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FIRST EDITION. 


PART FOURTH. 


W. II^WAOISI^\^_ ISAAC COLLINS. MORRIS EARLE. 

AN ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE 



LENSES, 

AND OTHER APPARATUS AND MATERIALS 


FOR PHOTOGRAPHY, 



W. H. Walmsley & Co., 


Successors to R. &. <J. BECK. 


ISTO. 101.0 C STI^IEIET, 

PHILADELPHIA. 






-PRICE, TEN CENTS. 




































NOTICE 


There are some changes of prices and numbers in the present edition 
of this Catalogue; and all former editions are sujjerseded hy this. In 
ordering, please mention the number of the edition. 

Terms Cash, at the prices stated. Discounts cannot he given exceptmg 
to Dealers, Colleges and Schools. 

When the party ordering goods is unknown to us, the money should 
accompany the order, either by Bank Draft or Postal Money-order. 
Money should never he sent through the Mails. Where, however, this is not 
done, goods will be sent C. O. D., provided a small remittance accompanies 
the order to insure the prompt takiug up of the package on receipt. 

The Express Company’s charges for collecting and returning money on 
C. O. D. bills must be paid by the party ordering the goods. 

Articles of Glass, such as Spectacles, Eye-glasses and Microscope Slides 
can now be sent by mail at Merchandise Rates, but only in metallic boxes, 
as approved by the department. These will be furnished at cost, and are 
very cheap. Postage must be prepaid, and the necessary amount must 
be included in the remittance accompanying the order. 

All packing-boxes will be charged for at cost prices, and all goods will 
be packed with the utmost care; hut no responsihility will be assumed by 
us, for breakage or other damage, after a package leaves our premises, ex¬ 
cept upon special ‘contract. 

Institutions of Learning and Scientific Societies, being entitled by law 
to import instruments for their own use Duty Free, we are prepared to 
execute all such orders promptly, not only for apparatus of our own manu¬ 
facture, but that of any other makers in Europe; and to deliver the same 
at makers’ Catalogue prices, free of all shipping or freight charges. 

Having a full stock of all the articles enumerated in this Catalogue 
always in store, we are prepared to fill all orders w'ith the utmost prompt¬ 
ness, a matter of great importance to many, avoiding the vexatious delays 
formerly so common. 

W. H. WALMSLEY & CO. 

April 1, 1884 

Cable Address: “QUALMSEY.” 

We do not pay the postage on articles ordered to he sent hy mail, except¬ 
ing Books. The necessary amoimt must he inclosed with the order. 



A Classified and Illustrated 


OF 

Photographic Cameras, 

LENSES, 

AND OTHER 


APPARATUS AND MATERIALS 


FOR THE USE OF 


AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHERS. 



W. H. WALMSLEY & 


SUCCESSORS TO, AND SOLE AGENTS FOR, 


R. & J. BECK, 

2To. 1016 OHIESTITXJT STREET, 


PHILADELPHIA. 






Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1884, by 
W. IT. WALMSLEY & CO., 

In the Office of the Librarian, at Washington, D. C. 





INTRODUCTION. 


The love of pictures and the desire to reproduce in some manner the linea¬ 
ments of a beautiful or beloved form, or striking bit of landscape are universal 
passions of mankind. They have existed from the remotest antiquity, and all 
that is left to tell of the existence of races long since passed away are their rude 
carvings and drawings upon implements of stone and pottery found in their 
tenantless graves. But, with all their longings and aspirations, how few pos¬ 
sessed the ability to give their mental pictures a more tangible shape until the 
Genius of the Camera appeared and bade them use the means he so freely placed 
at their disposal? Then, indeed, a new world was opened to our gaze, and, with 
the introduction of Dry Plates, the hitherto impossible was made so utterly an 
every-day matter that in viewing the accurate scenes of foreign lands presented 
to our view, we lose sight of the means whereby they were procured and thus 
brought home to us. The magic exists none the less, however, and can be 
turned to account by any one who possesses an eye for the picturesque and 
beautiful, and the patience to master the few preliminary difficulties that go 
before all achievements. 

Photography is not a Fine Art, but is a most excellent handmaiden thereto, 
and many eminent artists do not hesitate to call in its aid to their inspirations. 
It educates the eye, teaches one to seek the salient points in a landscape or bit of 
architecture, and impresses the same upon the memory in a wonderful and 
imperishable manner. It is a fascinating pursuit, entices its devotees to seek a 
closer communion with nature, affords needed exercise to the man of sedentary 
liabits, promotes digestion, and carries one in the dismal winter months back to 
manv a summer ramble whilst looking on the pictured mementos of the same. 
What if some plates are “ fogged,” others “ over” or “ under exposed,” or the 
“developer” has gone astray, there will still be fiound a good balance on the 
right side of the account. 

And it is an inexpensive “ hobby.” Look over the succeeding pages, and note 
for what an insignificant outlay of money an “Outfit” capable of producing 
finished work may bo procured. We have seen pictures made with ten-dollar 
Cameras of which any worker might be proud. Our advice to all is to purchase 
at the outset the best Camera and Lenses they can afford, but not to forego the 
possession of awy, because they cannot buy the more costly ones. The lowest- 
priced instrument herein described will do most excellent and satisfactory work 
if properly handled ; the intelligent and enthusiastic operator is as important a 
factor in the proceeding as the tools with which he works. 


3 



4 


INTRODUCTION. 


In compiling this Catalogue of Cameras and other articles pertaining to Pho¬ 
tography, it has been our aim to gather together in a succinct and classified 
manner the best of everything now attainable relating to Amateur Photog¬ 
raphy and the needs of its devotees. In no other Commercial Price List pub¬ 
lished on either side of the Atlantic is there such a varied fund of information 
on the subject to be found; and it is the only one in which any classified system 
is attempted. Beginning with the lowest-priced Cameras (but cheap and good), 
the reader is led through a tempting array of the latest devices and appliances 
up to the very best, regardless of cost. Then come the various parts and appli¬ 
ances which make up an ‘■‘outfit”—Lenses, Plate Holders, Tripods, etc., suc¬ 
ceeded by Developing and Printing outfits, to suit all desires and all purses— 
ending with a valuable selection of Standard formulae of various sorts. The 
mysteries of Photo-Micrography are explained in a clear and concise manner, 
and cameras specially designed for this purpose are illustrated and described. 
Each article is designated by its own particular number, so that in ordering, it 
is merely necessary to give the number, without going to the trouble of writing 
out its name or description. The price of each article is also given, and the same 
will be strictly adhered to; one price to all, and that the lowest, at which first- 
class goods only (for we deal in no others), can be afforded. We guaran¬ 
tee every article sold, and if any is not satisfactory, will in every instance make 
it so. Although scarcely two years have elapsed since we added this branch to 
our business, we have already attained the position of the leading house in Ama¬ 
teur Photographic requisites in America; which has only been reached, and can 
be retained, by keeping the best of everything, at the lowest prices, and dealing 
fairly with every one. 

R. &J. Beck (of London—of which famous house we are the only American 
representatives) have recently added the making of Photographic Cameras and 
Lenses to their extensive business, and we shall shortly have a full supply of 
same for the Amateur and Professional Photographer. The same care and skill 
which have kept their Microscope Objectives in the van for more than the third of 
a century will be given to the construction of the Photographic Lenses. Their 
new Rapid Landscape Lenses, Nos. 2760-63, of this List, are unsurpassed by any, 
whilst their cost is very moderate. We are also direct importers of the Lenses 
of Ross, Dallmeyer, and Darlot; those of the latter bearing our firm name en¬ 
graved on them by the maker. We import our Sensitized Albumen papers, Pyro- 
gallic Acid, and some other chemicals direct from the makers in Paris, whilst 
those of domestic brands are obtained from the manufacturers, fresh and pure. 

We have recently added a Dark Room to our establishment, replete with every 
convenience, the use of which is freely offered to our friends and customers, to 
whom every instruction will be given by competent assistants, without charge. 
From those at a distance who cannot visit our establishment in person, we solicit 
inquiries, which will be carefully and fully answered by return post. 

The mechanical part of Photography, with modern Dry Plates, is very easily 
acquired, and presents no serious difficulties to any. It is practiced by very many 
ladies all over the country, and has as enthusiastic devotees among the fair sex 
as with the opposite one. It promotes digestion, gives one a taste for healthy 
exercise, and enables him to preserve many a scene for after contemplation that 
would otherwise be buried in oblivion. Therefore, we say to one and all, old 
and young, be not discouraged by seeming difficulties in the way, but try for 
yourselves. Our Mr. Walmsley is now preparing a little practical work, giving 
valuable hints to beginners, not found elsewhere in connected form, and we hope 
soon to announce its appearance. 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO. 


CAMERAS, 


NE PLUS ULTRA APPARATUS OUTFITS. 



Nos. 2500-2513. 


No. 

2500. Outfit A. For making 4x5-inch Pictures,. 

This outfit comprises a Ne Plus Ultra Camera, with rubber bel¬ 
low,s and rigid platform, one Double Dry Plate flolder. Achro¬ 
matic View Lens, Folding Tripod, and Carrying Case. 

2501. Outfit B. For making 5x8-inch Pictures, . 

The same as Outfit A in all respects excepting size. 

2502. Outfit C. For making 5x8-inch and Stereoscopic Pictures, . 

The same in all respects as Outfit B, with the addition of a pair 
of matched Lenses for making Stereoscopic Pictures. 

2503. Output D. For making Pictures 6^x8i inches,. 

The same as Outfit A in all respects excepting size. 

2504. Outfit E. For making Pictures 8x10 inches,. 

The same as Outfit A in all respects excepting size. 

2505. Outfit A A. Complete for Field Service,. 

This equipment consists of Outfit A, with the addition of one 
Focusing Cloth, one Ruby Lantern, and one dozen 4x5 Dry Plates. 

2506. Outfit B B. Complete for Field Service,. 

This equipment consists of Outfit B, with the addition of one 
Focusing Cloth, one Ruby Lantern, and one dozen 5x8 Dry Plates. 

2507. Outfit C C. Complete for Field Service,. 

This equipment consists of Outfit C, with the addition of one 
Focusing Cloth, one Ruby Lantern, and one dozen 5x8 Dry Plates. 

2508. Outfit D D. Complete for Field Service,. 

This equipment consists of Outfit D, with the addition of one 
Focusing Cloth, one Ruby Lantern, and one dozen 6Jx8i Dry 
Plates. 


Price. 
$10 00 

12 00 
18 50 

14 00 
28 00 
12 25 

15 00 

21 50 

18 00 


5 


























































6 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA 


NEW YORK OUTFITS. 



Nos. 2510-2512. 



No. Price 

2510. New Yoek Outfit, No. 601, for 4ix5i-inch Pictures, . . . $14 00 

This Outfit comprises the following articles: 

One Finely Finished Single-swing Camera, of Polished Sycamore Wood, with 
Folding Bed. 

One Improved Double Plate Holder. 

‘‘ Waterbury Achromatic View-lens, No. 1. 

“ Extension Tripod, No. 1, with Reversing Attachment. 

“ Compact Carrying Case, with Handle. 

2511. New York Outfit, No. 602, for 5x8-inch Pictures, . . . 17 00 

This Outfit is the same as 601 in all respects, excepting size. 

2512. New York Outfit, No. 603, for 6ix8i-inch Pictures, . . . 20 00 

This Outfit is the same as 601 in all respects, excepting size. 

The New York Outfits {just introduced) are the best and most perfect of any of 
the cheap outfits now in the market. They comprise most of the advantages 
hitherto obtainable only with the highest priced Cameras, 
































7 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

In cases where exposed Plates are taken to a photographer’s and there de¬ 
veloped, printed from, and mounted on cardboard, any of the above equipments 
lack nothing that is essential. We recommend the amateur to finish his own 
pictures, and hence to procure one of the following equipments, which are com¬ 
plete in every requisite for making the highest class pictures, lacking nothing 
for view taking, development, and the printing and mounting of photographs. 

No. Price. 

2515. Equipment A A A. Complete in every requisite, .... $20 50 

This equipment consists of Outfit A, with Developing Outfit No. 

3102 and Printing Outfit No. 3110, for 4x5 Pictures. 

2516. Equipment B B B. Complete in every requisite, . . . . 25 00 

This equipment consists of Outfit B, with Developing Outfit No. 

3103 and Printing Outfit No. 3111, for 5x8 Pictures. 

2517. Equipment C C C. Complete in every requisite, . . . .3150 

This equipment consists of Outfit C, with Developing Outfit No. 

3103 and Printing Outfit No. 3111, for 5x8 and Stereoscopic Pic¬ 
tures. 

2518. Equipment D D D. Complete in every requisite, . . . . 30 00 

This equipment consists of Outfit D, with Developing Outfit No. 

3104 and Printing Outfit No. 3112, for 6ix8i-inch Pictures. 


“NEW MODEL” CAMERAS. 


No. 2520. 4x5. No. 2521. 5x8. 

These Cameras are designed especially for the million—well made, accurate, 
reliable, easily worked, simple, practical, and cheap. 

The Camera-box is made of the best seasoned cherry, well finished in the 
natural wood. The Focusing Screen is hmged to camera-back, which is more 
convenient and less liable to loss and breakage than a removable one. The back 
with screen, slides upon the bed, being fastened by a set screw when the focus 
has been obtained. The Tripod is attached to the bed by a screw which, while it 
allows the swinging of box horizontally, or entire removal, remains in its socket 
at all times, thus obviating danger of loss. The lens is of remarkably fine quality, 
giving sharp definition and great depth of focus. The diaphragms are removable 
—a point of the greatest importance, to compensate for the varying strength of 
different lights. This is the only low-priced Camera in the market having this 
improvement. The Plate Holder is made on a greatly improved plan, doing 

















8 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

away with ledges, and thus exposing all of the plate to the action of the light, 
making a picture the full size of plate. By the old method a quarter of an 
inch all around was lost. The Tripod Legs are jointed, capable of folding to half 
length, but when in position are rigid and firm. A Carrying Case with handle is 
furnished with each outfit, and will take four Holders, a Focusing Cloth, Lens 
Cap, etc. The 5x8 and 6ix8i sizes are i^rovided, at a slight extra cost, with riaing 
and falling fronts, a swinging back, hinged and folding beds (almost indispensable 
adjuncts for some views), and are adjustable for stereoscopic work, having double 
lenses, on interchangeable fronts with partitions. All the sizes are reversible, 
thus allowing the pictures to be taken either vertically or horizontally, as may 
bo desired. 

No. Price. 

2520. Outfit No. 1. For making 4x5-inch Pictures, ... . §10 00 

This outfit comprises a “New Model Camera,” with rubber 
bellows and rigid platform, one Double Dry Plate Holder, Achro¬ 
matic View Lens, with three removable Diaphragms, Folding 
Tripod, and Carrying Case. 

2521. Outfit No. 2. For making 5x8-inch Pictures,.12 00 

This outfit comprises the same articles as those with No. 2520, 
but of larger size. 

2522. Outfit No. 2, with the addition of an extra front, partition, and pair 

of Lenses for Stereoscopic Avork,.18 00 

2523. Outfit No. 3. For making 6ix8i-inch Pictures, . . . . 14 00 

This outfit comprises the same articles as those furnished with 
No. 2520, but of larger size. 

2524. Outfit No. 3, with the addition of an extra front, partition, and 

pair of Lenses for Stereoscopic Avork,. 20 00 



Nos. 2525-2527. 

252.5. Outfit No. 4. For making 5x8-inch Pictures,.16 00 

This outfit consists of an “Improved New Model Camera,” 
which has rising and falling Front, adjusting for skj" or fore- 



























W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


9 


No. PRICI5. 

ground; Folding Bed, for compactness in packing, and single 
Swing Back. All the other apparatus is the same as that fur¬ 
nished with No. 2521. 

2526. Outfit No. 4, with the addition of an extra front, partition, and 

pair of Lenses for Stereoscopic work,.$22 00 

2527. Outfit No. 5. For making 6^x8J-inch Pictures, . . . .20 00 

This outfit consists of an “Improved New Model Camera,” 
with the same apparatus as that furnished with No. 2520, but of 
larger size. 

2528. Outfit No. 5, with the addition of an extra front, partition, and 

pair of Lenses for Stereoscopic work,. 26 00 

The Developing and Printing Outfits Nos. 3100-02 and 3107-09 
are specially designed for use with these Cameras. 


“THE AMERICAN CHALLENGE” SWIVEL-BED CAMERA. 

These Cameras are made in three sizes—3ix4i, 4x5, and 5x8, the first two 
being identical, except in size. The bed is of best seasoned cherry, highly fin¬ 
ished in natural wood. The front is mitred in four pieces, giving it a very 
elegant appearance. The bed swivels under the box, as shown in cut. L, fig. 6, 
is a focusing screw, and M lock nut for fastening box in position when focus is 



“AMERICAN CHALLENGE,” FIG. 5. “AMERICAN CHALLENGE,” FIG. 6. 

No. 2530. Open. No. 2530. Closed. 

obtained. The tripod head E is adjustable, so that the camera may be leveled 
without necessity of moving the tripod legs. The rising and falling front G is 
reversible for packing more compactljL (See fig. 6.) The diaphragms are 
removable. The focus screen is hinged and falls down at the camera back, thUvS 
otfering least resistance to wind. This camera is but two inches thick when 
closed, thus making it most compact for transportation. The lens is of great 
depth and fine quality, giving a sharp and clear-cut picture. 




























































































































10 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


THE “CHALLENGE” 5x8 STEREOSCOPIC CAMERA. 



This Camera combines all the superior points of excellence usually found only 
in high-class instruments, at a moderate price. The Tripod legs are attached 
to the tripod head A, fig. 1, which is so arranged that the Camera box may be 
leveled instantly witli set nut F, without the necessity of moving the tripod 
legs; the greatest convenience on uneven ground. 

Drop folding bed (7 and clamp with hook D, which gives perfect rigidity. 

The Camera box may now be drawn out upon the bed, fig. £, and locked in 
position by lever E. 

The double rising and falling front now comes into play, in order to give more 
foreground or more sky upon glass screen Gr, fig. 2, and is held in any desired 
position by the nuts H and L, fig. 3. 

Should the nature of the view require the focusing of near and distant, or tall 
objects on the screen, the double swing back is used by means of nuts E, fig. 1 
and J", fig, 2. This is a most essential attaclmient to any first-class instrument 
and is more conveniently arranged on the Challenge 5x8 than any other Camera 
in existence. 

Fou Stereoscopic Work, the screw H, fig. 3, is removed, and sliding front 
raised until the stereo partition furnished will occupy its position in recesses 




inside of Cam era box. The stereo front with two lenses is then inserted in place 
of single tube and the Camera is prepared for stereo work. 

It often becomes necessary, or it is preferred to take a view of some tall spire 
or lofty gorge, with the longest diameter of the plate vertical, the Challenge is 
especially arranged whereby this may be effected quickly and conveniently. 















































































11 


W. n. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

The screws J J, fig. 2, and K fig. 3, are unscrewed until Camera box is de¬ 
tached, but without the screws leaving their sockets so that they are never liable 
to bo lost. The Camera box is then reversed, placed in a vertical position, and 
securely fastened by the same screws. (See fig. 4.) The change of box from a 
horizontal to a vertical position does not interfere in the least with the use of the 
double sliding front, the double swing-back, or any of the other attachments. 
It occupies but a moment, and is a far more simple method than is employed in 
most instruments. 

A good lens giving great depth of focus is supplied with this Camera, with 
standard flange whereby, if desired, a more expensive one may be applied. The 
length of draw for the bellows is also sulficient to accommodate a lens of either 
long or short focus. 

No. Price. 

2530. Outfit No. 6. For making 3Ix4I-inch Pictures, .... §15 00 

This outfit consists of an American “ Challenge Camera,” for 
taking pictures 3ix4I, with mitred front, reversible lens, Swivel Bed, 

Belloivs Body, Focusing Screw, Adjustable Tripod Head, for uneven 
ground, set of Folding Tripod Legs, three Removable Diaphragms, 
one Improved Reversible Double Plate Holder, and Carrying Case. 

2531. Outfit No. 7. For making 4x5-inch Pictures, . . . . .20 00 

This outfit consists of an American “ Challenge Camera,” with 
apparatus and improvements same as No. 6, but for taking pic¬ 
tures 4x5 inches in size. 

2532. Outfit No. 8. For making 5x8-inch Pictures,. 30 00 

This outfit consists of an American “ Challenge Camera,” for tak¬ 
ing pictures 5x8 inches in size, with apparatus and improvements 
same as No. C, with the exception of a folding instead of a swivel 
bed, with the addition of the following; Double Rising and Fall¬ 
ing Front and Double Swing Back. 

2533. Outfit No. 8, with the addition of an extra front, partition, and 

pair of Lenses for Stereoscopic work,. 36 00 

All the above Cameras are reversible, so that views may be taken either horizon¬ 
tally or vertically upon the plate. The Carrying Cases furnished with each are 
capable of taking Four Extra Plate Holders; in ordering, it would be well to in¬ 
clude two or three extra, as they will surely be needed. 


ANTHONY’S EQUIPMENTS. 



No. 2540. 


2540. Anthony’s Equipment No. 4. Complete, 


. ' 25 00 

























































12 W. H. WALMSLEY & CO.,'PHILADELPPIIA. 

This equipment comprises a Mahogany Camera, for making pic¬ 
tures vertically or horizontally, measuring 4x5 inches, completo 
with Rising Front, Folding Bod, Rubber Bellows, and Focusing 
Screw, one fine Single Achromatic Lens, improved Tripod, six 4x5 
Patent Double Dry Plato Holders, and Carrying Case. 

Parts of No. 4 are supplied as follows: 


No. Price 

2541. 4x5 Camera, as above, without shield^ .$10 00 

2542. 4x5 Patent Double Dry Plate Holders, each,.2 00 

2543. Single Achromatic Lens,.3 75 

2544. Improved Tripod,.. 2 25 

2546. Carrying Case,. 75 



No. 2547. 


2547. Anthony’s Equipment No. 5. Complete,. 33 00 

This equipment comprises a 5x8 Mahogany Stereoscopic Camera, 
with Rising Front, Folding Bed, Rubber Bellows, Removable 
Ground-glass, Focusing Screw, extra Front Board, six 5x8 Patent 
Double Dry Plate Holders, Improved Folding Tripod, Carrying 
Case, and one pair of fine Achromatic Stereoscopic View Lenses. 


Parts of No. 5 are supplied as follows: 

2548. 5x8 Camera, as described, tvithout shield, .12 50 

2549. 5x8 Patent Double Dry Plate Holders, each,.2 25 

2550. One pair of Achromatic Stereoscopic Lenses,.7 50 

2551. Improved Tripod,.2 25 

2552. Carrying Case,.1 00 

2553. Anthony’s Equipment No. 6. Complete,. 37 50 


This equipment is the same as No. 5, with the addition of a fine 
Single Achromatic Lens, for producing single views on plates 
measuring 5x8 inches. 

The Cameras thus far described in this Catalogue are all priced complete, with 
* Lenses, Tripods, etc. Those to follow, consist of the Camera Boxes only, with one 
double Plate Holder and Carrying Case. Lenses, Tripods, and all additional ap¬ 
paratus may be selected from the lists given elsewhere. 






































W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


13 


ANTHONY’S NOVEL VTEW-CAMERAS. 



No. 1. Novel View-Camera in position for Vertical Pictures. 



Nos. 2555-2559. 


Fig. No. 2. Novel View-Camera, showing method of reversing. 

These Cameras are made in the best possible manner, and of first quality Ma¬ 
hogany, in good, hard varnish finish. They have Single and Double Swing 
Backs, Cone Bellows, and Folding Beds; are very light, compact, and strong. 
Their peculiar construction admits of making tlie pictures cither vertically or 
horizontally with equal ease, the change of 230sition being effected very quickly. 

The rear part of the Camera is separated from the bed by merely jiushing it 
from left to right, the keyhole slots releasing the heads of the screws. 

The front end of the bellows is arranged so as to revolve in a light frame¬ 
work, which runs on the two hollow upright brass rods ; when the rear of the 
Camera is separated from the bed, the entire bellows revolves at the same time 
with the rear. When this is turned on its side and replaced on the screw the 
Camera is reversed. The whole operation of reversing a 5x8 camera requires 
but two seconds by the watch. 

They are made with as long a bellows as possible, the 5x8 being about four 
inches longer than those of the ordinary kind. The ground glass is hinged to 
the Camera. 










































14 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO,, PHILADELPHIA. 


No. 

2555. Anthony’s Novel View-Camera, 4x5,. 

With Single Swing, one Double Plate Plolder, and Carrying 
Case. 

255G. Anthony’s Novel View-Camera, 4ix6i,. 

With Single Swing, one Double Plate Holder, and Carrying 
Case. 

2557. Anthony’s Novel View-Camera, 5x8,. 

With Single Swing, one Double Plate Holder, and Carrying 
Case. 

255S. Anthony’s Novel View-Camera, 6Jx8i,. 

With Single Swing, one Double Plate Holder, and Carrying 
Case. 

2559. Anthony’s Novel View-Camera, 8x10,. 

With Single Swing, one Double Plate Holder, and Carrying 
Case. 

(The three latter sizes have stereoscopic partitions and extra front.) 



2565. American Optical Company’s Outfit No. 202, .... 

This outfit comprises a Folding jMahogany Polished Camera for 
taking pictures 4x5 inches, with Folding Bellows Body, Single 
Swing, Hinged Bed, Brass Guides, and a Shifting Front for ad¬ 
justing the sky and foreground, with one Daisy Double Dry Plate 
Holder, one Canvas Carrying Case, and one Extension Tripod, 
No. 1. 

2566. American Optical Company’s Outfit No. 202 A, . 

This outfit is the same as No. 202, but adapted for taking pictures 
4ix5i inches. « 

2567. American Optical Company’s Outfit No. 203, .... 

This outfit comprises a Folding Mahogany Camera, French pol¬ 
ished, for taking 5x8-inch pictures, and also for Stereoscopic views. 
Single Swing, Brass Guides, and vShifting Front, together Avith one 
Daisy Dry Plate Holder, one Extension Tripod No. 2, and Canvas 
Carrying Case. 

2568. American Optical Company’s Outfit No. 204, . . . . 

. . This outfit is the same in all respects as No. 203, but has Exten¬ 

sion Tripod No. 3, and is adapted to taking pictures 6ix8^ inches. 


Price. 
$17 50 

20 00 

20 00 

25 00 

30 00 


25 00 

26 50 

38 00 

46 00 





















W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


15 


FLAMMANG’S PATENT 

REVOLVING BACK CAMERAS. 



Nos. 2575-2582. 


“ These are the finest View Cameras ever constructed,” so says every photog¬ 
rapher who has examined any of them, and this exclamation is not merely a 
tribute to the beauty and grace of their design ; for invariably the desire has at 
the same time been expressed to possess one of these truly novel and 
substantial Cameras. 

Wherein lies the merit of the Revolving Back Camera, that photographers 
want to cast aside others now in use and procure one of this new pattern? 
Briefly stated, it enables the view taker to secure either an upright or a horizon¬ 
tal picture without changing the plate holder after it has been slid into the 
carriage. No other camera can with such wondrous ease and celerity be changed 
from the vertical to the horizontal or vice versa. The carriage is simply turned 
about in the circle and automatically fastened. By this latter provision the 
carriage may be secured at either quarter of the circle. Ordinarily, the slide 
will be drawn out of the holder to the right; but, in certain confined situations, 
the ability to withdraw the slide to the left enables the photographer to obtain a 
view which he could not get with the usual provision in a Camera. The photog¬ 
rapher of experience is well aware of the difficulty, when taking an upright 
picture with a large camera, of reaching up to draw out the slide at the top, and, 
what is more essential, of getting out the slide without fogging the plate in the 
holder. 

Grace and strength are combined in the Revolving Back Camera, and its 
highly desirable features are gained without the sacrifice of steadiness or any 
other essential principle in a good camera. Indeed, its merit is such, that out¬ 
door photography will be advanced and made more attractive by its introduction. 












































































16 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


PRICE-LIST. 

Revolving Back Cameras, each in a Canvas Carrying Case. 

Prick. 


No. 

2575. 

Flammang’s Revolving Back Camera, for view 4ix 5i inch. 

Single 

Swing, 

^33 00 

Double 

Swing. 

^38 00 

2576. 

ii 

44 

4 4 4 4 

5x7 

44 

35 00 

40 00 

2577. 

U ii 

44 

4 4 4 4 

5 X 7i 

44 

35 00 

40 00 

2578. 

u a 

44 

4 4 4 4 

5x8 

44 

35 00 

40 00 

2579. 

H ii 

44 

4 4 4 4 

Gix 8h 

44 

45 00 

50 00 

2580. 

u 

44 

4 4 4 4 

8 xlO 

44 

50 00 

55 00 

2581. 

t( ii 

44 

4 4 4 4 

10 xl2 

44 

65 00 

70 00 

2582. 

44 44 

44 

4 4 4 4 

11 xl4 

44 

77 50 

82 50 


BLAIR’S REVERSIBLE-BACK COMBINATION CAMERA. 



Nos. 2590-2593. Closed. 


This Camera, whilst the lightest of any in the American market, is perfectly 
firm and rigid, being constructed in the most thorough and workmanlike man¬ 
ner, of the best materials. The “ Feather Weight ” Double Plate Holders, with 
which it is provided, are perfectly light-tight, yet so thin and small that seven of 
them can be carried within the folding bed of the Camera when the latter is 
packed in its Carrying Case, thus giving the operator the use of fourteen plates 
in a day’s outing. 

The reversing of the back is accomplished by simply pressing a spring, and 
changing the holder from vertical to horizontal; and as great pains are taken to 
have very accurate adjustments on all sides, no appreciable gain could be made 
were it constructed to revolve, whilst increase in bulk would be necessited. 

Another unique part of its construction is the means of attaching the plate holder 
and ground glass. The latter is held by all the four corners, and kept in posi¬ 
tion, wherever it may come to a bearing, by a spring ; and when the plate holder 
is to be inserted, the lateral movement of a couple of inches causes the ground 
glass frame to recede sufficiently for the holder to be slid in freely without a 
spring to retard its motion or jar the camera; and when in position, and the 
ground glass frame acted upon by the spring is released, the latter lies firmly- 
behind the plate holder, keeping it in position ; all of which is accomplished 
without the touching of a catch or removing or swinging the focusing frame. 
































































































W. H. AVALMSLEY & CO., rHILADEEPIIIA. 


17 


The stationary portion of tlio bed has two sockets for attaching the tripod, 
which enables the operator to balance his camera whether using a short or long 
focus lens. 

In using the former, th.Q folding portion of the bed must be turned uj), otherwise 
it would interfere with the view. In addition to the improvements named 
these cameras possess all of the latest adjustments and are of the highest 
order of workmanship. 



No. 


Size of Plate. 

Weight. 

Price. 

2590. Blair’s Reversible-Back Camera, 41x5^ 

3I lbs.. 

§28 00 

2591. “ 


“ 5 x7 

4 lbs.. 

31 00 

2592. “ 

U 

“ 6ix8} 

5 lbs.. 

35 00 

2593. “ 

44 

“ 8x10 

71 lbs.. 

40 00 

Each of the above 

Cameras is 

provided with one “ 

Feather Weight” 

Double 


Plate Holder and Carrying Case. 

We are arranging for a full assortment of the finest and lightest English Ca¬ 
meras, which will be illustrated and priced in the next edition of this Catalogue. 

We generally have in stock a few Second-hand Cameras, which will be sold at 
greatly reduced prices, though good as new. Descriptions of same will be sent on 
application. 


SCOVILL’S ENLARGING, REDUCING, AND COPYING CAMERA., 



No. 2625. 

2625. ScoviLii’s Copying Camera, 8x10,. 


35 00 























































































































































































































18 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

The construction of this Camera is clearly shown in the illustration. The box 
is square and of a size to carry 8x10 plates either vertically or horizontally, the 
front and plate holder being reversible. Both are fitted with kits to carry any 
sized plates, from 3ix4i to 8x10 inches. The double bellows has an extension of 
about 6 feet, and has a side opening to permit the manipulation of the lens and 
diaphragms without removing the front. It is an invaluable instrument for the 
production of lantern and other transparencies. 

DIRECTIONS FOR USE. 

To copy a negative in the natural size, place it in the kit on the front of Camera 
and button it in. Attached to the centre frame of the Camera is a division 
upon which, on the side toward the Camera front, a Lens is mounted. Sup¬ 
pose this to bo a quarter plate Portrait Lens, the focal length of which is 4 
inches—draw back the centre frame and the Lens twice the focal length of the 
Lens (8 inches); slide the back frame with ground glass the same distance from 
the centre frame. To enlarge with the same Lens to eight times the size of the 
original, the centre of the Lens must be 41 inches from the negative, and the 
ground glass bo 3G inches from the centre of the Lens. To reduce in the same 
l^roportion, reverse and have 36 inches from the centre of the Lens to the nega¬ 
tive, and from the centre of Lens to ground glass 41 inches. 


WALMSLEY’S PHOTO-MICROGRAPHIC CAMERAS. 



No. 2644. 

Price. 

2640. WAnMSLEY’s Photo-Michographic Camera, with Plate Holder, $;i2 50 

The Camera has Cone front, ready for work. 

2641. Walmsley’s Photo-Micrographic Outfit A, . , , . 17 50 

This outfit comprises Camera and Plate Holder, as above. Du¬ 
plex Lamp on Stand, with adjustments for different heights, and 
Ruby Lantern; a complete apparatus for exposing plates. 




































































































19 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


No. Price. 

2G42. Walmsley’s Piioto-Micrographic Outfit B, .... $20 00 

This outfit comprises Camera and Plate Holder, as in 2640, one 
Carbutt’s Miiltum in Parvo Lantern No. 2823, one dozen Plates 
4Ix5i, and one dozen ditto 3ix4i, for making negatives, one dozen 
special Transparency Plates for Lantern Slides, and ono Walms¬ 
ley’s Focusing Glass No. 2807. 

2643. Walmsley’s Photo-Micrographic Outfit C, . . . . 37 50 

This outfit comprises a Square Camera Box as above, with Exten¬ 
sion Bellows and Cone Front, one Plate Holder with Kits for plates 
3Ix4i, or 4ix5^; reversible—so that the negative may be taken 
vertically or horizontally, as desired—Platform to hold the Ca¬ 
mera (made to order), and a Microscope Lamp with Duplex 
Burner, mounted so as to be maintained at a proper height above 
the platform to suit any Microscope; Focusing glass, No. 2807, 
two dozen Dry Plates for negatives. Developing Outfit No. 3103, 
and Printing Outfit No. 3110, for making negatives and finished 
prints from same. 

2644. Walmsley’s Piioto-Micrographic Outfit D, . . . . 42 50 

This outfit is precisely the same as 2643, with the substitution of 
a Fiddian Illuminator (as shown in the illustration) for the Du¬ 
plex Lamp, and the addition of one dozen special Transparency 
Plates for Lantern Slides, with Mats, Covering Glass, and Needle 
Paper for binding their edges. 

2645. Platform to hold Camera and Microscope (made to order), . . 4 50 

In ordering this Platform please state what Microscope is to he used with it, and 

the exact distance from the table to the centre of the eye-piece when the body is in¬ 
clined to a horizontal position. 


ARACHNOIDISCUS EHRENBERGII. 



Phototype from a Photo-Micrograph, by W. H. Walmsley. 

X215° 




20 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


Walmsley’s Photo-MicrograpMc Camera. 

This simple and inexpensive form of Camera, of which a very fair idea can be 
gained from the illustration, is designed to produce by the aid of Gelatine Dry 
Plates and ordinary Lamp-light, Photo-Micrographs of a high order of excel¬ 
lence, and of almost all transparent objects requiring microscopical examina¬ 
tion. It will answer equally well for photographing opaque bodies, if the latter 
be illuminated by the light of the sun reflected from a Silvered Mirror. 

Any Microscope, Monocular or Binocular, having an axial joint whereby the 
body can be inclined to a horizontal position, may be employed. The Micro¬ 
scope is placed upon a base-board four feet in length and nine inches in width, 
upon one end of which is constructed a i^latforrn for holding the Camera, of suck 
a height that the tube of the Microscope when inclined shall be precisely in the 
centre of the Camera, which is firmly secured to the platform by a thumb-screw 
beneath. 

The Camera box, which is square to allow reversal of the plates, has a remov¬ 
able cone front, and bellows sliding upon a frame, with an extension of three or 
four feet, which has been found sufficient for all ordinary work, though it could 
be increased to any desired extent. A simple form of clamp holds the focusing 
frame tightly at any point of extension. A second front is provided to replace 
the one carrying the Cone, to which any ordinary photographic lens may be 
fitted, thus providing an excellent Camera for copying or other studio or labor¬ 
atory purpo-ses. The focusing screen is of glass, with an exceedingly fine 
ground surface mounted in a hinged frame, which is turned aside when the 
plate-holder is inserted. This screen is only used, however, in adjusting and 
centering the object, the final and delicate focusing being done on a sheet of 
plate-glass, as presently to be described. 

The plate-holder (single) is square, opening at the back to admit the plates, 
which can be placed either vertically or Iiorizontally. The usual size of plate em¬ 
ployed is 41X5i inches, but there is a “ kit ” furnished also, which permits the use 
of plates 31X41—the proper size for Lantern Positives—which can be very readily 
made by contact printing from the finished negatives. 

Any coal oil or petroleum lamp of good illuminating power, and which can be 
placed at any desired height above the table, may be used. The Fiddian Illumi¬ 
nator (originally intended for microscopic purposes) has been found admirably 
adapted to use with the Camera, and is the one figured in the illusti'ation. It 
gives a strong white light through the lens composing its front, all the other 
rays being cut off by the metallic chamber and chimney containing the flame. 
It can be raised to any required height, and is recommended as being the best 
lamp for the purpose with which we are acquainted. 

Although any Microscope Stand with axial inclination may be used, it lias been 
found that those of the size and general form of Beck’s National and “Ideal” 
Stands are the best adapted to this class of work. The shortness of tube of the 
“Ideal” renders it specially valuable, whilst the revolving stage adds greatly to 
the proper adjustment of the object in the centre of the focusing screen, 
and the sub-stage carrying an achromatic Condenser is almost indispensable. A 
Mechanical Stage will also be found to greatly facilitate the necessary manipu¬ 
lations ; though the very simplest form of stage, with clips, will, with a little 
care and patience, answer every requirement. 

2 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


21 


In using this simple apparatus, the base-board is to be placed upon a solid 
table and the Camera firmly secured to the platform, as shown in the illustra¬ 
tion. The Microscope (from which the Eye-piece has been removed, and the tube 
lined with a roll of dead black paper) is to be inclined to a horizontal position 
and firmly secured to the board by turn-buttons, with the end of the body in¬ 
serted in the Cone front of the Camera \ about the joining of which a piece of 
black cloth or velvet is to be wrapped to exclude all extraneous light. The lamp 
is now to be lighted and raised to such a height as will bring the fiarne exactly 
even with the centre of the stage ; the direct light being used without the mirror, 
which must be removed. It is presumed that the proper object-glass has 
already been attached to the Microscoj^e body, and that an Achromatic Con¬ 
denser has likewise been inserted in the Sub-stage. A Kellner Eye-piece an¬ 
swers admirably for this purpose. A secondary Condenser is sometimes 
necessarj’’ between the lamp and stage, as shown in the engraving, to secure a 
bright and even illumination all over the focusing screen. This accomplished, 
the object to be photographed is placed upon the stage, secured in position by 
the clips or slides, and focused; which is readily done with the coarse adjust¬ 
ment, for the bellows of the Camera being still closed, one can observe the image 
on the screen and manipulate the milled head of the adjustment at the same 
time. 

The image having been accurately centered on the screen, the bellows is to be 
extended until the desired magnification is reached, when it will be found that 
its sharpness is considerably reduced, whilst the screen has been removed so 
far from the object that it is impossible to readjust the focus and observe the 
image at the same time without some special appliance, controllable from the 
screen end of the Camera. A very simple contrivance has been adopted in this 
case, which works with the utmost smoothness and delicacy. A groove is turned 
in the periphery of the fine adjustment screw, around which a small cord is 
passed, and carried through a succession of screw-eyes on either side of the 
base-board to the rear, where a couple of small leaden weights are attached to 
its ends, thus keeping the cord taut. A very slight pull on either side, whilst 
the ej'^e is fixed upon the image on the screen, suffices to adjust the focus with 
the utmost exactness. A glance at the illustration will show the arrangement of 
this focusing cord, which is applicable alike to stands having the fine adjust¬ 
ment screw on the nose-piece or at the rear of the compound body. 

Since no ground-glass has a sufficiently fine surface to admit of really sharp 
focusing of the image, with even moderately high pov/ers—the final adjustment 
is made as follows: The front and back of the plate-holder having been re¬ 
moved, a sheet of plate-glass the size of the gelatine plate to be used is inserted, 
and the holder adjusted to the Camera, when, by means of a focusing glass 
placed against the outer surface of the plate, a sharp and accurate adjustmen 
can be made in a moment, after which nothing remains to be done toward 
securing the negative but to substitute (in the dark room) a sensitive plate for 
the plain glass, attach the holder to the Camera, and make the exposure. 

Gelatine plates, possessing the two qualities of extreme sensitiveness and great 
density after development, are essential for the production of the finest nega¬ 
tives by the foregoing process. The brands known as Monroe’s “Semper 
Idem ” and “ Carbutt’s Special” combine these qualities in an eminent degree, 
and are recommended accordingly. Either Ferrous Oxalate or Pyro developer 
may be used with equal success, but they should be strong and active, as a rapid 
development is necessary to the best results. If Ferrous Oxalate be employed, 
it should be made quite acid with Citric or Oxalic acids. 

It having been found by actual work that the chemical and visual focii of the 
rays from a lamp are almost exactly coincident, there is no need of employing 
specially corrected objectives with this apparatus. And the following table ol 


22 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

exposures with Beck’s Objectives may be depended upon as an accurate basis for 
work with the average of objects to be photographed, using “Diamond” plates: 

l-i inch, 10 to 45 seconds. 

§ “ i to 1-^ minutes. 

4-10 “ 1 to 3 

1-5 “ 3 to 7 “ 

1-10 “ 6 to 10 “ 

For Opaque Objects, illuminated by sun-light, exposures of six to twenty 
seconds, depending upon the jjower employed and reflecting qualities of the 
specimen itself, will generally be found sutflcient. 

A Binocular Microscope may be used for photographing quite as well as a 
Monocular by removing the Eye-j)iece of the straight tube, and arranging the 
prism for monocular illumination. 


DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING THE NEGATIVES. 

To any one familiar with the ordinary processes of photography, the foregoing 
directions will be all-sufficient for the production of finished Negatives. But 
since there will, doubtless, be many Microscopists desirous of jDhotographing 
their preparations, who have no knowledge whatever of the latter art, the fol- 
,lowing simple directions are given to enable them so to do readily and with 
certainty. 

Presuming that all the preliminaries as described have been attended to, and 
that the plate-holder, with its sensitized plate, has been attached to the Camera, 
proceed to make the ex]3osure. A card having been placed between the lamp and 
stage of the Microscope, to prevent all light from entering the tube, the slide of 
plate-holder covering the plate is to be withdrawn. Wait a moment to allow 
the subsidence of all tremor, then gently remove the card and allow the light to 
fall upon the object, whilst (watch in hand) the time is carefully noted. When 
the full exposure is reached, replace the card and insert the slide in plate-holder, 
when the latter may be removed from the Camera box in safety. If more than 
one negative is to be made, it will be best to do them all before proceeding with 
the development, after a few experiments have given the operator a fair acquaint¬ 
ance with his subjects and time of exposure. 

The development may be made either by the Ferrous Oxalate or Pyro methods 
as the operator may prefer. The former has the writer’s preference, as being 
more cleanly, more easily controlled, and producing negatives of greater densitv 
than the latter. Formulse for both, however, are given, and the student may 
take his choice, with a certainty of success if directions are carefully followed. 

To make the Ferrous Oxalate developer, two solutions are necessary: 

No. 1.—Neutral Oxalate of Potassium. 8 ounces. 

Water. 32 “ 

Dissolve and add sufficient Citric acid to render the whole decidedly acid • 
filter. 

No. 2.—Proto-sulphate of Iron. 4 ounces. 

Water. 16 

Dissolve and add 16 drops of Sulphuric acid; filter. Both these solutions 
will keep indefinitely. 

To make the developing mixture, add one-half ounce of No. 2 solution to two 
ounces of No. 1, which will be sufficient to develop six plates of the size em¬ 
ployed, one after another. 






W. ir. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


23 


The work thus far (with the exception of placing the plate in holder) has been 
done in the full light of day or lamp—but now we must enter the dark room 
and depend solely upon the ruby light from our lantern. Remove the plate from 
the holder, place it in the developing tray, and pour the Ferrous Oxalate fluid 
over it with a rapid but steady sweep, to prevent the formation of air-bubbles, 
which may be still further guarded against by brushing the surface carefully 
with a camel’s-hair pencil. It is scarcely necessary to add that the film side of 
the plate is to be kept uppermost. 

If the exposure has been correctly timed, the image will begin to appear in 
from ten to twenty seconds; first the high lights, then the shadows, gradually 
deepening until the whole picture seems to have sunk, as it were, beneath the 
surface of the film and to appear on the back of the plate. Do not be afraid of 
overdoing the matter. A properly exposed plate can scarcely ”be over developed 
by Ferrous Oxalate; density is necessary to the production of satisfactory prints, 
and is much better obtained in the development than by after intensification. 

If the image appears very suddenly, flashing from all portions of the plate at 
once, it is an evidence of over-exposure, the remedy for which is to remove the 
plate at once to a vessel of water, add a few drops of a solution of Bromide of 
Potassium to the developer, return the plate to same, and finish the development. 
If, on the other hand, the image either does not appear at all, or so thin and in¬ 
distinct as to make certain no printing density can ever be reached by the most 
prolonged development, it is a sure sign of under-exposure, for which there is no 
other remedy than to throw the plate away and try again. 

The development completed, the plate is to be thoroughly washed in water 
and placed for a minute or two in a saturated solution of alum to harden the film, 
and then (after again washing) it is to be transferred to a solution of “ Hypo’’ 
for fixing. The latter is made as follows: 

Hypo-sulphite of Soda. 8 ounces. 

Water. .. 32 

The plate must be left in this solution until all milkiness has disappeared from 
its back, leaving only the clear negative; after which another washing, a further 
soaking in the alum bath, and a thorough washing in pure water, to remove all 
traces of the Hypo, followed by the final drying, give the finished negative 
ready for printing from. 

If the Pyro development be preferred, the following formula will be found most 


satisfactory: • 

No. 1.—Pyrogallic Acid. i ounce. 

Alcohol. 2 “ 

No. 2.—Water. 30 ounces. 

Bromide of Ammonium. 30 grains. 

Strong Liquor Ammonia.. 1 drachm. 


To use, add to two and a half ounces of No. 2, fifteen drops of No. 1 immedi¬ 
ately before using, and proceed in exactly the same manner as with Ferrous 
Oxalate. Do not attempt to develop more than two plates with the same mix¬ 
ture, and it will be better to prepare a fresh one for each. For over-exposure, 
dilute No. 2 with one-half water and slightly increase the amount of No. 1. 

From various causes it will occasionally happen that the negative refuses to 
acquire sufficient density for printing, and no amount of care or patience in the 
development will remedy the trouble. Recourse must then be had to intensifi¬ 
cation, and the following formula will be found to give, the most satisfactory 









24 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


results. The utmost care must, however, be taken in its use, as both solutions 


are deadly poisons: 

No. 1.—Bi-chloride of Mercury. 96 grains. 

Bromide of Potassium. 96 “ 

Distilled Water. 12 ounces. 

No. 2 .—Crystallized Cyanide of Potassium. 90 grains. 

Nitrate of Silver . 96 “ 

Distilled Water. 12 ounces. 


To use, wash the negative thoroughly in cold water and place in a tray con¬ 
taining No. 1 until it is well grayed over, taking care not to overdo the matter, 
or too great density will be the result. Then wash again thoroughly in clean 
water and transfer to solution No. 2, where it must remain until all the grayness 
has disappeared from the back, but not longer, as a reduction of the density then 
begins to take place. Remove to clean Avater and Avash again most thoroughly ; 
indeed, this is the most important axiom in Photography —wash thoroughly. 

After using the intensifying solutions, i*eturn each to its respective bottle, as 
they can be used over and over again almost indefinitely. A nd, again, be cau¬ 
tioned as to their deadly poisonous natures, taking eyery precaution to prevent 
possible accidents. 

After the final Avashing, the negative must be placed on a rack to dry, Avhich 
it must be alloAved to do S23ontaneously, and the film side must not be touched 
Avith anything until entirely hard. Varnishing is not necessary, unless a num¬ 
ber of prints are to be made, but it is alAvays desirable, since it Avill save the 
negative from many a possible injury. 


DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING PAPER-PRINTS. 

The necessary articles for this Avork—after the negative is secured—are a 
printing-frame, sensitized paper, cards for mounting the same upon, and mate¬ 
rials for toning and fixing the prints. The printing-frame should be a deep one, 
with a sheet of plate-glass in front to support the negative, thereby lessening 
the danger of breaking the same. This supporting-glass is also necessary for 
making transparencies for the lantern by contact printing. Ready sensitized 
paper should be used, as it produces quite as good prints as those made upon 
paper freshly silvered, without the trouble and stains attendant upon the latter 
operation by novices. This paper should be cut and kept in a subdued light, 
to prevent changing. Fuming Avith ammonia Avill add to the bi'illiancy of the 
prints. This must be done immediately before printing. 

The negative is to be placed in the printing-frame film side up, and the paper 
is to be laid upon it, sensitized surface doAvn—this in a subdued light; then lay 
a pad of felt-cloth upon the paper and insert the back of the frame, fastening it 
doAvn Avith the spring catches, and place it in the light to print. Some negatives 
Avill require the direct rays of the sun, others print better if a piece of tissue 
paper or ground glass be placed over them to modify the light. Experience and 
experiment Avill alone enable the student to determine Avhich plan to pursue. 
The time required for printing Avill also vary greatly, according to the density 
of the negative and Avhether it has been developed Avith Ferrous Oxalate or Pyro; 
the former generally yielding the quickest prints. The printing must be exam¬ 
ined as it proceeds bj’’ opening one-half of the back of frame in a subdued 
light. Do not print too deeply, as the beauty and usefulness of Photo-micro¬ 
graphic prints depend largely upon all the delicate markings being \dsible, which 








W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


25 


is not the case if the printing is carried too far. As soon as the print is found to 
be dark enough, it must be removed to a light tight drawer or box, to await the 
operation of toning, which must be as soon as possible if freshly sensitized 
paper has been emplo 3 ^ed, but may be postponed several days with the ready 
sensitized. 


TONING THE PRINTS. 

Gold is the material that really does the toning, but it has to be used in com¬ 
bination with some other which will neutralize its acidity and assist in giving a 
pleasant and harmonious tone to the finished prints. Very many formulae for 
this purpose have been published—Bi-carbonate of Soda, Borax, Acetate of Soda, 
etc., all of which are good and will give satisfactory results. The following will 
be found simple and good: Dissolve seven and a half grains of the Chloride 
of Gold in as many ounces of distilled water and keep it in a glass-stoppered 
bottle as a stock solution. To make the bath, which must be done just before 
using, dissolve twenty grains of Phosphate of Soda in eight ounces of water, 
with a pinch of table-salt. The proportion of gold required for toning is one 
grain to the sheet of paper (18x22); if, therefore, you have made that many 
prints, add one ounce of the gold solution to the bath, which will give one 
grain of same, and more or less, in proportion to the number of prints to be 
toned. If two sheets are to be done at once, the amount of water and soda must 
be doubled as well as that of the gold. 

The i)rints must have previousty^ been washed in several changes of water to 
remove all free silver, an operation which will require an hour or an hour and 
a half. The first water must be poured off immediately and the subsequent 
washings at intervals of about ten minutes, until all traces of milkiness disap¬ 
pear. To the last washing, add a pinch of table-salt, which will turn j^rints 
made on ready sensitized paper a brick-dust red in a few moments. From this 
final washing they must be removed to a vessel of clean water, when they are 
ready for toning. All the foregoing operations, as well as the toning, should be 
done in a light sufliciently bright to see clearly, but not in the full light of day, 
as this will impair the brilliancy of the prints. 

Everjdhing being in readiness, place in the toning-bath eight or ten of the 
prints, one after another, face up, and keep them moving about, to insure even¬ 
ness in the toning. They will soon reach the desired tint, which should be a 
little deeper than the finished prints are to be, since they will lose somewhat in 
tlie final fixing. As each one reaches the proper tone, remove it to a vessel of 
water and replace it with an untoned print, until the whole are done, when the 
bath is to be thrown away, as it will not keep.- 


FIXING THE PRINTS. 

If all the foregoing operations have been successfully conducted, the prints are 
now perfect, and objects of beauty, but they would quickly fade if not “yixec?.” 
Immersion in a solution of Hypo-sulphite of Soda is necessary' to this end, fol¬ 
lowed by a prolonged washing in water, to remove all traces of the former. I or 
be it known to the novice, “ Hypo " is a good friend, but a very cunning and to 
be dreaded enemy. If the fingers come in contact with it, they must be imme¬ 
diately washed clean; vessels or trays in which it is used must be kept foi that 
purpose only. No trace of it must be allowed to remain in the finished piint j 


26 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO,, PHILADELPHIA. 

otherwise, ugly yellow stains will be the result. The fixing bath must be used 
but once, then thrown out, and the tray well washed and wiped dry. 

The fixing solution is made as follows: 


Hypo-sulphite Soda. 2 ounces. 

Water. 10 “ 


Immerse the prints one by one in this solution, and keep them moving about 
for fifteen or twenty minutes, after which they must be placed in clean water, 
which should be frequently changed to insure the entire removal of the Hypo. 
Some hours are required for this purpose; indeed, an all-night washing in run¬ 
ning water, if practicable, is to be recommended. 

The prints, which should have been trimmed to a uniform size before toning, 
are now ready for mounting upon card-board. The ordinary cabinet mounts 
will be found best adai3ted to the purpose. The operation is a simple one. The 
prints must be removed from the water one by one, carefully drained of all 
superfluous moisture, and placed in a pile, one above another, face downward, 
on a sheet of glass. Brush the uppermost one over with a thin layer of 
parlor paste, and place it carefulty on the card mount, pressing it down with 
a soft cloth. Proceed in same manner with the rest until all are finished, when 
they may be placed in a pile with a blotting pad between each and subjected to 
a slight pressure until quite dry. Burnishing will greatly improve the appear¬ 
ance and sharpness of the prints. This is best done with Entriken’s burnisher, 
as named in this list. 

The appearance of a Photo-micrograph is gr(|atly improved by printing it with 
a mat of non-actinic paper (having a circle cut from its centre two and three- 
quarters inches in diameter) interposed between the negative and the front of 
plate-glass in the printing-frame. This gives a clean-cut circle of the object 
alone, leaving a margin of pure white paper around it. The effect is neat and 
pleasing. In making the negative, it is well so to centre the object as to allow of 
such printing. 


LANTERN TRANSPARENCIES. 

These very beautiful slides may be readily and rapidly made from good nega¬ 
tives; requiring no additional apparatus or chemicals to those already enumer¬ 
ated. The plates only, are different from those employed in making the nega¬ 
tives, being slow in action, while the latter are extremely sensitive and quick. 
The work may all be done in the dark-room, as lamp-light is to be preferred to 
that of day. 

By the red light of the lantern, place a negative in the printing-frame, film side 
uppermost, and upon it lay a slow gelatine plate, film side down, so that the two 
coated surfaces are in contact. Replace the pad and back, and, covering up the 
front, carry the frame to where the light of a lamp or gas flame may be allowed 
to fall upon it at a distance of about two feet. The exposure must be varied, 
according to the density of the negative, from two to twenty seconds, averaging 
about ten, but only to be determined by practice and experience. Returning to 
the dark-room, the plate is to be developed with Ferrous Oxalate, precisely as 
was the negative, care being taken not to carry the development too far, as much 
density is to bo avoided in transparencies intended for the lantern. If success¬ 
ful, the result will be a transparency full of vigor and sharpness, with clear glass 
in all the high lights and no appearance of smokiness. When dry, the slide is to 
be covered with one of same size of clear glass, a mat of black paper with opening 




27 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

of suitable size and shape being placed between them, and the edges bound with 
needle papery attached by means of parlor paste. 

The foregoing directions would seem to cover the whole ground, and enable 
any one with a little practice to do satisfactory work. But if insurmountable 
difficulties are met, correspondence on the subject is solicited, and all questions 
will be answered promptly and intelligently. 


PAETS AND ACCESSORIES OF CAMERAS 

PLATE HOLDERS. 



No. 

2650. 

2651. 

2652. 

2653. 

2655. 

2656. 

2657. 
2660. 
2661. 
2662. 


New Model ” 


Ne Plus Ultra Double Plate Holder, 4x 5 for Camera 2500, 

‘ 2501, 

‘ 2503, 

‘ 2504, 

‘ 2520, 

‘ 2521, 

‘ 2523, 

‘ 2530, 

‘ 2531, 

‘ 2532, 


5x8 
6ix 8i 
8 xlO 
4x5 
5x8 
61x 8.^ 

“Challenge” Double Plate Holder, 31x 41 
“ “ “ 4x5 

5x8 




u 


u 


Price. 
^2 15 
2 93 
4 50 
7 00 

1 75 

2 25 

3 00 

1 50 

2 00 
2 50 


“DAISY” PLATE HOLDERS. 



Nos. 2665-2671. 

“ This holder is a Daisy.” The frequent repetition of this exclamation fixed the 
name by which it is designated. It has the great merit of being lighter and of 































































28 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO.) PHILADELPHIA. 

occupying less space than any other substantial holder tliat has ever been 
devised. Although constructed to hold two plates, it is not thicker than a single 
holder. The Daisy Plolder opens like a book when the dry plates are being put 
into or taken out of it, and is so arranged that light cannot penetrate through 
from one side to the other. It also permits the use of “ Kits/’ whereby smaller 
plates may be employed if desired. 


No. Price. 

2665. ‘‘Daisy” Double Plate Holder, 4x5 for Camera 2565, . $2 15 


2666. 

i4 

ii 

ii 

4ix 5^ 

ii 

2566-2575, 

2 15 

2667. 

ii 

ii 

(• 

5x7 

ii 

2576, 

2 93 

2668. 

ii 

ii 

ii 

51x 7 

ii 

2577, 

2 93 

2669. 

it 

ii , 

ii 

5x8 

ii 

2567-2578, 

2 93 

2670. 

ii 

ii 

ii 

61x 8i 

ii 

2568-2579, 

4 50 

2671. 

ii 

ii 

ii 

8 xlO 

ii 

2580, 

7 00 


NOVEL VIEW PLATE HOLDERS. 



Xo. 2675. 


Anthony’s Novel View Plate Holders are so arranged that one or two 4x5 
plates can be used in a 5x8, one or two 4ix6J can be used in a 6ix8i, or one or 
two 5x8 in an 8x10 plate holder. Thin wooden frames can be supplied for hold¬ 
ing still smaller sizes, if desired, so that the amateur can experiment with 
smaller plates than the extreme limit of his holders, and at much less expense. 


2676. 

2677. 

2678. 


2681. 

2682. 

2683 


These Holders are the thinnest and lightest of any ever made, hut are so per 
fectly constructed as to he absolutely light-tight. 


4 x5 for Camera 2555, 

$2 00 

41x6i “ 

2556, . 

2 25 

5 x8 “ 

2557, . 

2 25 

61x8.V “ 

2558, . 

4 00 

” PLATE HOLDERS. 


:, 41x 5;^ for Camera 2590, . 

1 25 

5x7 “ 

2591, . 

1 50 

6.ix 8h “ 

2592, . 

2 00 

8 xlO ” 

2593, . 

3 00 














































































































































29 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


THE FLAMMANG SINGLE PLATE HOLDER. 



Nos. 2685-2686. 


2685. The Flammang Single Plate Holder, 4Ix 5i, with Kit, . . ^2 15 

2686. “ “ “ “ 8 xlO “ . . 7 00 

These Holders are made in all sizes, hut we have selected the above two as spe¬ 
cially suited to Camera No. 2625, and Photo-Micrographic Camera No. 2640. 


TRIPODS. 




2700. Folding Tripod. For any size of Cameras to 8x10, 

2701. Taylor Folding Tripod. For any size oi Cameras to 8x10, 




























30 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

The Taylor Folding Tripod is of English origin. The illustration makes an 
extended description unnecessary. Suffice it to say that it is very firm when 
set up and folds compactly by simply pressing together the two upper joints 
of each leg, thus unsetting them from the pins on the brass top, and then doub¬ 
ling them over on to the third joint. This movement is naturally reversed 
when placing the tripod in position to support the camera. The brass top 
should have the side uppermost which has the arms flush. 


THE SCOVILL EXTENSION TRIPOD. 



Nos. 2705-2707. 

No. Price. 

2705. ScoviLL Extension Tripod. No. 1, for 1-4; 4ix5i Cameras, . §3 50 

2706. “ “ “ No. 2, “ 5x7; 5x8 “ . 4 00 

2707. “ “ “ No. 3, “ 6ix81;8xl0 “ .6 00 

This Tripod possesses special advantages. It can be set up, ready for use, more 
quickly tlian any other, and with less trouble. By turning the brass buttons 
shown in the accompanying illustration, the legs may “in a twinkling” be 
extended to the desired length, and fastened. When this Tripod is placed on 
uneven ground, the camera it supports may be brought to the proper level by 
simply adjusting the length of the legs. Another commendable feature of the 
Extension Tripod is, that it has no detachable parts to be misplaced or lost. 
Combining, as it does, firmness, strength, and lightness, this Tripod has gained 
great favor with the amateur view-taker, who very often wastes valuable 
time or loses opportune moments in placing the Tripod legs and changing 
their position to include just what is w^anted in a picture and to level the camera. 
The artist, for a sketching trip, finds the top of this Tripod a very convenient 
place to fasten his easel as well as his camera. 










31 


W. li. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


LENSES. 



PORTRAIT LENSES. 

No. Price. 

2720. Darlot Portrait Lens, i size, 4i inch focus, .... OO w 

2721. “ “ “ i “ “ .... 15 00 

2722. “ “ “ i “ 7 “ .... 18 00 

Whilst very moderate in cost, tliese Lenses are of exceptionally fine perform¬ 
ance, quite equal to the wants of the most advanced amateurs. They are also 
specially adapted to magic lantern and stereopticon purposes. We are direct 
importers of these and all others of Darlot’s Lenses, which have our name en¬ 
graved on them, and are sold with our guarantee. 


VIEW LENSES. 



Nos. 2725-2727. 

DARLOT’S RAPID HEMISPHERICAL VIEW LENSES. 

2725. Darlot Rapid Hemispherical Lens, No. 1, for 4 x5 Cameras, $15 00 

2726. “ “ “ “ No. 2, “ 5 x8, “ 25 00 

2727 ! “ “ “ “ No. 3, “ 6ix8i, “ • 35 00 

These Lenses embrace angles from 60 to 75 degrees; are quick-acting, per¬ 
fectly rectilinear, and provided with central-stops. They will be found very 
fine Lenses for landscapes, out-door groups, and instantaneous work; also for 
copying engravings, maps, architectural subjects, etc. 































32 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 



VOIGTLAENDER’S EURYSCOPE VIEW LENSES. 

No, Price. 

2730. Improved Euryscope View Lens, No. 0, for 4x5 Cameras, . §>27 00 

2731. “ “ “ No. 00, “5x8 “ . 37 50 

2732. “ “ “ No. 1, “ 6ix 8i “ . 45 00 

2733. “ “ “ No. 2, “ 8 xlO, “ . 53 00 

These Lenses are unrivalled for groups, full-length figures and large heads, 
working with full apertures, and giving a depth of focus and equal distribution 
of light unexcelled by any known lenses. They are entirely free from distor¬ 
tion, and the pictures produced by them are mathematically correct, rendering 
them invaluable for copying plans and for architectural subjects. Another 
adv^antage is their extraordinary power of gathering light, adapting them par¬ 
ticularly to the making of instantaneous views, animals in motion, yachts, etc. 
The width of angle embraced is from 65 to 85 degrees, according to the size of 
diaphragm employed. 

Nos. 0 and 00 can be had in matched pairs for stereoscopic work, 



Nos. 2735-2738. 


DALLMEYER’S RAPID RECTILINEAR VIEW LENSES. 


2735. Dalemeyer’s Rapid Rectilinear Lens, 5 x4, 

2736. “ “ “ “ 6 x5, 

2737. “ “ “ “ 8ML 

2738. “ “ “ “ 10 x8. 


6-inch focus, §37 00 
8i “ “ . 45 00 

11 “ “ . 57 50 

13 “ “ . 75 00 


These Lenses are constructed to embrace angles from 60 to 80 degrees. They 
admit of being used with full opening, and are therefore invaluable for dimly 
lighted interiors and for instantaneous exposures. The image produced by them 
is absolutely free from distortion, and the resulting pictures from all flare or 
central spots. We are direct importers of these Lenses. 

No. 2735 can be had in matched pairs for stereoscopic work. 












































W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 33 

ROSS’ SYMMETRICAL LENSES. 

No. Price. 

2740. Ross’ Rapid SYMMETmcAL Lens, 4ix3J, 4i-inch focus, $33 00 


2741. 

ii 

a 


ik 

5 x4. 

6 

kk 

kk 

36 00 

2742. 

ii 

a 

a 


7 x5. 

n 

kk 

kk 

44 00 

2743. 

a 

n 

a 

ki 

8 xo. 

9 

it 

kk 

48 00 

2744. 

a 

a 

a 

kk 

8ix6i, 

10^ 

kk 

kk 

54 00 

2745. 

a 

a 

a 

kk 

9 x7. 

12 

it 

kk 

62 00 

2746. 

a 

a 

a 

kk 

10 x8. 

14 

kk 

kk 

. 70 00 

2747. 

a 

a 

a 

kk 

12 xlO, 

16 

kk 

kk 

85 00 


The Rapid Symmetricals being Aplanatic, work with full apertures, and are as 
good and useful lenses as an Amateur or Professional Photographer can possess 
for general out-door purposes. They are provided with the systems of dia¬ 
phragms recommended by the Photographers’ Society of Great Britain, by which 
each stop requires double the exposure of the next larger, as shown below. 


UNIFORM RATIO OF STOPS. 


Nos. 

«0 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 


f. 

f. 

f. 

f. 

f. 

f. 

f. 

Ratios... 

8 

11.3 

16 

22.6 

32 

45'25 

64 


* 0 signifies the ratio of the lenses to their fodi. 


2750. 

Ross’ 

Portable Symmetrical Lens, 41x31, 

4-inch focus. 

$28 00 

2751. 

kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 

5 x4. 

5 “ “ 

30 00 

2752. 

kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 

7 x5. 

6 “ “ 

34 OO 

2753. 

kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 

8 x5. 

y <( n 

42 50 

2754. 

kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 

81x61, 

8 “ “ 

50 00 

2755. 

kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 

9 x7, 

9 “ “ 

58 00 

2756. 

kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 

10 x8. 

10 “ “ 

67 00 


Perhaps no lenses for Landscape and Architectural purposes has had a greater 
share of popularity than the Portable Symmetricals. This is doubtless attributa¬ 
ble to their extraordinary definition and fiatness of field, as well as to the exceed¬ 
ingly portable form in which they are constructed, the series fitting the same 
flange. They are fitted with the Standard Series of Diaphragms, same as the 
Rapid Symmetrical, as shown below. 


UNIFORM RATIO OF STOPS. 


Nos. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

Ratios. 

f. 

16 

f. 

22'6 

f. 

32 

f. 

45'2 

f. 

64 








These Lenses are supplied accurately paired for stereo work. 

































34 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

BECK’S RAPID LANDSCAPE LENSES, 



No. 


Nos. 2760-2763. 


2760. Beck’s Rapid Landscape Lens, 41x5J, . 

2761. “ “ “ “ 5 x8, . 

2762. “ “ “ “ 6ix8i, . 

2763 “ “ “ 8 xlO, . 


Price. 
§17 50 
27 50 
37 50 
50 00 


These Lenses, being Aplanatic, work with fall aperture, are perfectly rectilinear 
and exceedingly rapid, rendering them specially valuable for groups and in¬ 
stantaneous exposures. 

No. 2760 can be had in matched pairs for stereoscopic work. 


MORRISON’S RAPID COPYING LENSES. 

2770. Morrison’s Rapid Copying Lens. B, 5 x 8, 6-inch focus, §40 00 

2771. “ “ “ “ C, 6ix 8i, 8 “ “ 45 00 

2772. “ “ “ “ CC, 8 xlO, 11 “ “ 60 00 

These Lenses are unexcelled by any in the market for copying outdoor groups 
and instantaneous views. They work with full aperture for groups and will 
copy absolutely sharp to the corners of the plate. They are perfectly rectilinear. 

IMITATION DALLMEYER LENSES. 



No. 2775. 

2775. Imitation Dallmeyer Lens, 4x5, focus 4 inches, .... §10 00 

These Lenses are made expressly for us by Darlot and are the cheapest Lenses 
in the market, while their quality is most excellent. In point of speed they are 
unsurpassed, rendering them specially serviceable for instantaneous work, 
groups, etc., in or out of doors. Each is provided with a set of diaphragms in 
case, and rack and pinion ai.justment of focus. 

































W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA, 


35 


DALLMEYER’S SINGLE LANDSCAPE LENSES, 

IN RIGID TUBES, WITH ROTATING STOPS. 



Nos. 2776-2779. 

No. Price. 

2776. Dallmeyer’s Single Landscape Lens, la, 5 x4, 51-inch focus, $27 50 

2777. “ “ “ “ 1, 7 x5i, 7 “ 32 00 

2778. “ “ “ “ 2, 8ix6i, 8i “ 37 50 

2779. “ “ “ “ 3, 10 x8, 10 “ 46 00 

These Lenses are of extremely wide angle, and for landscapes pure and simple 
have no equal. The apertures of all the diaphragms (as well as those of all 
others made by Dallmeyer,) are so arranged that counting from the largest to 
the next size smaller the time of exposure is doubled. Stops marked X are 
exceptions to this rule, and re'^uire an exposure only half as long again as the 
PRECEDING LARGER stop. 


DARLOT’S SINGLE VIEW LENSES. 


Nos. 2780-2782. 

2780. Darlot’s Single View Lens, 4 x5, focus 5^ inch, 

2781. “ “ “ “ 5 x8, “ 7 

2782. “ “ “ “ 6ix8J, “ 9i “ 

These Lenses (as well as the preceding) consist of a single Achromatic Combina¬ 
tion, and for landscapes only are probably superior to any double combinations 
made. Where buildings form only a portion of the view they are entirely satis¬ 
factory, but are not recommended for architectural subjects exclusively, since 
they are not absolutely rectilinear. They are provided with diaphragms of vari¬ 
ous sized openings, and Rack and Pinion adjustment of focus. 


$5 75 
6 50 
8 00 









36 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


WIDE ANGLE LENSES. . 


For street views, architectural effects in confined situations, and many inte¬ 
riors, it becomes necessary to employ lenses of a very wide angle and compara¬ 
tively short focus. Those now to be described embrace angles from 90 to 100 
degrees, and are the most useful to the amateur of any lenses of their class in the 
market. 



Nos. 2785-2788. 

No. 

2785. Darlot’s Wide Angle Hemispherical Lens No. 1, 3ix4i, focus 

2i inches,. 

2786. Darlot’s Wide Angle Hemispherical Lens No. 2, 4x5, focus 3 

inches,.15 00 

2787. Darlot’s Wide Angle Hemispherical Lens No. 3, 5x8, focus 5 

inches, . . . •. 20 00 

2788. Darlot’s Wide Angle Hemispherical Lens No. 4, 8x10, focus 

8 inches, .., , , , 25 00 



Nos. 2790-2795. 

2790. Morrison’s Wide Angle View Lens No. 1, 31x 4J, focus 3 inches, 25 00 


2791. 

(4 

44 

44 

44 

44 

No. 2, 4 X 5, 

44 

31 

44 

25 00 

2792. 

(4 

44 

44 

44 

44 

No. 3, 5 X 7, 

44 

4i 

44 

25 00 

2793. 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

No. 4, 5 X 8 , 

44 

5i 

44 

25 00 

2794. 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

No. 5, 61x 81, 

44 

61 

44 

25 00 

2795. 

44 

44 

44 

44 

44 

No. 6, 8 xlO, 

44 

8 

44 

30 00 


These Lenses embrace an angle of fully 100 degrees, are perfectly 
rectilinear, and the most rapid Wide Angle Lenses in use. 

2797. Dallmeyer's Wide Angle Rectilinear Lens 1 A A, 7x5, focus 

4 inches,. 37 50 

2798. Dallmeyer’s Wide Angle Rectilinear Lens 1 A, 81x6-1, focus 

5i inches,. 47 50 

2799. Dallmeyer’s Wide Angle Rectilinear Lens 1, 10x8, focus 7 

inches,. 62 50 

These Lenses are mounted in rigid settings or tubes, and furnished with 
rotating diaphragm plates. The No. 1 AA can be had in matched pairs for 
stereoscopic work, They are probably the finest Wide Angle Lenses made. 



Nos. 2801-2806. 

2801. Votgtlaender’s Wide Angle Euryscope Lens No. 00, 3ix41, 
focus 3i inches, . . .. 


29 00 
















37 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


No. Price. 

2S02. VoiGTiiAENDER’s WiDE Angle Euryscope Lens No. 0, 4x5, 

focus inches,.^30 00 

2803. Voigtlaender’s Wide Angle Euryscope Lens No. 1, 5x7, 

focus 5i inches,. 35 00 

2804. VoiGTLAENDER’S WiDE ANGLE EURYSCOPE LeNS No. 2, 5x8, 

focus inches,.. . . . 40 00 

2805. VoiGTLAENDER’S WiDE ANGLE EURYSCOPE LENS NO. 3, 6^x8^, 

focus 7i inches,. 50 00 

2806. VoiGTLAENDER’S WiDE Angle Euryscope Lens No. 4, 8x10, 

focus 9 inches,. 65 00 


Nos. 00 and 0 may he had in matched pairs for stereoscopic work. In confined 
situations, where the ordinary View Euryscope is not available, these wide angle 
ones are most excellent, as they embrace objects not accessible with the aid of the 
former. They are provided with rotating stops; all sizes will screw into one 
flange, and are of such convenient shape as to be easily carried in the pocket. 


FOCUSING GLASSES. 



2807. Walmsley’s Focusing Glass, with Screw Adjustment, 

2808. Darlot’s “ “ “ Sliding “ 


$0 75 
2 50 


A Focusing Glass is an exceedingly useful accessory to the camera for ^eld 
use, especially when very accurate focusing of buildings is required. It is 
indispensable for dimly lighted interiors and photo-micrography. Being placed 
against the back of the ground glass screen on the camera and the focus adjusted 
by means of the screw or sliding tube, all the details of the view are seen most 
sharply defined when the proper focus of the lens on camera is obtained. In the 
Darlot form a clamping screw retains the lens in adjustment, whilst the solid 
tube in front shuts otf all extraneous light. The Walmsley form answers very 
well, however, whilst it is much less expensive. It is also an exceedingly useful 
magnifier for all purposes requiring only a low power. 



























38 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


INSTANTANEOUS SHUTTERS. 



AN INSTANTANEOUS SHOT. ANOTHER INSTANTANEOUS SHOT. 


No. Price. 

2809. Walmsley’s Drop Shutter, with Trigger Escapement, . . $3 00 

2810. “ ** “ “ Pneumatic “ . . 6 00 

2811. Phantom “ “ . .12 50 

2812. Jackson’s “ “ . 12 50 

2813. Hunter AND Sand’s Drop Shutter, . . . : . . .15 00 

2814. Dallmeyer’s Flap Shutter, .4 00 


These Shutters will be fitted to any lens without extra charge. Other forms 
will be added to the list soon as received from England. 

The photographing of objects in motion is becoming more and more popular 
with amateurs. It is a fascinating employment, and with the facilities now 
obtainable, an easy one. With the rapid lenses and jilates in use no difficulty is 
experienced in getting excellent negatives of Animals, Railway Trains, Steamers, 
Yachts, Bicyclers, etc., in rapid motion, provided a suitable shutter is used for 
making the exposures. Any of the above described can be timed for a variety 
of exposures, according to rapidity required. 


In taking pictures of moving objects it is highly important that the exposure 
should be made at the exact moment when the object occupies the proper posi¬ 
tion upon the screen. This is best accomplished by the employment of a 

VIEW ADJUSTER. 


2819. Walmsley’s View Adjuster, with Attachment for Camera, . $3 00 

This little instrument consists of a magnifying lens, with focusing adjustment, 
mounted in a tube containing a ground glass focusing screen, forming a minia¬ 
ture camera. When attached to the side or top of the view--camera its field 
embraces exactly the same picture as that seen in the latter, so that when a 
moving object comes into the proper position upon the small screen the in¬ 
stantaneous shutter is dropped and the exposure made with certainty. 

Having now given very complete lists of Cameras and their parts, we next pro¬ 
ceed to the illustration and description of the necessary apparatus for the develop¬ 
ment of the plates after exposure, and for making and mounting the finished 
prints. 













39 


AV. II. AVALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

APPARATUS FOR DEVELOPING NEGATIVES. 

DARK-ROOM LANTERNS. 

The importance of a safe light, combined with a sufficiency thereof, to enable 
the operator to see clearly in the dark room, cannot be overestimated. These 
qualities are combined in an eminent degree in the Lanterns described below. 





No. 2820. Front. 


No. 

2820. W. I. A. PoHTABLE Ruby Lantern 



Price. 

for travel! ug, . , . . $0 50 



No. 2821. 


No. 2822. 


2821. Anthony’s Perfect Dry Plate Lantern,. 

In Anthony’s Perfect Lantern all the parts are separable, and 
easilj'’ and quickly adjusted. It has no hinges to break, can be in¬ 
stantly extinguished, requires but little oil, is abundantly wicked, 
and yields a superb light. 


1 50 




































































































































































40 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO.," PHILADELPHIA. 


„ Price. 

No* 

1^822. Scovill’s Non-Actinic Dark-Room Lantern, . . • . 00 

This Lantern marks another and decided step in advance, dispensing with the 
old and baleful ruby light and substituting therefor a clear, bright orange, very 
pleasant to work with and abundant in amount, whilst entiiely safe witi t e 
most sensitive of plates. The Lantern is thoroughly well made and entirely im¬ 
pervious to the escape of any white light. 



lESiijmiiiiiiiiininp 

I |I|||||H 

Pin 

ilp 

Jr! ‘‘''"''11P1 ; ''i 

'm '' u 

mmS ' 

llil-,/. 

1 

■/;\\ 

illy 


P 







No. 2823. No. 2823. 

Lantern arranged for developing, and after Lantern arranged for making positives by 

fixing, examining negatives by opal light. contact. 


2823. Carbutt’s Multum in Parvo Lantern,.$6 00 

This Lantern, though somewhat costly, is so manifestly superior to all others, 
and can be put to so many uses, that no one will regret the first outlay after using 
it a short time. 

The following are some of the advantages possessed: It is simple and easy to 
manage, nothing complicated, yet has three separate and distinct forms of light. 
It is adapted to the use of either oil or gas ; is about nine inches square by four¬ 
teen high, with eight by ten deep orange cathedral-glass, coated with ruby 
colored glass substitute in front, giving a perfect, safe, and pleasant orange-red 
light. Each Lantern is provided with a coal-oil lamp, with improved jiatent 
burner and silvered reflector, Avhich may be revolved in any direction, and 
operated from the outside. By removing the revolving lamp bed, a hole will be 
found through which a gas burner can bo introduced. 

It can be used for seven or more different operations in photography, several 
of which have never been combined in any one lantern, to wdt: 

1. A safe light for the preparation of gelatino-bromide emulsion. 

2. A safe light for the coating of gelatino-bromide plates. 

3. A safe light for developing the most sensitive plates ; whilst, for preparing 
developer or doing other work, the room can be instantly flooded with white 
light and as quickly changed to the orange-red, giving abundance of light by 
which to develop the largest sized plates used. The adjustable hood effectually 
shields the eyes from the glare of the light, a matter of the greatest importance 
to those having a large number of negatives to develop. 

4. An opal light by which to examine negatives or positives after flxing, 
enabling the operator to judge of their quality, thereby avoiding the necessity of 
leaving the dark-room in search of white light. 

































41 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

5. A clear, transparent light for making positives on glass (gelatino-broinide). 

6 . The making of enlarged negatives from gelatine positives, placed in front of 
opal light. 

7. By the adjustment of condensers and holder for slides and objective in front 
of the clear light, a very effective Magic Lantern is formed. 

DEVELOPING TRAYS. 



Nos. 2825-2831. 


No. 

2825. 

Japanned 

Iron 

Developing 

Tray, 

4ix 54, 




Price. 
. ^0 20 

2826. 


(( 

ii 

ii 

54x 84, 




. 25 

2827. 


U 

ii 

ii 

7x9, 




30 

2828. 

(( 

H 

ii 

ii 

9 xlO, 




40 

2829. 

ii 

n 

ii 

ii 

10 xl2, 




. 50 

2830. 



ii 

ii 

12 xl5. 




. 75 

2831. 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

15 xl8. 




1 00 


INDIA RUBBER DEVELOPING TRAYS. 


2835. 

Hard 

Rubber Developing 

Tray, 

4x5, 

No. 2, . 




60 

2836. 

ii 

ii 


ii 

5x7, 

No. 3, . 




80 

2837. 

ii 

ii 

(( 

ii 

5x8, 

No. 34, 




1 00 

2838. 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

7x9, 

No. 4, . 




1 10 

2839. 

ii 

ii 

ii 

ii 

8 x10, 

No. 5, . 




1 40 


AGATE-IRON LIPPED TRAYS. 



Nos. 2840-2845. 


2840. 

2841. 

2842. 

2843. 

2844. 

2845. 


Agate-Iron 

Developing 

Tray, 

5x 7, . 



Shallow. 

. $0 80 

Deep. 
$1 00 

ii 

ii 

ii 

7x 9, . 



1 00 

1 25 

ii 

ii 

ii 

8 x10, . 



1 25 

1 60 

ii 

ii 

ii 

10 x12, . 



2 00 

2 25 

ii 

ii 

ii 

11x14, . 



3 00 

3 37 

ii 

ii 

ii 

14x17, . 


. 

5 00 

6 00 


These Trays are not affected by acids or any chemicals that may be employed. 



















42 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO.'; PHILADELPHIA 

GLASS-LIPPED DEVELOPING TRAYS. 


No. 

2846. Glass Developing Tray, with Lip, 5x 7, 

Price, 
. $0 50 

2847. 

“ “ “ “ 7x 8, 

75 

2848. “ 

“ “ “ “ 8x10, 

1 15 

2849. “ 

“ “ “ “ 10x12, 

1 90 

These Trays 

are very strong, and being transparent 

enable the operator to 


see through the negative during the process of development. 

THE EFFICIENT PLATE-LIFTER. 



No. 2850. 

2850. The Efficient Plate-Lifter, . 15 

This little piece of apparatus is like an ordinary thimble, with a pointed piece 
of metal soldered securely to it, as shown in the illustration. Slipped on to the 
end of the finger, it is a most “efficient” aid in lifting the negative from the 
tray for examination during development. 

FERROUS-OXALATE DEVELOPING BOTTLE. 



2852. 

Ferrous-Oxalate Developing Bottle. Pint, 

. 

. 

60 

2853. 

“ “ “ Quart, . 



75 

2854. 

“ “ “ Half-gallon, 

• 


1 00 


Full directions for use on each bottle. 


CAMEL’S-HAIR DUSTERS. 


Nos. 2855-2860. 

2855. Camel’ s-H air Duster, i-inch wide, . 

2856. “ “ 1 “ “ 


15 

20 






















W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA 


43 


No. 

2857. Camel’s-Hair Duster, li-inch wide, . 

2858. “ “ li “ “ 

2859. “ “ 2 “ “ 

2860. “ “ 2i “ “ 


Price. 
$0 25 
30 
50 
65 


These Brushes are exceedingly useful for removing dust from the surface of 
Sensitized Plates before placing same in the holders and air-bells when the de¬ 
veloping fluid is poured over the plates in developing tray. Two or throe of 
them should be found in the outfit of every amateur. 


NEGATIVE WASHING BOXES. 

Guaranteed not to Husf. 




No. 2865. No. 2866-2873. 


2865. 

Scovill’s Adaptable Negative Washing Box, . 
Arranged to carry plates 4x5, 5x8, 6^x8^, and 8x10. 

. . 2 75 

2866. 

ScoviLL’s Plain Negative Washing Box, 34x 4i, 

1 20 

2867. 

4i 

a 

a a 

“ 4x5, 

1 25 

2868. 

ii 

a 

(( a 

“ 4ix 5^, 

1 30 

2869. 

a 

a 

it a 

“ 4ix 6i, 

. 1 35 

2870. 

a 

it 

(4 44 

“ 5x7, 

1 40 

2871. 

a 

a 

4 4 44 

“5x8, 

1 50 

2872. 

a 

a 

44 44 

“ 6ix 8i, 

1 75 

2873. 



44 44 

“ 8 xlO, 

2 25 


It is necessary in the last stage of development to remove from photographic 
negatives all traces of hyposulphite of soda, and it is not generally convenient to 
place them where water will flow over their surface a sufficient length of time to 
accomplish this effectually, without injury to the sensitive film. To watch the 
plate is to waste time. The flow over it should be with gentle force. This can 
best be regulated, and a thorough cleansing from hyposulj)hite of soda of every 
portion of the negative be assured, by the employment of one of the continuous 
flow Negative Washing Boxes. Plates are simply slid into the grooves, a guar¬ 
antee that the film will not be disturbed or marred; a bit of hose is slij^ped over 




















































































































































































44 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO.^ PHILADELPHIA. 


a tap, and the other end over the spout of the box. If need be, another section 
of rubber tubing is used to carry olf the waste water to an outlet. After this 
simple preparation the Washing Box is in readiness for service. 

The Adjustable Washing Box has a false bottom Avith perforations to every 
square inch. The receiving-pipe conducts the water underneath the false bottom. 
The result accomplished by this form of construction is to prevent the water 
passing through the box with too great force. Not only is it checked, but it is 
also equally distributed so that every plate and each portion of a plate is washed 
equally, 

NEGATIVE DRYING RACKS. 



No. 2875. 


No. Price. 

2875. Folding Drying Rack. Will hold any size of plate, . . . ^0 50 

The Negative Drying Rack is an indispensable adjunct to the Dark-Room, as 
it facilitates the drying of the negatives after development without danger of 
scratching. 

NEGATIVE BOXES. 



Nos. 2876-2885. 


2876. 

Negative Box, for holding twenty-four plates, 

3Jx 4i, 


70 

2577. 

H 

(i a 

a 

it 

4x5, 


75 

2878. 

ii 

(( (i 

it 

a 

41x 5J, 


75 

2879. 

ii 

(( (( 

it 

a 

4ix 61, 


75 

2880. 

U 

a a 

it 

a 

5x7, 


90 

2881. 

a 

a a 

a 

it 

51x 7, 


95 

2882. 

a 

it 

a 

it 

5x8, 


95 

2883. 

ti 

a a 

a 

a 

61x 81, 


1 05 

2884. 

a 

it a 

it 

a 

8 xlO, 


1 20 

2885. 

a 

it a 

a 

it 

10 xl2. 


2 40 

These are thoroughly well 

made Cases, and furnish 

a most desirable 

method 


of storing negatives. 


































































































































W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 45 


NEGATIVE PRESERVERS. 


No. 

28SG. Preservers, for negatives 3ix 4i, per 100, 


2887. 


n 

4x5, 

ii 

2888. 

ti 

a 

41x 5i, 

ii 

2889. 

ii 


41x 6J, 


2890. 

ii 

a 

51x 7, 

ii 

2891. 

a 

(i 

5x8, 

(( 

2892. 

(( 


6 .1x 8i, 

(i 

2893. 


a 

8 xlO, 

(( 


Price. 

$0 30 
38 
40 
45 
45 
54 
61 
76 


The Preservers consist of an Envelope made of strong, thick paper, one end 
open, and having on one side three printed lines for the number, name, and 
remarks. 


GLASS GRADUATES AND FUNNELS. 



2895. 

Glass 

Graduate, 

Minim 

2896. 

n 

ii 

1 oun 

2897. 



2 

2898. 

n 

i% 

3 

2899. 

n 

a 

4 

2900. 

<( 

a 

6 

2901. 


u 

8 

2902. 


4( 

12 

2903. 

n 

ii 

16 

29(M. 

n 

a 

24 

2905. 

it 

u 

32 ‘ 



25 

20 

25 

30 

35 


90 
1 00 


































































































46 


W. II. AVALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA 


2906. Glass Funnel, Half-pint,.. 18 

2907. “ Pint, . . . 

2908. “ “ Quart,.. 25 

2909. “ “ Half-gallon,. 

2910. Glass Filter and Funnel Combined, Pint,. 50 

2911. “ “ “ ** ** Quart, .... 65 

2912. “ “ “ “ “ Half-gallon, ... 1 00 


This combination of Funnel and Filter is intended specially for the use of cot¬ 
ton as the filtering medium. The bulb retains the cotton in such a manner as to 
obviate the difficulty experienced with the ordinary funnel from the cotton 
becoming compressed too tightly. A glance at the illustration will make its 
advantage apparent. 


FILTERING COTTON. 


2913. Filtering Cotton, four ounces, in paper box, 


25 


FILTER PAPER. 


2915. 

Filter Paper, Best Round Gray, 

No. 15, 

6 inch. 

per 100, 

• 

25 

2916. 

a 

a a 

a 

No. 19, 

8 

(( 


• 

30 

- 2917. 

4 

a a 

<i 

No. 25, 

10 

ii 

ii 

• 

35 

2918. 

n 

a a 

it 

No. 33, 

13 

a 

a 

• 

40 

2920. 

ii 

a a 

a 

No. 40, 

16 

a 

a 

• 

50 

2921. 

ii 

a a 

a 

No. 45, 

18 

a 

ii 

• 

60 

2922. 

ii 

U ifc 

a 

No. 50, 

20 

a 

ii 

• 

75 

2923. 

it 

“ Swedish (Munktel’s), per quire, 

% t 


1 00 


SCALES AND WEIGHTS. 


Nos. 2925-2926. 



2925. Scales and Weights, 5-inch beam, drachms and grains, . , 65 

2926. “ “ 6 “ “ “ . . 90 

In wood or metal cases. 




















w. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


47 



No. 



Price. 

00 

5 50 

6 50 


These Balances are provided with a full set of Weights and are mounted on a 
Polished Walnut Case containing a drawer in which the whole apparatus can be 
packed. 


RETOUCHING FRAMES. 



No. 2935. 


2935. Retouching Frame, for 8x10 and under, .§3 75 

This is a compact and most convenient apparatus for retouching negatives, 
stopping out spots, etc. 

2930. Crowell’s Metallic Lead, for retouching, .* 20 

2937. Gihon’s Opaque, for stopping out faults, .50 

Gihon’s Opaque is applied with a brush and is the most perfect material for 
stopping out light ever made. 

































































48 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO./ PHILADELPHIA. 

The apparatus thus far described is all that is necessary to the production of 
finished negatives ready for prmting from. %Many amateurs are content to rest 
their labors here, and confide their negatives to the professional printer for the pro¬ 
duction of the finished prints. Much the larger majority, however, prefer to do their 
own printing, toning, and mounting; which is indeed the only true way of pro¬ 
ducing amateur work; and for such we now proceed to illustrate and describe 
apparatus suited to the purpose. 


APPARATUS FOR MAKING PRINTS. 


PRINTING FRAMES. 



FLAT. 


No. 


DEEP. 


Price. 


Flat. 


Deep. 


2950. 

Printing Frame. 

For Plates 3Ix 4L 

. . . . $0 55 

$0 75 

2951. 

U 

n 

(( 

4x5, 

.... 55 

75 

2952. 

ti 

a 

ii 

4Ix 5i, 

. . . . 55 

75 

2953. 

n 

a 

ii 

4ix 6}^, 

.... 60 

85 

2954. 

ii 

a 

(( 

5x7, 

70 

1 05 

2955. 

a 

n 

(( 

Six 7, 

70 

1 05 

2956. 

a 

a 

(( 

5x8, 

70 

1 05 

2957. 

a 

a 

a 

Cix 8i, 

75 

1 10 

2958. 

a 


a 

8 xlO, 

. . . . 85 

1 20 

2959. 

a 

a 

a 

10 xl2. 

1 15 

1 40 


, These Frames are made of Cherrywood, with Panelled Back and Brass Springs, 
in a very superior manner, and are so constructed that a uniform pressure is 
exerted, thus insuring perfect contact between the positive paper and the negative 
plate. The backs are hinged in the middle, so that the progress of the printing may 
be watched without danger of shifting the paper. The deep frames are specially 
adapted to the making of transparencies by contact printing. 







































































































49 


W. n. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

VIGNETTING FRAMES. 



No. 

29G1. 

McDonald’s 

Metallic Vignetter. 

For Frame 

3ix 4J, 

Price. 
. §0 50 

2902. 


44 

44 

44 

4x5, 

. 05 

2903. 

% 

44 

44 

44 

4ix 

. 05 

2904. 

it 

44 

44 

44 

4ix Gi, . 

05 

2905. 

ii 

44 

4» 

44 

5x7, 

05 

2033. 

ii 

44 

44 

44 

5.Vx 7, 

05 

2907. 

a 

44 

ik 

44 

5x8, 

. 05 

2908. 


44 

44 

44 

OJx 8i, . 

. 75 

2909. 

(4 

44 

44 

44 

8 xlO, 

. 75 


These Vigyietters are adapted to the Flat Printing Frames Nos. 2950 to 2958. They 
are readily adjusted and ean he changed to thirty different positions; any one of 
them in three to five seconds. 


SCOTT’S ADJUSTABLE VIGNETTEE AND PLAIN 

PRINTER. 



Nos. 2970-2979. 





































































50 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


No. 

2970. 

Scott’s Adjustable Vignetter. For Frame 3 ^x 41, 


PnicE. 
$0 50 

2971. 


u 

4 4 4 4 

4x5, 


60 

2972. 

u 

a 

44 44 

41x 51, 


60 

2973. 


ki 

4 4 4 4 

41x 61, . 


65 

2974. 

a 

44 

4 4 4 4 

5x7, 


70 

2975. 

a 

44 

4 4 44 

5x8, 


70 

2976. 


44 

44 44 

51x 7, 


70 

2977. 

u 

44 

4 4 4 4 

Olx 8V, . 


. 75 

2978. 

u 

44 

4 4 4 4 

8 xlO, 


85 

2979. 


44 

4 4 4 4 

10 xl2. 


1 00 


The Scott Adjustable Vignetter is easily attached to any ordinary printing frame^ 
and when once in position need not he removed, as the square opening is sufficiently 
large to print to the full capacity of the frame. It is readily adjusted to any de¬ 
sired position, and is firmly held with thumb screws. The frame is of tin, with brass 
springs beneath to raise the vignetter to proper position, whilst a clamping wire 
holds tightly either tissue paper, cut-out, or both. 


ROBINSON’S PHOTOGRAPH TRIMMERS. 



No. 2980. No. 2981. 


2980. Robinson’s Straight Cut Trimmer, . 50 

2981. Robinson’s Revolving Trimmer, with guide, . . . . 1 00 

Robinson's Photograph Trimmer does the work much more expeditiously and 
elegantly thayi a knife. It does not cut but pinches off the waste paper, and leaves 
the print xvith a neatly beveled edge, which facilitates adherence to the mount. For 
ovals, circles, and rounded corners it is indispensable. 


ROBINSON’S GUmES. 

These Guides are made of sheet-iron for use with the Revolving Trimmer No. 
2981. They may be had round, oval, square, or round-cornered, as desired, and 
of sizes to suit any of Collins’ Card Mounts. Price, ten cents per inch the longest 
w'ay of the aperture. 













61 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


GLASS FORMS. 

No. Price 

2982. Glass Form or Guide, 4 x5,.$0 50 

2983. “ “ “ 4ix5i,.60 

2984. “ “ “ 5ix7,.75 

2985. “ “ “ 5 x8,.75 


These Forms are intended for use with Robinson"s Straight Trimmer, No. 2980. 
They are of plate-glass with beveled edges. 


ENTREKIN’S BURNISHERS. 



No. 2986. 


2986. Entrekin’s Burnisher, 6-inch roll, . 

2987. “ “ 10 “ . • 
Each Burnisher is furnished with a lamp for heating ; 

cloth to polish tool, and instructions for use. 


15 00 
25 00 

cake of lubricator, emery 


CARD MOUNTS. 

PER PACKAGE OF 25. 


No. 

1, 

6ix 8h . 

40 

No. 

2, 


30 

No. 

1, 

9 xll, 

65 

No. 

2, 


50 

No. 

1, 

10 xl2. 

75 

No. 

2, 


60 

No. 

34, 

8 xlO, 

1 00 

No. 

20, 

11 xl4. 

1 25 


2991. 

2992. 

2993. 

2994. 

2995. 

2996. India Tint Cards. 

2997. “ “ 

The tinted opening o/2996 measures blxJl inches, and that o/2997 SxlUlinches. 

2998. Black or Chocolate Cards, 

2999. “ “ “ 

3000. “ “ 

3001. Cabinet Cards, assorted, 

3002. “ black, 

3003. “ seconds, 


No. 13, 

6ix9^, 

1 25 

No. 13, 

5ix8i, 

75 

No. 13, 

6.1x8i, 

1 00 

No. 43, 

41x6i, 

50 

No. 43, 

4ix6i, 

56 

No. 42, 

4ix6i, . 

. . 20 
































52 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


No. 

3004. 

Boudoir Cards, green or maroon. 

No. 68, 

5ix8L . 


Price. 

. $1 25 

3005. 

Carte de Visite Mounts, assorted. 

No. 35, 

2hx4h, . 


15 

3006. 


No. 42, 

2ix4L . 


20 

3007. 

a (( <( 

No. 43, 

2.Vx4L . 


30 

3008. 

Stereoscopic Card Mounts, assorted. No. 5, 

3.ix7, . 


20 

3009. 

(( (( (t <i 

No. 5, 

4 x7, . 


25 

3010. 

(( H il it 

No. 5, 

41x7, . 


30 

3011. 

it a a it 

No. 5, 

4ix7, . 


35 

3012. 

n a it it 

No. 5, 

5 x8. 


40 


All the above Cards are from pure stock (A. M. Collins, Son ct* Co.), guaran¬ 
teed entirely free from soda, and not to injure the prints. The prices are all for 
packages of twenty-five. 


READY SENSITIZED ALBUMEN PAPER. 


3015. 

Package Sensitized Paper, one dozen. 

4x5, . 




25 

3016. 

H 


4ix 51, . 




25 

3017. 

H 

(( a (( 

5.1x 7, . 




40 

3018. 

ii 

n (( a 

5x8, . 




40 

3019. 

ti 

it a a 

6lx 81, . 




50 

3020. 

a 

a it it 

8 xlO, . 




80 

3021. 

Roll Sensitized Paper, “ 

18 x22, . 




3 00 


This Paper is made expressly for us by the best manufacturer in Paris, in 
various shades, rose, white, mauve, etc. Its quality is of the best, it is higlilj" sen¬ 
sitized, prints readily, and tones to any desired tint with the greatest facility. It 
is almost univ’-ersally used in the galleries of Europe, yielding etfects in no wise 
inferior to those obtainable with freshly sensitized paper. Its keeping qualities 
are extraordinary, as excellent prints may be made with it a year after sensitiz¬ 
ing. Each package is made up with chemically prepared pads, which greatly 
add to its keeping qualities; and to save possible loss, packages and rolls are not 
broken. Forrnulee for printing and toning accompany each package. For the 
amateur, this Ready Sensitized Paper is an indispensable requisite, whilst to the 
professional i^hotographer it offers numei’ous advantages which he will not be 
slow to recognize. 

3022. Japanned Tin Case, to hold roll of 3021,. 35 


FERRO PRUSSIATE PAPER. 


3025. Package Ferro Prussiate Paper. 1 Dozen, 4x5,. . . 15 

3026. “ “ “ “ 4Ix 5^, . . 20 

3027. “ “ “ “ 5ix 7, . . . 30 

3028. “ “ “ “ 5x8,... 30 

3029. “ “ “ “ .Lx 8.1, . . 40 

3030. “ “ “ “ 8 xlO, ... 50 

3031. Roll Ferro Prussiate Paper. 11 yards, 29 inches wide, . . 5 00 

This Paper is also made expressly for us in Paris, and is far superior to any 
other in the market, being of uniform sensitiveness and entirely free from spots, 
streaks, or flaws, jDrinting a brilliant blue with clear Avhites. It is extremely 
simple in its manipulation and therefore very convenient for making proofs 
from negatives, whilst for the rapid reproduction of plans, drawings, etc., it has 
no equal. Full instructions for use accompany each package. 















W. 11. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 53 


No. 





Price. 

3035. 

Litmus Paper. Blue or Red, per sheet, .... 

• 


§0 06 

3036. 

ii H ii 4i 

in books, per doz.. 

• 


40 

3037. 

Post “ For Dark Room, “ . . 

• 


25 

3038. 

Onion “ “ Vignetting, etc., “ 

• 


25 

3039. 

Tissue “ “ “ 

best English, per doz.. 

• 


20 

3040. 

“ “ “ Dark Room, yellow, “ 

• 


10 

3041. 

White Blotting Paper. 

19x24, “ 



1 00 


PASTES FOR MOUNTING PRINTS. 




3045. 

Parlor Paste. 4 pint jar. 

• •••••• 



20 

3046. 

ii ii ii ii 

• •••••• 



45 

3047. 

“ “ l-quart“ 

• •••••• 



65 

3050. 

Anthony’s Pearl Paste. 

i pint jar, .... 



25 

3051. 

ii ii ii 

1 



45 

3052. 

ii ii * ii 

1 quart “ .... 


. 

65 


This paste is warranted not to ferment or become sour, mouldy, or offensive. 
It will remain moist even after much exposure to the air, and it j^ossesses a 
pleasing, pearly color. Its adhesive properties are unsurpassed, and, like starch, 
it leaves no stain upon the card mount. If found too thick, it may readily be 
thinned with water, and will keep for any length of time, no matter what may 
be the temperature. 


• VIEW ALBUMS. 

3055. View Albums. For Pictures 31 x 41 to 4ix5i, 

3056. “ “ “ “ 41x61 to 5 x8, 

3057. “ “ “ “ 61x81, . 

3058. “ “ “ “ 8 xlO, . 


1 10 
1 30 

1 95 

2 40 


These Albums are made of the finest cardboard, chemically free from any¬ 
thing that could injure the print. Each contains forty-eight pages and is neatly 
and substantially bound in cloth, with leather back and corners. No more 
compact or convenient method of preserving prints for examination has been 
devised. 


GELATINE DRY PLATES. 


Though the amateur may be the possessor of the most perfect and complete out¬ 
fit of Camera and Lenses that money can procure, coupled with a thorough 
acquaintance-with their manipulation, all his efforts to produce satisfactory nega¬ 
tives will prove futile unless he is provided with good Dry Plates suited to the 
work he has on hand. Most of the plates now in the market are good and reli¬ 
able, but each brand possesses some merit peculiarly its own. Thus, one make 
is especially adapted to portraiture, another to landscaping, another to photo¬ 
micrography, and, again, another to the production of transparencies for the lan¬ 
tern and windows. Recognizing these facts, wo keep in stock a full line of plates 
by all the leading makers, and will cheerfully give our unbiased advice in the 
choice of plates for any particular kind of work, where such is sought. Some 
makers i^roduce plates of various degrees of sensitiveness for different kinds of 
work, whilst others confine their manufactures to a single sort. In both cases 
we carry in stock their entire assortment. The following brands we are always 
prepared to furnish promptly: Beebe’s; Carbutt’s “Keystone” H, R, 
Special” and Transparency; Cramer’s; Diamond; Eastman’s “Tropical” 









54 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO.,^PHILADELPHIA. 

and “ SpecialInglis’ “ Insoluble Monroe’s “ Semper Idem,” and Norden’s. 
The prices of all makers being the same, it is unnecessary to give more than a 
single table of same, which will be applicable to any and all of them. In order¬ 
ing please name the make of plates desired, as well as the Catalogue number. If 
Keystone, state in addition whether A, B, or “Special” shall be sent; if 
Eastman’s, whether “Tropical” or “Special.” All the other makers produce 
but one grade. 


GENERAL PRICE LIST. 


No. Price. 


3060. Gelatine Dry Plates, 

any 

make, 2ix 3i, per dozen, . 

* 

. $0 50 

3061. 

a 

i 

3ix 4i, 


60 

3062. 


i 

4x5, “ 


90 

3063. “ 

a 

ii 

41x 51, “ 


1 00 

3064. “ 

a 

it 

41x 61, 


1 20 

3065. “ 

<i 

it 

5x7, “ 


1 55 

3066. 

a 

it 

51x 7, 


1 65 

3067. “ 

a 

it 

5x8, “ 


1 75 

3068. “ 

a 

a 

61x 81, 


2 30 

3069. “ 

n 

it 

7x9, “ 


. 2 75 

3070. “ 

a 

it 

8 xlO, 


3 40 

3071. “ 

a 

ik 

10 xl2. 


5 00 

3072. 

a 

it 

11 xl4. 


. 6 50 

3073. Carbutt’s Special Lantern 

Plates, 31x4i, per dozen. 


70 


These Lantern Plates are made on special extra thin, crystal glass, and are the 
best Gelatine Plates for the purpose ever made. 


TRANSPARENCY FRAMES. 


3075. Transparency 

3076. “ 

3077. “ 

3078. “ 

3079. “ 

3080. ‘ 

3081. “ 


Frame. 4x 5 inches, 
“ 4ix 5i “ 

“ 5Jx 7 “ 

“ 5x8 “ 

“ 6ix 81 “ 

“ 8 xlO “ 

“ 10 xl2 “ 


30 

35 

40 

40 

45 

60 

75 


These Frames are made with Plain or Ornamental Borders, and with rings to 
hang vertically or horizontally. In ordering please state which pattern is desired. 

To give Transparencies a finish they are backed when placed in the f rames with 
a plate of ground glass, either plain or with etched margins, as below. 


3083. Ground 

3084. “ 

3085. “ 

3086. “ 

3087. “ 

3088. 

3089. 


Glass. 4x5,. 

“ 4ix 51, 

“ 51x 7, . 

“ 5x8,. 

” 61x 81, 

“ 8 xlO, . 

“ 10 xl2, . 


Plain. 

Etched 

Margin. 

20 

50 

23 

50 

25 

55 

25 

60 

30 

60 

35 

70 

50 

80 


(( 




















W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA, 


55 


VARNISHES. 

No. 

3091. Anthony’s Dry Plate Varnish. Per bottle, 

3092. Carbutt’s Keystone “ “ 

3093. Retouching “ “ 

3094. Ground Glass Substitute. “ 


Price. 
^0 40 
50 
50 
50 


METALLIC PROTECTING CASES, with GLASS BOTTLE and TUMBLER. 





Nos. 3095-3097. 


Nos. 3095-3097. Open. 


Where is the amateur who, when on a photographic excursion, has not wished 
very often for some safe method of carrying with him developers and other 
chemicals in solution ? A most useful article is in the market which answers 
this jiurpose. We allude to the Patent Metallic Protecting Cases invented for 
similar purposes. The bottles may be of ordinary shape so that they fit the 
metal cases, which latter are drawn from solid metal, with a locking ring, to 
afford perfect protection for the bottles containing the liquids which are en¬ 
trusted to their care. They are made of different sizes for bottles of one, two, 
four, and eight ounces capacity, and each case is made adjustable to bottles of 
different lengths. They are very light, and the corrugation makes them so 
strong as to resist crushing. They can be packed in any position. The metal is 
drawn of even thickness throughout by hydraulic pressure. 


3095. Metallic Case, with 1 oz. Bottle. 


3096. 

3097. 


(( 

a 


“ 4 “ “ and Tumbler. 

(( g a a (( 


No. 1, 

• 

50 

No. 3 A, . 

• 

85 

No. 4 A, . 

• 

1 10 






















5(3 


W. H. WALMSLEY & C^O , ^PHILADELPHIA. 


DEVELOPING OUTFITS. 

No. 

3100. Developing Outfit, No. 1. 4ix5i, . 


One dozen Plates 3ix4i, 4x5, or 4,1x5^, 
Two Developing Trays, 44x5-^, 

One 2-ounce Graduate, 

“ pound Neutral Oxalate Potassium, 

“ “ Protosulphate Iron, * 

“ “ Hyposulphite Soda, 

3101. Developing Outfit, No. 2. 5x8, 


Price. 
$3 50 

One Ruby Glass Lantern, W. I. A., 

“ set Scales and Weights, 5 inches, 

“ half-pound Alum, 

“ ounce Bromide Potassium, 

“ “ Sulphuric Acid, 

“ Instruction Book. 

.... . . 5 00 


This Outfit is the same as No. 3100, with the substitution of 5x7 to 5x8 Plates, 
and Pans, Graduates, etc., to correspond. 


3102. Developing Outfit, No. 3. 64x84, ’. 6 50 

This Outfit is the same as No. 3100, with the substitution of 64x84 Plates, and 
Pans, Graduates, etc., to correspond. 

The foregoing Outfits comprise only those articles absolutely essential to the 
making of a negative. Those now to be described are much more complete and 
afford greater latitude for experimental developing. 


3103. Complete Developing Outfit, No. 4. 44x54, .... 7 00 

This Outfit comprises the following articles, securely packed in a wooden case : 


One dozen Dry Plates, 34x44 to 44x54, 
Two Japanned Developing Trays, 

One set Scales and Weights, 5-inch, 

“ 4-ounce Graduate, 

“ Minim Measure, 

“ ounce Bromide Potassium, 

“ “ Sulphuric Acid, 

“ Oxalic Acid, 

“ bottleWalmsley’s PyroDeveloper, 
“ Camel’s-hair Brush, flat. 


One pound Neutral Oxalate Potassitim, 
“ “ Protosulphato Iron, 

“ “ Hyposulphite Soda, 

“ “ Alum, 

“ bottle Negative Varnish, 

“ Ruby Glass Lantern, W. I. A., 

“ Efficient Plate Lifter, 

“ Focusing Cloth, 

“ Note Book, 

“ Instruction Book. 


3104. Complete Developing Outfit, No. 5. 5x7 to 5x8, 




This Outfit is the same as No. 3103, with the substitution of 5x7 to 5x8 Plates, 
and Pans, Graduates, etc., to correspond. 


3105. Complete Developing Outfit, No. 6. 64x84, . . . . 10 00 

This Outfit is the same as No. 3103, with the substitution of 64x84 Plates, and 
Pans, Graduates, etc., to correspond. 


PRINTING AND TONING OUTFITS. 

3107. Printing and Toning Outfit, A,.2 25 


One Printing Frame, 

Two dozen Sheets Sensitized Paper, 
Two dozen Card Mounts, 


74 grains Chloride of Gold, 
One ounce Phosphate of Soda, 
One half pint jar, Parlor Paste. 


With the above Outfit the Printing Frame and Sensitized Paper are f urnished to 
suit 34a;44, 4a:5, or 44^:54 negatives as required, at the same price. 





AV. H. AVALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


57 


No- Price. 

3108. Printinq and Toning Outfit B,.§3 00 

This Outfit is the same as A, with the substitution of Printing Frame, Sensi¬ 
tized Paper, and Card Mounts suited to negatives 5x7, 5^x7, or 5x8. 

3109. Printing and Toning Outfit C, .3 75 

This Outfit is the same as A, with the substitution of Printing Frame, Sensi¬ 
tized Paper, and Card Mounts suited to negatives 6^x8^. 

The above Outfits comprise all the absolutely necessary articles for printing, 
toning, and mounting finished pictures. 


3110. Complete Printing and Toning Outfit D, 


One Printing Frame, 

“ Porcelain Pan, 5x7, deep, 

“ ounce Acetate Soda, 

“ bottle Chloride of Gold, 7i grains. 
Four dozen sheets Sensitized Paper, 

‘‘ Card Mounts, 

One four-ounce Graduate, 

One sheet Blue Litmus Paper. 


6 00 

One half-pint jar Parlor Paste, 

“ one-and-a-half-inch Bristle Brush, 
“ Glass Form (for trimming prints), 
“ Bobinson’s Straight Trimmer, 

“ Japanned Tray, 5ix8i inches, 

“ pound Hyposulphite Soda, 

“ ounce Borax, 

“ doz. sheets Ferro Prussiate Paper. 

ix4i. 


The various articles with the above Outfit are furnished in sizes to suit. 
4x5, or 4ix5i inch negatives, as may be desired, at the same price. 


3111. Complete Printing and Toning Outfit E, .... 7 00 

This Outfit is the same as D, with the substitution of Printing Frames and 
other apparatus, Sensitized Paper, etc., to suit negatives 5x7, 5ix7, or 5x8 
inches. 


3112. Complete Printing and Toning Outfit F, .... 8 00 

This Outfit is the same as D, with the substitution of Apparatus, Paper, etc., 
to suit negatives 6-1x8^ inches. 

Outfits 3110-3112 are complete in every conceivable requisite for Printing, Toning, 
and Mounting, securely packed in a strong cardboard box. 


GELATINO-BROMIDE RAPID PRINTING PAPER. 

This paper being prepared with tlie same substance as the Gelatino-bromide 
Dry Plates, requires no other chemicals for the production of prints than those 
used with the plates, which is a great convenience to amateurs who intend to 
travel and do not wish to be burdened with too many chemicals. 

It must, of course, be opened only in a ruby or orange light, and can be printed 
by the light of a gas jet or kerosene lamp in five seconds. 

By the use of Eastman’s Tropical Dry Plate (which can be dried over a spirit 
lamp after development), and this paper (which can be printed in so short a 
time), a proof cm be made within twenty minutes after the exposure of the 
plate in the camera. 

Anv one possessing a Magic Lantern or Solar Camera can make beautiful 
enlargements on this paper, which may be subsequently painted or finished in 
crayon. 

Another great advantage is that the prints may be made in the evening, inde¬ 
pendently of cloudy or foggy weather, and the exposure being so short, many 
more prints can be made in a given time than with any other paper. 




58 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


No. 

3120. 

Gelatino-Bromide Paper. 

1 Dozen. 4x5, 


Price. 
. ^0 40 

3121. 

U (i 

1 “ 5x8, . . 


75 

3122. 

ii a a 

1 “ 6ix 81, 


1 10 

3123. 

a (( 

1 “ 8 xlO, 

• 

1 50 


Each dozen sheets, packed in a light, tight box, with ample directions foi 


use. 


GLASS STIRRING RODS, 


3130. 

Glass Stirring Rod. 8-inch, 

* * 




• 

• 

10 

3131. 

(4 

44 

“ 12 “ 







15 

3132. 

44 

44 

“ 15 “ 





* 

• 

20 

3133. 

44 

44 

“ 18 “ 

« • 

• 



• 

• 

25 


FLAT BRISTLE BRUSHES. 


3135. Bristle 

Brush, Flat. 

1 

inch wide, 





• 


15 

3136. 

44 

44 

li 

44 





• 


20 

3137. “ 

44 

44 

li 

44 





• 


25 

3138. “ 

44 

44 

2 

44 





• 


35 

3139. “ 

44 

44 

2h 

44 





• 


50 


For Mounting Pi'ints, with Parlor or other pastes. 


MISCELLANEOUS ARTICLES. 

3140, Rubber Focusing Cloth. 40 inches square,.1 00 

3142. Velvet “ “.2 00 

3143. Mats for Lantern Slides, Per package,.25 

3144. Glass “ “ Covers. 3ix4L Per dozen, ... 30 

3145. Needle Paper for binding edges of Lantern Slides. Per sheet, 10 

3146. India Ink. Per stick,.25 

3147. Canvas Bag for Extension Tripods Nos. 1 and 2, . . . . 1 50 

3148. “ “ “ “ No. 3,.2 50 

POULENC & WITTMAN’S CHEMICALS. 

3175. Poulenc & Wittman’s Pyrogallic Acid, one-ounce bottle, . 50 

3176. “ “ Bromide Ammonium, one-ounce bottle, 20 

3177 . “ “ Bromide Potassium, one-ounce bottle, 25 

The above are of our own importation, and the finest articles of their kind made. 
The Pyrogallic Acid is instantly and entirely soluble in cold water, leaving no 
residue. 


WALMSLEY’S ALKALINE DEVELOPER. 

3180. Walmsley’s Concentrated Alkaline Developer, ten-ounce 

bottle,.1 00 

3181. Walmsley’s Concentrated Alkaline Developer, twenty-ounce 

bottle,.1 50 

This is the best a,nd most eeonomical Developer in use. A ten-ounce bottle will 
develop six dozen 5x8 negatives if carefully used, producing the finest results with 












59 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 

any make of plates. Errors of exposure are more easily controlled than with any 
other developer, and the negatives are without stain or blemish. It is made from 
Poulenc Wittman's Pyro, loith the utmost care, and its keeping qualities are 
excellent. Try it, and you will use no other. 


CYANIDE OF SILVER INTENSIFIER. 


No. Price. 

3183. Walmsley’s Silver Intensifier, in two ten-ounce bottles, . fl 00 

It sometimes happetis that negatives, full of detail and otherwise excellent, have 
not sufficient density to make good prints. Resort must then be had to an Intensi¬ 
fier, and the above will be found easy of manipulation, and perfect in its perform¬ 
ance. It is put up m two bottles, containing solutions Eos. 1 and 2, with full 
directions for use. It may be repeatedly used by returning each solution to its 
respective bottle. 


WALMSLEY’S PURE CHEMICALS. 

W. P. C. 

All Chemicals are bought and sold by Avoirdupois weight, which has four 
hundred and thirty-seven and a half grains to the ounce, and sixteen ounces to 
the pound, whilst all the formulae for their use and mixing are made by Apothe¬ 
caries’ weight—four hundred and eighty grains to the ounce and twelve ounces 
to the pound. Hence, if you get but four hundred and thirty-seven and a half 
grains of any chemical for an ounce do not think it short weight. 


3200. 

Acid, Acetic, No. 8, 



one-pound bottle. 

« 

20 

3201. 

“ “ Glacial, 



one-ounce “ 


15 

3202. 

“ Citric, .... 



a ii 


15 

3203. 

“ Muriatic, C. P., 



four ounce “ 


20 

3204. 

“ Nitric, C. P. 



one-ounce “ 


15 

3205. 

“ Oxalic, .... 



ii (i 


10 

3206. 

“ Pyrogallic, 



H ii 


50 

3207. 

“ Sulphuric, C, P., . 



ii a 


15 

3208. 

Ammonia, Bromide, 



a n 


15 

3209. 

“ Liquid Cone., C. S., 



one-pound “ 


20 

3210. 

Alcohol, Absolute, . 



two-ounce “ 


25 

3211. 

“ ninety-five per cent.. 



a n 


15 

3212. 

Alum, Chrome, 



one-ounce “ 


10 

3213. 

“ powdered. 



“ box, 


20 

3214. 

Chloroform, .... 



two-ounce bottle, 


30 

3215. 

Gold, Chloride, pure, 



seven-and-a-half-grain bottle 35 

3216. 

<( (( (( 



fifteen-grain bottle. 


60 

3217. 

(( (( 



ii 4i ii 


75 

3218. 

Glycerine, .... 



two-ounce bottle. 


25 

3219. 

Hydrokinone, .... 



one-ounce bottle. 


1 50 

3220. 

Iron, Proto-sulphate, 



one-pound box, 


10 

3221. 

Iodine, Tincture, 



one-ounce bottle. 


15 

3222. 

Lead, Acetate, .... 



ii ii 


15 

3223. 

Lime, Chloride, 



one-pound “ 


15 

3224. 

Mercury, Bichloride, 



one-ounce “ 


15 

3225. 

Potassium, Bromide, 



ii it 


15 

3226. 

“ Cyanide, 



ii ii 


10 















60 


W. II. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


No. 

3227. 

Potassium, Iodide, 


one-ounce 

bottle, 

Price. 
. ^0 20 

3228. 

“ Neutral Oxalate, 


u 

box. 

50 

3229. 

Potassa, Bichromate, 


a 

a 

. 35 

3230. 

Soda, Acetate, 


a 

bottle, 

15 

3231. 

“ Bicarbonate, 


one-pound box. 

15 

3232. 

“ Carbonate (Sal.), 



U 

10 

3233. 

“ Citrate, . . . 


(i 

bottle, 

. 20 

3234. 

“ Hyposulphite, 



box. 

. 10 

3235. 

“ Phosphate, 


one-ounce bottle, 

. 15 

3236. 

“ Sulphite, 


(i 


15 

3237. 

Silver, Nitrate (crystallized), . 


(( 

ii 

85 

3238. 

Tannin,. 


(( 

a 

. 20 

3239. 

Uranium, Nitrate, . 



4ft 

. 1 00 


STANDARD FORMULJl. 

FERROUS OXALATE DEVELOPERS. 

No. 1. Saturated Solution Neutral Oxalate of Potash. Filter. 

No. 2. Saturated Solution Protosulphate of Iron, with one drop of Sulphuric 
Acid or one drop of a Saturated Solution of Citric to each ounce of the 
Iron Solution. Filter. 

To use, add one part No. 2 to six parts of No. 1 for ordinary exposure. For 
instantaneous, one part No. 1 to four parts No. 2. If over-exposed, add at once 
a few drops of a solution of Bromide of Ammonium, which should always be 
kept for the purpose. 

Another. 

No. 1.—PoTAssic Oxalate Solution. 

Potassic Oxalate (neutral), . 8 ounces | Water, .... 32 ounces 

Dissolve the Oxalate in the water heated to boiling, and filter. The solution 
should be tested Avith blue litmbs paper; if it is not slightly acid, add sufficient 
Oxalic Acid to render it so. 


No. 2.—Iron Solution. 

Sulphate of Iron (pure), . 2 ounces Sulphuric Acid, . . 15 drops 

Water, .... 8 “ 

After the solution has settled, decant and use only the clear supernatant por¬ 
tion. 

I 

No. 3.—Bromide Solution. 


Bromide Potass., . . 30 grains ] Water, 

To make the developer, take 


2 ounces 


No. 3 Solution. 


5 drops 


No. 1 Solution, ... 3 ounces 

No. 2 “ ... 4 drams 

Over-exposure may be corrected by decreasing the amount of No. 2 Solution 
to one and a half drams and doubling the amount of the No. 3 Solution ; while 
under-exposure may be corrected by doubling the amount of No. 2 Solution 
and leaving No. 3 out of the developer. 








W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


61 


As the developer becomes exhausted the proportion of No. 2 Solution may be 
increased, but the entire amount added should never exceed one-fourth of the 
mixture, i e., four parts of No. 1 to one part of No. 2. 

Another. 

No. 1. 

Neutral Oxalate of Potash, . 1 pound | Water,. 5 pints 

Make decidedly acid with Citric Acid, and filter. 

No. 2. 

Sulphate of Iron, Pure, . 1 pound | Water,.2 quarts 

Filter, and add sixty drops Sulphuric Acid. 

To develop, take 

No. 1. Oxalate Solution, . 4 ounces | No. 2. Iron, ... 4 drams 

Always have ready a bottle of 

Water, .... 10 ounces | Bromide Ammonium, . 300 grains 

If more intensity is needed add ten drops Bromide Solution and continue the 
development. 

Image should show through on back of plate. An over-exposed plate needs 
weaker developer and more Bromide Solution. An under-exposed plate needs 
stronger developer and less Bromide Solution. 

Carry the development until image is well sunken in; don’t try to hurry. 


SPECIAL DEVELOPERS FOR TRANSPARENCIES. 

No. 1.—OxAL.ATE Solution. 

Oxalate of Potash, . . 8 ounces ( Water, .... 32 ounces 

When dissolved, add of a strong Solution of Citric Acid sufficient to faintly 
change blue litmus paper, then add two hundred grains more of Citric Acid; 
when dissolved, filter. 

No. 2.—Iron Solution. 

Pure Protosulphate of Iron, 4 ounces [ Water, .... 16 ounces 

Dissolve and add of Sulphuric Acid, sixteen drops. 


Oxalate Solution, 


DEVELOPER FOR BLACK TONES. 


4 parts I Iron, 


1 part 


DEVELOPER FOR BROWN TONES. 

To the above add two or three parts water, bearing in mind what has been said 
about regulating the exposure to suit the developer. The development should 
bo carried on until the detail in the strongest light of the image is well defined ; 
then wash, and fix in clean and fresh Hypo. Solution, made by dissolving four 
ounces of Hypo. Soda in twenty ounces of water; place in Alum Solution a few 
minutes, then give a thorough washing, and before putting to dry, with a swab 
of absorbent cotton go over the surface while holding the transparency under 
the tap, rinse and place to dry spontaneousl 3 ’’, and it is then ready to bind in the 
metal frames sold by dealers for that purpose. 

N. B.—By leaving out the two hundred grains Citric Acid in the above Oxalate 
vSolution, it is suitable for the ordinary Negative Developer. 


62 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


ALKALINE DEVELOPERS. 

No. 1 Solution. 

Pyrogallio Acid (Poulenc & Witt- Distilled Water, . . G ounces 

man’s), .... 1 ounce Nitric Acid, C. P., . . 20 drops 

Bromide Ammonium, . 600 grains 


No. 2 Solution. 

Concentrated Liquid Ammonia, i ounce | Distilled Water, . . 20 ounces 

Keep both Solutions tightly corked. 

To use, add one-quarter ounce No. 1 Solution to five ounces of water, and to 
this an equal quantity of Solution No. 2, which will be sufficient to develop 
several plates. 

Another. 


No. 1. 


Strong Liquid Ammonia, . If ounces 
Bromide Potassium, . 240 grains 


Water, 


No. 2. 

Pyrogallic'Acid, . . 30 grains | Water, 

In case of an ordinary exposure, mix equal volumes. 


80 ounces 


10 ounces 


Swan’s Developer. 

No. 1. 


Pyrogallic Acid, 

. 2 grains | 

Water, .... 

. 1 ounce 


No. 2. 


Liquid Ammonia, 
Bromide Ammonium, 

. 1 ounce 1 
. i “ 1 

Water, 

. 80 ounces 

Equal parts of 1 and 

2 . 




Nelson’s Developer. 



No. 1. 


Pyrogallic Acid, 
Alcohol, . . 

. 1 qunce 
. 7 ounces 

White Sugar, 

Distilled Water, 

. 1 ounce 
. 3 ounces 


No. 2. 


Liquid Ammonia, 
Bromide Ammonium, 

. 4 ounces 
. 1 ounce 

White Sugar, 

Water, 

. 4 ounce 
. 2 ounces 

For half-plate take one-half drachm of No. 1 and put in developing cup. Now 
take one-half drachm of No. 2 and dilute with one and a half ounces of water; 
pour No. 2 thus diluted on to No. 1, and develop immediately. 


Wratten’s Developer. 



No. 1. 


Pyrogallic Acid, 

. 6 grains 

1 Water, 

. 2 ounces 


No. 2. 


Liquid Ammonia, 
Potassium Bromide, . 

. 1 ounce 

. 60 grains 

Water, 

. 2 ounces 


Pour on No. 1 after soaking the plate in water for a few seconds; now add five 
drops of No. 2, wait till high lights show themselves, and then add fifteen or 
twenty drops more to finish development. •' 







W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


6 :^ 


Alum Bath. 


Powdered Alum, . . 2 ounces Water, .... 20 ounces 

Table Salt, .... 1 ounce 

This form of Alum Bath is exceedingly useful with iron developed gelatine 
negatives, preventing any tendency to frill in hot weather and removing stains 
and Hypo after fixing. 


Hardening and Bleaching Bath. 

Water, 


20 ounces 


Pulverized Alum, . . 2 ounces 

Oxalic Acid, . . . i ounce 

This Bath is to be used after development with Pyro. and before fixing. It 
effectually removes the yellow stains so frequently accompanying Alkaline 
development, producing a clear, gray negative resembling one developed with 
iron. 

To Intensify Gelatine Negatives with Mercury. 


Bichloride of Mercury, saturated solution in cold water. (The negative should 
be placed in alum for a short time before treatment.) Wash the negative well, 
and immediately pour on Mercury Solution ; do not keep it on too long unless 
the negative is very thin. Wash well, and immerse in bath of 

Water, .... 10 ounces ] Ammonia, .... 10 drops 

Leave plate in this solution until the black color goes quite through the film.. 
Wash well. If the Mercury Solution makes the negative too dense, dilute with, 
water. 

Selected Toning Formula. 


Bounces 


It keeps well, and gives 


No. 1. 

Chloride of Gold, . . 1 grain Water, 

Acetate of Soda, . . 30 grains 

This must not be used till one day after preparation, 
warm, rich tones. 

No. 2. 

Chloride of Gold, . . I grain Water, 8 ounces 

Bicarbonate of Soda, . . 4 grains 

This is ready for immediate use after preparation, but it will not keep. 


No. 3. 


Water, 


8 ounces 


Chloride of Gold, . . 1 grain 

Phosphate of Soda, . . 20 grains 

This gives rich tones of a deep purple nature, but must be used soon after 
preparation. 

No. 4. 


Gold Solution, . . 10 drachms Chloride of Lime, ► . 1 grain 

Acetate of Lime, . . 20 grains Tepid water, ... 20 ounces 

The “ Gold Solution ” before mentioned is prepared by neutralizing as much 
as is required of a one-grain solution of chloride of gold by shaking it up with a 
little prepared chalk, then allowing it to settle, and filtering off the clear liquid. 
This toning bath improves by keeping. To use, add two ounces of it to eight 
ounces of tepid water, which will prove sufScient to tone a full-sized sheet of 
paper. 

No. 5. 

Chloride of Gold, . . 15 grains | Water, .... 5 ounces 

Neutralize with lime water, make up to fifteen ounces with water, and add two 
drachms of chloride of calcium. This stock solution will keep for a long time. 
For use, dilute one ounce with ten ounces of water. 








04 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 
No. 6. 

Toning and Fixing in One Bath. 

. . 1 ffrain 


15 grains 


Hyposulphite of Soda, 
Water, 


. 240 grains 
. 2 ounces 


Chloride of Gold, . 

Phosphate of Soda, 

Sulphocyanide of arn’ium, 25 
Dissolve the gold separately in a small quantity of water, and add it to the 
other solution. 

Solution for Mounting Prints Without their Cockling. 

Nelson’s No. I Photograpic Glycerine, ... . .1 ounce 

Gelatine, ... 4 ounces Alcohol,.5 ounces 

Water, . . . . 16 “ 

Dissolve the gelatine in the water, then add the glycerine, and lastly the spirit. 

Mounting Solution for Scrap Books, etc. 

Soak half a pound best glue in cold water till soft. Melt the glue in kettle or 
earthen jar standing in a saucepan. Wlien quite thin, pour in gradually Alcohol, 
stirring well between each addition until quite clear. Strain through coarse 
muslin into pickle bottles. Well cork and store away for use. When wanted, 
stand bottle in hot water till glue is melted. 


WEIGHTS AND MEASURES. 

A P O T H E C A R I E S’ WEIGHT. 

SOLID MEASURE. 

20 Grains == 1 Scruple = 20 grains. 
3 Scruples = 1 Drachni =60 “ 

8 Drachms = 1 Ounce = 480 “ 

12 Ounces = 1 Pound = 5760 “ 

FLUID. Symbol. 

60 Minims = 1 Fluid Drachm f. ^ 

8 Drachms = 1 Ounce f. 

20 Ounces = 1 Pint O 


8 Pints = 1 Gallon 


gall. 


The above weights are those usually adopted in formulce. 

All Chemicals are usually sold by 
AVOIRDUPOIS WEIGHT. 

27H Grains = 1 Dram = 27^^ Grains, 

16 Drams = 1 Ounce = 437i “ 

16 Ounces = 1 Pound = 7000 “ 

Precious Metals are usually sold by 
TROY WEIGHT. 

24 Grains = 1 Pennyweight = 24 Grains. 

20 Pennyweights = 1 Ounce = 480 “ 

12 Ounces = 1 Pound = 5760 “ 

Note.— An ounce of metallic silver contains 480 grains, but an ounce of nitrate 
of silver contains only 4374 grains. 




W. H. WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPHIA. 


65 


BOOKS ON PHOTOGRAPHY. 

Either of the works in the following list will be mailed to any address in the world 
on receipt of the price. 

No. Price. 

1041. Price. How to Make Pictures. The very A B C of Photography 

for beginners. By H. Clay Price,.§0 50 

A study of this little work will enable any one to take excellent 
photographs with any of the Amateur Dry-plate Outfits in the 
market. 

1042. Tayeor. The Photographic Amateur. A book of reference for 

the young photographer. By J. Traill Taylor, .... 50 

1043. Wilson. Photographies. A series of Lessons, with Notes, By 

Edward L. Wilson,.4 00 

1044. Robinson. Pictorial Effects in Photography; being Hints on 

Composition and Chiaro Oscuro for Photographers. By H. P. 
Robinson,.1 00 

1045. Robinson, A bney. The Art and Practice of Silver Printing. By 

H. P. Robinson and Captain W. de W. Abney, .... 50 

1046. Abney. Photography with Emulsions; A Treatise on the Tlieory 

and Practical Workings of Gelatine and Collodion Emulsion Pro¬ 
cesses. By Cajjtain W. de W. Abney,.1 00 

1047. Vogel. Hand-book of Practical and Artistic Photography. By 

11. Vogel,.3 50 

1048. Eder. Modern Dry Plates. By I. M. Eder. Cloth, . . . 1 00 

1049. The Silver Sun-beam. One of the most popular text-books of 

the day. Ninth edition. 100 illustrations,.3 00 

1050. Hearn’s Practical Printer. Second edition, . . . . 2 50 

1051. Hearn. Studies in Artistic Printing, By C. A. Hearn, with six 

fine Cabinet and Promenade Portrait Studies,.3 50 

1052. Vogel. Photographic Progress Since 1879. By Dr. H. W. Vogel, 3 00 

1053. Vogel. Photographers’ Pocket Reference Book. By Dr. H. W. 

Vogel. For the dark room. Full of formulas, short, practical, 
and plain. 

1054. Pritchard. About Photography and Photographers. By H. 

Baden Pritchard,.1 00 






G(> W. II. ’WALMSLEY & CO., PHILADELPPIIA. 


No. Pkice. 

1055. Thp] Ferrotypers’ Guide,. $0 75 

1050. The Modern Practice of Retouching,. 25^ 

1057. Twelve Elementary Lessons in Photographic Chemistry, 25 

1058. Twelve Eli<]Mentary Lessons on Silver Printing, . . 25 

1059. Hardwich’s Chemistry. Ninth edition. Edited by J. Traill 

Taylor,.2 00 

1000. The Photographic Times and American Photographer. A 

Monthly Journal of Photography and the best in Anierica. Per 
year,.2 00 

1001. Malley’s Comprehensive Treatise on Photo-Micrography, 1 50 


1002, Roche. How to Make Photographs. A Manual for Amateurs. 

By T. C. Roche,. 50 

1003. Walmsley. Photographic Beginnings. A Practical Elementary 

Instruction Book for those who know nothing about the subject. 

By W. H. Walmsley. (In course of preparation,) .... 59 

1078. Sternberg, Dr. G. M. Photo-Micrographs, and How to Make 
Them. 8vo, 200 pages. Illustrated by 47 Photographs of Miei-o- 
scopic objects; Photo-Mio’ographs reproduced by the Heliotype 
process. By Dr. George M. Sternberg, U. S. A., . . , . 3 00 






INDEX 


PAGE 

Agate iron trays. 41 

Albumen papers. 52 

Albums, for views. 53 

American Challenge cameras.9-11 

“ Optical Co.’s cameras.... 14 

Anthony’s cameras.11-14 

“ Pearl iraste. 53 

“ perfect lantern. 39 

Beck’s lenses. 34 

Blair’s reversible back cameras...16, 17 

Blotting paper. 53 

Books on photograi)ln^.65, 66 

Bottle, Ferrous Oxalate.42 

Boxes for holding negatives. 44 

Brushes, bristle. 58 

“ camel’s hair.42,43 

Burnisher’s, Entrekin’s. 51 

Camel’s hair duster.42, 43 

Cameras, American Optical Co.’s... 14 

“ Anthony’s.11-14 

Blair’s reversible back..16,17 

“ Challenge.9-11 

“ Copying.17, 18 

“ Flammang’s patent.15, 16 

“ Ne Plus Ultra. 5-7 

“ New Model.7, 8 

“ New A'ork. 6 

‘ ‘ Photo-micographic.18-27 

Canvas bags for tripods. 58 

Carbutt’s lantern..40, 41 

“ lantern plates. 54 

Card mounts,.51, 52 

Case for sensitized paper. 52 

Challenge camera.9-11 

‘‘ plafe-holders. 17 

Chemicals, Poulenc & Wittman’s... 58 

“ Walmsley’s W. P. C...59, 60 

Copying camera.17, 18 

Cotton, for filtering. 46 

Crowell’s retouching leads. 47 

Daisy plate-holder. 27 

Dallmeyer’s flap shutter. 38 

“ lenses.32, 35, 36 

Darlot’s focusing glass. 37 

“ lenses.31, 35, 36 

Developer, Walmsley’s. 58 

Developing bottle. 42 

“ outlits . 56 

“ trays.41, 42 


PAGE 


Drop shutters. 38 

Drying racks for negative. -14 

Dry plates.53, 54 

Efficient plate-lifter. 42 

Entrokin’s burnishers. 51 

Euryscope lenses.32, 36, 37 

Extension tripods. 30 

Ferrous Oxalate bottle. 42 

Ferro prusside paper. 52 

Filtering cotton. 46 

“ paper. 46 

Flammang’s patent cameras.15, 16 

“ i)late-holdcr. 29 

Focusing cloths. 58 

“ glasses. 37 

Folding tripod.29, 30 

Forms for trimming 2 >rints. 51 

Formulae for alum. 63 

“ “ hardening bath. 63 

“ “ intensiliers. 63 

“ “ mounting prints. 64 

“ “ oxalate develoi^ers 60, 61 

“ “ pyro “ ... 62,63 

“ “ toning baths.63, 64 


Frame for retouching. 47 

Frames for printing. 48 

“ transi)arencies. 54 

“ vignetting.49, 50 

Funnels, glass.45, 46 

Gelatine dry plates.53, 54 

Gelatine bromide ixijier.57, 58 

Gihon’s opaque. 47 

Glass covers for lantern slides. 58 

“ develoi^ing trays. 42 

“ forms. 51 

“ funnels.45, 46 


“ “ and filters. 46 

“ graduates. 45 

“ stirring rods. 58 

Ground glass for transi3arencies.... 54 

“ substitute . 54 

Hard rubber trays. 41 

Hunter and Sand’s shutters. 38 

Imitation Dallmeyer lenses. 34 

India ink. 58 

“ rubber trays. 41 

Instantaneous shutters. 38 

Introduction.3, 4 


Jackson’s instantaneous shutter.... 38 


67 





























































































index: 


C8 


PAGE 

Japanned case for sensitized paper 52 


“ developing trays. 41 

Lantern plates. 54 

“ slide mats. 58 

’ Lanterns for dark room.39-41 

Lenses, Beck. 34 

“ Ballmever.32,35,30 

“ Darlot.r.31,35,36 

“ imitation Dallmeyer. >'A 

“ Morrison.34-36 

“ portrait. 31 

“ Ross. 33 

“ view.31-35 

“ wide-angle.36,37 

Litmns paper. 53 

Mats for lantern-slides. 58 

McDonald’s metallic vignetter. 49 

Minim measures. 45 

Morrison’s lenses.34-36 

Multum in parvo lantern.40, 41 

Needle-paper. 58 

Negative boxes. 44 

“ drying racks. 44 

“ preservers. 45 

“ washing boxes.43,44 

Ne plus ultra cameras. 57 

New model “ . 7-8 

New York “ . 0 

Novel view “ .13, 14 

Ne plus ultra plate-holders. 27 

New model “ . 27 

Onion-paper . 53 

Opaque, Oihon’s. 47 

Outfits for developing. 56 

“ for printing and toning.56, 57 

“ Ne Plus Ultra. 5-7 

“ New York. 6 

“ Photo-micrographio.18,19 

Paper, blotting... 53 

“ ferro prussiate. 52 

“ for filtering. 46 

gelatino bromide.57, 58 

“ litmus. 53 

“ needle. 58 

“ onion. . 53 

“ ready sensitized. 52 

tissue. 53 


PAGE 

Parlor paste. 53 

Pearl paste, Anthony’s. 53 

Phantom droj) shutter. 38 

Photo-micrographic cameras.18-27 

Plate-lifter. -12 

Plates, gelatine dry.53, 54 

Pneumatic shutter. 38 

Portrait lenses. 31 

Poulenc & Wittman’s chemicals... 58 

Printing and toning outfits.56, 57 

Rapid printing paper.57, 58 

Retouching frame. 47 

“ lead. 47 

Reversible-back cameras.16, 17 

Revolving “ “ 15, 16 

Robinson’s guides. 50 

“ trimmers. 50 

Rubber developing trays. 41 

Scales and weights.".46, 47 

Scott’s adjustable vignetter.49, 50 

Scovill’s non-actinic lantern. 40 

Special transparency jDlates. 5-1 

Standard formuloe.."..60-61 

Stirring rods, glass. 58 

Tissue paper. 53 

Toning and printing outfits.56, 57 

Transparenc}^ frames. 54 

“ plates. 54 

Trimmers for i^rints. 50 

Tripod cases, canvas. 58 

Tripods. 29, 30 

View adjuster. 38 

“ albums. 53 

“ lenses.31-35 

Vignetting frames.49, 50 

Voigtlaender’s lenses..32, 36, 37 

Walmsley’s developer.58, 59 

“ drop-shutter. .38 

focusing-glasses. 37 

“ intensifier. 59 

“ photo-micro camera..l8-27 

“ pure chemicals.59, 60 

“ view adjuster. 38 

Washing-boxes for negatives.43, 44 

Weights and measures. 64 

Wide-angle lenses.36,37 

W. I. H. Ruby lanterns. 39 































































































Our illustrated Catalogues are published in Five Parts, as below, either 
of which will be mailed to any address on receipt of Ten Cents in stamps. 

Part 1. Microscopes, Microscopical Apparatus and Accessories. 

“ 2. Telescopes, Opera, Field, and Marine Glasses. 

“ 3. Spectacles and Eye-glasses, with directions for fitting all sights. 

“ 4. Photographic Cameras and Apparatus for Amateurs. 

“ 5. Meteorological Instruments, Thermometers, Barometers, etc. 

We have also issued a Condensed Catalogue of Thirty-Two Pages, which 
will be mailed to any address in the world free on application. 

Our list of Prepared Objects in every department of Science, Test and 
Type Plates, Eulings on Glass, etc., is now issued in a separate pamphlet 
of Twenty-Four Pages, which will be sent free on application. 


W. H. WALMSLEY & CO. 


V 



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