Skip to main content

Full text of "The Echo [1924]"

See other formats







V',.. 


m 


m 






. 


pmti 

if 



/////;■ 
v ( /: / // , 


"X. ‘ 


W*8&& ■■ . ';■■v-i-; 


$*/% ! ; '- V • ; •, 

■ 


‘ n W:4s 


Sr , v>' £3th££"-» • - 
X;Vf.' •. *>. ■, ■•,. -*■ . 


v I » '7V 1* , •», 








i58k 




ROWAN PUBLIC 


I B R A R Y 


Given in memory of 
Harold Grier McCurdy 
by 

Erma H. Kirkpatrick 


K3& 


• y ■>>. . . , v 


•'.j- 




it--. - v 

. ' > *'•: 


•svw. - 




M&Vit. ' 


' 


ay 








■JTS j 


2 w 


Echo 


( (( (((((( 111 ( 1 ( 1 ( 11(11 

I t ( I i t ( 

?C00tS^4'C' 










4 




VOLUME FOUK 

1924 



Published by the students of the 

Salisbury High School 

Salisbury, N. C. 


ROWAN PUBLIC LIBRARY 
SALISBURY, N,C 






City Board of Education 

COL. A. H. BOYDEN, Chairman 
H. P. BRANDIS 
T. C. CONELY 
H. W. DAVIS 

REV. EDWARD FULENWIDER 
A. G. PEELER 
W. M. RUTH 
J. F. SOMERS 


MRS. W. W. WE A NT 


FOREWORD 


I N compiling this, the fourth volume of the 
Echo, we have endeavored to portray as 
fairly as possible the scenes and happen¬ 
ings of our last year at dear old S. H. S. and 
thus form a permanent record for ourselves 
of happy days gone forever. 




iiH^i;aigiw i«iBiigiigi igiisiisiigiiaigiiaiig|giBi WB iigiigiBiw»asiig 






4 


THE ECHO 



Miss Mabel Lippard 








THE ECHO 


Dedicated to 

MISS MABEL LIPPARD 
in recognition of her time and work 
so unselfishly rendered 
to this magazine 
and of 

the deep interest that she has taken 


in the success of the members 
of the Class of ’24 




6 


THE ECHO 



* 


Faculty 




THE ECHO 


7 


Our Faculty 

SUPERINTENDENT 

MR. T. WINGATE ANDREWS_ Salisbury, N. C. 

PRINCIPAL 

MR. FRANK B. JOHN ___ Laurinburg, N. C. 

MATHEMATICS 

MISS JULIA WHARTON GROVES__ Salisbury, N. C. 

MISS FLORENCE WHARTON_ Salisbury, N. C. 

MR. W. M. PICKENS_ Albemarle, N. C. 

MR. R. E. BOYD_Gastonia, N. C. 

HISTORY 

MISS MAY MEADOR _ High Point, N. C. 

MISS BELLE HAMPTON _ Chapel Hill, N. C. 

MISS ALBERTA MONROE _ Biscoe, N. C. 

MISS JESSIE LAWRENCE_Salisbury, N. C. 

ENGLISH 

MISS MABEL LIPPARD _ Concord, N. C. 

MISS MARY HARRELL_Bessemer City, N. C. 

MISS ETHEL BROWN_ Catawba, N. C. 

MISS JESSIE THOMPSON_High Point, N. C. 

MISS LILLIE PARKS___Woodruff, S .C. 

SCIENCE 

DR. FLORENCE HARPHAM_ Salisbury, N. C. 

MR. CHAS. F. DANIEL_ Landrum, S. C. 

LATIN 

MISS HULDA LATTA_ Oxford, N. C. 

MISS ANNIE GRABBER_Salisbury, N. C. 

FRENCH 

MR. J. ALLAN DUNN _ Salisbury, N. C. 

MUSIC 


MR. FRANCIS GRIFFITH 


Salisbury, N. C. 

























THE ECHO 


Significant Dates at S. H. S. 


September 10th—School opens. Everyone downcast. 

September 11th—Numerous groups of wide-eyed Freshmen timidly appear on the 
playground. 

September 28th—Football season begins. Salisbury versus Concord. 

October 5th—Circus—holiday. 

October 10th—First reports are out. Many good resolutions are past. 

October 18th—Teachers decamp for Charlotte. Much rejoicing. 

November 14th-—Football game at Davidson. Senior teachers report numerous 
afternoon absences. 

November 29th—Beginning of Thanksgiving Holidays. Many thanks returned. 

December 6th—11-A becomes accustomed to the lecture course on the manner in which 
ladies and gentlemen should conduct themselves in a school-room. 

December 21st—Christmas approaching. Much restlessness. 

January 2nd—School reopens. Many sleepy students. 

January 21st—Exemption list read. Some great disappointments. 

January 22nd to 24th—School suffused in exams. 

February 1st—Same old struggles. 

March 28th—Senior party. Many new Seniors discovered. 

April 8th—Another circus in town. Holiday extracted. 

April 11th—Junior-Senior. Chaperones in evidence. 

April 21st—Salisbury beat Spencer! 

April 22nd—Easter Holidays over. 

May 2nd—“Clarence.” Big success. 

May 5th—Spring fever prevalent. 

May 9th—Memorial Day. 

May 16th—“Fun for Folks.” 

May 26th—Chautauqua and finals arrive together. 

May 31st-June 2nd—Commencement exercises. 























































10 


THE ECHO 



Senior Class Officers 


Mary Baker_ 

Joe Overton _ 

Elizabeth Sifferd 
Billy Owen _ 


_President 

Vice-president 

_ Secretary 

_ Treasurer 













THE ECHO 


11 


GEORGE ANDERSON 
“Knowledge comes, but wisdom lingers.” 

Entered ’20; Science Course; Hi-Y ’22. 

George’s wisdom lingers all over his report 
card in the eye-pleasing shape of E’s. Espe¬ 
cially does he shine in Physics. Although 
generally rather quiet whenever a question 
of weight arises he always has a suggestion 
to offer and it is usually a good one. If he 
continues in his present path, success awaits 
him just around the corner. 


COUNCIL ARCHIE 

“No farther seek his merits to disclose.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course ; Debating Society 
’20 ; Senior Hi-Y ’24. 

Council is a jolly good fellow. He has 
taken life easy in high school, but, never¬ 
theless, he has gotten through. We hope 
he will not find college any harder next year. 


BEATRICE BAITY 

“Her voice was ever soft, gentle, and low 
An exceilent thing in a woman.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course. 

Beatrice is one of our demure, quiet mem¬ 
bers. She seldom speaks but is a hard worker 
and well deserves her diploma. 


LUCILLE BAKER 

“She’s not afraid to say her say, tho the 
whole world be against her.” 

Entered ’21 ; Science Course; Girls’ Athletic 
Association ’22, ’23, ’24 ; Basket-ball Tourna¬ 
ment, ’22, ’23. 

Imagine 11-B without “the little Bakers!” 
It can’t be done ! For a year, Lucille and her 
sister, Mary, have set the standard of intelli¬ 
gence for that notorious class. Fortunately, 
Lucille has escaped the “chronic case of lazi¬ 
ness” and we are sure that her academic 
knowledge will enlighten those with whom 
she comes in contact next year. 









12 


THE ECHO 



MARY BAKER 

“’Tis good will that makes intelligence. 

Entered ’21 ; Girls’ Athletic Association 

'21, ’22 ; Basket-ball Tournament *21, ’22 ; 

President of class ’24. 

Although she swipes her sisters’s rouge, 
Mary gets her work honestly. Coming in a 
year after her class, we find her being used 
as a model of intelligence, and you probably 
wouldn’t believe it, but she’s not a bit stuck 
up ! 


LOYCE BLAYLOCK 

“The girl that loves and laughs must 
sure do well.’’ 

Entered ’21; Science Course; Girls’ Club ’23. 

Who wouldn’t love Loyce with her demure 
ways and sweet nature? Loyce’s pleasing 
temperament has won her many friends. We 
wish there were more like her in our class. 


CAREY H. BOSTIAN 

“Comb down his hair; look, look! 
it stands upright!” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Member Hi-Y 
’23 and ’24. 

Carey is a puzzle. He is one of our smar¬ 
test, and yet professes not to be happy. Un¬ 
less appearances are deceiving, he isn’t in 
love either. Maybe that explains his unhap¬ 
piness. Carey says he is going to be a med¬ 
ical missionary, but we think that he should 
be a college professor. 


ARTHUR BRANCH 

“He’s always there with his words of cheer.” 

Entered ’22; Science Course; Football ’22, ’23; 
Business Manager of Echo ’22 ; Secretary and 
Treasurer S. H. S. Letter Club ’24. 

“A. B.” is a general favorite of all the 
boys and girls who know him because of his 
generous supply of jokes. And from a cer¬ 
tain Senior we find that he is an all-around 
sport. The class is proud of his record in 
football, and wishes him success in college. 







THE ECHO 


13 


HENRY P. BRANDIS 

“Who does his task from day to day. 

And meets whatever comes his way.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Secretary Hi-Y 
’22, ’23 : President Hi-Y ’24 ; Marshal ’23 ; 
Triangular Debate ’23, ’24 ; Basket-ball '24 ; 
Letter Club ’24; Editor-in-Chief Echo ’24; 
“Clarence’’ ’24. 

“Henry Parker” is our star student. Al¬ 
though he is engaged in various school acti¬ 
vities, he never says. “I don’t know” on 
class, and we envy him for his ability to make 
the highest grades. Also, a Senior tells us 
that he is a nice fellow to have dates with. 
S. H. S. will be sorry to lose him next year, 
but our loss will be some college’s gain. 


ELMER E. BROWN 
“Silence is golden.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Hi-Y ’22, ’23, ’24; 
President ’22 ; Baseball ’24. 

Although Elmer never has much to say, 
he is a good student, and always has his 
lessons prepared. We know he will have suc¬ 
cess in college because of his ability to keep 
quiet and stick to things. 


FRANCES CAMPBELL 

“Come and trip it as you go 
On the light fantastic toe.” 

Entered ’19; Latin Course: Debating Society 
’20 ; Tennis Club ’21 ; Athletic Association 
’20, ’23; Girls Club ’20, ’21. ’22, ’23’, ’24; 
“Clarence” ’24. 

“Fritz” is the gayest of the gay. If there 
is any prospect of a good time, she is sure 
to be on hand. Anyone who saw “Clarence” 
know tha,t “Fritp.” has dramatic ability, 
which, if cultivated, will lead her to a career. 


I. Z. CHRISTY 

“A certain simplicity that makes 
everyone her friend?” 

Entered ’20 ; Science Course; Athletic Asso¬ 
ciation ; Class Tournament ’23. 

I. Z. is the kind of a girl who works hard 
when she works and plays hard when she 
plays. She enters heartily into everything 
she undertakes and must surely succeed in 
life. 








14 


THE ECHO 



CALDWELL CLINET 

“Sentimentally I am disposed to harmony, but 
violiirically I*m incapable of a tune.”“ 

Entered *20 ; Latin Course; Violinist in 
High School Orchestra. 

“Pansy'” is our “Beau Brummel.’* A peep> 
in his desk will show several articles besides 
books. Still, he’s all. right and: has certainly 
proved that he is an “on. the minute*’ bell 
ringer. 


PAULINE CRESS 

“The more I study, the mure ignorant I 
find myself.” 

Entered T9; Latin Course; Marshal *22 - 
Girls’ Club ; Secretary of Girls* Athle¬ 

tic Association *23, *24 ; French Club *22. 

“Has the bell rung?** “What time is it?’* 
If we hear these questions, there is no doubt 
as to who the questioner is.—Pauline, of 
course. We don’t know whether it is her 
fault or that of her Dodge, that she is often 
late, but we love to see her merry smile as 
she enters the room after the gong has rung. 
Although Polly doesn’t care about studying, 
shee is such a good sport, that we are sure, 
she wilL make many friends in college next 
year. 


BETSY DAVIS 

“Sober, pensive, and demure.” 

Entered *20 ; Latin Course; Secretary Girls* 
Club ’20, *21 ; Chairman Service Committee 

’23, *24 ; Athletic Association *20-’24. 

Here’s a girl who mixes work with pleasure 
and enjoys both. You can always count on 
her to take part in everything. She's frank, 
friendly, and a good sport. We know her 
college life will be a success. 


HERMAN FISHER 

“Silence is more eloquent than words.** 

Entered *20; Latin Course; Hi_Y ’24. 

You rarely ever hear Herman say anything, 
but that’s not because he hasn’t anything to 
say. When he does speak it’s something: 
worth listening to. Wherever he goes he is 
sure to win friends, and he is certain to 
make a success of whatever he does. 








THE ECHO 


15 


RAY FISHER 

“Honest as Abe Lincoln but a whole 
lot better looking.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Hi-Y '24. 

Ray is a boy who stands for things. And 
he’s not afraid to let other people know that 
he does stand for them. He’s rather quiet 
but he bears his share of the recitation well. 
May he carry his ideals with him after he 
has left High School. 


ELLEN FLETCHER 

“And still they gazed on. 

Still the wonder grew. 

How one small head 

Could carry all she knew.” 

Entered '20 ; Latin Course; Girls’ Club ’20, 
'21 ; Chairman Social Committee Girls’ Club 
'22 ; Treasurer Girls’ Club '23 ; Girls’ Athletic 
Association ’20, ’21, ’22. 

“Flellen” is clever and gets exempt from 
all her exams. With her pensive looks one 
would never imagine she is an emphatic be¬ 
liever in Woman Suffrage, but she is, so 
we predict a successful career for her as a 
congresswoman. 


ZELA GHEEN 

“No padlocks, bolts, on bars can secure 
A maiden so well as her own reserve.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Girls’ Athletic 
Association '20, ’21, ’22. 

Zela’s quiet nature has won her a place 
in all our hearts. A happy future is cer¬ 
tainly in store for her. 


MARY SUSAN GRIGGS 

“Leave silence to the saints, 

I am but human.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Girls’ Club ’21, 
'22, ’23 ; Athletic Association '21, '22 ; Class 
Prophet *24. 

“Soixante” is not the biggest member of 
the class but she most certainly cannot b 
likened to a bean pole. Her stock of jokes 
seems endless since she has a new one for 
every occasion and unless she’s called down 
she usually gets more attention than the 
teacher. 






16 


THE ECHO 



LEWIS HARTLINE 

“Nothing: great was ever achieved without 
enthusiasm.” 

Entered ’19; Science Course; Hi-Y ’22. 

Lewis is one of the faithful members of 
the class of '24. He never misses a day and 
usually answers “Prepared” for every one of 
his studies, especially French. 


BERNICE HARTMAN 

“Fit and fair, neat and sufficient.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Girls’ Club '22, 
’23, ’24 ; Athletic Association ’23. 

Nine o’clock! “Does anyone know if Ber¬ 
nice has come in yet?” “No’m, but don t 
mark her absent—she’ll be here after while.” 
And sure enough, in a short while Bernice 
appears. However, this mark of tardiness in 
no way signifies her mental ability for she 
has always passed her work easily. 


ANNIE HEILIG 

“Fashioned slenderly, young and fair 
With blue eyes and golden hair.” 

Entered ’21 ; Science Course. 

Annie is a faithful friend of Millikan and 
Gales’ Practical Physics as many of us are. 
She’s a good pal and tries hard to please 
everyone. (Pat included.) 


ELIZABETH HENDERSON 

“Those lovely eyes, those windows 
of the soul.” 

Entered ’22 ; Latin Course; Athletic Associa¬ 
tion ’22-’24 ; Class Basket Ball Team ’23 ; 
Girls’ Club ’23 ; French Club ’22 ; 
“Clarence” '24. 

Elizabeth has been with us only two years, 
but we feel as if she has always been one 
of us. For som? reason she seems peculairly 
interested in French. However this may be. 
v /2 pre-diet that she will be an extremely 
popular member of St. Mary’s. 






THE ECHO 


17 


MARY VV. JONES 

“Genteel in personage, conduct, and equipage; 
Noble by heritage, generous, and free.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course: Member Girls* 
Club ’21, ’24 ; Treasurer Girls’ Club ’21 ; 
Secretary Girls’ Club ’23 ; Vice-President 
Girls’ Club ’24; Tennis Club; Athletic Asso¬ 
ciation ’20-’24 ; Treasurer Junior Class ’23 ; 
Marshall ’23 ; Exchange Editor Echo ’24 ; 
“Clarence” ’24 ; Class Song ’24. 

Nobility and generosity are reflected in all 
that Mary does. She is a good worker and 
a good friend. She gives freely of her time 
to all worthy causes. No one is more pop¬ 
ular than she. 


JENNIE KLUTTZ 
“Haste makes waste.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Girls’ Club ’21, 
’22, ’23, ’24 ; Athletic Association ’21, ’22. 

If it wasn’t for Jennie’s Dodge or maybe 
a Buick, she would never get to school and 
lots of us would never get home to dinner. 
Her knowledge is more or less mediocre, but 
she gets by on her winning personality. Her 
motto is “On to Chevy Chase!”, and though 
she may not bring down the house, she’ll be 
a success. 


KATHERINE KLUTTZ 

Gentle of speech, beneficent of mind.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course ; Girls’ Club ’20-’24 ; 
Athletic Association ’24. 

Katherine is a good all around student. 
She ranks well in all her classes and is 
popular with teachers and students. Such 
pupils as Katherine are missed when they 
leave us. 


CORINNE LEONARD 

“We have learned to do by doing.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Athletic Asso¬ 
ciation ’21 ; Girls’ Club ’21, ’22, ’23, ’24 ; 

Senior Class reporter ’24. 

If you want something put across give it 
to “Krick.” She is always ready to do her 
share and she does it well. For further in¬ 
formation regarding her many good qualities, 
we refer you to a certain member of 10-A. 





18 


THE ECHO 



ETHEL LIPPERT 

“I love her for her smile, her look, 
her gentle way of speaking.” 

Entered ’20 ; Science Course; Athletic 
Association ’24. 

Ethel is inclined to be quiet on class, but 
the boys of 11-B tell us that her quietness 
does not detract from her personality. She 
has always stood for the best, and during 
her four years with us she has acquired 
many friends. 


ELIZABETH LEIGH MASSEY 

‘‘Could I love less, I should be happier.” 

Entered ’20; Science Course; Girls’ Club ’21- 
’24 ; Athletic Association ’22 ; Treasurer Girls’ 
Club '22. 

Who is that sweet-looking girl with her 
good nature and jolliness? Why it is no 
other than our good friend, Elizabeth of 
11-B. She is one of our steady and ever- 
working members and we wish her success 
in life. 


ROBERT LEE MAUNEY 
“Thou art truly a most worthy actor.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Hi-Y, ’21, ’22 ; 

Marshall ’23; “Clarence” ’24. 

Whither thou goest, “Prince” will follow 
because Bob says “Love me, love my dog.” 
His favorite pastime (with the possible ex¬ 
ception of girls) is arguing, and he often sup¬ 
plements the text with his knowledge of the 
Ku Klux Klan, or four C’s. Of course it is 
understood that he is a shining light on 
classes and that “Clarence” could not have 
been the success that it was but for his 
dramatic presence. 


BETSY McCORKLE 

“To know her is to love her.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Athletic 
Association ’20-’24. 

Here we have a human interrogation point 
-Betsy loves to ask questions. In her, many 
virtues are blended; therefore, everyone loves 
her. 





TIIE ECHO 


19 


FRANCES McCORKLE 

“Rare is the union of beauty and purity. ” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Girls’ Club ’21-’24 ; 
Vice-President Girls’ Club ’23 ; President 
Girls’ Club ’21 and ’24 ; Tennis Club; Athle¬ 
tic Association *20-’24 ; Secretary Sophomore 
Class ’22; Vice-President Junior Class ’2o’; 
“Courtship of Miles Standist” ’23 ; Marshal 
’23 ; “Clarence” ’24 ; Song ’24. 

France’s combination of beauty and purity 
will lead her to the higher plane of life. 
She now stands exalted among us and as 
time continues to develop her wonderful 
traits of character, we know she will leave 
her influence on those that are to come. 


CHARLES MILLER 

“Being good is an awful tiresome job.” 

Entered ’20; Science Course; Hi-Y ’22, ’23. 
’24 ; Vice-President Hi-Y ’22 ; President Hi_Y 
*23 ; Leader Sophomore Hi-Y ’24 ; Football 
’22. ’23 ; Echo Staff ’24 ; “Clarence” ’24. 

Charles is quite well known in High School 
circles. If you go into 11-B and hear a 
voice loudly protesting to the teacher about 
most anything, especially Walt Harrell, you 
may be sure it’s Charlie. He seems to thrive 
on History and minstrels, for Charlie is a 
tuneful soul. 


LUCILLE MILLER 

“Silence oppresses with too great weight.** 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Girls’ Club 
’21-*24. 

“Silly,” our talkative member, is the 
bright spot in the class. Her stream of con¬ 
versation, like Tennyson’s brook, flows on 
forever. But talking is Lucille’s talent, and 
when it comes to reciting, or “speaking 
pieces,” she can’t be beat. She’s a good 
sport and we love her dearly. 


DAVID MILNE 

“I will speak, though hell itself should 
gape and bid me hold my peace.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Class Historian 
’24. 

When “Dave” speaks, the class looks for 
the dictionary, as our minds are too shallow 
to absorb what he says. But he is a good 
sport, and. as we have heard, is very talented 
when it comes to the Mandolin. 








20 


T HE ECHO 



C. STEDMAN MORRIS 
“He hath music in his Saxaphone.** 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Triangular 
Debate ’23 ; Marshal ’23. 

“I move we have a class party next week.’’ 
As we hear this motion at a Class meeting, 
we know it’s C. Stedman, for he loves 
pleasure. However, when a jazz melody 

comes floating to us from a certain window 
on Bank street, we find that he has talent, 

and hope that some day our schoolmate will 

be playing in one of America's largest 
Symphony Orchestras. 


ELIZABETH MURPHY 

“The power of thought—the magic of the 
mind.” 

Entered *20 ; Latin Course; Athletic Associa¬ 
tion ’20, *21, *22 ; Assistant Advertising Man¬ 
ager Echo *23 ; Advertising Manager Echo 
*24 ; Class Statistician *24. 

“Pete” is school spirit personified. She 
never misses a game, and is always glad to 
fill up her car and take a bunch with her. 
Then too, she studies well and is a credit to 
her teachers. Any college may be glad to 
get her. 


ZORA NAIL 

“Not too sober, not too gay. 

But a real good fellow in every way.’* 

Entered ’20; Science Course; Athletic Asso¬ 
ciation *20-’24 ; Class Tournament ’23. 

Zora is about the smallest member of our 
class but she counts just the same. If we 
are blue or the day seems so long Zora is 
the one we want near by for she’s a girl 
that can smile when everything goes dead 
wrong. 


MARY NICOLSON 

“There is no jewel in the world 
So valuable and chaste as virtuous woman.*’ 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Member of Girls’ 
Club ’20, ’24 ; Chairman of Program Com¬ 
mittee ’23, *24. 

Mary is conscientious not only in school 
work but also in other activities. She is 
always ready to do her share and is a true 
friend. 




THE ECHO 


21 


JOE OVERTON 

“Heart to concieve, understanding to direct, 
and the hand to execute.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Hi-Y ’22, ’23, ’24; 
Treasurer Hi-Y ’22, ’23 ; Business Manager 

Echo ’24 ; Assistant Manager Echo ’23 ; Vice- 
President Senior Class ’24 ; Football ’20. ’21, 
’22, ’23*; Baseball ’24; Letter Club ’24. 

If Joe had a badge for every office he’s 
had in High School he’d look like a signboard. 
But laying aside all joking Joe is one of 
the best football players that has ever played 
on a team for S. H. S. Not only does he 
star on the football field, he seems to get 
along in his studies as well. 


PEARL OWEN 

“A soul of fire in a shell of pearl.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Girls’ Athletic 
Association ’21. 

Pearl is our quiet member. Her words are 
few and far between, but when she speaks 
everyone listens for it is certainly worth¬ 
while. She is one of our most lovable stu_ 
dents and a general favorite. 


WILLIAM F. OWEN 
“The most precious goods often come 
wrapped in smallest packages.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; 8-E Critic ’20 ; 
Class Treasurer ’24. 

Billie’s hair is the envy of all the girls, 
but he uses his head for something besides a 
place upon which to grow a nice crop of 
curls. He is one of our deepest thinkers, and 
never has he been stumped in Math. 


RUTH PIERCE 

“Whilst she lives she wishes to live nobly 
and to leave to those who come after her 
a memory of good works.” 

Entered ’23 ; Latin Course; Girls’ Club ’24 ; 
French Club ’23. 

Ruth may be the heavyweight champion 
of the class but she also leads the class in 
ideals. Ruth wishes to live nobly and to lead 
a life which will make the world better for 
her having lived. 






T HE E C H O 



CHARLES PRICE 

“Bid me discourse, I will enchant thine ear.** 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Tennis Club ’20 ; 
Debating Team ’23 ; Marshal ’23 ; Hi-Y; 
Football ’23 ; Class Lawyer ’24 ; Cheer 
Leader ’23. 

“Gus, Jr.” is one of our most popular 
classmen—especially with the girls. Besides 
being a versatile speaker he has several other 
attributes of a splendid lawyer. Here’s 
wishing him success. 


MARY BERN REYNOLDS 

“A smile for all, a greeting glad, 

A lovable, jolly way she had.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Girls’ Reserve; 
Athletic Association ’21, ’22, ’23. 

If “Ick” spent as much time on her stu_ 
dies as she does on a certain Junior, she 
would be able to make E’s on everything. 
Still, she is an excellent Geometry student. 
Altogether, she is a jolly, good fellow and her 
laugh and dimples enchant us all. 


LLOYD RICE 

“I sit by, I remain faithful.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Hi-Y ’24. 

Lloyd rarely ever makes any noise but a 
look at his report shows that he gets along 
with the teachers. Lloyd is a good sport 
and is always ready to join in anytning 
that’s started. 


EMILY RIDEOUTTE 

“ ’Tis folly to be wise.” 

Entered T9; Girls’ Club ’20-’24 ; French Club 
’23 ; Athletic Association ’22. 

Emily is not noted for her scholastic ability, 
but when it comes to dancing—she’s the ber¬ 
ries from the top of the bush. 





THE E C H O 


23 



MYRTLE ROSEMAN 

“The girl who wins is the girl who works. 
The girl who toils while the next one shirks.” 

Entered ’20; Science Course; Athletic Asso¬ 
ciation ’20-’24 ; Tennis Banner ’20 ; Tourna¬ 
ment *21, ’22 ; Girls’ Club ’20, *21, ’23, ’24. 

Myrtle is another of our quiet members, 
but she is certainly a conscientious worker. 
She is always ready to do her share, espe¬ 
cially in athletics, and is a true friend at 
all times. 


ERNEST C. SAFRIT 

“Speech is silver 
But silence is gold.” 

Entered ’20 ; Science Course. 

Ernest’s quiet and retiring nature has won 
for him a host of friends. Yet he isn’t al¬ 
ways quiet for he sometimes entertains 11-B 
with a thrilling story of the West—the blood 
and thunder kind, you know. He is the sort 
of a fellow that may be depended upon to 
have his work up. 


OPHENIA SHIVES 

“Sober, quie*, pensive and demure. 

One of those friends of whom you are 

always sure.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course. 

Ophenia is one who takes life easy, always 
being ready to have a good time. She has a 
pleasing personality, however, and has friends 
throughout the whole school. 


ROY A. SHORE 

“My mind to me a kingdom is.” 

Entered ’20 ; Science Course ; Hi-Y *22,’23.’24 : 
Echo Staff ’24 ; Marshal ’23 ; Chief Cheer 
Leader ’24 ; Basketball ’24 : Debating Team 
’23 ; “Clarence” ’24. 

Roy’s magnanimity is revealed on English 
class. When in doubt as to the pronunciation 
of the names of the Gods of old, Roy is ever 
ready with a suggestion. If you use it and 
get by with it, all’s well. However, as one 
can see by glancing at the above honors. 
Roy is an outstanding member of the class. 












24 


THE ECHO 



SADIE SHUPING 
“My gentle lady, 

I wish you all the joy that you can wish.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Vice-president of 
class ’21 ; Debating Society ’21 ; Inter-class 
debate ’22 ; Girls’ Club ’21, ’22, ’23, ’24 ; 

Delegate to Y. W. C. A. Conference for two 
years. 

Although small in stature, Sadie is a good 
student, and a faithful friend to all who are 
acquainted with her. She has participated 
in various school activities, and we wish for 
her a successful future in college. 


ELIZABETH SIFFERD 

“Her wavy hands on the ivory keys 
Strayed in a fitful fantasy 

Like the silver gleam when the poplar trees 
Rustle their pale leaves listlessly.’’ 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Girls’ Club ’21, 
’22, ’23, ’24 ; Girls’ Athletic Association ’22 ; 
Dramatic Club ’23; Secretary of Junior Class 
’23 ; Secretary of Senior Class ’24 ; Hig.i 
School Orchestra ’23; Marshal ’23'; Secretary 
of Girls’ Club ’24 ; Chairman of Committee on 
Song ’24 ; School Pianist ’22, ’23, ’24. 

We sometimes wonder just how it happens 
that Elizabeth accomplishes everything that 
she undertakes. For besides being queen of 
the ’’ivory ticklers’’ she is one of the most 
popular girls in our class and, if her report 
tells the truth, she is also one of the smartest. 


MARGARET L. SMITH 

“I am determined every chance to take 
to acquire knowledge.’’ 

Entered ’20; Science Course; Girls’ Club 
’20, ’24. 

Margaret is an honest-to.goodness worker. 
There is no “laying out’’ for her. Every 
day sees her in her accustomed desk by the 
window. The only thing that ever takes her 
away is a music lesson. The class is sure 
that some day she will be a rival of Pader- 
ewsky if she works as hard on her music as 
she does on other things. 


EDWARD STEELE 
“Things are not what they seem.’’ 

Entered ’20 ; Science Course; Hi-Y ’24 ; 

Baseball ’24. 

Edward has been here four years and has 
done hard, steady work both as a student 
and as a baseball player. In addition to these 
qualities “Red’’ would probably take first 
prize for his pretty, red, wavy hair. 




THE ECHO 


25 


BLANCHE STUART 

“As merry as the day is long.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Girls’ Club ’20-’24 ; 
Athletic Association ’20-’24 ; Chief Marshal ’23. 

Blanche’s sweet personality and attractive, 
pleasing ways have made her one of our 
most popular girls. Blanche is a graceful 
dancer, and we hope that she will dance her 
joyous ways along the paths of life, just 
as she has danced in so many “home-talent” 
plays. 


CATHERINE TATUM 

“Thy modesty is a candle to thy merit.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Debating Society 
’20 ; Girls’ Club ’20-’24 ; Athletic Association 
’20-’24 ; Class Basket Ball Team ’23. 

“Cattie V.” is always ready to help in 
anything from committee work to ice-cream 
selling. If people want to borrow anything 
they head for her and they usually get their 
wants supplied. “Cattie V.,” be careful not 
to let yourself be imposed upon. It often 
happens to good natures such as yours. 


KATHERINE TAYLOR 

‘“Thou living ray of intellectual fire-” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Athletic Associa¬ 
tion ’24 ; Alumni Editor ’24 ; Class Poet ’24. 

Katherine is not a self assertive person, 
so she rarely volunteers to recits; but when 
she is called on, such a volcano of intellec¬ 
tualness as pours forth. She is exceptionally 
smart and the best point of it is that it 
hasn’t hurt her one bit. We know that Kath¬ 
erine will be successful and we shouldn’t be 
surprised if she went to France and taught 
the French their own language. 


SUSIE TUCK 

“No storm ever ruffled the course of her life.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Athletic Associa¬ 
tion ’21, ’22 ; Girls’ Club ’20, ’24. 

According to Mr. Dunn, Susie is a splen¬ 
did French student. But Susie never exerts 
herself in school, so we can’t quite “get 
her.” Nevertheless we understand she has a 
gay time out of school. 













26 


THE ECHO 



MITCHELL WAGGONER 
“Nothing: endears but personal qualities/’ 

Entered *20 ; Science Course. 

Mitchell has served his teachers faithfully 
along: every line during his journey thru High 
School. Although he is rather small in sta¬ 
ture, his brain-power is in no way measured 
by this for he is especially brilliant and effi¬ 
cient in that subject known as Physics. 


LOUISE WHITE 

“Charms strike the eye, but merit wins 
the soul.” 

Entered ’20 ; Latin Course; Athletic Associa¬ 
tion *20-’24 ; Girls’ Club ’20, ’24. 

Louise’s quiet nature and pleasing person¬ 
ality have won her many friends. She is a 
conscientious worker, and a happy and suc¬ 
cessful future is surely in store for her. 


ROSALIE WILEY 

“For if she will, she will,—you may depend 
on it; 

And if she won’t she won’t, and there’s 
an end on it.” 

Entered ’20; Latin Course; Athletic Associa¬ 
tion ’20 ; Vice-president Athletic Association 
’24 ; Girls’ Club ’20, ’22 ; Class Reporter ’23 ; 
Marshal ’23 ; Managing Editor of Echo ’24 ; 
“Clarence’’ ’24. 

Really Rosalie needs no “write up’’—one 
look at her picture tells anyone she’s “plumb 
all right.” One of our most energetic and 
lovable students, she is active in many fields. 
Not only does she do well in all school work, 
but the “Echo” and, the Class Play owe her 
much. 


INEZ WINECOFF 

“Do you not know that I am a woman? 
When I think, I must speak.’’ 

Entered ’20 : Latin Course; Girls’ Athletic 
Association ’22, ’23 ; Junior Basketball team. 

Although Inez likes to talk a lot, she is 
a good student, and we like to hear Mr. Dunn 
ca l out a “100” for her French quiz. We are 
sure she will be a fine student in college. 








THE ECHO 


27 


Senior Class History 

It is required that unutterable woes and unspeakable joys be written. What 
scenes have transpired in which we ourselves have taken no small part. In recounting- 
such things what member of the class of ’24 or even of the faculty is without remem¬ 
brance? Yet if you are so desirous of hearing of our continuous struggles in High 
School, though I am filled with remorse in publishing such things, yet I will begin. 

To the class of 1924 belongs the distinction of having broken more customs and 
traditions and having established more precedents than any class since the first 
graduated from S. H. S. We have entirely riddled the theory that scholarship and 
deportment always go together. When we were Freshmen we led the school in the 
number exempt from all examinations. This record we have maintained during our 
four years in High School. Several of our class have never had to take an examina¬ 
tion. It is to be hoped that they can maintain this high record in college. 

As Juniors we furnished all the members of the teams which represented our 
school in the triangular debate. These were: Affirmative; Henry Brandis and Roy 
Shore, Negative; Stedman Morris and Charles Price. 

However, at the same time, we were continually tqld that our deportment was— 
to use the terms of our dear teachers—worse than that of any class in which I have 
ever taught. At the end of the Sophomore year only three out of all the boys of the 
class of '24 had succeeded in keeping a record of “E” on deportment. The first of 
these to fall from grace was Charles Price, who made his first “G” on conduct the last 
part cf his Junior year. Henry Brandis kept his “E” until about the second month 
of this year, when, for some quite evident but not explainable reason he tco fell by the 
wayside. Now only one boy remains in the “E” class—this is Elmer Brown. As for 
the girls—we are tcld that their conduct has been fairly good except that they have 
continually led the boys into conversation and thereby caused considerable confusion. 

Our eccentricities are so numerous that after we had been in High School one 
year, our beloved principal, Miss Watson, resigned her position, while Mr. Andrews, 
after having survived with us during our whole four years, is leaving with us. We 
do not claim the entire responsibility for these misfortunes to our school, but we do 
hope that the class of 1925 will use discretion as to how it drives away members of 
the faculty. 

The achievements of the class of ’24 have not been altogether confined to the 
classroom, however. We have always had an unusually large number of representa¬ 
tives on the school’s athletic teams. Unfortunately, space does not permit that they 
can be mentioned here. We can well be proud of all of them and rest assured that 
they will soon be starring on college teams. 

Others of us who did not actively participate in athletics supported the various 
teams loyally from the sidelines. Several times in our zeal t.o reach games on time 
and because excuses were refused, we had to cut classes and were duly reprimanded 
and sentenced to various forms of torture for the same. 

When Freshmen we organized and by rare good fortune chose for our nresident 
John Holshouser. After wavering for some weeks we finally decided that blue and 
white were better colors than pink and green. In our Junior year we were again 
organized and Spencer Jackson was elected President. This year during our first 
term Walter Harrell was President, while Mary Baker served in that capacity for 
the second term. 

It is indeed unfortunate that space will not permit that an account be given con¬ 
cerning the individual achievements cf the members of the class of 24. However, 
if any of our beloved readers are curious as to our careers, they may consult “Who’s 
Who” for 1935. 


David Milne. 




THE ECHO 


2$ 


Senior Class Prophecy 

One afternoon while at a cii’cus 1 went in a side show where a man was offering 
to hypnotize people. I eagerly listened while he told about the wonderful trick and 
how harmless it was. After hearing him say it was free (I had spent my last cent 
to get on the inside) I went up and told him he could put me to sleep. He seemed 
pleased beyond expression and so did the tired looking audience which expected its 
money’s worth but seldom got it. He put me on a couch, glared at me, and then 
shook his fingers at me. At last I fell asleep. Then I had the most marvelous dream. 
My mind took a leap into the future and I dreamed twenty-five years ahead of time. 

In my dreams I had joined a carnival. The managers of the show were Joe 
Overton and Charles Miller who from time to time yelled the wonders of their show 
thru a megaphone. In our extensive tour thru North America we stopped in the big 
city of Los Angeles. During our performance a young lady came up to me and asked 
if we could use her in our show. After finding out that she could play a piano the 
position of steam pianist was bestowed upon her at once. After talking to her for a 
while I was dumbfounded to find out that she was Elizabeth Sifferd. She told me 
that Ellen Fletcher and Elizabeth Henderson had attained that exalted honor, the 
Senate, by large majorities. I was glad to hear it for they were certainly cut out 
for that jcb. We were walking down the street next day when a small boy ran out 
before us screaming “Extra, extra; Shore wins by forty-nine minutes.” The name 
sounded familiar so we purchased a copy and discovered to our utmost amazement 
that Roy Shore and Emily Rideoutte had run a cross-country airplane race. I was 
surprised to learn that Emily could lose in a race requiring speed. 

As we turned to continue our walk a thin little woman came rushing by. Seeing 
us she stopped, gazed at us, looked harder, opened a bag, took out a lorgnette, and 
eyed us suspiciously. I was starting to inquire whether she was a detective or merely 
criticizing our dress when she rushed up and said, “My dears, I was really trying to 
find out if it were you or not, don’t yer know. I am jolly well glad to see you.” At 
last I saw it was Inez Winecoff. She had married an Englishman. Looking across 
the street I saw a lady, gaudily dressed, peep around a telephone pole, draw back 
suddenly and giggle hysterically. The object of her attentions was a bald-headed 
man, except for a small patch of red hair around the bottom of his head, who pre¬ 
tended he didn’t see her but who in reality watched every movement she made. “I 
believe I know that giggle, Elizabeth, don’t you?” After getting an affirmative an¬ 
swer we advanced and tapped her on the shoulder. “Could this possibly be-?” 

I began. “Lucille Miller,” cried Elizabeth, “we thought you were Corinne Leonard.” 
She stopped her attentions on the gentleman, who walked off, and showered them on us. 

“Corinne? Why she is just around the corner working in that hot dog stand.” 
She also told us that Blanche Stuart, Pauline Cress, and Frances Campbell had be¬ 
come so infatuated with the stage in “Don’t Park Here,” that they had joined the 
movies to exhibit their ability and that they were playing there that day in “Faith, 
Hope, and Charity.” 

As we were getting on the train that night a man approached us and said, “My 
dear ladies, as the opportunity of assisting some heavily-laden ladies on this train 
has presented itself, I feel it my duty to offer you my humble services and unworthy 

self as assistant,-allow me.” He picked up our hat boxes, satchels, grips, hand 

bags, and a few sundries that wel were carrying and landed them safely in the car. 




THE ECHO 


29 


I turned to thank him and found it to be Stedman Morris. The conductor whispered— 
“No need to thank him—he stays here all the time and speels off that speech to every 
lady that gets on the train.” We seated ourselves in front of twq ladies who kept 
whispering and giggling until I felt that I must jump up and down and scream. 
Turning around to reproach them with my eyes, I found that the two frivolous ladies 
were none other than Louise White and Susie Tuck. They were traveling for Swift 
and Company. They were in a good place—-those two. I became tired of traveling 
and picked up a magazine to divert my mind. It was diverted indeed. There was 
a deep and exceedingly interesting article, “The Advantage of Bobbed Hair,” by 
Rosalie Wiley. I read it three times before I absorbed it. It was applied wonder¬ 
fully. About that time the conductor came thni crying, “Next stop is Busbyville.” 

When he drew near I said, “What on earth is Busbyville?” 

“Why don’t you know? It’s that one man town owned by that millionaire, 
George Francis Busby, who made his money in oil stock.” As he was talking I rec¬ 
ognized one of our brilliant students, Lloyd Rice. 

The next week found our troop in Salt Lake City. There we rode up town on 
the street car. To our amazement we found it was propelled by an old friend, Herman 
Fisher. While in the city we saw an advertisement, “French, Latin, Spanish, German, 
and Greek, taught here—Professor Council Archie. We went to see if it were our 
friend. He proved to be the identical same. He told us that Russell Daniel, Ray 
Fisher, Edward Steele, Mary Baker, and Lucille Baker were assistant teachers, while 
he himself taught Yiddish. He also told us that Lewis Hartline held a position as 
mining engineer. We left him and went to a vaudeville. There we saw Zela Gheen 
as a fairy toe dancer and Ernest Safrit as chief clown. Coming out we discoveded 
that the manager of the show was none other than Elizabeth Massey. Next door was 
a shingle hanging out which bore this sign “Lippert and Krider—Attorney’s at Law." 
I was absolutely struck dumb. But the next day I had the pleasure of hearing them 
sway a large crowd to tears in favor of the defendant. The case was a divorce suit 
with Arthur Branch and Frances McCorkle playing prominent parts. Strange to say, 
Arthur was the defendant. It proved that the judge who was sitting on the case 
turned out to be very worthy one, none other than Henry Brandis. After court we 
spoke to him. He told us that Carey Bostian and Elmer Brown were auctioneers. In 
coming out of the court room a fat woman hustled by and nearly took me off my feet. 
I protested; she stopped, looked at me, and then cried out, “Don’t you knew me? It 
locks like you would. I’ve fallen off fifty pounds.” Studying her dimpled face, I 
recognized an old school chum, Mary Bern Reynolds. 

She told us that Betsy McCorkle, Mary Jones, and Katherine Kluttz were partners 
in a modiste shop on Fifth Avenue. Leaving Mary Bern relunetantly we decided to 
go shopping. These words, on a huge glass window shewing ladies’ apparel, met our 
eyes, “Miss Shuping’s Woman’s Shop.” As we were naturally interested we went in. 
A tall, slim woman in a long, high-necked black di-ess met us at the door. At once 
the stiff, formal face changed and she said, “Oh Mary Susan and Elizabeth, it it really 
you?” After answering her that we sincerely hoped we were ourselves, she took us 
into an adorable little rest room and said, “Talk, talk, talk for goodness sake- 
all I hear is styles and fashions. Whom have you seen that you know?" We told 
her all we knew and more besides. At last we tore ourselves away from Sadie and 
went on. After wasting all the time we could we again resorted to the newspaper. Great 
was my joy and astonishment on beholding these words 1 haden’t before seen, “Represen- 




tative Charles Prise smoothes over strained relations between U.S. and Great Britain with 
marvelous diplomacy.” Even this was not all. At the bottom of the page we saw 
this: “Photographs taken over radio—discovered by Professor Owen. Reading the 
article we found Professor Owen to be none other than Billie. He had won distinction 
from the masses. 

Our last stop before winter headquarters was in Salisbury. While visiting old 
S. H. S. which was being used by the grammar grades we met Mary Nicolson who 
said she was teaching Geometr-y in the new High School. She informed us of the 
fact that Ophenia Shives had made her name world-famous by her undying romance, 
“Black Is White” or “Why Lucy Left Home.” It seemed that she was stocked up 
with news of classmates for she told us that Catherine Tatum was enlisted in church 
work and was doing slum work in China Grove. Katherine Taylor was introducing 
a new method of reforming criminals thi'oughout the U. S. 

One day while sauntering down Innis street we noticed that Purcell’s Drug Store 
was still in existence. Going in to see if Samuel was running it we discovered that 
Samuel was located in New York as head of a chain of Purcell’s Drug Stores. So 
prosperity had smiled on Samuel. While in the drug store we learned that another 
of our class had taken up his father’s profession. David Milne had become an evan¬ 
gelist. When several days later we visited the new S. H. S. Robert Mauney, who 
was the brilliant and enthusiastic principal, greeted us. From him we learned that 

Ruth Pierce had married a Trinity college professor and was dean of the college. 

Another ambition had been attained! 

One night I dropped in a Chautauqua tent to hear a number. The curtain rose 
and the manager introduced to us his wonderful contralto, Miss Myrtle Roseman, 
who, he said, was from Salisbury. I listened enraptured until a perfectly beautiful 
woman swept up the aisle and sat down beside me, wrapping her ermine trimmed 

cloak around her carefully. I heard no more singing for it was my cherished school 

chum—Bernice Hartman. After the performance I met Carrie Roseman who said 
that she was private secretary for Myrtle. 

I met Loyce Blaylock on the street that same evening. She told me that she 
was teaching music in Salisbury, Spencer, and Franklin. I also learned from her 
that Jennie Kluttz had turned out to be an automobile saleslady. I had wondered 
why Salisbury was so full of cars. She also said that Betsey Davis, one of our 
most popular students, was a Y. W. C. A. worker in Charlotte. Her work was known 
all over North Carolina. 

Reading the Salisbury Evening Post late that night I noticed to my great sur¬ 
prise that George Anderson and Mitchell Waggoner were the editors. The Post now 
boasted a funny paper and Sunday edition. This edition of the Post carried the an¬ 
nouncement of Paul Woodson’s election to the state senate. 

One night down in the Yadkin Hotel I ran into ai tall, well dressed woman who 
seemed to know me. When I was introduced to her by a friend of both of us I found 
it to be Margaret Smith. She had married an Earl who had died and left her a 
widow with a cool million. She had come to Salisbury to get out of the limelight and 
escape a train of admirers. She told me that Elizabeth Murphy was playing a prom¬ 
inent part in New York society. She also had married—her husband having been a 




THE ECHO 


31 


literary light who had written himself into Elizabeth’s heart. Caldwell Cline had 
also risen above the common walks of life. He had tired of his name and now he 
called himself Caldwell De Cline. He was in England pursuing a fair one who also 
bore a title. Margaret told me to look over the Greensboro paper which she was 
carrying. In it I found that Annie Heilig, Zora Nail and I. Z. Christy were partners 
in an interior decorators establishment. They had decorated many popular places, 
including the President’s country home, the Vanderbilt’s palace, the Strand theatre, 
etc. I also found in the same paper that Sam Lee Hall was a picture show director 
in Hollywood, and threatening to stand on the pedestal that D. W. Griffith and Cecil 
B. De Mille now hold. 

My dream now grew dimmer and faded into the shouting of people. I opened 
my eyes and found I was lying on the same couch that I went to sleep on. I had 
come back into the reality. 


Mary Susan Griggs. 




THE ECHO 


Last Will and Testament of the Class of '24 

To whom it may sound reasonable: 

We the class of 1924, being’ of a heterogeneous body and indicisive mind, but 
realizing that the time for our departure from this school life is drawing near, do 
hereby bequeath our many possessions herein mentioned to the parties hereinafter 
named, to.wit: 

SECTION I. 

Article 1. To the school we hereby leave the expectancy that in the near future 
a number of new buildings will be constructed and contain up-to-date equipment. 

Article 2. To our superintendent, Mr. T. Wingate Andrews, we leave our sincere 
appreciation for all that he has done for us and our deepest regret that he will not 
be back next year. To Mrs. Andrews, 1924’s former principal, we bequeath as a per¬ 
manent gift, the big place in our heai'ts which she has occupied during our school days. 

Article 3. To our principal, Mr. Frank B. John, we leave: first, the hope that in 
the near future he will have a large office in which to entertain the three o’clock 
visitors, particularly the Friday afternoon group; second, a number of keep-of-the-grass 
signs to be used by students and faculty; and third, our best regards and genuine 
respect. 

SECTION II 

Article 1. To Mr. James Allan Dunn we give the assurance that the scholastic 
standing of next year’s Senior Class will be extraordinary high, because during the 
past year we have most assiduously cribbed our French books. 

Article 2. To Miss Julia Wharton Groves we leave the hope that the rising Senior 
Class will assume all the dignity and precociousness which we have never possessed. 

Article 3. To Miss Mabel Lippard we leave the hope that the incoming class 
of 11-B will not be interested in things outside the windows. 

Article 4. To our most beloved instructor of harmony and song, Mr. James 
Frances Griffith, we hereby will a whole period of forty-five minutes each Friday, 
since we feel that the twenty minutes heretofore allotted has never been sufficient. 

Article 5. To our most faithful friend Mr. Parks we leave various and sundry 
missives which have been hurled with considerable accuracy inside rooms 11-A and 
11-B—also copious quantities of love notes. 

SECTION III 

Article 1. To the class of ’25 we leave a series of most profitable lectures on 
politeness, deportment, and dealing of throats, to be delivered each morning and at 
sundry intervals during the day by Miss Groves. These will be supplemented with 
■’How to Spend Your Future Life,” by Miss Lippard. 

Article 2. Further, to the class of ’25 we hereby bequeath the remains of a 
considerable number of blackboard compasses, protractors, etc. These will be found 
in very bad condition and barely usable. However, they will be found very useful 
in the forceful settling of private disputes and petty animosities. 




THE ECHO 


33 


SECTION IV. 

We, the class of ’24 do further will our characteristics, personal, imaginary, and 
real, to the beneficiaries as hereinafter designated. 

Article 1. In accordance with the request of the class of ’23, Cyrus Hereford 
Wolfe will receive the cage in this menagerie which was formerly occupied by Olen Lyon. 

Article 2. To Augustus Merriman Gregory is bequeathed by Henry Parker Bran¬ 
dis his great knowledge of public speaking, and last but not least, the art of making 
love to the ladies. 

Article 3. George Francis Busby, one of our most noted students, leaves his 
handsome appearance and his ability to keep quiet to Laurance Underhill. 

Article 4. Joe Overton leaves his business-like manner and good looks to Tommy 
Kesler. 

Article 5. David Milne, our noted Latin shark, leaves to John Robert Crawford 
a carefully corrected copy of all Latin composition covered in the Senior year—to 
which most of the members of the class have contributed—with the request that the 
recipient of the same use it with fitting generosity for the advancement of the stand¬ 
ing of the class of ’25. 

Article 6. Elizabeth Brownrig Henderson leaves her magnetism and personality 
to Margaret Ramsay Witherspoon. 

Article 7. Ellen Fletcher leaves her co-operative and generous spirit to Theresa 
Meroney. 

Article 8. Paul Bernhardt Woodson leaves his vast and extensive knowledge of 
all Geometrical problems to Elizabeth Homes. 

Article 9. Claudius Stedman Morris, Jr. leaves his musical and argumentative 
powers to Junius Fisher. 

Article 10. Robert Mauney leaves a guaranteed course in the writing of love 
letters to Max Barker. 

Article 11. Emily Rideoutte leaves the rare art of vamping the boys to Jose¬ 
phine Kluttz. 

Article 12. Caldwell Cline, sometimes called “Pansy,” leaves his unlimited supply 
of stacomb to Nelson Woodson. 

Article 13. Betsy McCorkle leaves the art of asking questions to John Locke 
Burke. 

Article 14. Mary Bein Reynolds leaves a very handsome Junior to the mercy 
of the many flappers of S. H. S. 

Article 15. In conclusion, we, in pursuance of the law, do designate and appoint 
as the executor of this, our Last Will and Testament, our most trusted and faithful 
friend, Mr. Daniels, with the hope that he will most rigidly carry out these our last 
wishes of High School Days. 


Signed: The Class of ’24. 


Charles Price, Lawyer. 




THE ECHO 


Senior Class Poem 


Farewell, our beloved S. H. S! 

We leave thee with stout hearts and bold, 
To see what the future holds for us 
Who were taught by thS black and the gold. 


Through four long years we’ve journeyed on 
In our quest for useful learning, 

But never will the fires go out 
Which you have set to burning. 


We thank you for all that you taught us. 
For our joys and the hardships we bore. 
May you ever have cause to feel proud 
Of the class of twenty-four. 


Farewell, our beloved S. H. S! 

Your memory ever will stay 
In the hearts of us who are leaving 
Your cherished portals today. 


Katherine Taylor, Poet. 




THE ECHO 


35 


Senior Class Song 


We have sailed the sea of High School days, 
Blown by the winds both east and west; 

Now at last we reach the parting ways, 

And must leave our beloved S. H. S. 

Chorus 

Farewell to thee, farwell to thee; 

The walls will hold the secret of our gain: 
Just one fond glance to hold in memory, 
Until we meet again. 

When we hear the dear old school bell ring, 
It seems to call us back to class; 

To our minds in future it will bring 
Happy mem’ries of school days that are past. 

We have left our marks along the walls, 

In books, and carved upon our desks; 

But forever stamped upon our hearts 
Is the mark of our dear old S. H. S. 


When we meet the trials of the world, 
We’ll work and strive to do our best; 

For we’ll ne’er forget the lessons learned 
From our study in dear old S. H. S. 


Elizabeth Sifferd, Mary Jones, Frances McCorkle. 




36 


THE ECHO 


Senior Class Statistics 


After having been chosen to write the statistics of our class, I could only look 
wise for I knew not what statistics might or might not be. Just as soon as I was 
alone I rushed for a dictionary to find out just what it was I was in for. To my 
dismay 1 found that the word statistics means facts and figures of a group of people. 
Since the styles are what they are I need say nothingi of one kind of figures. The 
other figures, however, are not so soon dispensed with. It was only by adding our 
weights and dividing the results by seventy-five (the supposed number of graduates) 
that I finally came to the conclusion that cur average weight is one hundred and 
twenty-one pounds. At first it seemed that our average would not be fair if Mitchell 
Waggoner, our smallest, and Ruth Pierce, our largest, were included; but matters 
were straightened out w r hen I subtracted seme from Ruth and added the same amount 
to Mitchell. By the same means our total height is three hundred seventy-eight and 
one-half feet and our average is five feet six inches. 

There has recently been invented a scheme by which one’s brains are measured. 
A book is placed on the top of the head and the straight measure from under the 
side of the book to the top of the ear is the measurement of the brain. Scientists 
have found that the average brain is five and one quarter inches and only exceptional 
brains range greater than five and one half inches. We have always realized that 
we were exceptional but this test proved it to everyone, withj the exception, perhaps 
of our teachers. This measuring was a delicate process, still everything went along 
smoothly until George Francis Busby was reached; he for some unknown reason ab¬ 
solutely refused to be measured. Then, too, another difficulty was reached in the 
shape of Carey Bostian. I had only a twelve inch ruler and it wouldn’t reach the 
top of his head. The only cause to which I could attribute such an astonishing dis¬ 
covery was that his hair was arranged in its usual coiffure. Anyway! by leaving off 
the two aforementioned prodigies our brains measured five and three-fourth inches. 

The facts, however, are not so easily dispensed with. Being of a peaceful nature 
I begin with fear and trembling, but I have safeguarded myself by taking out a life- 
insurance policy, so here goes! 

Probably the most sought for honor would be that of best all around. This 
honor is highly contested. 11-B claims that it belongs to Mary Baker and Joe Overton, 
while 11-A is just as sure that Frances McCorkle and Arthur Branch should have it. 
It would never do to start a fuss about such a matter so they may hold the place jointly. 

Next on the list of sought for honors comes “locks.” Never was there such a 
good looking class. The beys aren’t so handsome it is true, but the girls certainly 
are right there when it comes to beauty. How they would appear without their hair 
curled and their faces rouged I won’t say, but the result is certainly worth seeing. 
Among our Beau Brummels are Robert Mauney, Paul Wcodson, George Busby, Charles 
Price, and Arthur Branch. I am fearful of naming the prettiest girl, but among the 
prettiest are Mary Jones, Ethel Lippert, Rosalie Wiley, and Mary Baker. 




THE ECHO 


37 


Everyone in our class is popular, although most of us are more popular with 
ourselves than we are with anyone else. Still it is comparatively easy to find out 
that Henry Parker Brandis, Jr. is most popular with himself, Charles Price is best 
liked by the girls, and Blanche Stuart by the boys. 

Although Seniors we are woefully lacking in dignity and if it weren’t for Elmer 
Brown and Charles Miller (sometimes) we don’t know who would uphold our supposed 
dignity. Elmer also shares with Ellen Fletcher the trait of being most studious. 
Henry Brandis might have gotten it last year, but this year a mysterious change has 
come over him. 

Although the “Fisher brothers” could undoubtedly claim brilliancy by what is on 
top of their heads, Katherine Taylor and Henry Brandis get it for what’s on the inside. 

If a certain member of cur class were going to graduate, it would be extremely 
easy to name the laziest, but since we leave him behind, the honor falls to George 
Busby. 

As for the most talented, that is hard to say. We are all talented, for haven’t 
we successfully endured four years of High School? Musically, Stedman Morris, our 
saxaphone hound, would claim it, but Elizabeth Sifferd, our piano player, would get 
it. Talents include many things. Dancing might come under this head and I am 
assured that another member who falls by the wayside should get it. Since he is ine¬ 
ligible, Frances McCorkle gets the honor. The art of lying with the greatest ease 
is highly contested, especially by David Milne and Charles Price. Since these two 
gentlemen also contest for the place as most talkative it seems best to split the 
honors and give David that of talking, leaving Charles the place of best liar. 

Mary Susan Griggs shares the envious position of being best natured with Fritz 
Campbell, who is our best little sport. The Latin class attributes these young- 
ladies’ good nature to the fact that neither of them takes Virgil. 

It seems “quite the thing” for the papers to take different features of different 
people and make them into one perfect face. We feel sure that we might do this and 
have the most perfect face yet if we took Rosalie Wiley’s hair, Elizabeth Henderson’s 
eyes, I. Z. Christy’s eyelashes, Mary Bern Reynolds’ dimple, Betsy McCorkle’s smile, 
Fritz Campbell’s mouth, and Corrinne Leonard’s nose. 

Among miscellaneous curiosities we have five long haired girls, one Chandler, 
seven Fords, five Buicks, forty-nine compacts, forty-four combs, and last but not 
least seventy diplomas. 

The preceeding are the facts and figures of our class transcribed to the best of 
my ability. 


Elizabeth Murphy, Statistician. 




as 


THE EC H O 















THE ECHO 


39 


INNES STREET SCHOOL, SALISBURY, MAY 2, 1924 
BOOTH TARKINGTON’S 

“Clarence” 


Director—Miss Mabel Lippard Assisted by Mrs. John Busby 

Stage Director—Miss Julia Groves 


THE PLAYERS—(In order of their appearance) 

Mrs. Martyn _ Elizabeth Henderson 

Mr. Wheeler _ Henry Brandis 

Mrs. Wheeler _ Frances McOorkle 

Bobby Wheeler_ Robert Mauney 

Cora Wheeler _ Frances Campbell 

Violet Pinney _ Rosalie Wiley 

Clarence _ Mr - J - Allan Dunn 

Della Mqiv Jones 

Dimviddie_ R °y Shore 

Hubert Stem _ - Charles Miller 


Ellen Fletcher—Property Manager. Assistants Joe Overton, Arthur Blanch, 
Carey Bostian, Billie Owen. 

Coriinne Leonard-Chairman of sale of tickets-David Milne. Elizabeth Murphy. 
Katherine Taylor—Publicity Manager—Elizabeth Henderson. 


Llanche Stuart—Chairman Poster committee. 














40 


1'HE ECHO 



Junior Class 







THE ECHO 


41 


Junior Class History 


The Junior Class is very large this year and it is to be hoped that the Senior Class 
of next year will also be a large one. The Juniors led in the number of exemptions 
at mid-term, and they are very proud of their long list. There are also a large 
number of students classed as Juniors who have built up for themselves quite a 
renutation at S. H. S. We wish to mention a few who have made themselves familiar 
to the other students in the High School and to the townspeople as well. 

Thomas Kesler and Mary Elizabeth Strickland, members of the triangular debat¬ 
ing team, are very studious inhabitants of 10-A. Together with Buster Gregory, of 
football and Fi-ench fame, they support 10-A’s part of the class very well. 

Hereford Wolfe, also known as “Cowpuncher,” hails from 10-B. Hereford has 
played varsity tackle on the football team for three years and is captain-elect of the 
team. “Herf” is also President of our class. 

Agnes Rideoutte, chief marshal, well-known to everybody, gets her report card 
from 10-C. Agnes is better known by almost everybody as “Tootie.” Fred Ryan, 
who has held down third base for Salisbury for two years, also sits in 10-C. 

John Holshouser, who has played four years as catcher on the baseball team and 
who has been captain of the team for the last two years and is manager of the foot¬ 
ball team for next year is registered in 10-D. Ralph Fesperman, better known as 
“Wink,” also a member of 10-D has carved his name in Salisbury’s athletic hall af 
fame, in that he has been the mainstay of Salisbury’s pitching staff. “Bud” Shuler, 
chief marshal, varsity football man for three years, captain basketball team last 
season, and pitcher on the base ball team, is also from 10-D. 

This has been a rather quiet year for the Juniors, except for the much enjoyed 
Junior-Senior party, the time Fesperman beat Spencer, Fred Ryan walked from 
Concord, and several other incidents. 




12 


T HE ECHO 



















THE ECHO 


43 


\E CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, MOL 


5 l 

EEK | 

I 

ion 

as 

it, ! 

) the J 

•c re- , 
■nit- ! 
>sti- i 
orts 
the ! 
/Time. [ 
-o con-I 
hut it 
the 
their 
l the 
:om- 
into j 
Utor, 
vlon- i 
-vl. S. i 
,cvrmer i 
ate sub- ! 

com¬ 
as this J 


OVERTON TO BE SEATED 
AS MAYOR OF SALISBURY 


Special to The Observer. 

SALISBURY, April 27—Joe Over- 
ton has just been elected- mayor of 
Salisbury. He takes his seat Tues¬ 
day afternoon at 4 o’clock, and will 
have charge of the city's affairs for 
the period of two hours. Joe is just 
one of a number of high school boys 
who have been elected to municipal 
Tices for the brief period when the 
city is to be turned over to the boys 
as a feature of boy’s week that is to 
be observed here this week. Other 
youths elected include Hereford 
Wolfe, judge; John Locke Burke, 
prosecuting attorney, and these 
eight aldermen: Burton Gwyn, James 
Shuler, Ray Fisher, Rowe Fesper- 
man, Carl Ray Beaver, Sidney Cau- 
ble, Jason Clemence, Maddry Cooke. 
At the first meeting of the new offi¬ 
cials other officers will be elected by 
them to serve until B o’clock the 
evening of their election Mayor 
Henderlite and his aldermen will ab¬ 
dicate their offices during the reign 
of the boys. 


A A co 'OIATION 


, ft 
j fo 

tht 

SOUtl 

New 

liver 

ma 

Yr 

re 

tl 

lr 

O) 

li¬ 
ce 
be 
visi 
f u ti 
longi 
Tt 
sider 
the s. 
bales). 
contrai 
.cents, 
portlc 
liver’ 

I vvhe 
[ port, 
size 
cor 


"Cl •• 












44 


THE ECHO 



Sophomore Class 








THE ECHO 


45 


Sophomore Class History 


In the fall of 1922, one hundred and twenty live freshmen entered Salisbury High 

School. Locking back from the height of the Sophomore class we think we must 

have appeared very verdant to the older members of the High School. At first many 
of us were homesick for our old schools but we soon got over this. During our 
Freshman year we won the most points in the Athletic Association. 

In September, 1923, we entered as Sophomores, feeling very grown up. We 
have since been busy keeping up with the activities and studies of the Sophomore 

year. When we leave our High School we hope to leave an excellent and never-to- 

be-forgotten record. 

The names of the members of our class are as follows: 

Bobby Brawley; Frank Brown; Allen Doby; James Fletcher; Sidney Kirk; Dodd 
Linker; Rowland Long; Harold McCurdy; Robert Murphy; Haywood Robbin; Philip 
Somers; Frank Stossel; McMaster Ulmer; Edward Walker; James Warlick; Louie 
Watkins; Emory Weesner; Virginia Burt; Edith Clark; Ella Mae Daniel; Grace Daniel; 
Mabel Davis; Thelma Gwynn; Margaret Hudson; Elizabeth Peacock; Virginia Shuping; 
Ruby Smith; Christine Trexler; Fannie Wallace; Fleta Winecoff; William Baker; Carl 
Brown; Anthony Cushing; Lewis Ebener; James Foil; Linwood Foil; Stanford Gard¬ 
ner; Dennie Hanes; William Heilig; Joe Lyerly; Frank Morris; Ralph Mulder; Fran¬ 
cis Price; Arthur Reynolds; Edgar Safrit; Blythe Ausband; Sadie Bostian; Mildred 
Brown; Frances Cauble; Annie Cook; Margaret Daniel; Willie Gillespie; Myrtle 
Goodman; Jessie Griffin; Wrennie Griggs; Inez Hartley; Rebecca Julian; Elizabeth 
Morrison; Elizabeth Roseman; Myrtle Parks; Sarah Smith; Grace Stewart; Effi 1 
Tiernan; Helen Trexler; Ellie T'rott; Grace Turner; Hallie Hartman; Milton Cooper; 
George Dyer; Odell Eliot; Joseph Fouts; Elword Goodson; Jennings Hill; Hugh Julian; 
Raymond Morgan; Ralph Kesler; Jones Satterwhite; Dan Wood; Mauney Yancey; 
Geneva Albright; Pearle Bowers; Ruth Cain; Margaret Galvin; Eva Hauser; Lennie 
Jacobs; Bernice Jordan; Inez Kesler; Mildred Kluttz; Ethel Kluttz; Violet Lee; Jose¬ 
phine Linn; Ora Nail; Inez Owen; Thelma Powell; Lucille Rankin; Bessie Rankin; 
Viola Rary; Mary Robmson; Florence Rufty; Ollie Sherwood; Virginia Simuson; 
Margie Simpson; Margie Trexler; Julie Wolfe; Marie Yontz; Charles Bessent; Grovsr 
Cooke; James Fisher; Fred Floyd; James Floyd; Joe Floyd; Willis Griggs; Wilbur 
Hall; Harold Isenhour; Herbert Jacobs; Charles Kluttz; Bob Lee; Billie Monroe; 
Paul Plyler; Walter Poole; Francis Rufty; Roy Shaw; Felix Thompson; Louie 
Go-dman; Daisy Brown; Regina Brown; Edna Caster; Mary Coughenour; Pearl Clod- 
felter; Beulah Graham; Lucile Dartman; Helen Huff; Eula Jordan; Ruby Cress; Mary 
Morefield; Isabelle Norman; Mabel Wellman; Theresa Shively; Virginia Parson; 
Lucile Julian; Richard Ayres; Olney Brown; Murray Burke; Lemont Canup; Matthew 
Cauble; Obe Chambers; Dewey Foster; Joe Gill; Burton Gwynn; C. P. Hess, bred 
Kesler; John Lowery; Leston Meacham; Carr Peeler; Clyde Roberts; Leo Stiller; Janeye 
Austin; Chloe Cook; Hallie Cress; Helen Gent; Mabel Grubb; Ruth Hartsell; Mildred 
Murph;’ Evelyn McQuage; Viola O’Neale; Viola Rufty; Opal Smith; Gecrgie Thomas; 
Helen Thompson; Margaret Whitaker; Mary Yarborough; Edith Zimmerman. 





Freshman Class 












THE ECHO 


47 


Freshman Class History 

When school opened in September we were a happy grcup of girls and boys, for 
at last we were numbered among the High School throng. With high hopes we began 
our journey toward the next goal passed on this road to knowledge. We were about 
two hundred and fifty in number, but after a territic struggle with Arithmetic prob¬ 
lems, Latin conjugations, Civics note books, and English language our line was somewhat 
thinned. The following, though subdued and weary, are eagerly looking forward to 
the next stage of our journey: 

Marie Allbright; Lillian Cook; Jean Cornette; Alice Ennis; Margai’et Gill; Mary 
Heilig; Mary Hoyle; Ethel Long; Thelma Moore; Katherine Morgan; Louise Nuss- 
man; Helen Peacock; Katherine Raney; Thelma Shives; Ethel Summers; Mildred Yea¬ 
ger; Arnold Canup; Page Choate; John Deadmon; Gordon Earle; Charles Fouts; Ed¬ 
ward Hige; David Bishop; Ragland Kirchin; Carl Lentz; Paul Love; Howard Ma- 
dures; Clement Maupin; Albert Monroe; Harold Simpson; William Tiernan; Rachel 
Barnes; Margaret Eller; Louise Foster; Martha Grimes; Susan Grimes; Lillian Gwynn; 
Christine Hudson; Nancy Jones; Mary Linn; Ethel Littleton; Elva Mahaley; Grace 
Mahaley; Mary McDaniels; Virginia Morton; Eliza Murdock; Charlotte Purcell; Lu- 
cile Rodgers; Gladys Russell; Edna Tatum; Eva Walser; Willie Porch; Bernice Wilson; 
Thurston Fox; Virgil Holmes; Doyle Harrell; John McCanless; Bruce McSwain; Kerr 
Ramsay; Ernie! Saleeby; William Thomason; Samuel Wiley; Glenn Yates; George 
Anderson; Addie Cauble; Dorothy Cauble; Elizabeth Fisher; Connie Foster; Dewitt 
Fulk; Edward Gantt; Catherine Hamilton; Bain Harrelson; Daisy Hartman; James 
Heilig; Laura Hess; Bessie Kidel; Mildred Leonard; Mary McCanless; Lina Moore; 
Ella Norman; Gregory Peeler; Paul Propst; Frances Ramsay; Henderson Rogers; 
Beulah Shives; Aileen Swicegood; Mable Waggoner; William White; Alma Allgoo.l; 
James Bennett; Lena Cauble; Mallie Coleman; Stephen Cornelison; John Cress; Har¬ 
mon Davis; Max Drake; Roscoe Fisher; William Fleming; Claude Frederick; Franklin 
Glover; Grace Harmon; Mary Hall; Elma Harris; Frances Heilig; Herbert Hobs'n; 
Geneva Jacobs; Bennie Kenerly; Genevieve Kenerly; Henry Kluttz; Ray Linn; Nor¬ 
fleet Lytton; Lindsay McDaniel; Elizabeth Miller; Alfred Mowery; Franklin Nail; 
Jessie Nail; Mabel Neel; Eddie Reeves; Margaret Shuler; Taft Sills; Andrew Small; 
Ruth Strickland; Evelyn Thomas; William Yancey; Dorothy Anderson; Fred Archie; 
Raymond Bernhardt; Otis Blackwell; Willie Boone; Inez Cagle; Fannie Caldern; James 
Casper; Dorothy Chaney; Lucy Cornelison; Cora Crook; Delmore Davis; Louise Earn¬ 
hardt; Ronald Edmundson; Roger Evans; Francis File; Preston Frederick; Leon Good¬ 
man; John Hearn; Russell Helderman; William Hoyle; Edna Jacobs; Willie Jones; 
Gladys Kincaid; Margie Kluttz; Lor ne Lingle; Charles Massey; Lester Morgan; Lor¬ 
raine Morgan; Thomas Myers; Burton Newsome; Walter Peacock; Council Powlas; 
Louise Ritchie; Annie Rufty; Ralph Sifford; Mary Sowers; Annie Swink; Elizabeth 
Tartleton; Vertio Whitley; Ray Winecoff; George Yarborqugh; Frances Barton; Mar¬ 
gie Brittain; Olney Brown; David Chambers; Clarence Cox; Chloe Cook; Hallie Cress; 
Viola Dickens; Jessie Earnhardt; George Farris; Carl Fisher; Helen Gantt; Stellr 
Goodman; Margaret Henry; R. J. Harwood; Helen Holboner; Gilbert Jackson; Joe 
Lentz; Robert Leonard; Walter Leonard; Charles Ludwig; Hallie Lyerly, \ erona 
Massey; Evelyn McQuage; William Miller; Carl Miller; David Norwood; Margaret 
Parrish’; Erma Peeler; Frank Peeler; R-y Peeler; Robert Pierce; George Robinson; 
Wendell Shives; Marvin Smith; Marvin Shoaf; Carl Smith; Robert Stewart; Brergen 
Strange; Marvin Thomas; Claud Thompson; Joscy Thomason; Max Tichenor; Evelyn 
Wellman; Hilton West; Margaret Workman. 




% f, 


48 


THE ECHO 



Senior Girls’ Club 
















THE ECHO 


49 


Senior Girls' Club History 

The past year has> indeed been a successful one for the Senior Girls’ Club under 
the leadership of the following officers: 


President __ Frances McCorkle 

Vice-president _ Mary Jones 

Secretary___ Elizabeth Sifferd 

Treasurer _ Ellen Fletcher 

Advisers _ Miss Harrell, Mrs. Norwood 


After the organization and installation cf officers in the fall, we sent to the 
county home a box of fruit, candy and the like, which was greatly appreciated. 

During the winter, we had several enjoyable social functions such as the party 
for the football team, the Christmas affair at the Y hut, and the club supper. 

However, we have not spent all our time in this manner, for we had the oppor¬ 
tunity of rendering the White Christmas Program in chapel. Then, for several weeks, 
the club sold candy at the school and made a considerable sum of money for the Jap¬ 
anese Relief Fund. Also, we packed a box of useful articles and sent it to an Indian 
school in Oklahoma, which was much appreciated by the boys and girls. 

As a public service, our representatives have been helping Miss Bennett in the 
Public Library. Djuring “Keep Faith Week,” we enjoyed interesting talks by Miss 
Locke, Mr. E. M. Hoffman, and Miss Gardyne of High Point. The program, which 
was attended by all High Schocl girls, was very inspirational. 

Then, as a final activity, we gave the “Fun for Folks” circus at the Y hut on May 
16 , which proved such a great success financially that we hope to be able to send sev¬ 
eral delegates to the Y. W. C. A. Conference this summer. 

Our members are: Irene Burke; Mary Chambers; Pauline Cress; Betsey Davis; 
Ellen Fletcher; Ruth Fulk; Pauline Julian; Jennie Kluttz; Katherine Kluttz; Mary 
Jones; Elizabeth Massey; Frances McCorkle; I.ucile Miller; Mary Nieolson; Ruth 
Pierce; Emily Rideoutte; Sadie Shuping; Elizabeth Sifferd; Blanche Stuart; Margaret 
Smith; Catherine Tatum; Susie Tuck; Lcuise White; Inez Winecoff; Corrinne Leonard; 
Loyce Blaylock; Myrtle Roscman; Frances Campbell; Mary Susan Griggs; Ber¬ 
nice Hartline. 










junior-Sophomore Girls’ Reserve 











THE ECHO 


51 


Junior-Sophomore Girls' Reserve 


Julie Wolfe _ 

Katherine Freeman 

Nita Ayres _ 

Helen Huff _ 


_ President 

Vice-president 

_ Secretary 

_ Treasurer 


The names of the members are as follows: 


Nita Ayres 

Roberta Herrington 

Virginia Burt 

Lucille Julian 

Edith Clark 

Rebecca Julian 

Edith Cutting 

Inez Kesler 

Jean Dunham 

Gertrude Kesler 

Ella Mae Daniel 

Blanche Kesler 

Mabel Davis 

Catherine Linn 

Grace Daniel 

Inez Owen 

Jeannie Fowler 

Elizabeth Peacock 

Dorothy Fleming 

Margaret Rendleman 

Katherine Freeman 

Bessie Rankin 

Keith Feamster 

Virginia Shuping 

Thelma Gwynn 

Helen Trexler 

Lucille Hartman 

Fannie Wallace 

Helen Huff 

Julie Wolfe 

Inez Hartley 

Mabel Wellman 

Hallie Hartman 

Mary Walser 

Margaret Hudson 

Mary Elizabeth Strickland 


When the Junior-Sophomore Girls’ Reserve was organized, in November, 1923, 
there were thirty-two members. The program for the year was carried out by the 
four committees: membership, program, social, and service. 

We have had some very interesting programs this year such as, “What Am I 
Worth?”, “Hobbies,” “An Evening with Birds,” and a Christmas play. One of the 
outstanding pieces of work of the service committee was to fix Chi-istmas boxes for 
fifty Indian children. They also helped to keep the rest rooms in the Community 
Building and station supplied with magazines. 

The social committee has given us many good times in the way of winnie-roasts 
and parties. Many of the members have shown great interest in hiking and nature 
study. 

Instead of a joint club next year it is planned to have a Junior and a Senior Club. 
The following officers have been elected for the Senior Club next year: President, 
Margaret Rendleman; Vice-President, Dorothy Fleming; Secretary, Mary Elizabeth 
Strickland; Treasurer, Lucille Coltrane. Those for the Junior Club are: President, 
Grace Daniel; Vice-president, Mabel Davis; Secretary, Fannie Wallace; Treasurer, 
Margaret Hudson. 

The club owes its progress to Miss Locke and Mrs. E. M. Hoffman who. have been 
most capable advisers of the club this year. 









Senior Hi-Y 





















THE ECHO 


53 


Senior Hi^Y History 


President_Henry Brandis 

Secretary_Roy A. Shore 


Vice-president_John Jackson 

Treasurer_James Shuler 


MEMBERS 


Council Archie 
Carey Bostain 
Elmer Brown 
Caldwell Cline 
Obe Chambers 
Bruce Coletrane 
Russell Daniel 
Emerson Faggart 
Junius Fisher 
Dewey Foster 


Ray Fisher 
Herman Fisher 
Fred Floyd 
Burtrn Gwynn 
Charles Miller 
Joe Overton 
Edward Steele 
Hereford Wolfe 
Paul Woodson 


Hi-Y has closed its most successful year. Never before has any Hi-Y had such 
a splendid program carried out. Our members have worked hard and we think there 
has been quite an effect produced on the High School. Mr. A. S. Jones has made our 
Bible Study very interesting and has helped us in many ways. We were indeed for¬ 
tunate in having Mr. Jones as our leader and the Club wishes to express its appre¬ 
ciation for his fine and needed services. 


Our purpose; “Toi create, maintain, and extend throughout the school and com¬ 
munity, high standards of Christian character,” has been lived up to, and carried out 
to its fullest extent. Our platform is the Four C’s. They are Clean Speech, Clean 
Sports, Clean Living and Clean Scholarship. 

The theme of Four C’s was brought out very impressively during one of our 
most forceful Four C’s Campaigns. Then nearly all the High School fellows signed 
the “Come Clean Cards” and few of the fellows will soon forget the meaning these 
cards hold. We are indebted to the delegation from Chapel Hill, for its splendid 
work during this period. 

Hi-Y stands for Four-Square Fellows; advocating under the intellectual side, 
Clean Scholarship; under the physical side, Clean Athletics; under the spiritual side, 
Bible Study and last under the social side, socials, wennie roasts and overnight hikes. 

In conclusion we present a summary of last year’s work; Fifty Thousand Dollar 
Club; Four C’s Campaign; overnight hikes; Hi-Y Conference; Delegation to Older 
Boys’ Conference; Triangular Track-Meet; Boys’ Week; Stunt Night; increase in 
membership; and lastly the arrangement of next year’s program. 







THE ECHO 



Junior rin Y 












THE EC II O 


55 


Junior Hi-Y History 


The members of the Junior Hi-Y are as follows: 


Max Barker 
Luther Barnhardt 
Edgar Ennis 


Robert Goodman 
Heywcod Miller 
Kenneth Miller 
Karl Morgan 
Arthur Morris 
George Shaver 
Harry Shinn 
Thomas Snyder 
Laurance Underhill 
Frank Monroe 
Nelson Woodson 


Aubrey Fisher 
George Fisher 
Marcus Fisher 


Merriman Gregory 
John Grimes 


Lincoln Kesler 
Thomas Kesler 
Richard Lentz 


We are sorry to say that the Junior Hi-Y has not done all that it could have done 
this year. The Bible Study has been bad and the attendance nothing to brag about. 
However, that is past and we are the Senior Hi-Y and we mean to put out some real 
work next year. 

Lincoln Kesler led in attendance for the year with Luther Barnhardt second 
and Arthur Morris a close third. A brief summary of Junioi* Hi-y’s activities is as 
follows: 

We held our first meeting in September with Dr. Tatum as our leader. The 
various committees and their chairmen were appointed. We started out for a banner 
year. Christmas all the Juniors enjoyed the Hi-y-Girls’ Club party. Seven boys 
were initiated into the Royal Order of the Kazebras which bears the same part in 
Junior Hi-y as the Dodo Hunters in the Senior group. At the regular Induction 
ceremony Merriman Gregory, Max Barker, Nelson Woodson, Laurance Underhill, 
Richard Lentz, George Fisher, and Karl Morgan were taken in. 

The following officers have been elected for the coming year from a list of 
nominees submitted by the nominating committee. President, Hereford Wolfe; Vice- 
President, Fred Floyd; Secretary, Laurance Underhill; Treasurer, Junius Fisher. 
With such fine officers for next year we should make the year the best foi* Hi-y. 

The members of Junioi' Hi-y wish to take this opportunity to thank Dr. Tatum 
for his time and service through the past year and for the interest which he has 
taken in us as a club and as individuals. 




l'HE ECHO 
















THE ECHO 


57 


Arthur Branch 
Max Barker 
Frank R. Brown 
Emerson Faggart 
Fred Floyd 
Dewey Foster 
Merriman Gregory 
Burtcn Gwynn 
Walter Harrill 
Allen Hartman 
John Jackson 


Henry Brandis 
Emerson Faggart 
Fred Floyd 
James Floyd 
Burton Gwynn 


Elmer Brown 
Roger Evans 
Emerson Faggart 
Ralph Fesperman 
Burton Gwynn 
John Holshouser 
Robert Morefield 


Letter Club 


FOOTBALL 


Lincoln Kesler 
Charles Miller 
David Norwood 
Joe Overton 
Charles Price 
Fred Ryan 
James Shuler 
T. W. Summersett 
Otto Talbort 
Hereford Wolfe 
Paul Woodson 


BASKETBALL 


Allen Hartman 
Roy Shore 
James Shuler 
Thomas Snyder 
Hereford Wolfe 


BASEBALL 


Joe Overton 
Fred Ryan 
Glenn Safrit 
James Shuler 
Thomas Snyder 
Edward Steele 
Roy Shore 




5$ 


THE ECHO 



Triangular Debate 

Query: Resolved, that the inter-allied war debts should be cancelled. 

Affirmative Negative 

Mary Elizabeth Strickland Thomas Kesler 

Harold McCurdy Henry Brandis 

The state inter-high school debate this year aroused much interest and brought 
out about fifteen debaters from S. H. S. One reasqm for this was that the query was 
of nation-wide interest and was decidedly a two-sided question. 

Statesville’s team (negative) put up a gcod debate, but did not prove equal to 
our affirmative team. The debate was held in Salisbury and resulted in a two to one 
decision in favor of Salisbury. Our negative team won over Concord’s affirmative 
team at Concord by a unanimous decision. This entitled us to ga to Chapel Hill but 
there our inexperience manifested itself when both our teams were defeated in the 
first preliminary. The final debate was between Durham (negative) and Wilson 
(affirmative). The decision was three to two in favor of Wilson. This was the 
first year Salisbury’s debaters ever went to Chapel Hill. We wish them better suc¬ 
cess when they get there next year. 





THE ECHO 


59 























tit) 


THE ECHO 



Football 


Left to right, standing: Gordon Urbansky, coach; Max Barker; Kenneth Miller; Lin¬ 
coln Kesler; Frank Brown; Paul Woodson; Charles Miller; Charles Tichenor; Aubrey 
Fisher; David Norwood; Fred Burke; manager; F. B. John, coach. 

Kneeling: Luther Earnhardt; T. W. Summersett; Fred Floyd; Joe Overton; 
James Goodman; Arthur Branch. 

Sitting: Burton Gwynn; Hereford Wolfe, captain-elect; John Jackson; Emerson 
Faggart, captain; Allen Hartman; James Shuler; Charles Price; Fred Ryan. 

FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 


Salisbury—0 
Salisbury—0 
Salisbury—12 
Salisbury—0 
Salisbury—6 
Salisbury—0 
Salisbury—59 
Salisbury—0 
Salisbury—0 


_Concord—0 

_ Lexington—6 
Statesville—6 
_ Davidson—12 
Greensboro—13 
_ Spencer—12 
Morganton—0 
_ Statesville—0 
. Statesville—9 


















THE ECHO 


61 



Basketball 


Standing, left to right: J. Paul Dunham, coach; Eddie Reeves; James Floyd; Hereford 
Wolfe; James Shuler, captain; Fred Floyd, captain-elect; Roy Shore; Emerson 
Faggart, manager; Thomas Snyder; F. B. John, coach. 

Kneeling: John L. Burke; Russell Daniel; Henry Brandis; 

Luther Barnhardt; James Fletcher. 


BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 


Salisbury—24_ 

Salisbury—18 _ 

Salisbury—26_ 

Salisbury—28 _ 

Salisbury—14 _ 

Salisbury Reserves—-34 

Salisbury—19_ 

Salisbury—32 _ 

Salisbury Reserves-—14 

Salisbury—20 _ 

Salisbury—16 _ 

Salisbury—7 _ 

Salisbury Reserves—11 

Salisbury—13_ 

Salisbury—23-- 

Salisbury—21 _ 

Sa’.isbuiy—-21 _ 

Salisbury—25 _ 

Salisbury—20 _ 

Salisbury—23 _ 


_Kannapolis—23 

_ Greensboro—33 

_Mooresville—33 

- Badin—14 

_ Kannapolis—21 

Mooresville Baptists—23 

_Mooresville—27 

High Point—19 
_ So. Main Pioneers—12 

_ Badin—16 

_ Charlotte—14 

Churchland—26 
_ So. Main Pioneers—12 

_ Farm Life—11 

_ Statesville—12 

_ Concord—14 

_Farm Life—22 

. So. Main Pioneers—7 

_ East Spencer—12 

_ Albemarle—26 




































































62 THE ECHO 



Baseball 

Standing, left to right: Fred Ryan; Glenn Safrit; Edward Steele; T. W. Summersett; 
Rowe Fesperman; Roger Evans; Robert Mo/refield; Elmer Brown; Joe Overton 
James Shuler; Emerson Faggart, manager; F. B. John, coach. 

Sitting: Thomas Snyder; John Holshouser, captain; Roy Shore. 

BASEBALL SCHEDULE 


Salisbury—0 
Salisbury—5 
Salisbury—12 
Salisbury—6 
Salisbury—3 
Salisbury—4 
Salisbury—0 
Salisbury—6 
Salisbury—4 
Salisbury—4 


_ Concord—4 

Churchland—5 
Churehland—0 

_ Spencer—1 

Kannapolis—17 
Kannapolis—0 
_ Statesville—6 
Farm Life—13 

_ Concord—5 

. Statesville—2 























High School Athletics 


The Salisbury High School has enjoyed its best year in athletics during the season 
past. More interest has been taken in the various sports by patrons and fans than 
ever before, and also by the students themselves. The number of candidates answer¬ 
ing the call for practice for the different sports exceeded by far the numbers here¬ 
tofore, and good work was done by these new aspirants. 

The building of the Y hut last fall aided athletics materially as the boys had 
dressing rooms in this structure. The basketball practices were held and games were 
played on the spacious court of this building. Excellent seating equipment afforded 
an opportunity to handle the crowds, and good attendance held up throughout the 
season. 

The outlook for athletics next year is very encouraging. A new field has been 
built on the grounds on which the new high school building is to be erected and this 
will be available next fall. For the first time in the history of the school the football 
and baseball teams will have a permanent field on which to practice, and best of all, 
on which to play their home games. 


FOOTBALL 


The football call to practice was answered by approximately 40 candidates. Three 
full teams stuck throughout the season and under the careful training of Coach F. B. 
John, assisted by Gordon Urbansky, former Randolph-Maccn Academy star, a good 
team was whipped into shape. Out of a total of nine games played, the record shows 
that two ware won; two tied; and five lost. However, since the team wast made of 
much new material the season was not a failure. The new men received plenty of ex¬ 
perience and will prove a valuable nucleus around which to build the team of next year. 

Probably the best game of the season was played against Greensboro. Although 
Salisbury last by the close score of 13 to 6, Greensboro had to exert her every energy 
to win. The victors expected a walk-away in this game, but were sorely disappointed. 

Salisbury entered the championship series and won the fii'st game easily from 
Morganton. Statesville was next on the list and for five quarters the two teams 
fought with neither being able to push the pigskin across the last white line. Another 
game was necessary for Statesville to assert her supremacy by the score of 9 to 0. 

Emerson Faggart, half back, was the captain of the team, while Fred Burke man¬ 
aged it. Hereford Wolfe, right tackle, is captain-elect. 




BASKETBALI 


Salisbury entered her second year of basketball under auspicoius circumstances. 
Practically all of the team of last year were back, and the new Y hut court was thrown 
open to the players. Physical Director Dunham of the Y, former star basketball 
player, had charge of the coaching, assisted by Coach John. A good sized squad was 
busy all the season perfecting plays, and some splendid games were the result. Out 
of a total of seventeen games played by the varsity, ten were victories. The second 
team played three games and won two. Only one varsity man is lost from the 
squad by graduation. 

The championship series was entered for the first time in this sport. Concord 
was defeated in the first game, but Farm Life ended championship hopes by 
defeating the locals by the hair-raising score of 22 to 21. 

One of the most pleasing games of the season was the 16-14 victory over Char¬ 
lotte high. It took five quarters to do it, but at the close of the game Salisbury held 
the big end of the score. 

James Shuler, left guard, captained the team during this season while Emerson 
Faggart held the managerial end of it. Fred Floyd, center, will head the team next 
year. 


BASEBALL 


As in football, a baseball team had to be built from a small nucleus. Three of 
last year players, John Holshouser, captain of the team and catcher; Fred Ryan, 
third baseman; and Emerson Faggart, right fielder and manager, were the beginning 
from which the present season’s team was built. Ten games were played with four 
victories, five losses and a tie game that went twelve innings. 

One of the outstanding features of the season was the pitching of Rowe Fesper- 
man, who hurled his fiist year of baseball for Salisbury. In the final game of the 
season he hung up the remarkable recorci of twenty-five strikeouts in a nine inning 
game, twenty of these coming in succession. The remaining five were made in suc¬ 
cession also. John Holshouser led the team in batting with an average of 400. 

Spencer, the ancient rival, and runner-up in the west for state championship, 
was defeated in the annual Easter Mcnday game by the decisive score of 6 to 1. Fes- 
perman yielded only three hits in this game and had 18 strikeouts. 

For the first time in six years, Salisbury did not enter the state championship 
series. With practically the entire team back next year, and with a favorable season, 
Salisbury should present championship timber. 





The Echo Staff 

LITERARY STAFF 


Editor-in-Chief- 

Managing Editor- 

Associate Editor- 

Joke Editor_ 

Exchange Editor 
Alumni _ 


_Henry Brandis ’24 

_ Rosalie Wiley ’24 

_John L. Burke ’25 

_ Charles Miller ’24 

_Mary Jones ’24 

Katherine Taylor ’24 


BUSINESS STAFF 


Manager- 

Assistant-- 

Advertising Manager __ 

Assistant- 

Circulation Manager 
Assistant - 


_Joe Overton ’24 

_ Kenneth Miller ’25 
_ Elisabeth Murphy ’24 
_ Gilmer Waggoner ’25 
_ Roy. Shore ’24 
Blanche Kesler ’25 


















66 


THE ECHO 


Sights Worth Seeing 

ADMISSION FREE WAR TAX EXTRA 

Hubert Hartman as a hero in Zane Grey’s latest novel. 

Ellen’s epileptic eyebrows. 

George Francis Busby’s neckwear. 

A. Merriman Gregoi'y and his senatorial pants. 

Senior Class meetings. 

Caldwell Cline playing football. 

Laurance Undei'hill not held in deep reverie by a Latin book. 

Fritz Campbell minus her ice-cream cone at the five-minute period. 

Charles Price without brilliantine, stacomb, or other hair glorifier. 

Billie Owen in his first long trousers. 

Ruth Pierce as a toe dancer. 

11-B between periods. 

Loren Goodman walking as he should. 

Charles Miller when he fails to argue. 

Elmer Brown having his first date. 

Bob Mauney not writing notes. 

Bud Shuler—Natural. 

All the Fisher brothers that are not red headed. 

Katherine Taylor when she doesn’t know the answer to a question. 

Mary Chamber’s French paper. 

Carey Bostian’s hair. 

Ed Steele with black hair. 

Joe Overton not grinning. 

Lucille Baker with her mouth shut. 

Mary Baker without her compact. 

11-A when it’s quiet. 




THE ECHO 


67 




















THE ECHO 


Jokes 


Miss Latta: “Who was Homer?” 

Geo. Francis: “The guy Babe Ruth knocked out.” 

* * $ * * 

He: "Would you like to hear the theory of kissing?” 
She: “No, I only care for applied science.” 

* * % * * 

R. Wiley: “Are late hours good for one?” 

R. Shore: “No, but they’re fine for two.” 


“Why did the salt shaker?” 

“Because it saw the spoon-holder, the potato masher and the lemon squeezer.” 

Miss Brown (in Sunday School): “Virginia, what is it that was born without a soul, 
lived and got a soul, and died without a soul?” 

Virginia: “The whale that swallowed Jonah.” 

* * * >}' * 

Johnnie: “A gentleman to see you, mum.” 

Mother: “Tell him I’m not receiving today.” 

Johnnie: “He ain’t deliverin’, either, mum. He’s collectin’.” 

* * % % 

Truth will out, even in advertisement, as another misprint shows: 

“Wanted, a general servant to do the work of a small horse.” 

***** 

Frances Me.: “Oh dear! I just can’t adjust my curriculum.” 

Arthur B.: “That’s all right. It doesn’t show.” 

***** 

Bud S.: “Hey you, don’t spit on the floor.” 

A1 H.: “Why, fish, does it leak?” 


* * * *. * 

John G.: “There is something eating on my brains.” 
Jos. K: “Don’t worry, it will soon starve to death.” 

* * * * * 

“Those two girls bet a kiss about something.” 
“What’s it to you?” 

“I’m holding the stakes.” 





THE ECHO 


69 


Gilmer: ‘I got two orders when I went out for ads this afternoon.” 
Elizabeth: "What were they?” 

Gilmer: “Get out and stay out.” 


* * * * * 

“Handsome” Goodman: “I say, that woman has been walking the streets all morning.” 
R. Mauney: “How do you know?” 

“Handsome” G.: “I’ve been following her.” 

* * * * * 

Al. Hartman: “I dreamed that I died last night.” 

“Sot Head:” “What woke you up?” 

Al. H.: “The heat.” 

* * :jc % 

“Pap” Gwynn: “If I should kiss you would you scream?” 

“-”: “Well, if you did it properly, I don’t see how I could.” 

* * * * * 

Chas. Price: “Margaret, what under the sun do you girls do at afternoon teas?” 
Margaret: “Giggle, gabble, gobble and git.” 

***** 

John Grimes: “Isn’t Sue changeable?” 

“Bus:” “Why?” 

John G.: “Because, when I told her that I was going to kiss her, she threatened to 
call her mother, but when I did she only said ‘Sweet Papa’.” 

***** 

Paul W.: “What is the plural of child?” 

George A.: “Twins.” 

***** 

Man: “Why all the noise in the kitchen? Is the cook beating her steak?” 

Wife: “No, she is licking her chops.” (Exchange.) 

***** 

Mr. Dunn: “I will not answer any questions during this exam.” 

L. A. Fox: “Shake! Neither will I.” 


***** 

Loyd Rice: “This picture of me looks like an ape.” 

Mr. Alexander: “Sorry, but you should have thought of that before you had it taken.” 

***** 

H. Wolfe: “Hey Charles, let’s go to the Strand.” 

C. Price “What they got on?” 

H. W.: “Nothing much.” 

C. P.: “By all means, let’s go.” 





70 


T HE ECHO 


By Their Tastes You Shall Know Them 

(This being- a list of favorite songs of certain of our classmates.) 
"Tramp, Tramp, Tramp.”—Allen Hartman. 

"Down on the Farm.”—(Duet)—Loren Goodman and Carey Bostian. 

"Oh, Sister, Ain’t That Hot?”—Fritz Campbell. 

"Nine O’clock Sal.”—Mary Susan Griggs. 

“Tell Me.”-—Frances McCorkle. 

"I Love You.”—Ai-thur Branch. 

"I Wonder.”—Betsy McCorkle. 

Mighty Like a Rose.”—Rosalie Wiley. 

Drifting Back to Dreamland.”—L. A. Fox. 

Dusting the Keys.”—Elizabeth Sifferd. 

“Drifting.”—Charles Miller. 

"That Red Headed Gal.”—John R. Crawford. 

"The Rosary.”—Henry Brandis. 

“Waitin’ for the Evening Mail.”—Emily Rideoutte. 

“You Know You Belong to Somebody Else.”—Roy Shore. 

“Somebody’s Wrong.”—George Francis Busby. 

“Peggy Dear.”—Charles Price. 

“Lovable Eyes.”—Elizabeth Henderson. 

“Disturb Not my Slumbering Sweet.”—Redd Faggart. 

“I’m a Spanish Beauty.”—Ellen Fletcher. 

“Vamp Me.”-—Elmer Brown. 

“Bright Eyes.”—Elizabeth Murphy. 

“Darling.”—Caldwell Cline. 

“Oh, What a Pal was Mary.”—Mary Baker. 

“How Firm a Fo undation.”—Fred Floyd. 

"Just for To-night.”—Bob Mauney. 

“Who’ll Take the Place of Mary?”—Dick Freeman. 

“Dotty Dimples.”—Mary Bern Reynolds. 

“I Don’t Want You to Cry Over Me.”—Blanche Stuart. 

-‘Why Should I Cry Over You?”—Walt Harrell. 

“Barney Google.”—Paul Woodson. 

“Maggie.”—Inez Winecoff. 

“Lost Chord.”—Stedman Morris. 

“Give Us a Drink and We’ll Go Home.”—Charles Price. 

“Who Knows.”—Katherine Taylor. 




THE ECHO 


71 


WE TAKE PLEASURE IN ANNOUNCING 
THAT ADVERTISING FROM FIRST-CLASS CONCERNS 
HAS ENABLED US TO PUBLISH 

The Echo 

WE ARE INDEBTED TO THESE ADVERTISERS 
AND WE ARE SURE 

THAT THE STUDENTS OF SALISBURY WILL 
SHOW THEIR APPRECIATION 


BY PATRONIZING THEM. 




g 

g 

g 

g 

« 

a 

” 

g 

” 

a 


g 

g 

a 

g 


i. ».a.^ a.a a' a g aa a aa a a a a a a a a a a a a a a 

To the Seniors of 1924 


We wish to congratulate them. May their whole 
life be as happy as their last day in High School. 

We wish to thank them for their past patronage 
and hope to serve them in the future. 

N u r i c k ’ s 

The Shop for Men 

Styles of today with a touch of tomorrow 


H. 0. SERVICE 



AT YOUR SERVICE ” 


a 


CARS WASHED, GREASED, 
AND POLISHED 




:: 

:: 

a 

m 


a 

a 

m 


Belk-Harry Co. 


Salisbury’s Largest and 
Best Store 

Phones 11, 1015, 187 


The Home of Better Values 


a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a .a .a a .a .a t( a x. x;,a lL a a a a ;a, a a a a a a gj[a 






























!gilBlBlBlBllllliasi|gi|giigi iHisi ig||g||g||giigiwigirgi>(«igiigiiaiiaiaiair giiaiigiigiigiigiraigiia iHigi iaiigiaBiigiiaiBiiaigiigiaBi iai!giBiig||g|iHi 
1=1 h 

1 

m 

« 


[a 


The Point Service Station 


Is the Place to Get SERVICE 
Kelly-Springfield Tires 
Bosch Ignition Systems for Fords 
Washing and Greasing Cars 
a Specialty 

Complete Line of 
Accessories 


IS 


At the Point of Fulton and Main Sts. 


Telephone 74-YV 


H 


a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 


larKiRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRiaRa RRRMRRRRRRRaaRRRRRRRRRRRR RRaRRaRRRiaigM 

R iHrKiRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRjaRRR RRRRRRRRaaRRaRRaaaaRRaRRRRaR RRRRRRRRi gi 

a si 

a a 


W. H. LYERLY’S 
GROCERY STORE 


@ 

:: 


The Home of Good Things 
to Eat 


'a 


A Staple Line of Groceries 


Corner of Ellis and Kerr Sts. 


Telephone 468 


m 

a 

a 

a 

a 


;t a a a !: a a a a a a :t a a a a a :: a a :: a a :: a a a a :: s: :: a a a a a a :: a a a >: a ,a :: -r •• 







x a'X a «"jf a’ a a a - a v aa itititit:: it i: it it is it it it a it it it it it it it it it aWiWaBlaiaBB[giaig]|gllaU51alBaWixMIS|gia 

it H 

I # | 

Salisbury Ice and Fuel Co. 1 

1 — - . ...... . H 

S B 

Wholesale and Retail in |» 

ICK AND COAL 1 

Telephones 798-799 


SALISBURY, N. C. 


,it it' g a it it K.lal lairaiiwai iallal fallgl lalRI ISIK Igllallallallallallalli 
B 

WK SEEK TO SERVE 
SI 
[x 

a 

El 


THE R. W. NORMAN CO. 




The New Edison 

s 

gS 


FURNITURE 


SALISBUSY, N. C. 


The Brunswick 


it it" it it it it it it gH it sniHHiisHUMgiiaaHBBBaBBBBBBBBBBBBaBBBBaBBBBBHaHaaaa 

II B 




it 

it 


For the Motorist 

IS OUR MOTTO 


99 


it 

a 
a 
a 

a 

- 

a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 
a 

a _ 

" a 

| Corner Main and Liberty Sts. Call 707 day and night g 

a a 

a a 

x.xx «x xxx x xxaaaaixjaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa 


If you trade here you will 
find we really are 


A COMPLETt AUTOMOBILE SERVICE 


B & B SERVICE 












[giBISISBBBBBTOBBBmEWBBHBBWisisisisisisisia isiB iSB'sisis rsfsisisisiaiaiaisfsisisis Bis' S'Sfsis'S is 


IS] 


jffodci/c ^Pictures 


For best results bring them to us. 
24-hour service 


STONE PHOTO CO. 

West Innis Street SALISBURY, N. C. 


















Salisbury Laundry 

A. S. Jones, Proprietor 


a 

a. , 

gflgmigillK 


pi 

iHUsaaaBBaBBaaBaaaaaaBaaaBBaBaaBBBaaaaaa 


s :::: gaais BBSBSBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBSiBBBBBBBBBBBEBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBBI 
a a 

Si B 

1 The Rouzer Motor Co. 1 


B 


F ord—Lincoln—F ordson 
Sales and Service 


i 


a 


Salisbury, 


North Carolina 


a 

a 

: ni 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 


p .!!,».;«:.«:K..« .aaaaaaaaaaaa aa aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa aa aaaaaaaaaaaaui 


Sit Srcictucition TJime 1 

_ a 

"-a 

1 , . a 

| Your Friends Expect Your Photograph [£J 

§ a 

Telephone 248 | 

J. E. ALEXANDER, ™I i-hotographkr g 

S 151 

« « ~ « « » :: - « k :: n :: :: « :: :: ;; it :: >x;s n *MX # MX MMXBMMMhM,MMMMMM, mtM«lMI 













HBi:aaiiHiiBiiaBiiiisiiiBis!iiiaiaHi8iiiHiasii]iaHiiiagiiaa®!si8!iii§iii!0iH)®®i§ia®i!i§iiiiiiiiiiiiiiaii@ | Ja®® 


7Jo the Sradii a tiny Ctass 
of Salisbury Jfcigh School 


1 


Permit us to join your many friends in congra¬ 
tulating you upon the successful completion of 
your high school years. And may we also offer 
cooperation in vour preparation for the farewell 
parties and dances, and finally graduation itself. 

Say it with beautiful SHOES 
from 

The Family Shoe Store 


i 


i@BP praiaaiaiaigiiaiHisi igiKi isiiaiiaiaiaRi BiBiia igii5iigi igi[ft»tsiigisiigiisiRWMgi ww wgisiigiisiigiig|giwgisiig|iHiigiBii»iwi«ir«it 










g[K]g][«] 



:: :t :: :: :: :t :: 

[g[Kj(a][«][S]g]Sg]g)(K](S]^ 

tKgJHISBB «.:• 


Coughenour Brothers 


Service Station 

226 E. Innis Street 


We sincerely and cheerfully serve 

(it! ;K 

1 to the best of our ability 

H * 

a b 

1 W I 

@ | 

Telephone 917 

p[S 1 l 51 [g|gl 51 B 1 [gllg 1 lg 1 ISl[«llgll 5 ll«l[HlSiailgl lgl lgllgllgiaiB] BiBl(gilS!K >: K- 










~ ~ “ k~ » K's Isa. 


EAT 


Perfection Ice Cream 


- 

g 

g 

fe 

g 

;; 

- 

@i 

g 

- 

g 


:: 

:: 

g 

g 

" 


made by 


Salisbury Ice Cream Company 


SALISBURY, N. C. 


TELEPHONE 919 


g 

fgjggg 


■;;;k x x x a xrx] fxlgggg|xlixMxl[xi[X|[x|[xi[xllx)[xl[x1fxl[xllxM x], , xl gggggggggggggggg»g|IBl(glx1[xlKllKl i5)f5irgirgl 


k 

=: 


s 


uccess 


■- 

g 


g 

g 

- 

g 


through life for the 
Class of 1924 
is the wish of 


The First National Bank 


Forty Years of Conservative Banking 




g 
g 
g 
g 
g 
g 
g 

:: :: ;; ;; :: ;; ;; ;; :: ;; ;; ;; :: :: xX ;; ;; :: ;; :: i: ;;x x/x.ix'KX X3*gMWigX«ilKXgX«g Kg A.,it. 














Brown Insurance and Realty Company 

Real Estate Real Estate Eoans 
Insurance 


Salisbury, 


North Carolina 


m 


iaiiBiiiiamBiinaBBiiiiaiaB!iaiiBiBiiiBiaBiiaBaHigg!!siisi igiisiiaKiigii5isiigiigiigiiKiigiiaigiigiigiigiigiigiigiigia;iBiig.igiiaiig; fc 





Ciasoline, Oils, Tires, and 
Accessories 

(tt) 

South Gate Filling Station 

"Just Where Fulton Meets Main” « 

m 

:: 

gj 

:: :: :: :: :: :: ;; :: :: :: :: :: :: ;; ;; ;; ;; ;; ;; :: ;; ;; ;; ;; 




SAFE ILLUMINATION 


If anything 

ELECTRIC 

we have it 
or can get it 
for you 


T. M. CASEY 

’Phone 204 Empire Block 


























“When a Feller 
needs a Friend” 


Did you ever start to re- 
view your lecture notes for 


them 1 Then is the time you 
will wish you had written 
them on a 


you couldn’t read half of 

n_ .7 HT1_ .-1_„- 




Remington 

Portable 


A few minutes spent in typing after each 
lecture hour will do the trick. And don’t 
overlook the time this machine will save in 
typing your themes, theses, papers, and all 
your writing. 

Standard Keyboard—the most complete 
portable typewriter—fits in case 


only four inches high. Price, com¬ 
plete with case, $60. 


S. H. 




Salisbury, N. C. 


D, 


Paragon ribbons for Remington Portable Typewrit ers 

50c each — $5 a dozen 























J. Feldman & Sons 


Oar 39th Year in Business 


Salisbury 


High Point 


p _ si 

RISISISlSIS lSISliSIISIfSUSlISlSIlSISl ISlISItglSlSISISlSlSlKlSlSlIallglSlSISllKlSlIglSlISIlHUHlHIHUHlIHlISIISliaiSlIglHUgUHlS'allttHgllSIlgllgHgl 


PPPPPP PPPPPPPPPP PPPPPPPPPfe lPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP PPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPK 


p 

p 

MJ 

«: 


Mi 

Ml 

MJ 

p 

Ml 

p 

MJ 

p 

X 

m 

p 

MJ 

MJ 

p 

p 

p 

p 

p 

X, 


Davis & Wiley 
Bank 


H 

X 

M 

X 

X 

Ml 

I 

X 

X 

X 

X 


P M 
p p 
p _______ ___ _____ MJ 

x x x xxxx x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x x XX x X x X x x XX x x x x x x xxxxx xxMap wx x X x x x 


wSISiKJgJgJIlllwJISiKJgJgJiwJSJIMlISJiKJiSISiSgJiiJgjiSiSgJHiSiKlISJiSSliKiiK] 

1 GET IT AT SMITH S 


Mi 


: XiX xi x, x x xj x, x x' 


;x 

x 


X 
« 
P 
x 

X 

x 

P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
P 
P 

T. Franklin Williams, Phar.D. Telephones 132-133 

P P 

;x xJxXx.x.x.x x x x x x.x x x x.x.xM xMTxJx k.kXxmm « KM x x ;; x x x x.x.x.x.x.x x x x x x X.x.x x x x x x x x 


Quality, Service, Satisfaction 
and Green Stamps, too 

Smith Drug Company 















3 -a a a « aSS )t SS«"SSi!SSIlaliaHaHa]|rf||allaliglEaia||5||al31laiHaia1H[aiaBlBliailllBlHllBIBll§llSlliail|gl EIBI|gllal|g|Bliali5i 
S SI 


When in a hurry 


T elephone 1406 

Yadkin Drug Company 

"Service That Serves” 

Prescriptions called for and delivered 


ISlSHfflSSIallalHsl 

(a| 

H 

m 

is 

H 

IS 

« 

B 


FOIL’S 

The Place for Quality and Sense 


Fancy Groceries and Fresh Meats 


FOIL BROTHERS 

Telephones 780-781 


R. L. FOIL & CO. 

Telephones 390-391 


m 


SSSSSSIgllalSlBlSIalS IallallHlIallallallHl IalS IalSS rSS SS IalSSSIallalSS Iallal lallalSSWSIallalSSSIallHlIaiSSSESIg^ 


II 

H 


Qua 1 1 1 1 y 


Oestreich er’s 


[«i 


s 


s 


3*or Sconomipa/ 7jrctnsportcttion 


Watch the Chevrolet Lead” 


Raney-CIine Motor Company 1 

Telephone 1429 SI 

H 

::S@ HHjSHHBSSSSSSHSBHSISBBHHBSSSSEHHHHHSSBElISISSiHBEBHHEBHBSJ 
























!!Bliai]BllBllBlllBliaBl BliaBia si ig|gisiiaiig| |g||giig||giigiigi iaiigiigiigiKiiaiiaiaiigiiaaigiiaiaiigiiaHiigiiaigBgiiaiaraigiiswaiigiRiig 


Quality 


Accuracy 


« 


CARTER & TROTTER 

A GOOD DRUG STORE 


THE PEOPLES DRUG STORE 

THE REXALL STORE 


H 

K 


Service 


Price 


l]|g]|g]|g||g]Ii][g]|g][g|Ig][i]|g][81[8]IgllglSHSllgIS]ll]llillSIlgllS]IEIS]l]S]llIlgllgBMIBlIl]ll]SB]ISIgIISIISiliIlllSlllllg!lgL' ] 
BillllllllSISISISIHSIHllBllllilgllllllllllllliaBIllllHHglHHIllliaSlllSBIgllliaBISIlHBISHlliaEIBIgHIlllgllSll 


Rowan Hardware 
and Machinery Company 


X 

a 


See Us Before Buying Your 
Hardware, Stoves, Ranges, Etc. 


- 

- 

* 

Si 


! WE CARRY A FULL LINE AT REASONABLE BRICES 

m 1 

m 1 

(SI _ _is 

MIKiSS »iK :: x « k'k-S x x :: x >: X x x x x x x :: >: x :: x x x x x x x x x X x x x X x X X x x x x :: x x X x x x :: 














» 

g 

j§] 

la] 

~ 

r. 

;; 

IS 


SUMMER SCHOOL 

You will save $35.00 to $50.00 on your course by taking 
advantage of our “Summer School Offer ” Only a 
limited number of Students will be taken at the re¬ 
duced tuition rate Call and register now. Send for 
catalog. Office hours 8:30 to 12:30. ’Phone 1503-W 

Salisbury Business College 


1 no 

ISSUES® 


West Innis Street 

SEE® 


SALISBURY, N. C. 


a® »:xSSS]XaIa]SSS@HHHSHHHHHHH@®E®HEHHH®aHE®@®@®@@E®HHS@SEaHHSHE@ 


Springtime, Summertime, and 
all the Time 



REG. U S. PAT OFP. 

cream ot Ice Creams 

Chapin-Sacks Corporation 

®®®[»]®®®®®[Ki®®®|51 ®® ® |g|® ® |«1® ®[«i® ral® ®ral®®®la1®®H®®®®®la1®®®[al lal® ®®®lalla1 ®®®®®lKi[X 


-a::;: ggp a g(g®HH@@n@@nnn0nmi§]m[gHHHHHH!gnu@mjx)®®®®H@H®®®@@HH@( 

1 LINGLE MOTOR SERVICE 

" Service That Satisfies ” 



jaj 

H 


Gas, Oils, Tires, Tubes, and Accessories | 

High- Class | 

Motor Car and Truck Repairing | 

y 

2 South Main Street Telephone 1517 j§j 


K a ~ X k x k ggjgtgggigiiHgigiagaigigiiiaSBHIlllllESHSSEHHESEESSHHEIiliaiiHBBHHHSSll 











a. 

a 

» 

a 

a 


AUTOMOBILES 

Overland Willys-Knight 
Anderson Oldsmobile 

Solid and Pneumatic Tires, Accessories 
Supplies and Repairs 

THOMPSON’S GARAGE 

Telephone 300 


m 
m 
i 

H 
pel 
m 
s 
s 
® 

• I 

|x| 

: :: a a a a :: :: a a :: a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a 


^HHSSSHSBSHHHSHHHHSBSSHBSIillSglSSiaHSSSlIISSHHSHHSHHHSHHlMSSMSHSSfS, 


Salisbury Hardware 
and Furniture Company 


@ 

H 


We have a full line of 
Baseball, Tennis, and Golf Supplies 
in addition to 

Hardware, Paints, Varnishes, 
Wax and Household Goods 


si 

s 

m 

p 

i 

s 


m 

a 

a 

S 


Telephones 81 -82 


SALISBURY, N. C. 


”< :: :: a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a ■ a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a ; 










jt a a a a a a - a a ga a rf|«l.»V«|[HllHpi[»1[gl[g1!gl[gl!«l[Sl|g1[gll51[«l[Hl^tllSllg|«lSl|51l5||5IW«llg||g|[ai l«iraigll51[KllSl[5iaiim»Hgt51lgllgl[Sl 
a ffl 

gj 

a 


Perpetual Building and Loan Association 

§ T. B. Brown, President Frank R. Brown, Sec. and Treas 

H 

H 

New Series Open March and September 


is 


SALISBURY, N. C. 


S 124 North Main Street 
a 

m 

EgBiigia aHS®S0®HHgltS[S!SSIMll3llltSH®HISISEHISIHH(SS®SISiaiS!SIS[S(SIS@ISIS[SISlSSlSllSIS[SISlSla!i 


Yadkin Furniture Company 

DEALERS IN 

High-Cla ss Furniture and Home Furnishings 
Brenlin Window Shades Made to Order 
Kirsch Curtain and Sash Rods 


is 


| 115 W. lnnis Street 

m 

gpisiiaiaisis 


Telephone 232 

i 

HHBglMglfe' 


-<:i][g]!g][gi(g]|giigi|«)g[g|g](§l(§liaiil[gl[glS]®lllH(g|5!lg®LSHHHSH®BISHHHHHHHaH®@HH®®HB!®@ISiaiaig]|gip 


0 

0 

0 

s 

s 

s 


0 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 

a 


The Wachovia Bank & Trust Co. 


Extends its congratulations 
and best wishes to all 
members of the 
Salisbury High School 




a 

a 


REMEMBER! WE WORK WITH YOU 


a :: a a a aia,g[a1 [«l[«H g||al[g|5|[a|[g||Kl[alla|[«l[gllK| [aii«i rai!al[ gl[ai r><i rKllKl[al ®lall alla llallal®®®®®[t 


















V. Wallace & Sons 


The Home of Kuppenheimer Suits 
Stetson and Kroful Knapp Hats 
Manhattan Shirts and Underwear 
Interwoven Socks 


The Store for the Particular 
Buyer 


« 

K 

X 

K 


i FIFTY YEARS OF SATISFACTION 

a a 

MiaiHKilglglBlglBWW WIBIBIBIBIBISI|g||g|SIIB|g|BIH|g||SllSIWIBH»IW!g|W|g|IB|giSI|g| |g||g||g|ISI|g||g|g||g||gllSISISIISIIgiaiia5Blg|giia 










[x][x][XjElXji«jS 

xj@[S][k]®{«][«](k] 


*J®®®®®®®®'_hj(j 

ffi®®®® 

®®®®® 

)®®®[> 

tlfx.lx xjxjx x x [x x/xHr ^ 


m 

,X| 


Tjat 9//ore 
97/other's 777react 


X 

X 

x 


Salisbury Bakery 


fX,,X Jt XX X'X X X X'jt XX X X X X !! Jt X X X X X'X X X X'X.'X 


; j; x Jt x x Jt it : 


jt Jt jt jt Jt Jt jt j: Jt jt jt x x x x x x 


X X Jt X X Jt Jt X Jt Jt Jt X X Jt Jt Jt Jt X Jt X Jt Jt Jt Jt Jt Jt X Jt Jt Jt Jt Jt Jt X Jt Jt Jt X Jt Jt Jt Jt Jt Jt X Jt X X X X X X X X Jt Jt Jt Jt :t Jt 

1 a 

® Jt 

Drink and Enjoy 

""Kenny s” High Grade Coffee 

y 

I Fresh Roasted and Ground While You Wait 


JJ 


C. D. Kenny Company 

| Telephone 4-0 SAI.1SB1 KY, N. C. gj 

m „ __ a 

jt jt it jt j; Jt Jt it Jt Jt it x j: tt jt Jt j; tt Jt x x Jt x x Jt x x x jt Jt Jt x j: x x Jt x x x Jt x x Jt jt x x x x x x tt x jt x it x x x.W 












" -_5?" :::::::::::: k 3ggg@ggg®ggggggg|ggggggg[a!][S![g]ig][g]|g]gggggggggg(iIla](i]SS 

| S 

Salisbury Bank and Trust Co. 

SALISBURY, N. C. 

"ON THE SQUARE” 


a; 

a 

a 

a 

!»' 

:a 

IS 


Capital .$ 150,000.00 

Surplus..$ 37,000.00 

Resources. $1,500,000.00 


13J [jfj 

Careful attention to all business entrusted » 

, li 

I to our care g 

ra_ i 

,a.gSBBSSBSSS®gg®gg®gSg®SSgg®gggggg®g®gggggggggggSgS®BgSggBggB 



m 


g 

g 

S 


a 

S 


a 


TJoms *2)rug Store 


a 


On the Minute Service ” 


Telephones 234-235 


Salisbury, N. C. 
















'* m a a a a a, a a a a :: >: a x a a :: :: a :: ::;; aa a a a a a a a a a a a ;; a a a a a a a a a :: a a a'a 


« 

x 

X 


Buy Your Tires at Wholesale 
Prices Direct from the Factory 


a 

'X 

a 


THIS PRIVILEGE GIVEN TO AIL 
ROWAN COUNTY CAR OWNERS 


The Paul Rubber Company 

Salisbury, N. C. 


lallailSll«llalla|[a|[«| [gll81 1«iraiallgllgllallgllaHallallallal!Kllalla|]a!lallall«l[all«l(al[allallKll«1lKK[SII«lHllS1|g|lKir«llKl|gi[! 


'a 

@ 

SI 

s 

s 

X 

a 

S 

H 

x 

x 

X 

« 



t is indeed a pleasure to plaq a part in the 
production of books that will, in after qears, 
brinq back the trials and joqs of school life 
UJ>lh this thouqht in mind, ipe stripe to ren¬ 
der close co-operation to each school to 
u>hom tl is our pleasure to furnish enqrau- 
mqs. that we too. maq look back with pride 
on each and euerq book u>e produce 
BIERMAN ENGRAMNG CO 

7.INC ETCHINGS 
S J lh EMBOSSING KIEV 

Lll H M HAI I TONE.N 
S fniOH PLATES 

COR t Ml Hi H AND AV ST 
TELEPHONE 1203 

CHAPLOTTE \ C 


DESIGNERS 
ILLUSTRATORS 
RETOUCHERS 
SHADING TINTS 



































































n 

m 
H 
m 
1 

Complimentary | 

jgj 

Southern Power Company | 

B 

I 

B 
B 

m 

SgjHSBBBBEHBBBBBBBBBBBBBEBBBBBBBSBaBBBBHBBBBBaHBBaBBBHBESfe 


Peeler Drug Company 


" The Service Drug Store” 

[g 

where your Prescriptions are 

| filled “rite” 

a 

a 

1 ’Phone 4SG 901 S. Main Street 

a 

HHBBBaBBBBBBBBSBBBBBBBBHBBBBBBBBHBBBaBBHBBBBBBBBBHBHEEaBBP' 
^aaaaaaaas 


If you once buy, you will 
always use and be satisfied with 


Grimes’ Flour 

A Guarantee With Every Sack 


M 

0 

M 


Grimes Milling Company 


a 


















Our Guarantee 


All goods sold by us are guaranteed to be as represented. 
Our purpose is to supply you with the best of everything 
in our line at the lowest possible price. 

We Thank You 

Empire Drug Company, Inc. 


HBiBlBiaig||gWlgl|gl|gl |gl|gl|gll«l|g|51|gll51Bll»lBl|gll>a iSllgl|gl|gl|gllgl|gl|gl|gl|gl|gl|gllSllg lSl|gi|g!l»!!51 !»ll»lBlSl BliaKI|gl|gll«lBlSl |gl lgllg|gl lgl 


Main Drug Company, Inc. 

“ THE DRUG CENTER ” 

The Place Where Your Prescriptions are Filled 
Agents for 

Whiteman’s Candies and Kastman’s Kodaks 


Telephones 163-164 


260 South Main Street 


is 

BiBiiiiiijiaigiiiiiiiiiiiHiiiiigjigiiiiaigisiiigiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiaigiBiiiiaiiiiiiiiiaiaiiiiiiliHgiiHiiiisiiiiiiMilgiBiBgilEiiKi 



YADKIN HOTEL 

160 Rooms 


SUNDAY LUNCHEONS AND DINNERS 
SPECIAL FEATURES 


[» 

n 

K 

i>« 


J. F. SOMERS. Manager 


m )(,:« :: x,x k x.,x :: :: XX k :: X X x X x x x X x x x x :: x x :t :: :: :: :: :: :: xte X x.x,x x x «,K :: x.x X<Xxx x x :: . 


















Vacation Time Is Here 


:: 

E 

- 

:: 

g 


Tennis Goods, Baseball and Basketball Goods, Fishing 
Tackle, and anything in the Sporting Line. 
BEST GOODS BEST PRICES 

Salisbury Pawn Shop 


:x a k assnag a@(iiniiiiiiiii]g|giiiiiigii)iiiiigini]|giia(aiMiiMiiiEiiiiiiiEiiiiiiiMSiiiiiiBiiasiEiii!EiiiiiHSiiisiisM 

1 “BOYS” I 

" = = = II 




See a full line of Suits and Furnishings in the latest 
materials and models at the store that sells you the 
clothing for less money. 


63 


TREXLER BROTHERS 


Telephone 1495 


108 North Main Street 




m 

li 1 

a ® 

1 ROBERTSON GROCERY COMPANY 

Salisbury, N. C, |j 

WHOLESALE GROCERIES I 

l«J 

CANDIES 



r :x is a/ sSSS000[3631SM1S36363[SSBIS[S63IS[S(k)631hH 0®i30@(§HH063®@®HHSSH[S(§[3!SE[KlI§BIS[sB63 

a !£j 

!1 


fr The Sweetest Thing on Earth 
fs the Pleasure of Pleasing ” 


“ 


The Genevra Shop 


MILLINERY 


BEAUTY PARLOR 


a i 

:::x a k ;».« sx Jxg tx :x g0@SE00®0000S®0aaHSa0]®@[8!gS3(§]lS[0!i][2][S[g]ia[llS]S][iBE]ii]E]IS!®IS63[S 

















SBMBBISHH 
fg 


M 

!«i 

”! 

M 

!»i 

a; 

M 

'«! 

a, 

a, 

m 


Give Us PART of Your Business 
If You Can’t Give Us ALL! 


Some institutions want ALL OR NOTHING. 
WE WANT ALL OR PART. 

In fact, our progress during eighteen years might 
have been even greater, but for our policy of de¬ 
voting most of our time to cultivating the business 
we have rather than coveting the business we 
should like to get. 

And we are not departing from that policy even 
now. We are still more concerned with satis¬ 
fying old customers than seeking new ones. But 
because we have more satisfaction to give than 
our present customers can use up, we just want 
to go on record, that— 

We would like part of your business—if you 
can’t give us all! 


PEELER’S PRINTERY 


Telephone 500 

i 
a 

g 

l 


SALISBURY, N. C. Wallace Building 

This Annual is a sample of our work 


n 




a 


»! 


. it :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: 1::: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: :: ^ ;; 














■ 




' 


■ • - • : SW-vw rags.-' 

*^|njNRHh 

■ ■- * 

,'t H, \ 

■;. . m ■/ ; : *