part, of writing simple Attic prose, involving the use of 
such words, constructions, and idioms only, as occur in the por¬ 
tion of Xenophon prescribed. 

II. Advanced. 

The Advanced Examinations will be adapted to the proficiency 
of those who have studied Greek in a systematic course of five 
exercises a week, extending through at least three school years. 
The examinations may be taken separately: 

1. The translation at sight of passages of Attic prose and of 
Homer; with questions on ordinary forms, constructions, and 
idioms, and on prosody. 

2. An examination consisting of translation and questions on 
the subject-matter of Homer’s Iliad , Books I and II, 1-493. 

3. The translation into Attic prose of a passage of connected 
English narrative. The passage set for translation will be based 
on some portion of the Greek prose works usually read in prepa¬ 
ration for college, and will be limited to the subject-matter of those 
works. 

LATIN 

Caesar’s Gallic War , Books I—III, and 50 additional 
pages of Caesar, Nepos, Eutropius, or other easy Latin. 

Cicero’s Orations against Catiline and the Manilian 
Law , and 12 additional pages of Cicero. 

Vergil’s PEneid , Books I-V, and 900 additional lines of 
Vergil or Ovid. 

Latin Composition (Collar’s Practical Latin Composi¬ 
tion , Part I or III, or Jones’s Latin Composition , Chap- 





TERMS OF ADMISSION 


15 


ters I-XXXIV, or Mather and Wheeler’s will indicate the 
amount required). 


The requirement in Latin recommended by the Com¬ 
mission of Colleges in New England on Entrance Exam¬ 
inations is as follows, and may be substituted for the above 
by those who take the examination at the College. The 
Elementary and the Advanced portions may be taken 
together, or, if it is found desirable, in different years : 

I. Elementary. 

The Elementary Examination will be adapted to the proficiency 
of those who have studied Latin in a systematic course of five, 
lessons a week, extending through at least three school years. 
It will consist of two parts (which, however, cannot be taken sep¬ 
arately): 

(a) The translation at sight of simple Latin prose and verse. 

(b) A thorough examination on Cicero’s Orations against 
Catiline , II, III, and IV, directed to testing the candidate’s mas¬ 
tery of the ordinary forms, constructions, and idioms of the lan¬ 
guage; the test to consist, in part, of writing simple Latin prose, 
involving the use of such words, constructions, and idioms only, 
as occur in the speeches prescribed. 

II. Advanced. 

The Advanced Examinations will be adapted to the proficiency 
of those who have studied Latin in a systematic course of five 
lessons a week, extending through at least four school years. 
The examinations may be taken separately: 

1. The translation at sight of passages of Latin prose and 
verse, with questions on ordinary forms, constructions, and idioms, 
and on prosody. 

2. An examination consisting of translation and questions on 
the subject-matter of Vergil’s ^ Eneid , Books I—V. 

3. The translation into Latin prose of a passage of connected 
English narrative. The passage set for translation will be based 
on some portion of the Latin prose works usually read in prepara¬ 
tion for college, and will be limited to the subject-matter of those 
works. 










16 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Other authors will be accepted for the above if plainly 
equivalent. 

Pupils should be carefully drilled in the Roman pro¬ 
nunciation of Latin, and attention should continually be 
called to the quantitative differences in vowel sounds. In 
no other way can there come the best appreciation of Vergil 
and, later, of the poets that follow in the college course. 
It is urged that there be an effort from the beginning of the 
study of the subject to comprehend Latin authors through 
the Latin order of thinking and without the medium of the 
English tongue. As a means to this end it is suggested 
that, together with the reading aloud of the text to be 
translated, easy questions and answers, based on the sim¬ 
pler constructions of the lesson of the day, have often proved 
an excellent method, not only of gaining familiarity with 
the proper pronunciation, but also of acquiring the simpler 
idioms and thought order of the language. 

It is further urged that much attention be paid to the 
quality of the English in both the oral and the written 
translation of the student. 

ENGLISH 

The requirements recommended by the Commission of 
Colleges in New England on Admission Examinations. 

Note —No candidate will be accepted in English whose work is notably 
deficient in point of spelling, punctuation, idiom, or division into para¬ 
graphs. 

i. Reading and Practice .—A limited number of books will 
be set for reading. The candidate will be required to present 
evidence of a general knowledge of the subject-matter, and to 
answer simple questions on the lives of the authors. The form of 
examination will usually be the writing of a paragraph or two on 
each of several topics, to be chosen by the candidate from a con¬ 
siderable number—perhaps ten or fifteen—set before him in the 
examination paper. The treatment of these topics is designed to 
test the candidate’s power of clear and accurate expression, and 





TERMS OF ADMISSION 


17 


will call for only a general knowledge of the substance of the 
books. In place of a part or the whole of this test, the candidate 
may present an exercise book, properly certified by his instructor, 
containing compositions or other written work done in connection 
with the reading of the books. 

The books set for this part of the examination will be: 

1902. —George Eliot’s Silas Marner; Pope’s Iliad , Books I, VI, 
XXII, and XXIV; The Sir Roger de Coverley Papers in The 
Spectator; Goldsmith’s The Vicar of Wakefield; Scott’s Ivan- 
hoe; Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice; Cooper’s The Last 
of the Rlohicans; Tennyson’s The Princess; Coleridge’s The 
Ancient Mariner; Lowell’s The Vision of Sir Laimf at. 

1903, 1904, and 1905.—George Eliot’s Silas Marner; The Sir 
Roger de Coverley Papers in The Spectator; Goldsmith’s The 
Vicar of Wakefield; Scott’s Ivanhoe; Tennyson’s The Princess; 
Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Ve 7 iice and fulius Cccsar; Cole¬ 
ridge’s The Ancient Mariner; Carlyle’s Essay on Bums; Lowell’s 
The Vision of Sir Lq,unfal. 

2. Study and Practice. —This part of the examination pre¬ 
supposes a more careful study of each of the works named below. 
The examination will be upon subject-matter, form, and structure, 
and will also test the candidate’s ability to express his knowledge 
with clearness and accuracy. The books set for this part of the 
examination will be: 

. 1902, 1903, 1904, and 1905.—Shakespeare’s Macbeth; Milton’s 
EAllegro, II Penseroso, Counts , and Lycidas; Burke’s Speech 
on Conciliation with America; Macaulay’s Essays on Addison a?id 
Milton. 


HISTORY 

Greek History.— History of Greece to the death of 
Alexander, from any suitable text-book. 

Roman History.— History of Rome through the reigns 
of the Antonines, from any suitable text-book. 

American History.— Johnston’s or McMaster’s His¬ 
tory will indicate the amount required. 










18 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


MATH EMATICS 

Algebra through quadratic equations, ratio and propor¬ 
tion, arithmetical and geometrical progressions, and the 
binomial theorem for positive integral exponents. 

Plane Geometry complete. This comprises the amount 
given in the first five books of Wentworth’s, Wells’s, Phil¬ 
lips and Fisher’s, and similar Geometries. 

A thorough knowledge of the fundamental principles of 
arithmetic, with facility in the use of integral and fractional 
quantities, is indispensable for any progress in mathematics. 
Frequent use of the metric system, giving familiarity with 
the units and their derivatives, is also necessary to prepare 
the student for the work to be taken up. 

It is assumed that no student has reached the point where 
he is ready to enter college without having received this 
necessary training in arithmetic. 

It is very unfortunate for a student if too long a period 
is allowed to intervene between the time of ceasing the 
study of algebra in school and that of resuming it in col¬ 
lege. So many of the important principles are forgotten 
if this period is prolonged, that the student is placed at a 
serious disadvantage. The study should be reviewed during 
the year preceding entrance to college. 

It is especially desirable that the work in geometry shall 
be so conducted as to train the powers of close, logical 
reasoning, and that this study never be allowed to deterio¬ 
rate into a mere memory exercise. The frequent use of 
original propositions is advised as an excellent method for 
accomplishing the purpose in view. 


1 







TERMS OF ADMISSION 


19 


COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE 


LATIN 

The same requirement as in the course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

FRENCH OR GERMAN 

Candidates will be examined in either French or Ger¬ 
man, as follows: 

French i.— Ability to translate simple prose at sight. 
For this purpose at least one hundred and fifty pages of 
text should be read. Such books as Ludovic Halevy’s 
IJ Abbe Constantin , George Sand’s La Mare an Diable , 
van Daell’s Introduction to French Authors , are suggested. 

French 2.— Proficiency in the elements of grammar. 
Whitney’s French Grammar , Part I, will indicate the 
amount required. 

German i.—A bility to translate simple prose at sight. 
For this purpose at least one hundred pages of text should 
be read. Such books as Volkmann’s Kleine Geschichten , 
Schiller’s Der Neffe als Onkel , Bernhardt’s Noveletten 
Bibliothek , Vols. I and II, are suggested. 

German 2.— Proficiency in the elements of grammar. 
Whitney’s Brief German Grammar will indicate the 
amount required. 


Beginning with the year 1904-1905 candidates will be 
examined in either French or German as follows: 

FRENCH 

The examination will consist of two parts (which, how¬ 
ever, cannot be taken separately): 











20 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


I. To test the candidates familiarity with grammar he will be- 
examined as to his proficiency in translating simple English sen¬ 
tences into French. Familiarity with grammar is here under¬ 
stood to include the inflection of nouns and adjectives; the con¬ 
jugation of regular and of all irregular verbs; the uses of the 
article; the partitive constructions; the forms, positions and uses, 
of the personal and other pronouns, and of possessive, demonstra¬ 
tive, and interrogative adjectives; the commoner uses of the sub¬ 
junctive. 

II. The candidate will be examined as to his ability to trans¬ 
late ordinary French prose at sight. The passages set for trans¬ 
lation will be suited to those who have read, from the works of at 
least three different authors, an aggregate of not less than four 
hundred duodecimo pages, not including sight translation done 
in the class. Not more than half the amount should be from 
works of fiction. The reading of French history should be com¬ 
mended and the reading of classic drama absolutely discouraged 
in preparatory schools. 

Suitable texts: Grammar.—Aldrich and Foster’s Foundations 
of French (Ginn & Co.); De Bordes’s Elements of Fre?ich (Scott* 
Foresman & Co.) 

Composition.—Francois’s Introductory French Prose Composi- 
tion (American Book Co.); Marcou’s Composition Exercises (D. 
C. Heath & Co.) 

History.—Sicard’s Easy French History (Scott, Foresman & 
Co,); Super’s Histoire de France (Holt & Co.) 

Literature.—Williamson’s Easy French Stories (Scott, Fores¬ 
man & Co.); Dumas’s Monte Cristo; About’s Le roi des mon- 
tagnes; Sand’s La mare au diable; Musset’s Le merle blanc / 
Martin’s La poudre auxyeux and Le voyage de M. Perrichon. 


GERMAN 

The examination will consist of two parts (which, how¬ 
ever, cannot be taken separately) : 

I. The translation into German of simple English sentences,, 
to test the candidates’ familiarity with grammar. 

Grammar is understood to include the declension of articles, 
adjectives, pronouns, and such nouns as are readily classified; 






TERMS OF ADMISSION 


21 


prepositions; the conjugation of the regular and of all the irregu¬ 
lar verbs; the uses of modal auxiliaries; prefixes and suffixes; 
•subjunctive; word-order. 

II. The translation at sight of ordinary German prose. The 
passages set for translation will be suited to candidates who have 
read not less than two hundred and fifty duodecimo pages of 
•simple German, chiefly narrative prose; this amount includes 
sight reading done in class. 

Suitable texts: Grammar.—Harris’s German Lesso7is (D. C. 
Heath & Co.); Thomas’s Practical German Gra??i?nar (Holt & 
Co.) 

Composition.—Harris’s German Composition (D. C. Heath & 
Co.); Poll’s Germa7i Prose Co7nposition (Holt & Co.) 

History of Literature. —Keller, Bilder aus der deutsche7i Lit¬ 
ter atur (American Book Co.). 

Literature.—Huss’s Ger77ia7i Reader (D. C. Heath & Co.); 
Heyse’s LArrabbiata; Zschokke’s Der Zerbroche7ie Krug; 
Storm’s I77i77ie7isee; Schiller’s Der Neffe als 07ikel; Lessing’s 
Mrnna von Bar7ihel7ii; Frey tag’s Die Jour7ialisten; Hatfield’s 
Ger 77 ia 7 i Lyrics a7id Ballads (D. C. Heath & Co.). 

To meet either of the above requirements two years’ work in a 
preparatory school will generally be necessary. 

Increased pleasure and profit in the study of living lan¬ 
guages come to those who acquire a good pronunciation. 
Rigorous attention should therefore be given from the start 
to this feature of the study and insisted upon to the end. 
The memorizing of short poems and the frequent repeti¬ 
tion of easy colloquial sentences are the surest means to 
this very desirable attainment. 

ENGLISH 

The same requirement as in the course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

AMERICAN LITERATURE 

Any text equivalent to that of Bates, Bronson or New¬ 
comer will be regarded as satisfactory. 









22 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


HISTORY 

English History.— Such a knowledge as may be se¬ 
cured by a thorough study of a work like Montgomery’s. 

American History. —Johnston’s or McMaster’s will 
indicate the amount required. 

MATHEMATICS 

The same requirement as in the course leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

ADMISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

Students from such schools as have thorough courses 
fully meeting the above requirements will be admitted 
without the entrance examination, on the certificate of 
their respective principals that they have satisfactorily 
completed the requirements for admission. 

Blank certificates, printed by the College, will be sent 
to the proper officers of the schools upon application. 

A student entering by certificate must prove by his class¬ 
room record during the first term that he is able to do the 
full work in any department to which he is admitted; fail¬ 
ing in this he may be dropped from the class. 

Students may be admitted to advanced standing, pro¬ 
vided that, in addition to the requisites for admission to the 
Freshman class, they are found, on examination, thoroughly 
acquainted with all the studies that have been pursued by 
the class they propose to join. 

Candidates for such standing should, however, be in¬ 
formed that in consequence of the thorough discipline and 
the exactness of knowledge that is required of the student, 
no one can hope, if admitted, to maintain a respectable 
standing, unless he comes with a high degree of prepara¬ 
tion. Indeed, it is very important for the unity and com¬ 
pleteness of a liberal education that the students enter 






TERMS OF ADMISSION 


23 


college at the commencement of the course. The disad¬ 
vantages incurred by those who postpone an entrance to a 
later period are much more serious than is commonly sup¬ 
posed. 

Every student admitted to an advanced standing (with 
the exception of those who come from other colleges) is re¬ 
quired to pay a fee of $5.00, if he enters after the expira¬ 
tion of the fall term of the Freshman year; and $10.00, if 
after the expiration of the Fall term of the Sophomore year. 

Candidates for admission must bring certificates of good 
moral character; and if from another college, of their reg¬ 
ular dismission and good standing. When a student has 
been examined and admitted to college, he is required to 
attend the prescribed exercises, and is subject to the laws 
of the institution. 

The educational privileges of the college are open to 
young women. 













COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


The courses of instruction leading to the two degrees 
offered by the College, that of Bachelor of Arts and that of 
Bachelor of Science, include studies of two kinds, required 
and elective. Each student is required to have at least 
fifteen hours of recitation a week. All the studies of 
Freshman and Sophomore years are required, but in the 
Junior and Senior years, nine and six hours a week respec¬ 
tively are required, and the studies for the remaining hours 
are chosen by the student from the elective courses offered, 
subject to the following regulations of the Faculty: 

A student may elect any study offered to a class below 
his own, and not already taken by him, if such choice is 
approved by the President and the instructor in that de¬ 
partment. No student will be allowed to take any study 
in advance of his class. 

A student may elect one extra study, which must be 
pursued under the same conditions as those of the regular 
courses, and may be counted for honors, but will not be 
considered in determining his rank. No extra study, how¬ 
ever, may be taken until a written request has been granted 
by the Faculty. 

Each student is required to give notice in writing to the 
Secretary of the Faculty of his choice of elective studies for 
any term not later than the last Friday of the preceding 
term. 







COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


25 


COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR 
OF ARTS 


FRESHMAN YEAR 

FALL TERM— THIRTEEN WEEKS 

Greek* —Selections from Xenophon’s Memorabilia. Greek com¬ 
position exercises based on the Xenophon. The work of this 
term is designed as a review of grammatical forms and of syntax. 
Four hours a week. Professor Eaton. 

L a tf n# —Daily drill in vocabulary and inflection. Readiness in 
handling verb forms is sought by means of many test exercises in 
tense and modal idioms. During the term about twenty-five 
hours are given to a thorough review of the elementary principles 
of Latin writing, concluding with the study of the development 
.and use of cases. Written prose exercises, based upon Livy, are 
required weekly. Selections from Livy, Books XXI and XXII, 
supplemented by sight passages from various authors, are assigned 
for translation. Four hours a week. Professor Sanford. 

Rhetoric.— A familiarity with the general principles of rhetoric 
being assumed, the work is divided between practical composi¬ 
tion and a study of the art on the basis of its philosophy. The 
criticism of work submitted is conducted as far as possible with 
each student individually, and the exercises are progressive 
throughout the year. Three hours a week. 

Professor Wright. 

Solid and Spherical Geometry.—Books VI, VII, VIII, and IX of 
Phillips and Fisher’s Elements of Geoinetry. Four hours a week. 

Professor Bryant. 

WINTER term— Eleven weeks 

G tee k—Select Oratio?is of Lysias. A brief study of legal pro¬ 
cedure and of the characteristics of Lysias as an orator is made. 
The formation of the verb and the acquiring of a vocabulary re¬ 
ceive special attention. Four hours a week. Professor Eaton. 








26 


MIDDLE BURY COLLEGE 


Latin.— Weekly exercises in prose deal largely with the subject 
of the development, history, and use of mood. De Officiis , De 
Amicitici , and De Senectute of Cicero, with sight reading from 
Quintus Curtius, Nepos, and others. The objects sought are 
fluency of rendering and correctness in the use of English-Latin 
and Latin-English synonyms. During this and the following 
terms several written tests in sight translation are given in which 
the papers presented are commented upon by the professors in 
both the English and the Latin departments. Four hours a week. 

Professor Sanford. 

Rhetoric.—A continuation of the work of the Fall term. Three 
hours a week. Professor Wright. 

Algebra.—Convergency and divergency of series; undetermined 
coefficients; binomial theorem; logarithms; permutations and 
combinations; probability. Wells’s College Algebra. Four hours, 
a week. Professor Bryant. 


spring term— Twelve weeks 

Greek.—Homer, Odyssey , Books XIII, XIV, XV, and XVI. The 
place of the Homeric writings in literature and their language 
and style are studied. Lectures upon the monuments of Athens, 
illustrated with lantern slides. Four hours a week. 

Professor Eaton. 

Latin.—Weekly exercises in prose; topics, indirect discourse 
and the periodic structure. Selections from the Philosophical 
Treatises and Letters of Cicero. An outline of history as far as 
through the twelve 'Caesars is studied to determine the place of 
Rome as related to contemporaneous nations. Special topics 
from the historians are assigned for library reading. Four hours 
a week. Professor Sanford. 

Rhetoric.—A continuation of the work of the Fall and Winter 
terms. Three hours a week. Professor Wright. 

Plane and Spherical Trigonometry.—Solution of right and oblique 
plane triangles; trigonometric analysis; solution of right and 
oblique spherical triangles. Phillips and Strong’s Elements of 
Trigonometry. Four hours a week. Professor Bryant. 









COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


27 


SOPHOMORE YEAR 

FALL TERM— THIRTEEN WEEKS 

Greek*—Sophocles, Electra. Lectures and collateral reading on 
the drama and the Attic theatre. Three hours a week. 

Professor Eaton. 

Latin. — Germania and Agricola of Tacitus. Comparison of the 
style of Tacitus with that of other writers of his time. A study 
of the Roman colonial system. Outline of the history of the later 
Empire, with brief investigation of the subject of the influence 
of Rome upon the northern tribes and, incidentally, our own 
heredity of law and custom from them. Library reading and the 
study of photographs of Roman remains in Germany and England. 
Three hours a week. Professor Sanford. 

German*—Thorough pronunciation is emphasized from the be¬ 
ginning and rigorously insisted upon throughout all the courses 
of study offered in this department. For the elementary stage 
of grammar study Harris's German Lessons is used. After 
about six weeks, a part of each recitation hour is devoted to a 
study of Grimm’s law as illustrated in the introduction to Huss’s 
German Reader; the reading of the text proper of this reader is 
then taken up and Hatfield’s Germa?i Lyrics and Ballads begun 
toward the end of the term. Easy poems and connected prose 
extracts, illustrative of the principles of language structure, are 
committed to memory and recited in class. Conversation in easy 
German is one of the main features of the daily recitations. 
Three hours a week. Professor Henckels. 

Rhetoricals*—One oration or essay presented before the college. 

Professor Wright. 

Physics*—Fundamental units of measurement; velocity; acce¬ 
leration ; composition and resolution of velocities; force; momen¬ 
tum ; work; energy; power; machines; properties of matter; mo¬ 
lecular forces; capillarity. Recitations, solution of problems illus¬ 
trating principles discussed, and experimental lectures. Three 
hours a week. Professor Bryant. 

Zoology*—Lectures with supplementary reading in Hertwig’s 
Principles of Zoology . Two hours and one period of laboratory 
work a week on invertebrates. Professor Burt. 








28 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


WINTER TERM-ELEVEN WEEKS 

Greek .—Thucydides, Book VII. The place of Thucydides in 
the development of prose and his characteristics as an historian 
are studied. Three hours a week. Professor Eaton. 

Latin —Selected Odes and Epodes of Horace. Questions of 
etymology, syntax, and mythology are made subordinate to the 
literary study of the verse. By comparison of the Odes with many 
lyrics in Latin and other languages the class attempt to estimate 
the place of Horace among the poets. Though incidental to the 
subject, “The debt of English Poetry to Horace” is' a topic of 
frequent discussion. Lectures on the private life of the Romans 
and on mythology, illustrated with photographs and lantern slides. 
Very careful preparation of note books is required. Three hours 
a week. Professor Sanford. 

German.—Harris’s German Lessons (completed). Huss’s Ger¬ 
man Reader (completed). Hatfield’s Ger?nan Lyrics and Ballads 
(continued). Poems and prose extracts committed to memory. 
Easy conversation. Three hours a week. 

Professor Henckels. 

Rhetorxcals.—One oration or essay presented before the college. 

Professor Wright. 

Civil Government.—American Constitutional History and Law. 
History of the development of American political institutions, 
study of colonial charters, examination of leagues and confeder¬ 
ations, history of the formation and adoption of the Federal Con¬ 
stitution, including a careful study of the text. Recitations, sup¬ 
plemented by lectures and library work. Three houi;s a week. 

Professor Howard. 

Physics.—Dynamics of fluids; density; sound, including speed, 
energy, reflection, refraction, and interference of sound waves; 
heat, including temperature, calorimetry, fusion, vaporization, 
thermodynamics. The work consists of lectures, recitations, the 
solution of numerous problems, and the preparation of a note 
book containing a full account of the lecture experiments and 
the principles illustrated by them. Three hours a week. 

Professor Bryant. 










COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


29 


SPRING TERM— TWELVE WEEKS 

Greek. — Selections from the Apology and Phcedo of Plato. A 
brief study of the life and character of Socrates is made. Old 
Greek life. Lectures are given, illustrated with lantern slides. 
Three hours a week. Professor Eaton. 

EdXu\—The Captives of Plautus with readings from the Trinum- 
mus and other plays. Lectures and library reading on the sub¬ 
ject of the Roman theatre. Dictation exercises, etymology, and 
the study of early Latin forms (Allen, Wilmann, Wordsworth, 
and the Inscriptions). Three hours a week. 

Professor Sanford. 

German.— Harris’s German Composition is used for advanced 
study of grammar; standard grammars are studied by reference. 
Hatfield’s German Lyrics and Ballads (completed). Poems com¬ 
mitted to memory. Survey of German Literature (earlier 
periods), text, Keller, Bilder aus der deutschen Litteratur. 
From the beginning of this term, German will be, as far as possi¬ 
ble, the medium of communication in the class room. Three 
hours a week. Professor Henckels. 

Rhetoricals. —One oration or essay presented before the college, 
and an additional oration from those who do not receive appoint¬ 
ments for the prize speaking. Professor Wright. 

Physics.— Light: reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, 
and polarization of light waves, and spectrum analysis. Electricity : 
electrostatic induction and potential, electrostatic machines, elec¬ 
trical units and measurements, magnetic induction and potential, 
electro-magnetic induction, dynamo-electric machines. As in the 
winter term, the work consists of lectures, recitations, solution of 
problems, and the preparation of a note book on lecture experi¬ 
ments. Three hours a week. Professor Bryant. 

Botany. — Laboratory work and recitations on seed, shoot, root, 
flower, and fruit. Lectures contrasting seed with spore and on 
the more elementary features of germination, nutrition, fertiliza¬ 
tion, and dissemination. Preparation of herbarium specimens. 
Two hours and one period of laboratory work a week. 

Professor Burt. 










30 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


JUNIOR YEAR 

FALL term— Thirteen Weeks 

Required Studies: 

English Literature*—A study of literary types in prose and verse; 
lectures; assigned readings. Three hours a week. 

Professor Wright. 

Logic*—Jevons’s. Three hours a week. Professor Wright. 

Rhetoricals*—Two orations or essays presented before the 
college. Professor Wright. 

Chemistry*— Roscoe; lectures. A study is made of the non- 
metallic elements and their principal compounds, and of their 
relation to the metals. Acids, bases, and salts-are studied care¬ 
fully and their formation illustrated. Numerous chemical prob¬ 
lems involving atomic and molecular weights, percentage compo¬ 
sition, etc., are solved by the student. Three hours a week. 

Professor McGilton. 


Elective Studies: 

Greek*—Selections from the Attic Orators, Antiphon, Andocides, 
Lysias, Isocrates, and Isaeus. Lectures on the origin and de¬ 
velopment of Attic oratory and the characteristics of the earlier 
orators. Three hours a week. Professor Eaton. 

Latin*—A study in Latin Lyrics. Selections from Catullus, 
Ovid, Vergil, Propertius, Tibullus, and miscellaneous lyrists are 
read and a comparison of style continually made. Three hours a 
week. Professor Sanford. 

Roman Archaeology*—Lectures on the topography of Italy and 
the buildings and statuary of Ancient Rome. Readings on 
various topics from Middleton, Lanciani, Jordan, Parker, Burn, 
Schreiber, and the journals are required, with careful prepara¬ 
tion of note books. Photographs and stereopticon views. (The 
course is intended as a background for the study of advanced 
Latin, and should be elected by all those intending to pursue the 
subject further.) Three hours a week. [To be given in 1902- 
i9°3-] ^Professor Sanford. 




COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


31 


German*—Harris’s German Composition and advanced gram¬ 
mar (by reference). Outline of German Literature, Keller, Bil- 
der aus der deutschen Litteratur , to the time of Schiller and Goe¬ 
the. Critical study of Schiller’s Wilhelm Tell. Three hours a 
week. Professor Henckels. 

Political Institutions*— The State. Elements of historical and 
practical politics. This course treats of the philosophy and his¬ 
toric development of government. It includes an examination 
of the governments of Greece and Rome and of the Teutonic sys¬ 
tem, and is designed to lay a foundation for the subsequent study 
of law and political science. Recitations and lectures. Three 
hours a week. Professor Howard. 

History*—Epochs of history. Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

Plane Analytic Geometry*— Loci and their equations; discussion 
of equations of straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse, and hyper¬ 
bola. Wentworth’s Analytic Geometry. Three hours a week. 

Professor Bry,ant. 

Botany*—Histology and Physiology of Plants. Strasburger’s 
Text-book of Botany, Section i. Recitations and laboratory work 
on external morphology of plants, the cell, cell-fusion, tissues, 
tissue systems, the phylogeny and ontogeny of internal structure. 
Three periods a week. 

[To be given in 1902-1903; this year’s cour.se the same as the 
Senior elective.] Professor Burt. 

WINTER TERM —Eleven Weeks 

Required Studies: 

English Literature*— History of English Literature (continued;. 
Three hours a week. Professor Wright. 

Rhetoricals.—Two orations or essays presented before the col¬ 
lege by those who do not take part in the Junior Exhibition. 

Professor Wright. 

History*—Mediaeval Europe; lectures. Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 








32 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Chemistry*—Roscoe; Jones’s fimior Course ; lectures. By means, 
of the study of the preceding term, the student is able, at his own 
desk and with his own apparatus, to manufacture the most import- 
ant chemical compounds and to isolate the principal elements* 
Full notes are kept by him of each step taken and of each observa¬ 
tion made, and frequent reports are presented to the instructor* 
Three hours a week, or three periods a week of laboratory work.. 

Professor McGilton. 


Elective Studies: 

Greek.—Demosthenes, Philippics. Attention is given to Demos¬ 
thenes as an orator and a statesman. Three hours a week. 

Professor Eaton. 

Latin Composition*—Advanced work in grammar and prose 
composition. Discussion of methods of teaching Latin and ex¬ 
amination of text-books used in preparatory work. (A course 
designed particularly for those intending to teach.) Three hours 
a week. Professor Sanford. 

Latin*—Selections from the Letters of Pliny. The course is in¬ 
tended to give practice in rapid reading. Comparison of the 
Letters with the correspondence of Cicero and others. Lectures 
on the book making and letter writing of the Romans. Three 
hours a week. [To be given in 1902-1903.] 

Professor Sanford. 

German*—Advanced grammar and composition. Keller, Bil- 
der aus der deutschen Litteratur (finished), completing the out¬ 
line of German Literature down to the present times. Wilbrandt, 
Der Meister von Palmyra. Three hours a week. 

Professor Henckels. 

French*—Grammar: Aldrich and Foster’s Foundatio?is of French. 
Careful drill in pronunciation is not lost sight of; an abundance 
of supplementary easy exercises, designed not only to fix in mem¬ 
ory the forms and principles of grammar, but also to cultivate 
readiness in reproducing natural and colloquial forms of conver¬ 
sational French is one of the main features of the daily recita¬ 
tion. Selections for sight tra?islatio?i (Bruce.) Ohnet, Le chant 
du cygne. Three hours a week. Professor Henckels. 









COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


33 


Political Institutions*—The State (continued). A brief treatment 
of the political history of England, Germany, France, and other 
European countries and a careful examination of their present 
constitutions. Recitations, lectures, and library work. Three 
hours a week. Professor Howard. 

History*—Epochs of history. Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

Differential Calculus*—Differentiation of functions; expansion of 
functions; indeterminate forms; application of calculus to curves; 
maxima and minima of functions. Osborne’s Differential and 
Integral Calculus. Three hours a week. 

Professor Bryant. 

Physics*—S. P. Thompson’s Elementary Lessons in Electricity 
and Magnetism. Frictional electricity; electric machines; con¬ 
densers; magnetism; current electricity; galvanometers; induc¬ 
tion of currents. The recitation work is supplemented by lec¬ 
tures and illustrative experiments. Three hours a week. 

Professor Bryant. 

Physics*—A laboratory course involving measurements of 
length, mass, time, velocity and acceleration; the verification of 
the laws of equilibrium of forces; the determination of coefficients 
of elasticity; the density of solids, liquids, and gases; experiments 
in sound. Ames and Bliss’s Manual of Experiments in Physics. 
Three periods a week. [To be given in 1902-1903]. 

Professor Bryant. 

Botany*—Histology and Physiology of Plants (continued). 
Strasburger’s Text-book of Botany , Section 2. Conclusion of 
laboratory work on tissues, and recitations, and laboratory work on 
the stability of the plant body, nutrition, respiration, growth, 
phenomena of movement and reproduction. Three periods a 
week. [To be given in 1902-1903; this year’s course the same as 
the Senior elective.] Professor Burt. 

SPRING TERM— TWELVE WEEKS 

Required Studies: 

Rhetoric.—The work in this course is confined to a considera¬ 
tion of the principles of argumentative composition, Whately 
being used as a text-book. Three hours a week. 

Professor Wright. 










34 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Rhetoricals.—Two orations or essays presented before the col¬ 
lege Professor Wright. 

Hi sto ry*— Mediaeval Europe (continued); lectures. Students 
are required to prepare papers upon assigned subjects. Three 
hours a week. Professor Howard. 

Chemistry*—Roscoe (continued); lectures. The work of this 
term is mainly laboratory work, the special subject being the study 
of the metals, their properties and principal compounds. The 
student is led to recognize individual metals in their compounds 
by characteristic reactions, and also constructs groupings of the 
metals with reference to their conduct toward various group re¬ 
agents. All this work is preparatory to Qualitative Analysis. 
Three periods a week. Professor McGilton. 

Elective Studies: 

Q ree ^_Rapid reading of selections from Herodotus. 

Professor Eaton. 

L a ti n .—A study in the Decline of Latin Literature. Selections 
from Apuleius, Ausonius, Prudentius, Patristic Latin, and the 
hymnology of the early Church. The Latin of the Middle Ages. 
Three hours a week. Professor Sanford. 

L a tin*—A study in Roman Philosophy. Readings from the 
Tusculan Disputations of Cicero, De Rerum Natura of Lucretius, 
with extracts from Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and Boethius. 
Three hours a week. [To be given in 1902-1903.] 

Professor Sanford. 

German*— Advanced grammar and composition. Poll’s Ger¬ 
man Prose Composition , von Jagemann’s German Syntax. Schil¬ 
ler, Die Jungfrau von Orleans and Maria Stuart are read criti¬ 
cally. Kluge, Deutsche National Litteratur is the work used for 
a detailed review of the literary history of Germany. Three 
hours a week. Professor Henckels. 

French*— The study is continued along the same lines as during 
tlie winter term. Foundatio?is of French is completed. Marcou s 
Exercises in French Composition. Daudet, Trois Contes choisis 
(Sanderson); de Musset, Histoire d'un merle blanc; Dumas’s 
Monte Cristo. Three hours a week. Professor Henckels. 









COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


35 


Elements of Jurisprudence*—This course is especially intended for 
students who purpose entering the legal profession, and is de¬ 
signed to give a survey of the science and to make the student 
familiar with its literature and terminology. It consists of a gen¬ 
eral view of the Roman and Common Law and an examination 
of the history of both of these systems and their fundamental 
ideas. Three hours a week. Professor Howard. 

History*—Epochs of history (continued). Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

Integral Calculus*—Integration of algebraic and trigonometric ex¬ 
pressions; application of integration to plane curves, to curved 
surfaces, and to volumes. Osborne’s Differential and Integral 
Calculus. Three hours a week. Professor Bryant. 

Physics*—A continuation of the work of the winter term. 
Theory of potential; electrometers; dielectric capacity; magnetic 
potential; diamagnetism; electromagnets; electrodynamics; elec¬ 
trical measurements; thermo-electricity; electric lighting; dyna¬ 
mos ; electro-chemistry; electric waves. Recitations and experi¬ 
mental lectures. Three hours a week. 

Professor Bryant. 

Physics*—Laboratory work in heat, light, electricity, and mag¬ 
netism. This includes experiments for specific heats, fusion and 
boiling points, heats of fusion and of vaporization, laws of reflec¬ 
tion and of refraction of light, photometry, wave lengths of light, 
electrical induction and resistance, electromotive forces, intensity 
of magnetic field. Ames and Bliss’s Manual of Experiments in 
Physics. Three periods a week. [To be given in 1902-1903.] 

Professor Bryant. 


SENIOR YEAR 

FALL TERM— Thirteen Weeks 

Required Studies : 

Rhetoricals*— Two orations or essays presented before the col¬ 
lege. Professor Wright. 

Psychology*—Study of the human intellect, embracing sensa¬ 
tion, perception, memory, imagination, and thought. Recitations 
from the first half of Sully’s Outlines of Psychology; lectures and 
discussions. Three hours a week. President Brainerd. 










3G 


MIDDLE BURY COLLEGE 


Economics.—Walker’s Political Economy , Advanced Course. 
Production, exchange, distribution, and consumption are studied, 
the object being to give the student a knowledge of general prin¬ 
ciples. Recitations, lectures, and discussions. Three hours a 
week. Professor Howard. 

Elective Studies: 

Greek.—Study of the CEdipus Legend: Sophocles, CEdipus Ty~ 
rannus ; Sophocles’s CEdipus at Colonus , ^Eschylus’s Seven against 
Thebes , and Euripides’s Phcenissce are read in English and dis¬ 
cussed. Three hours a week. [To be given in 1902-1903; this 
year's course the same as the Junior elective.] 

Professor Eaton. 

Latin.—A study in Latin Lyrics. Selections from Catullus, 
Ovid, Vergil, Propertius, Tibullus, and miscellaneous lyrists are 
read and a comparison of style continually made. Three hours a 
week. Professor Sanford. 

Roman Archaeology.—Lectures on the topography of Italy and 
the buildings and statuary of Ancient Rome. Readings on va¬ 
rious topics from Middleton, Lanciani, Jordan, Parker, Burn. 
Schreiber, Piranesi, Canina, and the journals are required, with 
careful preparation of note books. Photographs and stereopticon 
views. (The course is intended as a background for the study of 
advanced Latin, and should be elected by all those intending to 
pursue the subject further.) Three hours a week. [To be given 
in 1902-1903.] Professor Sanford. 

English Literature.— A study of Old English, with the special 
purpose of familiarizing the student with the fundamental prin¬ 
ciples of our English speech. Bright’s Anglo-Saxon Reader; 
lectures. Three hours a week. Professor Wright. 

German.—Advanced grammar continued through Poll’s German 
Prose Coinjbosition and von Jagemann’s Ger?nan Syntax. Goethe, 
Faust % Part I. Boyesen, Goethe and Schiller. Kluge, Deutsche 
Natio?ial Litteratur. Three hours a week. 

Professor Henckels. 

French.—Francois’s French Prose Composition. Corneille, Lc 
Cid / Racine, Andromaque; Moliere, Les Prdcicuses. Ridicules. 
Duval, Histoire de la litterature frangaise; private reading. 
Three hours a week. Professor Henckels. 





COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


37 


Constitutional Law. —Cooley’s Principles of Constitutional Law. 
Critical study of the United States Constitution. This course is 
a continuation of the Junior elective. It traces the growth of 
English political institutions and jurisprudence from Anglo-Saxon 
times, and includes a study of English Courts and procedure of 
the present day. Recitations and reading. Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

History. —Epochs of history. Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

Astronomy. —Problems of practical astronomy; the moon; sun ; 
revelations of the spectroscope; eclipses; planets; comets and 
meteors; stars and nebulae. Young’s Elements of Astronomy. 
Three hours a week. Professor Bryant. 

Chemistry. —Qualitative Analysis; laboratory work. The stu¬ 
dent pursues a systematic course of qualitative analysis, begin¬ 
ning with the detection of one unknown metal, and finally is able 
to separate the individual metals from the most complex mixture 
or compound. Three periods a week. Professor McGilton. 

Cryptogamic Botany. —Fleshy fungi, lichens, and myxomycetes. 
Lectures on their structure, classification, and life history; edible 
and poisonous fungi; fungi as wood destroyers. Laboratory 
work on the external morphology and microscopic structure of 
these plants; determinations of the genera and usually of the 
species studied. Three periods a week. Professor Burt. 

WINTER TERM-ELEVEN WEEKS 

Required Studies: 

Rhetoricals. —Two orations or essays presented before the col¬ 
lege. Professor Wright. 

Psychology.— Study of the feelings and of the will. Recitations 
from text-book; lectures and discussions. Three hours a week. 

President Brainerd. 

Geology. —Le Conte’s Elements of Geology , Parts i and 2. Dy¬ 
namical geology: consideration of the atmospheric, aqueous, ig¬ 
neous, and organic agencies acting on and modifying the earth’s 
surface. Structural geology: general form and structure of the 












38 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


earth; sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks; joints and 
fissures; mineral veins; mountain origin and structure; denuda¬ 
tion. Three hours a week. Professor Burt. 

Elective Studies: 

Greek.—Study of the CEdipus Legend (continued). Sophocles, 
Antigone. Also a comparative study of the tragedians. Three 
hours a week. [To be given in 1902-1903; this year’s course the 
same as the Junior elective.] Professor Eaton. 

Latin Composition.—Advanced work in grammar and prose com¬ 
position. Discussion of methods of teaching Latin and examina¬ 
tion of text books used in preparatory work. (A course designed 
particularly for those intending to teach.) Three hours a week. 

Professor Sanford. 

Latin.—Selections from the Letters of Pliny. The course is in¬ 
tended to give practice in rapid reading. Comparison of the Let¬ 
ters with the correspondence of Cicero and others. Lectures on 
the book making and letter writing of the Romans. Three hours 
a week. [To be given in 1902-1903.] Professor Sanford. 

German.—Goethe, Hermann inid Dorothea , Torquato Tasso j 
Schiller, Wallenstein's Lager j Boyesen, Goethe a?id Schiller / 
Kluge, Deutsche National Litteratur. Advanced grammar and 
composition. Three hours a week. Professor Henckels. 

French.—Duval, Histoire de la litterature franqaise (continued). 
French Prose in the XVII century (Warren). Advanced gram¬ 
mar and composition. Suljtnictive in French (Williams). Three 
hours a week. Professor Henckels. 

English Literature.—A study of Middle English, with special 
reference to Chaucer and Langland. Three hours a week. . 

Professor Wright. 

History of Philosophy.—Lectures, presenting the main features 
in the development of philosophy from the time of Descartes. 
Special topics are assigned for individual research to be presented 
as theses. Three hours a week. President Brainerd. 

Pedagogy.—A study of the science on the basis of text-book 
work and collateral reading; lectures. This course is primarily 
for those intending to teach. Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


39 


Constitutional Law*— Principles of Constitutional Lavj (con¬ 
tinued). Examination of leading cases in the Federal and State 
Supreme courts. Recitations and readings. Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

Economics*—Walker’s Advanced Course (continued). Study of 
present economic questions, such as money, bimetalism, banking, 
taxation, labor, socialism, co-operation, tariff, and tariff history. 
Recitations, lectures, and library work. Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

History*—Epochs of history (continued). Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

Chemistry*— Qualitative Analysis (continued) and Gravimetric 
Quantitative Analysis; laboratory work. The characteristic 
reactions of acid radicals are studied and the complete constitu¬ 
tion of unknown bodies is determined. The analysis of minerals 
and ores forms a part of the work. The various methods for 
decomposing silicates and refractory substances and bringing 
them to a condition of solution are carefully studied. Toward 
the end of the term the student learns the use and manipulation 
of the chemical balance and makes some simple quantitative de¬ 
terminations of metals. Three periods a week. 

Professor McGilton. 

Cryptogam ic Botany (continued)*— Bacteria and hyphomycetes. 
Lectures on morphology and life history of bacteria, culture 
methods, some pathogenic species and the diseases they cause, 
immunity. The laboratory work is in preparation of culture 
media, sterilization, the isolation of species by plate cultures, 
transfers, the study of pure cultures, identification of at least two 
of the cultures. Towards the close of the course, cultures of a 
few hyphomycetes are made and studied. Three periods a week. 

Professor Burt. 

SPRING TERM—TWELVE WEEKS 

Required Studies: 

Ethics*— An examination into the nature and ground of moral 
obligation, followed by a detailed study of the various practical 
duties of man. Mackenzie’s Manual of Ethics forms the basis for 
recitation and discussion. Three hours a week. 

President Brainerd. 











40 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


International Law* —Woolsey’s International Law. History; 
study of treaties and celebrated cases; reading of diplomatic cor¬ 
respondence in international controversies. Recitations and 
library work. Three hours a week. Professor Howard. 

Elective Studies: 

Greek* —Elegiac, Iambic, and Melic Poetry. Three hours a 
week. [To be given in 1902-1903; this year’s course the same 
as the Junior elective.] Professor Eaton. 

Latin. —A study in the Decline of Latin Literature. Selections 
from Apuleius, Ausonius, Prudentius, Patristic Latin, and the 
hymnology of the early Church. The Latin of the Middle Ages. 
Three hours a week. Professor Sanford. 

Latin. —A study in Roman Philosophy. Readings from the 
Tusculan Disputations of Cicero, De Rerum Natura of Lucretius, 
with extracts from Seneca, Marcus Aurelius, and Boethius. 
Three hours a week. [To be given in 1902-1903.] 

Professor Sanford. 

German.— Kluge, Deutsche Natio?ial Litteratur (completed). 
Schiller, Die Piccolomi?ii, Wallenstein's Tod. Lectures upon 
modern drama in Germany—its representatives; private reading. 
Three hours a week. Professor Henckels. 

French. —Reading of selected essays of Sainte-Beuve (Effinger). 
Duval, Histoire de la litterature franqaise (completed); French 
drama and novel of the nineteenth century; lectures; outside 
reading. Three hours a week. Professor Henckels. 

English Literature. —A study of the forms of literature and of 
the principles of literary criticism. Three hours a week. 

Professor Wright. 

Pedagogy. —A continuation of the work of the Winter term, 
with supplementary lectures by the members of the Faculty on 
the best methods of teaching in their respective departments. 
Three hours a week. Professor Howard. 

Sociology. —This course includes a study of race characteristics, 
heredity, environment, education, pauperism, insanity, crime and 
its punishment, hospitals, prisons, and almshouses. Lectures and 
readings. Three hours a week. Professor Howard. 










COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


41 


Elements of Jurisprudence*— This course is especially intended for 
students who purpose entering the legal profession, and is de¬ 
signed to give a survey of the science and to make the student 
familiar with its literature and terminology. It consists of a 
general view of the Roman and Common Law and an examination 
of the history of both of these systems and their fundamental 
ideas. Three hours a week. Professor Howard. 

History* —Epochs of history (continued). Three hours a week. 

Professor Howard. 

Chemistry* —Gravimetric and volumetric quantitative analysis; 
laboratory work. The work of gravimetric analysis is continued 
in the handling of more complex substances and their percentage 
composition is determined. The making of standard solutions 
and their applications in the determination of the percentage 
composition of bodies volumetrically form a part of the work. 
Three periods a week. Professor McGilton. 

Geology*— Le Conte’s Eleme?its of Geology , Part 3. Historical 
geology: the history of the evolution of earth-structure and of the 
•organic kingdom. Short excursions to study features of geological 
interest. Three periods a week. Professor Burt. 


COURSE LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR 
OF SCIENCE 


FRESHMAN YEAR 

FALL TERM— THIRTEEN WEEKS 

Latin* —Daily drill in vocabulary and inflection. Readiness in 
handling verb forms is sought by means of many test exercises in 
tense and modal idioms. During the term about twenty-five hours 
are given to a thorough review of the elementary principles of 
Latin writing, concluding with the study of the development and 
use of cases. Written prose exercises, based upon Livy, are 
required weekly. Selections from Livy, Books XXI and XXII, 
supplemented by sight passages from various authors, are assign¬ 
ed for translation. Four hours a week. Professor Sanford. 











42 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Rhetoric*—A familiarity with the general principles of rhetoric 
being assumed, the work is divided between practical composition 
and a study of the art on the basis of its philosophy. The criticism 
of work submitted is conducted as far as possible with each 
student individually, and the exercises are progressive throughout 
the year. Three hours a week. Professor Wright. 

German*—Thorough pronunciation is emphasized from the 
beginning and rigorously insisted upon throughout all the courses 
of study offered in this department. For the elementary stage of 
grammar study, Harris’s German Lessons is used. After about 
six weeks, a part of each recitation is devoted to a study of 
Grimm’s law as illustrated in the introduction to Huss’s German 
Reader; the reading of the text proper of this Reader is then 
taken up and Hatfield’s German Lyrics and Ballads begun 
toward the end of the term. Easy poems and connected prose 
extracts, illustrative of the principles of language structure, are 
committed to memory and recited in class. Conversation in easy 
German is one of the main features of the daily recitations. 
Three hours a week. Reviews and extra advanced sight reading 
in class. One hour a week. Professor Henckels. 

Solid and Spherical Geometry*—-Books VI, VII, VIII, and IX of 

Phillips and Fisher’s Elements of Geometry. Four hours a week. 

Professor Bryant. 

WINTER TERM-ELEVEN WEEKS 

Latin*—Weekly exercises in prose deal largely with the .subject 
of the development, history, and use of mood De Officiis , De 
Amicitia , and De Senectute of Cicero, with sight reading from 
Quintus Curtius, Nepos, and others. The objects sought are 
fluency of rendering and correctness in the use of English-Latin 
and Latin-English synonyms. During this and the following 
terms several written tests in sight translation are given in which 
the papers presented are commented upon by the professors in 
both the English and the Latin departments. Four hours a week. 

Professor Sanford. 

Rhetoric*—A continuation of the work of the Fall term. Three 
hours a week. Professor Wright. 

German.—Harris’s German Lessons (completed); Huss’s Ger- 
man Reader (completed); Hatfield’s German Lyrics and Ballads 







COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


43 


(continued). Poems and prose extracts committed to memory. 
Easy conversation. Three hours a week. Reviews and extra 
advanced sight reading in class. One hour a week. 

Professor Henckels. 

Algebra* —Convergency and divergency of series; undetermined 
coefficients; binomial theorem; logarithms; permutations and 
combinations; probability. Wells’s College Algebra. Four hours 
a week. Professor Bryant. 

SPRING TERM-TWELVE WEEKS 

Latin* —Weekly exercises in prose; topics, indirect discourse 
and the periodic structure. Selections from the Philosophical 
Treatises a7id Letters of Cicero. An outline of history as far as 
through the twelve Caesars is studied to determine the place of 
Rome as related to contemporaneous nations. Special topics 
from the historians are assigned for library reading. Four hours 
a week. Professor Sanforet. 

Rhetoric* —A continuation of the work of the Fall and Winter 
terms. Three hours a week. Professor Wright. 

German* —Harris’s German Cotnpositioji is used for advanced 
study of grammar; standard grammars are studied by reference. 
Hatfield’s German Lyrics and Ballads (completed). Poems 
committed to memory. Survey of German Literature (earlier 
periods), text, Keller, Bilder aus der deutschen Litterdtur. 
From the beginning of this term, German will be, as far as pos¬ 
sible, the medium of communication in the class-room. Three 
hours a week. Reviews and extra advanced sight reading in 
class. One hour a week. Professor Henckels. 

Plane and Spherical Trigonometry*— Solution of right and oblique 
plane triangles; trigonometric analysis; solution of right and 
oblique spherical triangles. Phillips and Strong’s Elements of 
Trigonometry Four hours a week. Prof essor Bryant. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

FALL TERM— THIRTEEN WEEKS 

Latin* —Germania and Agricola of Tacitus. Comparison of the 
style of Tacitus with that of other writers of his time. A study 
of the Roman colonial system. Outline of the history of the later 














44 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Empire, with brief investigation of the subject of the influence 
of Rome upon the northern tribes, and, incidentally, our own 
heredity of law and custom from them. Library reading and the 
study of photographs of Roman remains in Germany and Eng¬ 
land. Three hours a week. Professor Sanford. 

German. —Harris’s German Composition and advanced grammar 
(by reference). Outline of German Literature, Keller, Bilder 
aus der deutschen Litteratur, to the time of Schiller and Goethe. 
Critical study of Schiller’s Wilhelm Tell. Three hours a week. 

Professor Henckels. 

Rhetoricals. —One oration or essay presented before the college. 

Professor Wright. 

Physics. Fundamental units of measurement; velocity; accele¬ 
ration; composition and resolution of velocities; force; momen¬ 
tum; work; energy; power; machines; properties of matter; 
molecular forces; capillarity. Recitations, solution of problems 
illustrating principles discussed, and experimental lectures. 
Three hours a week. Professor Bryant. 

Physiology. —Huxley’s Elementary Lessons. Two hours and one 
period of laboratory work a week. Professor Burt. 

Zoology. —Lectures with supplementary reading in Hertwig’s 
Principles of Zoology . Two hours and one period of laboratory 
work a week on invertebrates. Professor Burt. 

WINTER TERM-ELEVEN WEEKS 

Latin.— Selected Odes and Epodes of Horace. Questions of ety¬ 
mology, syntax, and mythology are made subordinate to the 
literary study of the verse. By comparison of the odes with many 
lyrics in Latin and other languages the class attempt to estimate 
the place of Horace among the poets. Though incidental to the 
subject, “ The debt of English Poetry to Horace” is a topic of 
frequent discussion. Lectures on the private life of the Romans 
and on mythology, illustrated with photographs and lantern 
slides. Very careful preparation of note books is required. Three 
hours a week. Professor Sanford. 






COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 


45 


German* —Advanced grammar and composition. Keller, Bilder 
aus der deutscken Littercitur (finished), completing the outline of 
German Literature down to the present times. Wilbrandt, Der 
Aleister von Palmyra. Three hours a week. 

Professor Henckels. 

Rhetoricals* —One oration or essay presented before the college. 

Professor Wright. 

Civil Government. —American Constitutional History and Law. 
History of the development of American political institutions, 
study of colonial charters, examination of leagues and confedera¬ 
tions, history of the formation and adoption of the Federal Con¬ 
stitution, including a careful study of the text. Recitations, sup¬ 
plemented by lectures and library work. Three hours a week; 

Professor Howard. 

Physics* —Dynamics of fluids; density; sound, including speed, 
energy, reflection, refraction, and interference of sound waves; 
heat, including temperature, calorimetry, fusion, vaporization, 
thermodynamics. The work consists of lectures, recitations, the 
solution of numerous problems, and the preparation of a note 
book containing a full account of the lecture experiments and the 
principles illustrated by them. Three hours a week. 

Professor Bryant. 

Botany* —Morphology of cryptogams. Types studied are gloeo- 
capsa, oscillaria, pleurococcus, spirogyra, ectocarpus, rockweed, 
bacteria of the mouth, rhizopus, lachnea, grain rust, moss, fern. 
One lecture and two periods of laboratory work a week. 

Professor Burt. 

SPRING TERM— TWELVE WEEKS 

Latin* — The Captives of Plautus with readings from the Tri- 
nummus and other plays. Lectures and library reading on the 
subject of the Roman theatre. Dictation exercises, etymology, 
and the study of early Latin forms (Allen, Wilmann, Words¬ 
worth, and the Inscriptions). Three hours a week. 

Professor Sanford. 

German* —Advanced grammar and composition. Poll’s German 
Prose Composition. Von Jagemann’s Germaji Syntax. Schiller, 
Die Jungfrau von Orleans and Maria Stuart are read critically. 







46 


M1DDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Kluge, Deutsche National Litter atur is the work used for a 
detailed review of the literary history of Germany. Three hours 
a week. Professor Henckels. 

Rhetoricals*—One oration or essay presented before the college, 
and an additional oration from those who do not receive appoint¬ 
ments for the prize speaking. Professor Wright. 

Physics*—Light; reflection, refraction, interference, diffraction, 
and polarization of light waves, and spectrum analysis. Electricity; 
electrostatic induction and potential, electrostatic machines, elec¬ 
trical units and measurements, magnetic induction and potential, 
electro-magnetic induction, dynamo-electric machines. As. in the 
winter term, the work consists of lectures, recitations, solution of 
problems, and the preparation of note book on lecture experi¬ 
ments. Three hours a week. n Professor Bryant. 

Botany*—Laboratory work and recitations on seed, shoot, root, 
flower, and fruit. Lectures contrasting seed with spore and on 
the more elementary features of germination, nutrition, fertiliza¬ 
tion, and dissemination. Preparation of herbarium specimens. 
Two hours and one period of laboratory work a week. 

Professor Burt. 

Zoology*—Morphology of vertebrates. Lectures on the com¬ 
parative morphology and development of vertebrates. The labo¬ 
ratory work is dissection of the cat and of the frog. One lecture 
and two periods of laboratory work a week. Professor Burt. 


JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

In the Junior and Senior years, the studies of the 
course leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science are 
identical with those of the course leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts already given on the preceding pages. 





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


47 


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 


GREEK 

To aid in laying a foundation for later work in this de¬ 
partment, considerable time is given, during the first term 
of Freshman year, to the writing of Greek, because it is the 
most successful way of attaining an exact knowledge of the 
elements of the language. 

After this the aim is to secure facility in the reading of 
the Greek and to become acquainted with the varied de¬ 
partments of the literature and the thought contained there¬ 
in. In reading the orations of Lysias, attention is given 
not only to the charm of his style as a writer, but also 
briefly to legal procedure and to some phases of the every 
day life of the Greeks. During the study of Homer, indi¬ 
vidual subjects connected with the text read are assigned to 
the members of the class for investigation. Associated 
with the reading of .tragedy there is a consideration of the 
stages of its development, its characteristics, the differences 
between the three great Greek tragedians, between ancient 
and modern tragedy, and the construction of the Attic 
theatre. The origin and development of Attic oratory is 
treated of, and, by examination of selections from the early 
orators, illustrations of the changes are obtained and the 
resultant oratory as seen in the writings of Demosthenes is 









48 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


studied. An effort is made to ascertain, for practical pur¬ 
poses, what excellences have found their way into English 
oratory. 

The following outline shows the present arrangement of 
the work, although different writers and works are selected 
for other years: 

FRESHMEN (required). 

1. Xenophon, Memorabilia; Greek composition based on the 
Xenophon. Fall term. 

2. Selections from the orations of Lysias. Winter term. 

3. Homer, Odyssey; lectures on the monuments of Athens, 
illustrated with the stereopticon. Spring term. 

SOPHOMORES (required). 

4. Sophocles, Electra. Fall term. 

5. Plato, Apology of Socrates and Phaedo. Winter term. 

6. Thucydides, Book VII; study of old Greek life, illustrated 
with the stereopticon. Spring term. 

JUNIORS AND SENIORS (elective). 

7. The early Attic orators. Fall term. 

8. Demosthenes, Philippics. Winter term, 

9. Selections for rapid reading. Spring term. 

10. Sophocles, Oedipus Tyrannus; in alternation with 7. Fall 
term. 

11. Sophocles, Antigone; in alternation with 8. Winter term. 

12. Elegiac, Iambic, and Melic Poetry; in alternation with 9. 
Spring term. 

LATIN. 

That there may be the best insight into the structure of 
the language, a thorough review of grammatical principles 
has been found necessary during all of the terms of the first 
year. Students will be expected, on entering, to have such 
familiarity with forms, and such vocabulary, as to be able 
both to write prose composition after model paragraphs 
taken from the authors daily translated in the class, and to 
make a somewhat critical study of word order and style. 





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


49 


In the second year principles of syntax are supposed to 
have been mastered and the student, with the reading- of 
the text, makes a careful study of the many-sided, religious, 
political, and social life of the Roman people as pictured in 
the writings of the authors chosen for translation. As these 
authors present their several views, the influence of the 
national life upon the contemporary world is emphasized, 
and the continuity of that influence to the present time is 
often considered worthy of investigation. 

In the elective work of the last two years there are studies 
in topography, antiquities, and art; in advanced prose com¬ 
position for those intending to teach the subject; in rapid 
leading; in the drama; in the lyrics, developing into- 
mediaeval poetry and the hymns; and in philosophy. 

To consistently keep three ideals before the student en¬ 
tering the department, that of translating Latin into the best 
idioms of his own language and of finally interpreting the 
thought without tianslation, that of forming an estimate of 
the place of the Roman nation in history, and that of 
obtaining a view of the relation of the Roman writings to 
the other literatures of the ancient world as well as the debt 
of the modern languages to Latin, the courses have been 
arranged at present in the following order: 

FRESHMEN (required) 

1. Selections from Livy, Books XXI and XXII. Prose com¬ 
position through Cases. 

2. De Amicitia and De Senectute. Prose composition through 
the chapters on Mood. 

3. Letters and other selections from Cicero. Prose composi¬ 
tion on Indirect discourse and involved Periodic structure. 

SOPHOMORES (required) 

4. Germania and Agricola. Historical review and the'in¬ 
fluence of Rome upon her colonies. 

5. Selections from Horace. The influence of the Odes upon 
later poetry. 

6. The Captives. Dramatic poetry and the theatre. 







50 


middlebury college 


JUNIORS AND SENIORS, (elective) 1901-1902 

7. Lyrics of the Golden and Silver Ages. 

3. Advanced Prose Composition. 

9. The later Lyrics and the Hymnology of the early church, 

JUNIORS AND SENIORS, (elective) 1902-1 903 

10. Topography, Antiquities, and Art. 

11. Selections from Pliny. Rapid reading. 

12. Selections from the philosophical writings of Cicero, Lu¬ 
cretius, and Seneca. 

GERMAN AND FRENCH 

Much of the advanced knowledge and thought of the 
world is published in the German and French languages. 
In quantity and value of records of new and independent 
investigation and discovery, the French comes next to the 
German. The English-speaking student or professional 
man who is able to read fluently the German and French 
languages has access thereby to nearly all the valuable 
records of investigation at the present day in any depart¬ 
ment of human knowledge. 

While the ability to read German and French freely is a 
valuable acquisition to the man of business in America, as 
in other countries, it is an absolute necessity to the educator, 
the investigator, and the professional man who does not 
wish to be left hopelessly in the rear by those who possess 
this ability and use it. 

It is admitted that the German language affords an ex¬ 
cellent opportunity for mental discipline. Throughout the 
first year the aim is primarily to give to the student a gram¬ 
matical and practical knowledge of German and of French 

_to form an adequate introduction to the study of their 

literatures in subsequent years. By a practical knowledge 
is meant ability to read these languages readily, without 
translating, ability to understand them with ease when 
spoken, and ability to use them in both speaking and 







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


51 


writing; this ability to understand the spoken as well as 
the written language is secured by conducting in the lan¬ 
guage studied the most of the work in the different courses. 

ENGLISH 

The study of English is on the two-fold basis of the 
language and the literature. Text-books are supplemented 
by the materials of the library and work is brought to date, 
so far as practicable, by the additional means of lectures. 
The department aims to secure a knowledge of historical 
development in the English tongue; an appreciation of 
what is best in the writings of its users; and ability in 
personal practice for creditable literary work. To secure 
these results three lines of study are pursued : 

I. Jdnglish Literature .—The Eall and Winter terms 
of the Junior year are given to a general survey of the 
principal English authors from Chaucer to the present 
time, with a rapid treatment of the various phases of 
English literary development. The leading facts of Eng¬ 
lish history are also discussed, whenever they are necessary 
to an adequate understanding of the subject. The work 
is introductory to the more detailed investigations of the 
various elective courses. 

II. Rhetoric and the English Language .—The work 
in rhetoric is placed at the beginning of the college course 
and is continued through three terms. A familiarity with 
the common rules of rhetoric is assumed and the study is 
conducted largely from the standpoint of its philosophy; 
an abundance of written work, however, is introduced for 
its immediately practical results. The Spring term of the 
Junior year is given to a consideration of rhetoric as the 
art of persuasion, with Whately as a text-book. 

Two terms’ work in Old and Middle English is offered 
to members of the Senior class, with collateral study of the 




52 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


history of the English language. The literature of the 
periods will be treated throughout the course, but the work 
in Old English will be conducted for the most part from 
the linguistic side, with a special view to showing the 
foundations of English speech. 

III. Rhetoricals —Rhetorical exercises, attended by 
the entire college, are conducted in the chapel on Saturday 
mornings. Their aim is to train the students in the ap¬ 
propriate presentation of original thought. Four orations 
or essays are delivered by each Senior, Junior, and Sopho¬ 
more. 


PHILOSOPHY 


The department of Philosophy is under the charge of the 
President. Three hours a week are required throughout 
the Senior year, and three hours more a week during the 
Winter term may be taken as an elective. The aim in this 
course is to direct the student to the highest sources of 
knowledge concerning himself and his relations to nature 
and to God. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

The Science of Mind is pursued through the Fall term. 
It is taught chiefly as a science based upon the facts of 
consciousness; speculative and metaphysical questions are 
kept largely in the background; the aim is principally to 
ascertain the various modes of mental activity, to determine 
the scope and function of the several faculties of the mind, 
and to discover how they can be best developed and trained. 

MORAL SCIENCE 

During the third term three hours a week are required 
for the study of Moral Science. This involves a consider- 








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


53 


ation of the fundamental principles of Christian morality, 
and of the relation of the teachings of Christ to the highest 
truths of philosophy and life. 

HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 

During the Winter term the History of Philosophy is 
taught as an elective. The more important systems of 
thought that have appeared in the past are discussed and 
criticised; and as far as practicable the present status of 
metaphysical problems is presented. 


PEDAGOGY 


In view of the fact that many graduates become teachers, 
a course in Pedagogy is offered to the Senior class. This 
course will be under the immediate supervision of one 
instructor and will be based upon a text-book, but each of 
the other members of the Faculty will supplement it with 
lectures upon the theory and practice of teaching as applied 
to his particular department. In addition, the study of 
psychology will be pursued, under the direction of the 
President, with special reference to the subject of mind 
development and training. The course as thus formulated, 
with collateral reading, is intended to represent a full 
year’s work in pedagogy and methods of teaching as pur¬ 
sued in the leading normal colleges of the country. 


HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 


HISTORY 

The course of instruction in History and Political Science 
has been arranged so as to form a consecutive whole. It 
commences in the Sophomore year. A general knowledge 










54 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


of the history of England and America is assumed, and 
special attention is first given to the study of the constitu¬ 
tional development of those countries. The growth of the 
present American and English political institutions is 
traced from their very first manifestations down to the 
present day. The required course in general history, in 
the Junior year, is made as broad and thorough as possible, 
and, at the same time, is intended to serve as a special 
preparation for the studies of constitutional and interna¬ 
tional law, political economy, and political science, which 
follow, and for which such a course is considered essential, 
as giving the necessary ground work. While following 
in the main the broad outlines laid down in the text-book, 
the course is supplemented by outside reading, and the 
student constantly referred to the principal treatises and 
leading authorities. In an alternating elective course run¬ 
ning through the Junior and Senior years, important 
epochs in mediaeval and modern history are considered in 
detail. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

The aim in this department is to instruct the student as 
to the workings of government, and then to prepare him 
to meet intelligently the social and economic questions that 
are likely to confront him. The work begins in the Junior 
year with the study of political institutions, federal, state, 
and municipal, both separately and in their bearings on 
one another. 

In Political Economy, which commences in the Senior 
year, the first term is devoted to a study of the leading 
principles of economic science, the aim being to give a 
general outline of the subject; the second term is elective 
and devoted to the study of the historical development of 
the subject and of the relation of economic life to economic 
thought. 





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


55 


In Constitutional Law the object is two-fold: first, to 
acquaint the student with the present constitutions of the 
leading countries; second, to trace the rise of each institu¬ 
tion historically. In International Law the general prin¬ 
ciples of the subject are outlined and special attention is 
given to the leading treaties of the United States. 

The course in this department allows of considerable 
latitude, so that important questions, such as modern 
socialism, labor organization, nationalization of land, man¬ 
agement of railroads, banking, money, tariff, interstate 
commerce, taxation, etc., may be taken up to meet the 
needs of the students. But whatever the subject, special im¬ 
portance is attached to original research and investigation. 
To that end library work is insisted upon and special 
theses and reports are frequently demanded. And in gen¬ 
eral, both in the required and in the elective work, investi¬ 
gation from the original sources and by independent 
methods is encouraged, and collateral reading is required. 


MATHEMATICS AND ASTRONOMY 


The instruction in this department is given with a two¬ 
fold purpose. There is first the aim to give the student 
such a thorough knowledge of the facts and principles that 
he will be able to apply them in the solution of any prob¬ 
lem requiring them. Second, and of even more import¬ 
ance, is the endeavor to train the mind of the student in 
logical thinking and close reasoning. The mathematical 
exercises calling for accurate definition and correct reason¬ 
ing are intended to be so applied as to enable the student 
to acquire the power of grasping any subject and reasoning 
about it, whether that subject be mathematical or not. 








56 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


The work begins with a thorough training in geometry 
and algebra, as the necessary foundation for all further 
mathematical study. These are followed by plane and 
spherical trigonometry, which occupy the remainder of the 
Freshman year. Elective courses in analytical geometry 
and in differential and integral calculus are offered in the 
Junior year. The object of these elective courses is to 
enable those wishing to take up further work in engineer¬ 
ing to prepare themselves for it. 

Astronomy is a Senior elective. The aim is to give the 
student a thorough knowledge of the fundamental princi¬ 
ples of this important science, but especial prominence is 
also given to the important results attained by the most 
recent advances in physical science. 


MECHANICS AND PHYSICS 


The course in Physics is introduced by a thorough discus¬ 
sion of the principles of statics and dynamics during the 
Fall term of the Sophomore year. The remainder of the 
year is given to a study of the principles of general physics, 
the subjects being abundantly illustrated with experimental 
lectures in the Physical Laboratory. 

The further study of physics is made elective. For this 
year the work will consist ot a course in electricity and 
magnetism given in the Winter and Spring terms and open 
to Seniors and Juniors alike. 

As soon as the equipment for the new Warner Science 
Hall is obtained, the course in advanced physics will con¬ 
sist of laboratory work, in which the students will them¬ 
selves make the measurements and verify the laws. It 
will begin with the simple measurements of mass, length, 











DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


57 


time, velocity and acceleration; the intention being to give 
the student facility in the manipulation of apparatus, and 
in recording and interpreting his results. Then will fol¬ 
low the more difficult work in sound, heat, light, elec¬ 
tricity and magnetism. A complete report of each experi¬ 
ment, giving the apparatus used, the measurements taken, 
and the results obtained will be required of each student 
taking this course. 


NATURAL HISTORY 


The purpose of the work in this department is to give 
such a view of the earth and of its living organisms— 
objects always about us and constantly presenting peculiar 
and interest-arousing problems—as should, because of its 
importance, be included in a liberal education. This view 
is made as real as possible by appropriate laboratory studies. 
In addition to their general educational value, the various 
courses possess a special value for those intending to take 
university work in the same lines, to teach, to enter the 
ministry, or to study medicine. 

The following outline shows the arrangement of the 
work: 


SOPHOMORES (required) 

1. Zoology. General course; entire class; Fall term. 

2. Human Physiology. Latin-Scientific division; Fall term. 

3. Botany. Morphology of cryptogams; Latin-Scientific divi¬ 
sion; Winter term. 

4. Zoology. Morphology of vertebrates; Latin-Scientific divi¬ 
sion; Spring term. 

5. Botany. General course; entire class; Spring term. 












58 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


JUNIORS AND SENIORS (elective) 

6. Cryptogamic Botany. Fungi and lichens; Fall and Winter 
terms. 

7. Histology and Physiology of Plants. Fall and Winter terms. 

(Courses 6 and 7 are given in alternate years.) 

SENIORS 

Geology. Required, Winter term; elective, Spring term. 

ZOOLOGY 

The work in Natural Plistory opens at the beginning of 
the Sophomore year with a course in zoology, in which 
the chief groups of animals are considered, not only with 
regard to their morphology, but also from the standpoint of 
their embryological development. The aim of the course 
is to give not only a familiarity with the general forms of 
animal life, but also a knowledge of some phases of the 
evidence in regard to the evolution of life, and to prepare 
the student to read the more understanding ^ 7 current 
literature which has to do with variation, heredity, and 
other biological problems. The laboratory work is de¬ 
voted to invertebrates and begins with the study with the 
microscope of Amoeba and Paramecium or Vorticella by 
each student. The invertebrate material which can be 
obtained, for class use, from the region about is supple¬ 
mented by marine forms from the Marine Biological 
Laboratory at Wood’s Holl. 

The other courses in zoology are human physiology 
during the Fall term and morphology of vertebrates dur¬ 
ing the Spring term of the Sophomore year. The former 
course is made as practical as possible by laboratory 
demonstrations, and by the student’s study of preparations 
showing the microscopic structure of the more important 
organs and tissues. In the latter course the laboratory 
work on vertebrates is a direct continuation of that on in¬ 
vertebrates in Course 1. 





DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


59 


BOTANY 

The work in Botany begins with an introductory course, 
in which the morphology of the cryptogams, or flowerless 
plants, is taught by the laboratory study with the micro¬ 
scope of selected illustrative plant types, ranging from 
unicellular algas and fungi to mosses and ferns. This is a 
required course for the Latin-Scientific division and is 
followed in the Spring term by a course of more general 
nature—Course 5—taken by the entire Sophomore class. 
This last is a companion course to Course 1 in zoology. 
The laboratory work is upon the gross structure and func¬ 
tions of phaenogams, or flowering plants. In addition to 
the lectures, the recitations cover Gray’s lessons, and the 
student is trained to some degree of facility in the deter¬ 
mination of flowering plants and encouraged to enter upon 
the formation of an herbarium, but only a part of the time 
of the course is so available. 

Elective work in Botany is open to Juniors and Seniors 
in two courses, each of which extends through the Fall 
and Winter terms. These courses are given in alternate 
years. In the advanced course in Cryptogamic Botany, 
the attention is given for periods of several weeks each to 
basidiomycetes, myxomycetes, bacteria, moulds, pyreno- 
mycetes, and lichens. The laboratory work is largely on 
collections or cultures made by the students. The course 
aims to give knowledge of the morphology, life history, 
and relationships of these not generally understood plants 
and, in certain groups, to give practice in specific deter¬ 
mination and acquaintance with the best works on the 
various groups. In the case of the basidiomycetes (mush¬ 
rooms and toadstools), the early opening of the college 
year makes it possible to study in their fresh condition 
plants of most of the genera, and to identify many species 







60 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


of economic interest. In the alternate course the objects 
of study are the microscopic structure of the tissues of 
plants; the physical, chemical, and vital properties of 
protoplasm and its relations to its surroundings; and such 
vital processes as the absorption of food, its conduction 
through the plant and its assimilation, also growth, nuclear 
phenomena, reproduction, repair, fall of leaves, nitrifica¬ 
tion of the soil, etc. 

GEOLOGY 

The work in natural history closes with a course in 
Geology given to the Senior class during the Winter and 
Spring terms. The forces now in operation are considered 
as active agents through past time in shaping the earth 
into its present condition. The geological history of the 
earth and of its general formations is treated, and the geo- 
logy of the region about is taken up in greater detail, 
excursions to points of geological interest in the vicinity 
being made. 


CHEMISTRY 


The instruction in required Chemistry is designed to give 
the student an insight into the philosophy of the science, 
and at the same time to make him practically acquainted 
with the more frequently occuring elements and com¬ 
pounds. In addition, the student is expected to become so 
familiar with chemical manipulation by working at the 
laboratory tables that he can arrange apparatus and make 
experiments illustrating the principles discussed in the 
ordinary text-books. 

Each member of the Junior class will spend six hours a 
week during a portion of the Winter term and the entire 
Spring term in laboratory work. 







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 


61 


Chemistry as a Senior elective through the entire year 
is devoted exclusively to laboratory work, in the following 
courses: 

Course I. —Qualitative analysis in the Fall term, in which 
special attention is given to the analytical reactions of each base, 
and to practice in the separation of metals from each other in 
unknown liquid and solid mixtures. The analytical reactions of 
each acid and the separations of the acids are also carefully 
studied. Full notes are made by the student on all processes and 
reactions involved and frequent reports are made to the instructor. 

Course II. —Gravimetric quantitative analysis in the Winter 
term. 

Course III. —Volumetric quantitative analysis in the Spring 
term. 

Courses II and III are elective only for those who 
have completed Course I. Mineral analysis and the de¬ 
termination of the constitution of unknown substances 
form a large part of the above courses. Besides perform¬ 
ing indicated work, the student is encouraged to enter upon 
some work of independent investigation. 

(Apparatus and material are furnished by the College; 
that broken or used is paid for by the student.) 






GENERAL INFORMATION 


LOCATION 

M IDDLEBURY COLLEGE is situated at Middlebury, 
Addison County, Vermont, a village on the Rut¬ 
land railroad, midway between Rutland and Burlington. 
The location of the College in a community within reach 
of the larger centers of population, and yet unusually free 
from the temptations often found in or near the city life, has 
justified the wise choice of the founders. The village is 
delightfully situated on the Otter River, having attractive 
views of the Champlain Valley, the Green Mountains, and 
the Adirondack^. The atmosphere is remarkable for its 
purity, being exposed to no malarial influence from any 
conceivable source. The prevailing good health of the 
students for many years has been a most gratifying fact. 
During the present year a system of village water works 
has been completed by which water of unexcelled purity is 
brought from mountain springs eight miles distant. 

EGBERT STARR LIBRARY 

During the celebration of the centennial exercises in 
July, 1900, occurred the dedication of a library building 
erected through the liberality of Egbert Starr, who be¬ 
queathed $50,000 for this purpose. To this bequest his 
son, Dr. M. Allen Starr, has added $5,000 for the decora¬ 
tion of the building, and also $5,000 for the purchase of 
books. The Library standing at the southern end of the 
campus, is of white marble and in architectural features is 
adapted from a classic design. The main room is in¬ 
tended for purposes of reading and research, where every 






GENERAL INFORMA TION 


63 


facility for consultation of standard books of reference and 
periodicals is supplied. The capacity of the stacks and 
reference room is 90,000 volumes. 

The library now contains 25,000 volumes and is a de¬ 
positary of government publications. All the books are 
accessible to students. The library is open seven hours 
each week day except Saturday, when it is open during 
the forenoon only. 

READING ROOM 

In the south division of Painter Hall there is a reading 
room containing the daily and weekly papers, open during 
each day and evening. 

WARNER SCIENCE HALL 

Warner Science Hall has been erected through the gen¬ 
erosity of Mr. Ezra J. Warner, of the Class of 1861, in 
memory of his father, Hon. Joseph Warner, formerly a 
citizen of Middlebury, and a trustee of the College from 
1850 to 1865. The cost, without apparatus, was $82,500. 
The dedication occurred on November 15 of the current 
college year, and the lecture rooms and laboratories were 
ready for the use of students immediately afterwards. 

The building is arranged for the departments of Physics, 
Biology, and Chemistry. It is located on the north-eastern 
slope of the campus and faces the south. It is of white 
Rutland marble, 112 feet in length, 80 feet in depth through 
the central portion at the ground elevation, and 46 feet at 
the ends. There is an elaborate system of ventilation by 
hoods and flues, the heating is by steam, and the illumina¬ 
tion by both gas and electricity. 

The first floor is devoted to the department of Physics. 
The Physical Lecture room, lighted on the south and east 
sides, is equipped with hot and cold water, gas, compressed 





64 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


air, and electricity. A solid masonry pier, extending to- 
bed rock foundation, forms one end of the lecturer’s desk; 
along this a beam of sunlight can be sent from the heliostat 
at one of the south windows. Opening from the lecture 
room is the apparatus room and the work shop equipped 
with lathe and necessary tools for the construction and re¬ 
pair of apparatus. 

At the west end of this floor are the Physical Laboratory,, 
the private laboratory of the instructor, and a dark room. 
The main laboratory is lighted on three sides. It has two- 
masonry piers for galvanometers and other delicate instru¬ 
ments and slate shelves fastened to the wall of the south 
side. There are tables for ordinary experimental work r 
porcelain sinks with hot and cold water, hood, and cases 
for apparatus. The dark room is fitted for work in photo¬ 
metry and photography. The private laboratory has desks 
and cases for apparatus and a departmental library con¬ 
taining periodicals and books of reference useful in the 
experimental work. 

On this floor, in the hemicycle at the north side, a lecture 
room has been arranged with one hundred and fifty seats 
for purposes of general scientific lectures. 

The second floor is given up to lecture and laboratory 
work in natural history, and to the museum exhibits. A 
wide and well-lighted hall on the north opens into three 
large rooms on the east, south, and west, the Biological 
Laboratory and Lecture Room, the Botanical Laboratory,, 
and Museum, respectively. 

The Biological Laboratory and Lecture Room is fitted 
with triple windows on the three sides. Laboratory tables 
for four students each are arranged in front of the windows. 
The central portion of the room is fitted up with chairs 
with arm supports for the purpose of taking notes and for 
recitation exercises. The lecturer’s table, cases for appa- 






GENERAL INFORMATION 


65 


ratus, and for materials used in dissections, a Wardian case 
in which plants may be kept growing free from the dele¬ 
terious influence of a changing temperature, cases of birds, 
marine invertebrates and specimens needful for continual 
reference, are conveniently arranged in this laboratory. 

The Botanical Laboratory is intended for the elective ad¬ 
vanced work in plant histology and physiologv, and on 
fungi and bacteria. It has, besides the working tables, 
lockers, sink, wall cases for laboratory supplies, reference 
books, and apparatus including compound microscopes of 
approved continental model for laboratory use, dry and 
steam sterilizers, incubator, autoclave, imbedding appara¬ 
tus, culture apparatus for work with bacteria and fungi, 
etc. A small room adjoining for the private use of the 
professor in charge has also for the use of students a hood, 
freezing apparatus, and microtome. 

At the east end of the third floor, which is entirely 
devoted to chemistry, is a lecture room, furnished with 
raised seats, for the use of the classes in this department. 
Adjoining this room are a private laboratory, for the use 
of the instructor, and the balance room equipped with 
Becker chemical balances so mounted as to be free from all 
out-side vibrations. The Quantitative Laboratory occupies 
the principal portion of the central section of the floor, and 
is furnished with desks and all necessary apparatus for 
doing thorough work in both gravimetric and volumetric 
quantitative analysis. The entire west end of the floor is 
given up to the Laboratory of general chemistry and quali¬ 
tative analysis in a room containing forty-eight individual 
desks. A hydrogen-sulphide room provided with special 
draught-hoods and drying ovens communicates with both 
the Qualitative and Quantitative laboratories; a store room, 
also accessible to both, contains chemicals and apparatus 
for immediate use. Adjoining the Quantitative Laboratory 







66 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


is a dark room for the storage of chemicals sensitive to 
light and for work in photography. On the basement 
floor a fire proof room is provided for work in organic 
chemistry. 

The laboratories are furnished throughout with running 
water, pneumatic troughs, draught hoods, gas, and elec¬ 
tricity; several Sprengel Bunsen pumps are provided for 
rapid filtrations and for producing air blasts in blow-pipe 
analysis. There is a departmental library, where all the 
important books of reference are to be found and the lead¬ 
ing chemical journals are kept on file. 

All work in the chemical laboratories is conducted 
under the direct supervision of the Professor of the depart¬ 
ment. 


MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY 

In the Museum on the second floor of the Warner Science 
Hall the natural history collections are arranged. In 
zoology the native birds are represented, and also sponges, 
corals, and other marine forms, contributed in part from 
the collections of the United States Fish Commission. 

A collection representing the rocks of the state was made 
during a geological survey conducted by Professor Adams, 
then occupying the chair of Natural History. He also ar¬ 
ranged a series of fossils representing the different geolog¬ 
ical formations, and this collection has since been enriched 
by notable additions from many sources. Besides this gen¬ 
eral series, a special collection of the fossils of the Cham¬ 
plain valley has been made, largely by Professor Seeley. 

For instruction in mineralogy, a complete working set of 
minerals is to be found upon the shelves, and material for 
the study of general petrology is also abundant. 

A valuable collection of shells for instruction in con- 
chology is contained in the Museum; also a full series 









GENERAL INFORMATION 


67 


of the land and water shells of Vermont collected and ar¬ 
ranged by Professor Adams. 

The Herbarium is located in a specially adapted room 
on the ground floor. It contains a complete series of the 
flowering plants and ferns of the Champlain valley, col¬ 
lected by President Brainerd, a collection which, during 
the recent activity in systematic botany, has been kept up 
to date by yearly additions. Collections of the crypto¬ 
gams—and more especially of the higher fungi of Ver¬ 
mont—are now being accumulated by Professor Burt. 

The Professor of Natural History is Curator of the 
Museum. 


MUSEUM 

On the first floor of the Chapel building rooms are ar¬ 
ranged for purposes of a general museum. The collection 
now includes valuable Assyrian tablets, slabs and casts and 
other objects of interest in Semitic history, a set of the cos¬ 
tumes and implements of the natives of the Yukon valley, 
and relics of local and general historic interest. 

DORMITORIES 

Starr Hall has accommodations for sixty-four men. 
Each suite consists of a study, a bedroom, and closets, and 
will accommodate two students. 

Painter Hall has thirteen suites of rooms, which are 
intended for two men each. These suites have study, bed¬ 
room, and closet, are heated with steam and lighted with 
electiicity. In this building, in addition to the room rent, 
there is a charge of $25 a year for each suite for heat and 
light; this bill must be settled at the end of the Fall term. 

The rooms in both halls are unfurnished. 







68 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


BATTELL HALL 

The large dwelling-house, built by President Kitchel 
and purchased by the college with funds bequeathed by 
Hon. Joseph Battell of the class of 1823, is fitted up for the 
use of the young women in college. The building is 
heated with steam, the rooms are all comfortably furnished 
except with lamps and linen, and the management is placed 
in the hands of a competent matron, Mrs. Charles N. 
Brainerd. By this arrangement room and board are fur¬ 
nished for $4 a week. 

RELIGIOUS SERVICES 

The exercises of each day except Sunday begin with 
religious services, which all students must attend. 

They are also required to attend public worship on Sun¬ 
day morning, at such churches as are decided upon by the 
students or their parents. 

In a room fitted up for the purpose, the Young Men’s 
Christian Association holds meetings on Tuesday evenings 
and the Young Women’s Christian Association on Wed¬ 
nesday afternoons, to which the students are welcome. 

ATHLETICS 

At the west of the college buildings is the Athletic Field. 
A running track, one quarter of a mile in length, encloses 
the base ball and the foot ball grounds. A grand stand 
gives accommodation for 400 spectators. Near by ample 
space is provided for the tennis courts belonging to various 
associations. 

The athletic interests of the College are controlled by 
the Athletic Association of the students acting together 
with a committee from the Faculty. 






GENERAL INFORMATION 


69 


GYM NASIUM 

The Gymnasium in the south division of Painter Hall is 
supplied with apparatus adapted to the systematic physical 
development of the students. In connection with it are 
bath rooms and a dressing-room furnished with lockers. 
It is open during the whole day and evening. 

EXPENSES 

The following statement embraces the principal neces¬ 
sary expenses of a man during a collegiate year, except for 


clothing and text-books : 

Tuition,.- - - - $ 60.00 

Annual Fee for incidentals (covering expenses of public 

rooms, library, reading-room, gymnasium, etc.) - 12.00 

Room Rent in Starr or Painter Hall, - 15*00 

Board for 37 weeks, at $2.75, ------ ior.75 

Fuel, lights, and washing, ------ 25.00 


$ 213-75 

Laboratory fees additional:— 

Elective physics,.$3-oo per term. 

Elective biology, - 3.00 per term. 

Required chemistry (two terms), - - 2.00 per term. 

Elective chemistry, ----- 3.00 per term. 


After January 1, 1902, the tuition will be $80 per year. 
This will not apply to students who have entered college 
before that date. 

The expenses for room rent, fuel, and lights are estimated 
on the supposition that two students occupy a room. This 
is required in Painter Hall, but a student may room alone 
in Starr Hall. Where a student rooms alone the charge 
for rent is $24.00 per year. Besides the expenses given 
there are others voluntarily imposed as taxes by classes and 
fraternities. These, and the expenses for clothing, fur¬ 
niture, books, etc., will vary with circumstances and the 
habits of the student. 








70 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


By practicing rigid economy a student can limit the 
cost of the college year to $300.00, while $400.00 will be 
a liberal allowance. This estimate does not include ex¬ 
penses for travel or clothing, and it may be diminished by 
scholarships and prizes. 

All college bills are to be settled annually, such settle¬ 
ment being a condition precedent to the continuance of the 
student in college; the college bills of Seniors must be set¬ 
tled not later than two months before Commencement. 

The Rutland Railroad and Central Vermont Railroad 
carry students for two cents a mile between Middlebury 
and their places of residence. 

BENEFICENT FUNDS 

The Waldo Fund, given by the late Mrs. Catharine 
Waldo of Boston, and the Baldwin Fund, received from 
the estate of the late John C. Baldwin, Esq., of Orange, 
N. J., furnish liberal aid in payment of term bills of stu¬ 
dents. The income of these funds is used : 

1. In canceling the term bills, to the amount of $So, 
of each of twelve students, whose scholarship, deportment, 
and necessities warrant such a benefaction. 

2. In canceling, wholly or in part, the term bills of 
such other students as are provided for by the terms of the 
legacies. 

The income of the Warren Fund is applied in payment 
of the term bills of those who are preparing for the Gospel 
Ministry. Those preparing for the Congregational Minis¬ 
try can also receive aid, after the Freshman year, from the 
American Education Society, usually to the amount of $75 
annually. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

A Scholarship Fund has been secured, which may be 
made available to those whose circumstances require it. 










GENERAL INFORMATION 


71 


The control of these scholarships is in the hands of indi¬ 
vidual proprietors, but students of good character and 
correct deportment can usually obtain assistance from this 
source. 

By a gift of $2,000 from the Emma Willard Asso¬ 
ciation, a scholarship paying $100 annually has been estab¬ 
lished for deserving young women. 

In addition to these, the following Scholarships, pro¬ 
vided by donations of $1,000 each, yield to the persons 
placed upon them by the donor the sum of $60 a year to 
be credited upon the term bills: two “Fairbanks Scholar¬ 
ships,” by Thaddeus Fairbanks, Esq., of St. Johnsbury, 
Vt. ; the “Levi Parsons Scholarship” and the “Daniel O. 
Morton Scholarship,” by Hon. Levi Parsons Morton, of 
New York City; the “Penfield Scholarship,” by Allen 
Penfield, Esq., of Burlington, Vt. 

It is to be understood that negligence or misconduct will 
forfeit beneficiary aid. 

STATE SCHOLARSHIPS 

An annual appropriation from the State of Vermont 
pays to the amount of $So annually “the tuition and inci¬ 
dental college charges of thirty students, one of whom 
shall be designated and appointed by each Senator in the 
General Assembly, such appointment to be made by such 
Senator from his respective county, provided any suitable 
candidate shall apply therefor, otherwise from any county 
in the State.” 

Any person, prepared to enter college, desiring to take 
advantage of a State scholarship, should apply to one of 
the Senators of the county in which he resides, and the 
Senator may thereupon give him a certificate of appoint¬ 
ment, holding good for two years, which will admit him 
to the college without other conditions than those required 






72 


MIDDLE BURY COLLEGE 


of all other students. Should the Senators in the appli¬ 
cant’s county already have made their appointments, the 
student should immediately apply to the President of the 
College, as there may be a vacancy from some other county 
of which the applicant may avail himself. 

Under this act students of both sexes are eligible for 
appointment to a State scholarship. 

RECORD OF SCHOLARSHIP 

A class-book is kept by each instructor, in which the 
character of each student’s recitation is noted. At the 
close of a study, any student who desires it may receive 
from the secretary of the Faculty a general statement of 
his rank in that study. If he has attained 90 per cent, or 
above, his rank is reported as A, or excellent; if between 
80 and 90 per cent., as B, or good; if between 70 and 80 
per cent., as C, or fair; if between 60 and 70 per cent., as* 
D; if below 60 per cent., the student is not allowed to 
pass in that study. These reports are also given to parents 
upon request. 

HONORARY APPOINTMENTS 

The Faculty, under the direction of the Corporation, 
give to the first third of each class, on the basis of scholar¬ 
ship, honorary appointments for Junior Exhibition and for 
Commencement. Those receiving honorary appointments 
for Commencement are eligible for election to the Phi Beta 
Kappa Society, provided that they have attained an average 
rank for the entire course of eighty-five per cent. 

SPECIAL HONORS 

To promote and encourage special investigation in the 
various departments of liberal study, the Faculty have 
established a system of honors. These are divided into 






GENERAL INFORMATION 


73 


two classes, called Honors and Highest Honors. They 
are awarded in the following departments: 

(i) Greek; (2) Latin; (3) German; (4) French; (5) 

English ; (6) Philosophy; (7) History and Political Science ; 
(8) Mathematics; (9) Physics ; (10) Natural History; 

(11) Chemistry. 

These honors are awarded on two conditions: 

1. The attainment of 80 per cent, for Honors, and 90 
per cent, for Highest Honors as an average rank in all the 
studies of the department in which the honors are sought. 

2. The performance of satisfactory additional work, 
assigned by the Professor, which must be of a superior 
quality for the attainment of Highest Honors. 

These honors will be printed on the Commencement pro¬ 
gram and in the next annual catalogue, and will be certified 
to when requested, by a written certificate from the Presi¬ 
dent and the Professor of the department, stating the nature 
and quality of the extra work done. 

PRIZES 

By bequest of the Rev. Thomas A. Merrill, D. D., 
the College received the sum of fifteen hundred dollars, 
the interest of which is applied annually “for the en¬ 
couragement and improvement of elocution.” Doctor 
Merrill, a graduate of Dartmouth College in the Class of 
1801, was for fifty years a resident of Middlebury and for 
thirty-seven years pastor of its Congregational Church. 
For the Merrill Prizes not less than eight nor more than 
twelve competitors are appointed from the Sophomore 
class in such manner as the Faculty shall deem expedient. 
There are four awards, the first $25, the second $20, the 
third $15, and the fourth $10. 







74 


MIDDLE BURY COLLEGE 


The Parker Prizes are given to the two of the four com¬ 
petitors in the Freshman class who are judged the best 
speakers; the first prize is $20, the second $10. 

EXAMINATIONS 

All classes are examined in the studies pursued, either 
at the close of the term, or of the study. If a student, for 
any cause whatever, has been absent from ten per cent, or 
more of the recitations of the study, he will be required to 
take a preliminary examination before the time of the 
regular examination. 

DEGREE OF MASTER OF ARTS 

The degree of Master of Arts is conferred on the follow¬ 
ing conditions: 

1. The candidate must have a Baccalaureate degree 
from this college or from one having an equivalent curric¬ 
ulum. 

2. He must have completed a thorough course of grad¬ 
uate study, not professional, in some special branch ap¬ 
proved by the Faculty, sufficient in amount to be a fair 
equivalent for a fifth year of college work; in proof of 
which he must present a thesis and pass a satisfactory ex¬ 
amination. 

3. By continuous residence at the college, a candidate 
fulfilling the above requirements may receive the degree 
one year after graduation. In case of partial or complete 
non-residence, the degree will not be conferred in less than 
two years after graduation. 

4. On registration as candidate a fee of $5 will be 
charged. Resident candidates will receive tuition free, but 
all other charges will be the same as for undergraduates. 
Before the degree is conferred an additional fee of $5 for 
a resident and $10 for a non-resident will be required. 







GENERAL INFORMATION 


75 


CENTENNIAL BOOK 

The Centennial Book containing an account of the ob¬ 
servances of Centennial week, July, 1900, together with 
the addresses delivered at the various exercises, has been 
placed upon sale at the Library at the price of $2.00 per 
copy. 

GENERAL CATALOGUE 

Work upon a new general catalogue is nearly completed 
and the volume will be issued during the present year. 

NECROLOGY 

For the Obituary Record, brief biographical notices of 
deceased graduates are desired. Any person who. can 
furnish such notices will confer a favor by sending them to 
President Ezra Brainerd. 






DEGREES CONFERRED IN I90J 


HONORARY DEGREES 

LL. D. 

Henry Franklin Severens, ’57. Edwin Hall Higley, ’68. 

Hon. Chester McLaughlin. 


DEGREES IN COURSE 
A. M. 

George William Stone, ’99. Guy Bertram Horton, 1900. 


A. B. 

Lemuel Ransom Brown, Dorothy Mary Graves, 

Reid Langdon Carr, Nellie Maria Hadley, 

Bert Linus Stafford, Charlotte May Johnson, 

Henry Charles'Tong, Marianne Frances Landon, 

Glenn William White, Florence Judith Walker, 

Rena Ellen Avery, Mildred Abbie Weld. 

B. S. 


Fred John Bailey, 

Walter Mason Barnard, 
David Flagg Clark, 

William Anderson Janes, 
Ellsworth Colonel Lawrence, 
Allen Henry Nelson, 

John Earle Parker, 

Roy Sumner Stearns, 


Alice Warren Brooks, 
Nellie Irene Button, 
Cecile Maud Child, 
Gertrude Ella Cornish, 
Grace Elizabeth James, 
Laura Ellah Jarvis, 
Fannie Electa Smith, 
Lena Berniece Thomas. 






APPOINTMENTS AND AWARDS 


COMMENCEMENT APPOINTMENTS 

VALEDICTORY ADDRESS 

Reid Langdon Carr. 

SALUTATORY ADDRESS 

Gertrude Ella Cornish. 

HONORARY APPOINTMENTS 


Nellie Maria Hadley, 
Grace Elizabeth James, 
Laura Ellah Jarvis, 


Lemuel Ransom Brown, 


Rena Ellen Avery, 
Cecile Maud Child, 


Charlotte May Johnson. 

HIGHEST SECOND YEAR HONORS IN LATIN 


Charlotte May Johnson. 


Gertrude Ella Cornish, 


SECOND YEAR HONORS IN LATIN 

Laura Ellah Jarvis. 

HONORS IN ENGLISH 

Charlotte May Johnson. 


HIGHEST HONORS IN JURISPRUDENCE AND HISTORY 

Ellsworth Colonel Lawrence. 


HIGHEST HONORS IN CHEMISTRY 

Charlotte May Johnson. 

HONORS IN CHEMISTRY 

Florence JudithJVValker. 







JUNIOR EXHIBITION HONORS 


John Reginald Duffield, 
Gilbert Waldo Roberts, 
Percival Wilds, 


Edith Florence Barrett, 
Elizabeth Bowles, 

Anna Keyes Deuel, 


Mabel Allard Ryder. 

These honors are of equal rank. 

MERRILL PRIZES 

Class of 1903 

First Prize. —Duane Leroy Robinson, 
Second Prize .— Charles Whitney, 

Third Prize .— Ralph Waldo Thompson, 
Fourth Prize .— Learned Ray Noble. 


PARKER PRIZES 


Class of 1904 


First Prize. —George Race Wilson, 
Second Prize. —Leslie Ernest Sunderland. 





STUDENTS 


SENIORS— CLASS OF 1902 


David Arthur Burke, 

Port Henry, N. Y., 

Mr. Burke’s. 

Orvis K. Collins, 

Ferrisburg, 

Battell Block. 

George Rufus Drake, 

Bristol, 

f 17 P. H. 

John Reginald Duffield, 

Rutland, 

Mr. Taylor’s. 

Frederick Arthur Hughes, 

Middlebury, 

Mr. Hughes’s. 

Frederick Bingham Miner, 

Bridport, 

Mr. Towle’s. 

Gilbert Waldo Roberts, 

New York, N. Y., 

16 P. H. 

Archie Chester Sheldon, 

East Middlebury, 

Battell Block. 

Fay Alton Simmons, 

Dorset , 

Battell Block. 

Wilfred Judson Stone, 

Vcrgennes, 

Battell Block. 

John Everett Thompson, 

Tarry town, N. Y, 

18 P. II. 

Charles Arthur Voetsch, 

New York, N. Y., 

8 P. H. 

Julius Abner Wilcox, 

Crown Poijit , N. Y., 

Mr. Towle’s. 

Percival Wilds, 

Middlebury, 

Mr. Skiff’s. 

Edith Florence Barrett, 

Manchester Center, 

Mr. Goyett’s. 

Elizabeth Bowles, 

Middlebury, 

Mrs. Avery’s. 

Bertha Ruth Collins, 

Ferrisburg, 

Mr. Howes’s. 

Anna Keese Deuel, 

Millbrook, N Y , Mr. 

C. J. Seeley’s. 

Ruth Sophia Murdoch, 

Akron, O ., 

Battell Hall. 

JUNIORS- 

-CLASS OF 1903 


Charles Warren Allen, 

Ferrisburg, 

* 31 S. H. 

Elbert Sidney Brigham, 

Si. Albans, 

Mr. Towle’s. 

Nelson Clarke Dale, 

Pittsfield, Mass., 

14 P. H. 

Burton Blakeslee Dimmock, 

West Cornwall , 

Logan House. 

Mortimer Vincent Drake, 

Ticonderoga, N Y , Mr. Marsailles’s. 

Henry Franklin Harvey, 

Bristol, 

9 S. H. 

David Ashley Hooker, 

Marshfield , Mass ., 

7 P. H. 

Frank Richmond Ingalsbe, 

Oakfield, N. Y ., 

14 P. H. 


f Abbreviation for Painter Hall. 
* Abbreviation for Starr Hall 












80 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Claud Frederick Lester, 
James Ira Newton, 
Learned Ray Noble, 
Duane Leroy Robinson, 
George William Skeels, 
Charles Preston Stubbs, 
Albert Edson Taylor, 
Ralph Waldo Thompson, 
Joseph Thurlow Weed, 
Garfield Minot Weld, 
Charles Whitney, 

Albert Edwin Withered, 
James Maynara Wright, 


Ticonderoga , N. V., 
Sidney, N. Y., 
Tinmouth, 

Strcetroad, N. V., 
Swanton, 

Macon, Ga., 

Alassena, N. Y., 

Wey bridge, 
Ticonderoga, N. Y., 
New Haven, 

Fran Jilin, Mr. 

Cornwall, 

North Hartland, 


7 P. H. 
9 P. H. 
32 S. H. 
Mr. Marsailles’s. 

15 P. H. 

12 S. H. 
15 S. H. 
Mr. Thompson’s. 

xo P. PI. 
6 P. H. 
E. H. Thomas’s. 
15 P. H. 
io P. H. 


Lena Mae Bixby, 

Leila Frances Dustin, 
Amelia Elizabeth Hausman, 
Anna Sarah Hazen, 

Lottie Mae Hull, 

Bertha Mabel Kelsey, 

Mary Eva Munsey, 

Elizabeth May Salisbury, 
Maude Winifred Smith, 
Elizabeth Augusta Williams, 


Springfield , Prof. Boyce’s. 

Brushton , N. Y. , Battell Hall. 

E.Nort/field,Mass., Mr. H. Hammond’s. 
East Wallingford, Mr. Merrill’s. 

Shoreham, Mrs. H. B. Wright’s. 

Middle bury, Mr. Howes’s. 

Su?icook, N. //., Mr. H. Hammond’s. 
Somerville, Mass., Mr. Merrill’s. 

Aliddlebury , Mrs. O. Smith’s. 

Poultney, Mr. Skiff’s. 


Sophomores—Class of 1904 


Allen Merritt Barrett, 

Stanley Frank Bond, 

Charles McNeil Crowell, 
Edmund Thompson Duffield, 
Arthur William Eddy, 

James Buckley Gooding, 
William Henry Hammersley, 
Roy Warner Jocelyn, 

Hugh Garfield Lynde, 

Harry Foster Markolf, 

Philip Edwin Mellen, 

Carl Abbott Perkins, 

Roy Martin Reed, 

William Ernest Slocum, Jr., 
Louis Clare Squire, 


Manchester Center, 
Middlebury, Mr, 

Alarblehead, Mass., 
Rutland, Mr. 

North Bangor, N. Y., 
Port Henry, N. Y., 
Waterford, N. Y ., 

East Swanton, 
Brattleboro, 

West Rutland, 
Aliddlebury, 

East Walpole, Mass ., 
South Alabama , N. Y ., 
Chicago, III., 

Council Bluff's, la., 


Mr. Moore’s. 
. E. E. Bond’s. 

Mr. Moore’s. 
I. M. Taylor’s. 
Mr. Eddy’s. 
14 S. H. 
26 S. H. 
8 P. H. 
30 S. H. 
18 P. H. 
Dr. Mellen’s. 
13 P. H. 
13 P- H. 
26 S. H. 
13 S. H. 












STUDENTS 


81 


Leslie Ernest Sunderland, 

West Cornwall, Mr. J. 

T. Kingsley’s. 

Richard Harold Warner, 

Port Henry, N. Y., Mr 

F. A. Bond’s- 

Edwin Walter Wilcox, 

Crow7i Point, N. Y., 

Mr. Towle’s. 

George Race Wilson, 

Raceviile , N. Y., 

30 S. H. 

Florence Louise Bemis, 

Charlemont, Mass., 

Battell Hall. 

Alice Beaumelle Brainerd, 

Middlebury, President Brainerd’s. 

Elna Garfield Coates, 

Marblehead,Mass., Mr. H. Hammond’s. 

Mary Wheaton Hager, 

South Deerfield, Mass ., 

Battell Hall. 

Florence Elizabeth Perley, 

Fnosburg, 

Mr. Wales’s. 

Jessie Maude Prentis, 

Waitsfield, 

Mr. Goyett’s. 

Josie May Prentis, 

Waitsfield, 

Mr. Goyett’s. 

Maude.Mary Tucker, 

Middlebury, Mrs. Stickney’s. 

Mabel Witmer, 

West Rupert, 

Battell Hall. 

FRESHMEN 

-CLASS OF 1905 


Samuel Lee Abbott, 

Bethel, 

15 P. II. 

Allen Dorval Ball, 

Ludlow, 

ii S. H. 

Charles Gardner Barnum, 

Coriiwall , 

27 S. H. 

Chester Blinn Clapp, 

Marblehead, Mass. , 

9 S. H. 

Harry Sylvester Fisher, 

Middlebury , 

Mr. Fisher’s. 

Harry Hazelton Holt, 

West Rutland, 

31 S. H. 

Joyce Walter Kingsley, 

New Haven , 

9 P. H. 

Sanford Henry Lane, 

Middlebury, 

ii S. H. 

Edward Hamilton Peet, 

Cornwall, 

27 S. H. 

Adolphus Christian Pilger, 

Vergeniies, 

32 S. H. 

Richard Smith Read, 

Newbu rgh-on-Hudson, 

Mr. Eddy’s. 

Percy Llewellyn Roberts, 

Flushing, N. Y., 

16 P. H. 

Walter Daniel Shea, 

Middlebury, Mr. 

Daniel Shea’s. 

James Forrest Taylor, 

liconderoga, N. Y., Mrs. Rockwood’s. 

Charles Beane Weld, 

New Have?i, 

6 P. H. 

Clark Jay Willson, 

Louisville, N. Y., 

15 S. H. 

Isabella Theobald Mather Blake 

, Westfield, Mass., 

Battell Hall. 

Bessie Mabel Bump, 

West Salisbury, 

Mr. Goyett’s. 

Elizabeth Ham Deuel, 

Milbrook, N. Y., Mr. 

C. J. Seeley’s. 

Bertha Chandler Duncan, 

Ha)icock, N. //., 

Battell Hall. 

Helen Haslam Fielden, 

A in esbu ry, Mass., 

Battell Hall. 

Bessie Bacheller Freeto, 

Marblehead, Mass., 

Battell Hall. 

Florence Elizabeth Giddings, 

Bakersfield, 

Mr. Wales’s. 






82 


MIDDLEBURY COLLEGE 


Lena May Goodwin, 

Alice Hannah Johnson, 

Jeffries Wilhelmina Leete, 
Mary Genevieve McMahon, 
Bessie Adair Merrrell, 

Emma Blanche Moore, 

Lillie May Neff, 

Alice Jeannette Potter, 

Alice Dutton Richmond, 

Lora Prudence Stickney, 

Eliza Vickery, 

Frances Helen Collins Warner, 


Marblehead, Mass ., 

IVo rcester , Muss ., 
Claremont , N. H. , 
Middlebury , Mr. P 

Wall i?igfo rd, 
Middlebury , 

Swanton , Mr. 

Marblehead , Mass.) 
Northfield , 

Middlebury , 
Marblehead , A/«ss., 
Middlebury , 


Battell Hall. 
Battell Hall. 
Mr. Mills’s. 
H. McMahon’s. 
Mrs. Avery’s. 
Mr. Moore’s. 
H. Hammond’s. 
Battell Hall. 
Mr. Jackson’s. 
Mrs. Stickney’s. 
Mr. Merrill’s. 
Mrs. Warner’s. 


SUMMARY 


Seniors, ------- 19 

Juniors, ------ 31 

Sophomores, - - - - - - 28 

Freshmen, ------ 35 


113 


Total, 







CALENDAR 


1901. 

June 26, Wednesday—Commencement. 

SUMMER VACATION OF TWELVE WEEKS 

September 18, Wednesday—Entrance Examinations. 

September 19, Thursday, 8.45 A. M.—Fall Term began. 
November 15, Friday—Dedication of Warner Science Hall. 
November 27, ) Wednesday, 12.30 P. M., to Monday, 12.30 P. M., 
December 2, j —Thanksgiving Recess. 

Decembei 16, ) Monday—Friday—Term Examinations. 

December 20, j J J 

December 20, Friday 12.30 P. M.—Fall Term ends. 

WINTER VACATION OF SEVENTEEN DAYS 

1902. 

January 7, Tuesday, 8.45 A. M.—Winter Term begins. 
February 9, Sunday—Day of Prayer for Colleges. 

February 22, Saturday—Washington’s Birthday. 

March 25’ } Wednesday—Friday—Term Examinations. 

March 25, Tuesday evening—Junior Exhibition. 

March 25, Tuesday—Winter Term ends. 

SPRING VACATION OF EIGHT DAYS 

April 3, Thursday, 8.45 A. M.—Spring Term begins. 

May 30, Friday—Memorial Day. 

June 22, Sunday, 10.45 A. M.—Baccalaureate Sermon. 

8.00 P. I\J.—Anniversary of the Christian 
Associations. 

June 23, Monday—Class Day. 

June 24, Tuesday, 10.00 A. M.—Preliminary Meeting of Associ¬ 
ated Alumni. 

11.00 A. M.—Anniversary of Associated Alumni. 
2.00 P. M.—Address before Phi Beta Kappa 
Society. 

8.00 P. M.—Parker and Merrill Prize Speaking. 
June 25, Wednesday, 8.30 A. M.—Adjourned Meeting of Associa¬ 
ted Alumni. 

10.30 A. M.—Commencement Exercises. 
2.00 P. M.—Commencement Dinner. 

8.00 P. M.—President’s Reception. 

SUMMER VACATION OF TWELVE WEEKS 

September 18, Thursday, 8.45 A. M.—Fall Term begins. 
December 19, Friday, 12.30 P. M.—Fall Term ends. 





INDEX 


Admission, Terms of, 13-23. 

By Certificate, 22. 

Bachelor of Arts Course, 13-18. 
Bachelor of Science Course, 
19-22. 

To Advanced Standing, 22-23. 
To Graduate Study, 74. 

Aid for Students, 72. 
Appointments and Awards, 77-78. 
Appointments, Honorary, 72. 
Athletics, 68. 

Battell Hall, 68. 

Beneficent Funds, 70. 

Biological Laboratory, 64-65. 
Botany, Department of, 59-60. 
Calendar, 83. 

Catalogue, General, 75. 

Centennial Book, 75. 

Chemical Laboratory^ 65-66. 
Chemistry, Department of, 60-61. 
Bachelor of Arts Course, Fresh¬ 
man Year, 25-26. 

Sophomore Year, 27-29. 

Junior Year, 30-35. 

Senior Year, 35-41. 

Corporation, 10. 

Committees of, 10. 

Degrees Conferred, 76. 
Dormitories, 67-68. 

Elective Courses, Rules regard¬ 
ing, 24. 

English, Department of, 51-52. 
Examinations, 74. 

Expenses, 69-70. 

Extra Studies, 24. 

Faculty and Officers, 11-12. 

Fees for Admission to Advanced 
Standing, 23. 

For Degree of Master of Arts, 74. 
Geology, Department of, 60. 
German and French, Department 
of, 50-51. 

Greek, Department of, 47-48. 
Gymnasium, 69. 

Herbarium, 67. 

Historical Matter, 3-9. 

Extracts from the Charter, 5. 
Legislative Action, 4-5. 

List of Presidents, 5-9. 


History, Department of, 53-54. 
Honors, Special, 72-73. 

Hours, Number of Required and 
Elective, 24. 

Instruction, Courses of, 24-46. 

Departments of, 47-61. 

Latin, Department of, 48-50. 
Bachelor of Science Course, Fresh¬ 
man Year, 41-43. 

Sophomore Year, 43-46. 

Junior Year, 46. 

Senior Year, 46. 

Library, 62-63. 

Location, 62. 

Master of Arts, Degree of, 74. 
Mathematics and’Astronomv, De¬ 
partment of, 55-56. 

Mechanics and Physics, Depart¬ 
ment of, 56-57. 

Moral Science, 52-53. 

Museum, General, 67. 

Natural History, 66-67. 

Natural History, Department of, 
57 - 6 o. 

Necrology, 75. 

Pedagogy, Department of, 53. 

Phi Beta Kappa Society, 72. 
Philosophy, Department of, 52-53. 
Physical Laboratory, 63-64. 
Political Science, Department of, 
54 - 55 - 

Prizes, 73 - 74 - 
Psychology, 52. 

Reading Room, 63. 

Record of Scholarship, 72. 

Religious Services, 68. 

R. R. Fare, Reduction of, 70. 
Scholarships, 70-72. 

State, 71-72. 

Students, List of, 79-82. 

Tuition, 69. 

Warner Science Hall, 63-67 
Women, Admission of, 23. 

Y. M. C. A., 68. 

Y. W. C. A., 68. 

Zoology, Department of, 58.