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THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


an 


FRANK R. ZEBLEY 


Author of “Along the Brandywine” 


A history, in brief, of the nearly 900 churches 
| and former churches in Delaware as 


located by the Author. 


— 1947 


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Dedicated to the memory of 


My Mother 


KATE PRICE ZEBLEY 


The finest of women 


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Allen County Public Libraty 
Ft. Wayne, Indiana 


Copyright 1947—Frank R. Zebley 


Wilmington, Delaware 


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FOREWORD 


WELVE years ago I began an effort to locate and photograph all of 

the churches and former churches in Delaware. Up to the present 
time I have located nearly 900 of them, about one-half of which are still 
active. As this work progressed I decided to attempt to get a brief history 
of each church. 


In the pursuance of this task I have interviewed hundreds of persons 
and I have been “‘brushed off’’ unceremoniously many times; I have writ- 
ten hundreds of letters with indifferent success in getting them answered. 
I have combed through 20,000 newspapers in Wilmington, Newark, the 
University of Delaware, Smyrna, Dover, and Milford. I have examined 
the Deed Records back to the earliest days and I have made notes from 
more than 3,000 church deeds in Wilmington, Dover, and Georgetown. 
I have searched through the Annual Diocesan Reports of the Episcopal 
Church, the Annual Conference Reports of the Methodist (M.E.) Church 
and various histories and books concerning Delaware. 


Undoubtedly errors will be found in this book; it would be a miracle 
if there were none, yet, every statement made has been obtained from a 
source that I believed to be reliable. 


Some churches have excellent records but many of the churches have 
no records or poorly-kept ones. Some church records have been destroyed 
in fires, while in extreme cases, the records have been loaned to unidenti- 
fied persons and not returned. 


I would appreciate fecaiving at any time, further or better data on 
any of the churches as I intend to continue assembling Delaware church 
history. 


FRANK R. ZEBLEY 


Wilmington, Delaware 
June 1, 1947. 


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TABLE OF CONTENTS 


Page 
PCC OA eee nis atau n este ea 7 
PART I 
WY TETETBEOIT ee. te ee. OD: AIRE. BOS: MEIC 8 9 
PART II 
Wewa Castle "Gon nity.) lille) dbs gay ai es ches aisles 111 
PART III 
Kent County eo eis: S285 os a nde = Bie ep o'eie oo 193 
PART IV 
Eistern SussexsCounty, oes. e ck ce ee ees oe ee 261 
PART V 
Western, Sussex County | 5 ms. oie ens es eis ele 313 
Tridex ©. AAUehoer hy Mie paren: Presbyterian Gh 351 


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“IN THE BEGINNING” 


In 1638, when the Swedes sailed up the Christina Creek and landed at the 
Rocks, now Wilmington, their first concern was to build a fort. It was here in 
Fort Christina, named for the Queen of Sweden, that the first regular religious 
services, by authorized persons, were held in the State of Delaware. This was 
the first organized congregation of Lutherans in America and the forerunner 
of all Delaware churches. 


The first church was built previous to 1655 at Swanwyck, a small settle- 
ment one mile north of New Castle. In 1667 Cranehook Church was built near 
the present Marine Terminal. These churches, both Swedish Lutheran, were 
built of logs and no evidence of them remains, The site of Cranehook Church 
was suitably marked, in 1896, with a stone monument by the Historical Society 
of Delaware. 


When the colonists decided to build a new church, a site closer to the 
growing village was selected and Holy Trinity Church, better known as “Old 
Swedes,” was built in 1698. In 1791, when Lawrence Girelius, the last Swedish 
minister, sailed away, the regime of the Swedish Lutheran Church in Delaware 
came to an end. 


The second denomination to secure a foothold was the Dutch Reformed 
Church. They built a log church in New Castle in 1657. The life of this church 
came to an end in 1689 when Petrus Teschemacker, their minister, moved to 
Schenectady, N. Y., where he was murdered in an Indian Massacre the fol- 
lowing Feb. 9th. © 


Of the denominations that have survived in Delaware the first to become 
established were the Friends or Quakers. They built a meeting-house, in 1687, 
in Brandywine Hundred, on land donated by Valentine Hollingsworth. It was 
known as New Wark Friend’s Meeting and was located on the present site of 
Newark-Union Methodist Church. 


The second denomination was the Episcopal Church. The history of the 
Episcopal Church in Delaware begins with the founding of Immanuel Church 
at New Castle in 1689. 


The third denomination was the Presbyterian Church. The Presbyterians 
began holding meetings in New Castle in 1685. By 1707 they were strong 
enough to proceed with the building of a church. This church is still standing 
and is used as a church-house by the present Presbyterian Church. 


The fourth denomination was the Baptist Church. Welsh Track Baptist 
Church was built, of logs, in 1703. The present brick church was built in 1746; 
there is a patch in each of the sidewalls where it is claimed a cannon-ball from 
the Battle of Cooch’s Bridge passed through the church. 


The fifth denomination was the Roman Catholic Church. In 1785, they 
built a church, on land purchased in 1772, four miles outside of Wilmington, 
on the old Lancaster Pike. This church was named “St. Mary’s” but was popu- 
larly known as “Coffee Run Church” from the name of a nearby stream. _ 


The sixth denomination was the Methodist Episcopal Church. In 1765, 
Captain Thomas Webb, a retired British officer, was preaching Methodism in 
Marcus Hook and in the Isaac Tussey home at the top of Penny Hill. In com- 


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mon with other early Methodist missionaries he was badly treated by the 
members of the other denominations. In 1780, at least six Methodist churches 
were built in Delaware: Bethel Church near Zebley’s Corner, in Brandywine 
Hundred, Barratt’s Chapel, Thomas’ Chapel and White’s Church in Kent 
County, Mt. Pleasant Church and Bethel Church, near Oak Grove, in Sussex 
County. All six of these churches are active today. 


The following denominations were established, in Delaware, in this order: 
the German Lutherans in 1848, the Swedenborgians in 1858, the Unitarians in 
1867, the Hebrew Congregations in 1880, the Seventh Day Adventists in 1892, 
the Christian and Missionary Alliance in 1897, the Christian Scientists in 1902, 
the Russian Greek Catholic Church in 1906, the Pentecostal Church in 1918, 
the First Independent Church in 1936, the Nazarenes in 1939 and the Greek 
Orthodox Church in 1939. 


The oldest inscribed tombstone in Delaware is that of Margaret Huling 
who died on Feb. 16, 1707 and is buried in St. Peter’s P. E. graveyard in Lewes. 
The second oldest tombstone is that of Hercules Coutts who died on Sept. 30, 
1707 and is buried in a crypt in Immanuel P. E. Church at New Castle. The 
third oldest tombstone is that of Riceus Rychiough who died in 1707 and is 
buried in Welsh Tract Baptist graveyard. 


The oldest date-stone on a church in Delaware is a gable-stone dated 1746 
in Welsh Tract Baptist Church. 





THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 
PART I 
WILMINGTON 


_—_—_ 


SWEDISH LUTHERAN 


Holy Trinity Swedish Lutheran Church, familiarly known as “Old Swede’s 
Church.” When the Rev. Eric Bjork became pastor, he preached his first sermon 
at Cranehook (Tranhook) Swedish Lutheran Church on July 11, 1697. That 
church, built in 1667, was located near the present Marine Terminal. Almost 
immediately Pastor Bjork began a movement to erect a new church in a better 
and more convenient location. At a congregational meeting held on July 30, 
1697, small difficulties were ironed out and it was decided to proceed with 
the work. 

A compromise was effected with the members living on the other side of 
the river by which the members of this side agreed to help finance the building 
of a church on the southerly side if the time came when it was desirable to 
erect a church there. Also, a canoe was purchased from Hendrick Tossa of 
Boston and placed in the care of Staffen Juranson of Pumpkin Hook. It was 
to be used by the members crossing the river. 

The site of Crane Hook Church was suitably marked by the Historical 
Society of Delaware on Oct. 17, 1896. The principal address at the unveiling 
of the monument was delivered by the Hon. Charles B. Lore. 

The site chosen for the new church was behind Fort Christina on a knoll 
where a graveyard had been located since the first settlement. The land upon 
which to build the church was secured from John Stalcop for 4 pounds which 
was to offset his contribution toward the building. Mr. Stalcop died before the 
land was transferred and it was Aug. 20, 1722 before his two sons deeded the 
land to the church trustees. | 

The first stone was laid on Sat., May 28, 1698, at the north end of the 
east gable. According to most historians the church was consecrated on Trinity 
Sunday, July 4, 1699, at which time the name Holy Trinity was adopted. 
Without trying to dispute this date, the fact is that in 1699 Trinity Sunday 
fell on June 4, under the old Julian calendar which was used by both Sweden 
and England until 1752. 

The service was followed by a feast at the home of John Stalcop, which 
was attended by hundreds, of all denominations. The building, of Brandywine 
§tanite, was an unpretentious rectangular building with a hipped roof. The 
floor was of brick, the pews were of the family box type and the high pulpit 
was surmounted by a canopy. This pulpit, with only minor changes, is believed 
to be the one in use today, undoubtedly the oldest pulpit in this country. The 
church bell hung in a walnut tree close to the church. After serving the church 
for fifteen years, during which time he married Christina Stalcop, Pastor Bjork 
returned to Sweden to assume charge of Kopparberg Church. 

The second outstanding pastor of Old Swedes Church was the Rev. 
Israel Acrelius, author of “History of New Sweden,” a collector's item. He 
served the church from 1749 until 1756. About 1750 the walls of the church 
showed signs of settling and bulging so the south porch and two additions on 
the north side were built, partly as a support to the ancient walls. The first 
stove was installed in November, 1770. The bell having become cracked a new 
bell was secured in November, 1772. It was brought from London by Captain 
Falconer. The gallery was added, with the stairway outside in the south porch, 


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this work being completed on Feb. 23, 1774. In August, 1777, two companies 
of British soldiers were quartered in the church. 

When the Rev. Lawrence Girelius sailed away from Delaware in 1791, the 
regime of the Swedish Lutheran Church in Delaware came to an end. The 
congregation selected the Rev. Joseph Clarkson, a clergyman of the Protestant 
Episcopal Church, to take charge. The regime of the Protestant Episcopal 
Church in Wilmington was begun with his first service on Sept. 25, 1792. 


FRIENDS 


Wilmington Friend’s Meeting, Hicksite. On Nov. 7, 1737, Friends living 
in Wilmington, asked New Wark Preparative Meeting for permission to hold 
meetings. On Dec. 4, 1737 the request was granted by the Monthly Meeting. 
Wilmington Meeting was constituted on Dec. 13, 1737. The first meetings 
were held in the one-story brick temporary home of Wm. Shipley, below 4th 
St., and 50 ft. west of Shipley St. The sanction of the Chester Quarterly Meet- 
ing was granted on Dec. 13, 1737. When the large home of Wm. Shipley, on 
the s. w. cor. of 4th and Shipley Sts., was completed, the meetings were held 
there. An elder and two overseers were selected in 1738. Wm. Shipley donated 


a lot at the n. e. cor. of 4th and West Sts., where a small Meeting-House was. 


built. The date, 1738, was laid out in the front wall with glazed bricks. A sun- 
dial was placed on the south wall and it remained in place for at least sixty 
years. On June 8, 1739 Wilmington requested the privilege of a Preparative 
Meeting, which was granted. 


In 1748, a much larger Meeting-House was built on the site of the pres- 
ent one. It was two stories in height and contained a gallery. The first Meet- 
ing-House was then used exclusively for school purposes. On Mar. 14, 1750, 
Wilmington joined with New Castle to form a Monthly Meeting. | 

Because the Friends refused to take any part in the Revolutionary War, 
they were subjected to many indignities, including fines and imprisonment. 
When they refused to pay the fines, their possessions would be restrained and 
sold. On Aug. 27, 1777, the Meeting-House was forcibly taken over by the 
Revolutionary soldiers as a barracks. While thus occupied, the Friends held 
their meetings under a tree outside of the Meeting-House. In September, 1777, 
the British having occupied Wilmington, they used the Meeting-House as a 
hospital for wounded soldiers. 


The present Meeting-House was started in 1816 and it was completed 
and opened on Sept. 25, 1817. Elias Hicks visited the Meeting on Nov. 16, 
1817, Oct. 23, 1819, Dec. 3, 1826 and Dec. 14, 1828. The Friends of Wil- 
mington Continued as one organization until the split in the Society in 1827. 
At.this time the followers of Elias Hicks, known as “Hicksites”, secured pos- 
session of the building at 4th and West Sts., and have continued to worship 
there. The Orthodox branch then built a frame Meeting-House at the n. e. cor. 
of 9th and Tatnall Sts. 

In 1920, a new heating system was installed and a social-room was 
equipped. This room was opened with a house-warming held on Dec. 7, 1920. 
The Meeting-House property comprises the entire block, 4th to Sth, West to 
Washington Sts. There is a large burying-ground. Former Governor Caleb 
P. Bennett. and John Dickinson, former President of Delaware are among 
the prominent Wilmingtonians buried here. In 1933, the Historical Markers 
Commission of Delaware placed a bronze plaque at 4th and Washington Sts., 
honoring John Dickinson. It recites some of his many activities including his 


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WILMINGTON 11 


authorship of the famous “Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania” and the 
fact that he was a founder of Dickinson College. 

Beginning about 1916 the Hicksite and the Orthodox Meetings frequently 
met together for business, for worship and to celebrate historical events which 
emphasized their common origin. The two Monthly Meetings first met to- 
gether to discuss mutual concerns on Sept. 16, 1932. In May, 1938, they joined 
in celebrating the 200th Anniversary of the building of the first Friend’s 
Meeting-House in Wilmington. In November, 1938, the two Meetings joined 
for worship. The Meetings were held at 4th and West Sts., from October to 
June and at 10th and Harrison Sts., from June to October. The two Monthly 
Meetings have been joined since January, 1942. 

The two groups of Friends in Wilmington decided to merge, on May 
18, 1945, under the name “The Wilmington Monthly Meeting of Friends.” 
Their first services as a united group were held at Fourth and West Sts., on 
May 20, 1945. 

The Friend’s School at Alapocas was developed by the Friends from the 
little school at 4th and West Sts., founded in 1748. 


Wilmington Orthodox Friend’s Meeting. In 1827, at the time of the sep- 
aration in the Religious Society of Friends, the Hicksites kept possession of 
the Meeting-House at 4th and West Sts. The Orthodox members built a frame_ 
Meeting-House, in 1828, at the n. e. cor. of 9th and Tatnall Sts. This building. 
was two stories in heighth, faced 9th Street and there was a wide front porch. 
The site was enclosed with a high brick wall. In 1832-33, Samuel Canby do- 
nated additional land and built a one-room frame schoolhouse. The school had 
been established in June, 1831 at 11th and Market Sts. A second room, of 
brick, was added in 1874. The property at 9th and Tatnall Sts. was sold on 
Oct. 30, 1913 and on Nov. 24, 1914 the site at the s. e. cor. of 10th and Harri- 
son Sts. was purchased. The stone Meeting-House was built in 1915 and it 
was opened for services in the autumn of that year. The Orthodox and Hicksite 
Friends in Wilmington later joined for all services. Meetings were held at 
10th and Harrison Sts., from June to October and at 4th and West Sts., from 


October to June. 


After deciding to merge, on May 18, 1945, the two groups of Friends 


held their first united meeting on May 20, 1945, at Fourth and West Sts. . 
The following notation appears in the Journal of George Fox, founder of 

the Society of Friends: ‘Justice Bennett of Derby was the first that called us 

Quakers because I bid them tremble at the word of the Lord. This was in the 


year 1650.” 
PRESBYTERIAN 


The First Presbyterian Church, The First-Central Presbyterian Church. 
The Presbyterians in Wilmington, on Dec. 30, 1737, purchased from Timothy 
Stidham an acre of land at the s. e. cor. 10th and Market Sts. In 1740, a small 
brick meeting-house was built and a graveyard was laid out. This church had 
a high pulpit with a large sounding-board and the seats had high straight 
backs. The church was used as a hospital for wounded American prisoners 
after the battle of Brandywine. It was incorporated on Dec. 23, 1789 and Dr. 
John McKinly, the first President of Delaware, was elected one of the trustees. 


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In 1799, Dr. McKinly donated 100 pounds to provide a low stone wall around | 


the property. In 1772, a group of members had withdrawn from First Church 
and built the Second or Christiana Church at Fifth and Walnut Sts. In 1838, 
they sold their church to the German Baptists and returned to First Church. 





12 1jHUE CH URS O Foal la WARe 


With this increased membership and interest it was decided to build a 
new church facing Market St. and south of the old church. The corner-stone 
was laid on May 7, 1840, the church’s centennial year. The old church was 
used as a Sunday School and a day-school. The day-school was conducted by 
Miss Mary Mahaffy and Mr. Thomas. The first floor was used for the girls 
and the second floor for the boys. The last service of any kind was held in the 
old church on Jan. 17, 1878. It was then rented to the Historical Society of 
Delaware. The Historical Society occupied the building until 1917 when it was 
moved to South Park Drive and West St. to become the headquarters of the 
Colonial Dames of Delaware. 

The second church was completed and occupied in 1840. In 1867, an 
aftermath of the Civil War and the formation of the Southern Presbyterian 
Church, led to two First Church congregations for two years. One met in this 
church and the other met in the old First Baptist Church at 1008 King St. 
After extensive repairs, reopening services were held on Dec. 30, 1877. The 
manse at the s. e. cor. 10th and Market Sts. was built at this time. The 150th 
Anniversary celebration was held during the first week in November, 1887. 
After renovations, reopening services were held on Sun., Sept. 10, 1899, by 
the Rev. James A. Worden, D.D. | 

In 1916, the Tenth St. front, 90 feet deep was sold to the Wilmington 
Institute Free Library. This necessitated the reinterment of many bodies. The 
marble vault containing the remains of Dr. John McKinly, the first President 
of Delaware, was moved to the Wilmington and Brandywine Cemetery. It was 
here that a large number of bodies were reinterred. The centennial celebra- 
tion of the Sunday School was held on Nov. 26, 1916. The project of merging 
First Church and Central Church took definite shape at a meeting held on 
Oct. 31, 1919. The merger was effected on Mar. 3, 1920 under the name 
‘‘First-Central Church.” In 1923, an auditorium was built north of the church 
on the King St. side of the lot. It was used as a Sunday School and for social 
purposes. The entire property was sold in 1929 to make room for the Dela- 
ware Trust Building. The last service was held on Feb. 24, 1929. x 

On Dec. 24, 1928, the congregation purchased the Draper property at the 
n. w. corner 11th and Market Sts. During 1929 and until Sept. 28, 1930 they 
worshipped at 502 Delaware Ave. and in the New Century Club.’ 

,, Phe corner-stone of the present church was laid on July 28, 1929. The 
dedication services continued from Sept. 28 to Oct. 3, 1930. The dedication 
service was conducted by the pastor, the Rev. Aquilla Webb and the sermon 


"was delivered by the Rev. Dr. Lewis S. Mudge, Stated Clerk of the Presby- 
~ terian Church in the U. S. A. This church property including more than fifty 


rooms is probably the best equipped in the State of Delaware for every activity 
associated with church work. 


Second,-Christiana,-Hanover Presbyterian Church. The Second. Presbyterian 
Church was organized in 1772 by a large group of members from First Church. 


* The first pastor was installed on Oct. 25, 1774. On Oct. 26, 1781, the Rev. 
‘Wm. Smith and a board of trustees purchased the lot on the s. w. cor. of Fifth 


and Walnut Sts., comprising 6215 sq. ft. from Matthew Crips, potter, for 30 
pounds. A stone church was built on this site. It had an old-fashioned high 
pulpit, a brick paved aisle, the door was two-leafed and circular topped and 
there were galleries on three sides. 

The church was incorporated and the name “Christiana” was adopted on 
Jan. 29, 1788. Dr. Thomas Read, noted for the assistance he gave to Wash- 
ington previous to the Battle of Brandywine, served the church from Jan. 





. 


(Page 9) 


FRIENDS’ MEETING-HOUSE 
(Page 10) 


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14 THE CHURCHES. 0 FieD BA WA RE 





1798 to 1817. The Female Harmony Society was organized in 1814 and they 
established the first Sunday School in Wilmington. It was organized in 
1814. In 1815, they opened a day-school for children. This Society was 
incorporated on Jan. 28, 1817, to operate a charity school for destitute or- 
phans or children of free white inhabitants who were proper objects of charity. 

In 1817, they asked for State aid. It is claimed that the present school 
system developed from this school. The first free-school legislation in Dela- 
ware was passed by the General Assembly in 1829. In 1820, the church was 
rebuilt and a ‘“‘conference-room” was added. This so-called conference-room 
was a separate brick building and was used as a Sunday School and a day- 
school. On Mar. 12, 1829, the Female Harmony Society purchased this build- 
ing from the church trustees for $600.00. : ae 

On Apr. 28, 1828, Willard Hall, acting for the trustees of Christiana 
Church, purchased a lot on the n. w. cor. of 6th and King Sts. In 1828, they 
built an imposing brick church on this site. The dedication services were held 
on Mar. 12, 1829. On Jan. 19, 1831, an Act was passed incorporating the 
church and changing the name from “Christiana” to “Hanover Street Pres- 
byterian Church.” At that time Hanover was the name of 6th Street. The 
church assumed title to the property of Aug. 29, 1831. 

In 1834, upon the death of General Lafayette at his home in France, 
Wilmington honored his memory by a solemn funeral procession which 
passed through the principal streets headed by the Governor of Delaware and 
the Mayor of Wilmington. This was followed by a funeral oration delivered 
by the Rev. Isaac Pardee in Hanover Church. On May 3, 1841, Dr. E. W. 
Gilbert resigned as pastor of Hanover Church to become President of Newark 
College. During Dr. Gilbert’s pastorate, small pewter tokens stamped E. W. G. 
were used as tokens of admission to the Lord’s table. These tokens were dis- 
tributed to communicants on the Saturday previous to the communion and 
were collected by the Elders on the Sabbath as the members were seated at the 
table. The origin and purpose of these tokens is unknown. The ceremony was 
known as the “divine right’”’ of tokens and was the cause of many controversies 
in some churches. : 

The semi-centennial of the Sunday School, organized at Christiana Church, 
was celebrated on Dec. 18, 1864, with Willard Hall and the Rev. Geo. F. 
Wiswell in charge of the ceremonies. The 100th Anniversary of the founding 
of the church was celebrated on Thurs., Oct. 24, 1872. 

The property at 6th and King Sts. was sold on Sept. 24, 1909. Hanover 
Church purchased the Washington Heights M. E. Church, at 18th and Baynard 
Boulevard, on Feb. 15, 1908. A new Sunday School building was erected and 
it was dedicated on Nov. 18, 1917, on the 103rd Anniversary of the Sunday 
School. Mayor John W. Lawson presided at the ceremonies. The dedication 
_was performed by the Rev. Robert L. Jackson, the pastor. The Rev. Dr. W. S. 
Holt preached at the evening service. 

The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Thurs., Nov. 30, 1922, 
_ by the Rev. Charles H. Bohner, the pastor, assisted by the Revs. Wm. Leish- 

man and Irwin F. Wagner. The dgdication services were conducted on Jan. 
20, 1924, by the Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, Pres. of Princeton Seminary and the 
Rev. C. H. Bohner, the pastor. Frank N. Overdeer of Haddock and Co., the 
builders, presented the keys of the building to Dr. Bohner who in turn pre- 
sented them to B. C. Grommon, President of the Board of Trustees. A week 
of celebration, including the Sesqui-centennial of the church, followed the 
dedication. 


On Sept. 1, 1927, a memorial window in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas 





WILMINGTON ‘5 


K. Porter, was presented to the church by their nieces and nephews. On Sun., 
June 13, 1937, the Rev. John Herrick Darling dedicated a communion service 
purchased by the Sunday School from a legacy of Miss Anne P. Porter. 


Olivet Presbyterian Church was the outgrowth of a Sunday School started 
on Aug. 5, 1849 in a frame building known as Hedgeville School with E. T. 
Taylor as Superintendent. It was located at the corner of Newport Road and 
Dock Street, now the southerly side of Maryland Ave., about 320 feet west 
of Front St., Dock St., in the meantime, having been vacated. The Sunday 
School was sponsored by Hanover Church who purchased the building. Prayer 
meetings and preaching were maintained for a number of years. 

The congregation was organized as a church on Jan. 31, 1863. The corner- 
stone of a new building, known as Olivet Chapel, at Adams and Chestnut 
Sts., was laid on Oct. 8, 1863. Judge Willard Hall, known as the father of the 
Wilmington Public School system, took a leading part in the ceremonies. This 
property was owned by Hanover Church, who took title to it on Feb. 8, 1864. 
The church was dedicated on Feb. 7, 1864. The congregation was formally 
constituted as Olivet Presbyterian Church on Jan. 31, 1868. 

After being enlarged the church was rededicated on Mar. 13, 1870. The 
congregation took title to the property on May 5, 1870, from Robert R. Porter. 
The property was sold in January, 1887. The present site at the s. w. cor. of 
4th and Broom Sts., was purchased on Dec. 31, 1887 from the Trustees of 
the Poor. It was a portion of the old New Castle County Almshouse property. 
The erection of a Sunday School building was started in October, 1887. The 
present church was built-in 1891. | 

The ground was broken on Sat., Mar. 21, 1891, at 5:30 P. M. by the 
Rev. W. P. Swartz and the pastor, the Rev. George S. Thompson. The corner- 
stone was laid on Tues. evening May 12, 1891. The prayer was offered by the 
Rev. Lafayette Marks, D.D. The lecture-room was formally opened on Jan. 
24, 1892 by the Rev. George S. Thompson. The church was dedicated on Sun., 
Dec. 4, 1892. The invocation was offered by the Rev. W. W. Taylor and the 
dedicatory sermon was preached -by the Rev. Charles P. Mallory; a former 
pastor. Improvements to the building were started in December, 1906. A 
formal reopening service was held on Mar. 24,1907. All-day services were 
held with the following taking part, the Revs. C. P. Mallory, A. Alison Jr., 
Wm. F. D. Lewis, T. A. McCurdy, Wm. H. Logan, A. J. Snyder and J. C. Lane, 
the pastor. In 1920, the pews of Central Church were presented to Olivet where 
they are still in use. 

The 50th Anniversary of the occupancy of the present church was cele- 
brated on Sun., Dec. 6, 1942. The 75th Anniversary of the founding of the 
church was celebrated on Sun., Jan. 31, 1943. The service was conducted by 
the Rev. Dr. William B. Pugh, Stated Clerk of the Presbyterian General As- 
sembly. It had been the intention to hold a full week of ceremonies but be- 
cause of war-time fuel oil restrictions, a one-day celebration was held. 


Central Presbyterian Church. In 1855, the membership of Hanover Church 
having become very large, a group of their members expressed a desire to 
form a new church. On Mon., Aug. 27, 1855 they held a meeting at the home 
of Dr. L. P. Bush and committees were appointed. After having dutifully 
secured the approval of Hanover Church and of the Wilmington Presbytery 
they proceeded with their plans. Incidentally, there was a schism in Presby- 
terianism in 1838 and the Wil. Presbytery was identified with the New School 
until the two groups reunited in 1869. 


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16 LORE (CHAU Ri@o BS Okie & LAW ARE 


Central Church was formally constituted on Dec. 6, 1855. They secured 
the use of the old stone church at Sth and Walnut Sts., where they held their 
first service on Sun., Dec. 23, 1855, when the Rev. George Dufheld Jr., of 
Phila., preached for them. A Sunday School was organized on the morning 
of the same day in the small brick building beside the church. On Jan. 1, 
1856, Charles Stewart, E. F. Taylor and Joseph W. Day were elected Elders 
and they were ordained on Jan. 3. On Jan. 30, a board of trustees was elected 
and a church site on the west side of King St., south of 8th St., was purchased 
on the same day. Their first pastor, the Rev. George F. Wiswell was installed 
on May 7, 1856. Taking part in the ceremony were the Rev. Mr. McIntire, 
who preached the sermon and the Revs. John W. Mears, W. W. Taylor, Wm. 
C. Dickinson and Geo. Foot. 

The corner-stone of the church was laid on June 18, 1856. Among those 
taking part were the Revs. John W. Mears, Geo. F. Wiswell, A. D. Pollock, 
Robt. Adair, D. Brainard, Geo. Foot and Mr. John R. Latimer. Among the 
articles placed in the stone was a copy of Elizabeth Montgomery's ‘‘Remin- 
iscences.”” The top-stone was laid on June 18, 1857. On Feb. 15, 1857, the 
church services were moved to the new building and held in the lecture-room. 
The church was built of brownstone with a high square tower above the front 
vestibule. 

The dedication services were held on Tues., Nov. 10, 1857. The consecra- 
tion took place at the morning service at which time the Rev. Albert Barnes 
preached on the text “Blessed are they who dwell in your house.” At the 3 
o'clock service the Rev. John Jenkins preached and the evening service was 
conducted by a visiting clergyman. On Wed., Nov. 11, 1857 at 3 P. M., the 
trustees offered the pews for sale or rent. 

_ During the period covering 1858 the Rev. Mr. Wiswell was also Principal 
of the Delaware City Academy conducted in the Pres. Church of that town. 

Central Church was outstanding in its success in establishing missions 
which developed into successful churches. In June, 1858, the Young Men's 
Christian Ass'n of Central Church was organized and their work consisted 
of furthering the success of these missions. They directed the work of these 
Sunday Schools and also conducted a regular Sunday service at the County 
Almshouse at 4th and Broom Sts. | 

In the summer of 1857, a mission was opened in the McDowellville 
schoolhouse on the northwestern outskirts of Wilmington. This mission de- 
veloped consistently and in the autumn of 1865 a frame chapel was built at 
14th and Rodney Sts. This mission developed into Rodney St. Church, now 


group to build the present West Church in 1871. In 1889, Eastlake Sunday 
School was opened with J. Edgar Franklin as Superintendent. From this group 
Eastlake Church was organized on May 5, 1896. 

The Twentieth Anniversary of Central Church was celebrated on Dec. 6, 
1875. Among those taking part were the Revs. N. M. Price, L. Marks and 
Geo. F. Wiswell. A commemorative poem by E. T. Taylor was read. 

In 1899, a new organ was installed, the church auditorium was altered 
and renovated after which a reopening service was held on Nov. 12, 1899, by 


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WILMINGTON 17 


the Rev. Dr. T. A. McCurdy. After extensive renovations a formal reopening 
was held on Sept. 11, 1911, by the Rev. J. H. Crawford, the pastor. 

At a congregational meeting held on Nov. 21, 1919 it was decided to 
merge with First Church under the name First-Central Church. The pews were 
donated to Olivet Church where they are still in use. The church property 
was sold on Jan. 16, 1926. 


Westminister Presbyterian Church. In the autumn of 1857, Central Pres- 
byterian Church started a Sunday School in the schoolhouse at McDowellville, 
at that time a village west of Wilmington. A short time later a room over a 
store at Pennsylvania Ave. and Lincoln St. was secured. In 1865, a frame 
building was erected at 14th and Rodney Sts. on the property of Robert Smith. 
This chapel was dedicated on Sun., Oct. 22, 1865, by the Rev. Geo. F. Wiswell 
and John W. Mearns. 

Preaching and prayer-meetings were held occasionally. On Jan. 10, 1882, 
a lot was purchased at 13th and Rodney Sts. C. G. Graham, Supt. of the Sun- 
day School, and an architect by profession, donated his services and designed 
the building. 

This building was intended for a Sunday School only and to be used as a 
church until a larger building could be erected on the front of the lot. The 
corner-stone was laid on Dec. 3, 1882 in the midst of a heavy rainstorm, and 
it was dedicated on Dec. 2, 1883. The dedicatory sermon was preached by the 
Rev. J. H. Nixon, D.D., at the afternoon service. The prayer was offered by 
the Rev. M. A. Brownson and the benediction was pronounced by the Rev. 
W. W. Taylor. Regular services were held on Sun. evenings. On Jan. 28, 1886, 
Rodney Street Church was formally constituted and a deed for the property 
was secured from Central Church. Trustees were elected on Feb. 8, and the 


first pastor was installed on May 7, 1886. In June, 1888, it was decided to - 


enlarge the building and E. L. Rice, Jr., was selected as the architect. A reopen- 
ing service was held on Dec. 2, 1888, by the Rev. W. L. McEwan, the pastor. 

The Rev. Charles L. Candee was installed as pastor on Sept. 23, 1909. On 
Jan. 17, 1910, it was decided to build a new church. Ground was btoken on 


July 31, 1910, by Mrs. Josephine W. Bissell. On June 22, it was voted to 


change the name to “Westminster.” On Sun., July 10, 1910, the Rev. Charles 
L. Candee delivered a sermon on “the significance and appropriateness of the 
name “Westminster.” The name is taken from the Westminster Assembly 
which met at Westminster, England on July 1, 1643 and rose on Feb. 22, 1649. 
Upon the restoration of the Stuarts, the manuels of faith and practice, as 
drawn up at Westminster were rejected in England but they were retained 
in Scotland. They are still the accredited standards of faith in all Presbyterian 
churches. 


The corner-stone of the new church was laid on Oct. 15, 1911. During a 


heavy rainstorm, the Rev. Dr. Candee preached in the chapel after which the 
congregation filed out in the rain to attend the consecration and laying of 
the stone by Dr. Candee. The first wedding in the new church was held on 
Oct. 20, 1911 and in the absence of an organ a string quartette was used. The 
first service was held on Oct. 22, 1911. The dedicatory sermon was preached 
on Nov. 15, 1911, by the Rev. Charles Wood. He was assisted by the Rev. 
C. L. Candee. Chimes, the gift of Wm. G. Mendinhall, were installed in 1912. 

The parish-house was erected in 1923-24. The corner-stone was laid on 
Mar. 23, 1924, by the Rev. C. L. Candee. In September, 1929, they purchased 
the balance of the block from Pennsylvania Ave. to 13th St., Rodney to 
Clayton Sts. 


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18 THE CHURGHES OG DEL AW ARE 


On Oct. 9, 1927 a window in memory of Mrs. Josephine W. Bissell was 
unveiled by the Rev. Harold E. Nicely, the pastor. The church has many special 
gifts and memorials. 


Gilbert Presbyterian Church. In 1859, Central Church opened a mission 
in the Phoenix Fire House at 209 e. 14th St. and named it Brandywine Mission. 
On July 7, 1866, the lot at the s. e. cor. of 13th and French Sts. was purchased 
as a church site. A frame church was built in 1868 and named “Gilbert 
Chapel.” The chapel was enlarged in November, 1882. Services were held 
regularly until 1886 when the members were merged with Central Church. 
The property was then rented to the Heavenly Recruits. The chapel was 
owned by the First-Central Church and is occupied by Ezion Fair Baptist 
Church, colored, who purchased the building on July 31, 1945. 


West Presbyterian Church was organized by a group of 67 members from 
Central Church, 40 members from Hanover Church and 1 member from First 
Church. The movement began in March, 1867 and on May 9, 1868 the effort 
was approved by the church session. The group from Hanover joined the 
‘movement on Sept. 17, 1868. The church was constituted on Oct. 19, 1868. 
The first service was held on Oct. 25, 1868, in the Wilmington Institute Build- 
ing. The Sunday School was organized on Nov. 1, 1868. The first communion 
service was held on Feb. 14, 1869, by the Rev. Wm. Aikman. The first pastor, 
the Rev. Geo. H. Smyth, was installed on Sept. 30, 1869. A few months later 
the services were moved to the Monroe Street Chapel at 8th and Monroe Sts. 
This chapel had been built by Central Church and a successful Sunday School 
was conducted here. The property was presented to West Church by Central 
Church. The two Sunday Schools were continued until the new West Church 
was built at which time they were combined. 

Ground was broken for the present church, at 8th and Washington Sts., 
on Oct. 19, 1870. The corner-stone was laid on Apr. 24, 1871 and the church 
was dedicated on Dec. 28, 1871. These services were continued until Dec. 31. 
Among those taking part were the Revs. James McCosh, Pres. of Princeton 
College, Dr. Withrow, Herrick Johnson and Geo. H. Smyth, the pastor. A 
new organ was unveiled at a musical entertainment held on Tues., Jan. 16, 1872. 

After major improvements a reopening service was held on Sept. 2, 1894, 
by the Rev. A. N. Keigwin. The new addition on Wollaston St. was opened 
on Sept. 30, 1894, when services were conducted by the Revs. J. D. Blake and 
A. N. Keigwin. 

On July 15, 1906, the church was closed for extensive interior improve- 
ments. The lower rooms were reopened on Sept. 16, 1906. A Kindergarten 
Department was opened on Oct. 21, 1906. The auditorium was formally re- 
opened on Sun., Nov. 4, 1906, by the Rev. Alexander Alison, Jr., the pastor. 
A baptismal font was presented by Mrs. Mary Lummis on Mar. 12, 1911. The 
. first manse was acquired in 1924 under a bequest of Pastor Emeritus Dr. 
A. N. Keigwin. 

A nursery service was opened in April, 1919. During 1928, major im- 
provements were made to the church, this being the 60th Anniversary. A 
celebration was held on Nov. 18, 1928. Among those taking part were former 
pastors, Dr. Smiley, Dr. Sonne, Dr. Alison and the pastor, Dr. A. H. Kleffman. 
At this time a tablet in memory of Dr. and Mrs. A. N. Keigwin was unveiled 
by Frank Sheppard. Dr. Keigwin’s son, the Rev. Dr. A. Edwin Keigwin de- 
livered an address. 

New organ chimes were dedicated by Dr. Kleffman on Apr. 19, 1931. A 





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20 DH EC ALU Gers O Ea) FalcA eA 


new organ was dedicated on Oct. 15, 1939, by the Revs. Dr. John W. Christie 
and Dr. Kleffman. ; ; 
The 75th Anniversary was celebrated with services lasting from Oct. 6 


to Oct. 27, 1943. 


Eastlake Orthodox Presbyterian Church. Presbyterian meetings were in- 
stituted in Eastlake in 1889 by the members of Central Presbyterian Church. 
In the spring of 1890 a small building was erected on 31st St. near Jefferson 
St. Permanent organization was effected on June 29, 1890. On July 7 and 14, 
1890, the Presbyterian Alliance purchased two lots at the s. e. cor. 30th and 
Madison Sts. A frame chapel, with its little belfry, was erected on this site in 
February, 1891 and the Rev. J. Edgar Franklin was placed in charge of the 
work which he carried on until 1896. On July 31, 1894 the Presbyterian 
Alliance sold the property to the Wilmington Board of Public Education and 
on Aug. 11, 1894, they purchased the plot on the n. w. cor. 27th and Market 
Sts. The present brick church was then erected. 

The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 2, 1894 at 4 P. M. The Rev. Wm. P. 
Swartz presided, in the absence of the Rev. J. Edgar Franklin, the pastor. 
The stone was set by N. B. Culbert. Those taking part in the ceremonies in- 
cluded the Rev. Mr. Montgomery, Dr. Lafayette Marks, the Rev. A. N. Keig- 
win and the Rev. J. R. Milligan. 

The opening service was held on Dec. 2, 1894 with three services in 
charge of the Revs. W. P. Swartz, Lafayette Marks and W. W. Taylor. 

The congregation was organized as the Eastlake Presbyterian Church on 
May 21, 1896, at which time Francis Vincent and Nathaniel Pipino were 
elected Elders. The church was incorporated on July 29, 1903. The title to the 
Property was acquired by the congregation on Aug. 27, 1903. In 1910, the 
church was rebuilt, the present section at the front and the Sunday School 
rooms at the rear being added. The manse at 210 w. 27th St. was purchased 
on Feb. 23, 1928. Ras 

In 1936, the pastor and the congregation withdrew from the Presbyterian 
Church in the U. S. A. and entered the present Orthodox Presbyterian Church 
because of a difference of opinion as to the doctrines being taught. In 1939, 
the Chancellor of Delaware ruled that the Property belonged to the Presby- 
tery and not to the congregation. The church was incorporated, on Nov. 19, 
1941, as the Eastlake Orthodox Presbyterian Church. The church property 
was purchased by the present congregation on Apr. 15, 1942. A new organ 
was dedicated on May 13, 1945, by the Rev. John P. Clelland. 

During 1945-46 they purchased lots at 29th and Van Buren Sts. as a site 
for a proposed new church. ; 


The First United Presbyterian Church. This church grew out of a Sunday 
School opened by a few members of Olivet Church. The meetings were first 


‘ Franklin St. In August, 1899, they moved to the former Covenant Church on 
West St. below 3rd St. The first pastor, the Rev. J. J. Huston, was installed in 
October, 1899. A congregational meeting was held on Jan. 31, 1900 at which 
time a church was regularly constituted and plans were outlined to build a 
church. The present site at 3rd and Broom Sts. was purchased on June 30, 1900. 

The first meeting in the new church was held on Dec. 15, 1901. On Sun., 
Dec. 22, 1901, the dedication services were held. The dedicatory sermon -was 
preached by the Rev. Alexander Gilchrist, D.D., Sec. of Home Missions and 
the prayer was offered by the Rev. W. W. Barr, D.D., Sec. of Foreign Mis- 


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VILMINGTON 21 





sions. The church was incorporated on Nov. 25, 1903. The church was re- 
modeled in 1938. New pews, new pulpit furniture and a Hammond organ 
were installed. The organ was dedicated on Apr. 19, 1938. 


Baird Memorial Mission was organized over John R. Hudson's store at 
the s. w. cor. Front and Market Sts. on Jan. 21, 1894. It was called the ‘Front 
Street Mission of West Presbyterian Church.’”’ At various times they met at 
112 w. Front St., West St. below 3rd St., 425 w. 2nd St., 315 Madison St. and 
in West Church. After the death of Charles Baird, in 1898, the name was 
changed to “Baird Memorial Mission.” On Nov. 27, 1908, the trustees of 
West Church purchased the property at the s. w. cor. 2nd and West Sts., 
where Baird Mission has been located since that time. 


The First Italian Presbyterian Church. An Italian Pres. Mission was es- 
tablished in October, 1905 in the Baird Mission on West St., below 3rd St. 
It was later moved to 7th and Scott Sts., where a room had been secured for 
the meetings. On Sept. 17, 1910 and June 20, 1911, the Trustees of the Pres- 
byterian Church purchased two lots on Dupont St., below 7th St., as a church 
site. A brick chapel was built and it was dedicated on Apr. 2, 1911. The serv- 
ices were in charge of the Rev. Alexander Alison, Jr., of West Pres. Church. 
The Rev. Thos. dePamphilis, a missioner, spoke in Italian and in English. 
The pulpit furniture was a gift of the King’s Daughters of West Church as a 
memorial to the Rev. Wm. H. Logan. The pulpit Bible was donated by Miss 
Nellie G. Logan. A baptismal font was donated by the children of the Italian 
Sunday School. The bell in the little belfry was formerly used on the chapel 
at 8th and Monroe Sts. 

The First Italian Pres. Church was formally organized on Oct. 16, 1916 
with the Rev. A. Vassori, as pastor. Title to the property was taken over by 


the New Castle Presbytery on Dec. 20, 1920. The church ceased to function in — 


1924. On Sept. 13, 1925, Gilbert Pres. Church, colored, moved in. The prop- 
erty was sold to the Seventh Day Adventists on Jan. 3, 1930. 


The Polish Presbyterian Mission was established in 1914. The} met in the 
former Olivet Church on the s. w. cor. of Adams and Chestnut Sts. Among 
their activities was a class in vocational training. Meeting with indifferent 
success the mission was closed in 1921. 


The Buttonwood Street Presbyterian Mission. This mission was started 
during the summer of 1894 by the members of Central Church. Their first 
location was on the corner of Buttonwood and Decatur Sts. On Christmas Day, 
1895, the weather being mild a photograph was taken of the participants of 
the Christmas party, outside of the mission. Miss Louise Hardcastle, one of 
the mission workers from its beginning until it was closed, still has one of 
these photographs. The mission was moved to Taylor and Church Sts., where 
the work was continued until 1901. The'lease on the building was taken over 
by Miss Sarah W. Pyle, to whom the mission equipment was given, and it 
was here that the history of the Peoples Settlement started. 


BAPTIST 


The First Primitive Baptist Church was organized on Oct. 8, 1785. Previous 
to this time services were held in the home of the Rev. Thomas Ainger, a 
Presbyterian minister who came to Wilmington from Philadelphia in April, 
1783. The meetings were continued in the First Presbyterian Church and in 


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22 LAE CHU ROHESFOF (DELAWARE 


the schoolhouse. The organization of this church met with keen opposition 
from the other denominations except the Presbyterians who aided them. On 
Aug. 23, 1784, they purchased from Joseph Stidham, a meeting-house site on 
King Sts., between 10th and 11th Sts. 

A brick Meeting-House was built at 1008 King St. The corner-stone was 
laid by the Rev. Thomas Fleeson, the first pastor. The Meeting-House was two 
and one-half stories high with the entrance facing 10th St. There was a five 
foot brick wall facing King St. A graveyard was laid out extending back to 
French St. The land was purchased from Joseph Stidham and was described 
as being next to the “Poor's Burying-Ground.” The Potter’s Field of that day 
was located on the 11th St. end of that block. More land was purchased from 
Ashton Richardson on Sept. 4, 1811. 


This meeting-house was the scene of the first meetings of a great many 
different denominations struggling to attain a foot-hold in Wilmington. 

On Apr. 10, 1913, the entire property was sold to make way for the City 
and County Building. This necessitated the removal of the bodies from the 
graveyard. A great many of these were buried in family plots in various ceme- 
teries. The great-grand-parents of the writer, Jonathan Zebley, died Nov. 19, 
1819 and Hannah Zebley, died Dec. 20, 1839, were reinterred in Chester-Bethel 
Cemetery. The rest of the bodies, numbering about twenty were reinterred in 
Bethel Baptist graveyard, west of Hare’s Corner. In this group the oldest 
tombstone is that of Abigail Ainger, who died on Feb. 23, 1793. She was the 
wife of the Rev. Thomas Ainger, who was ordained as the second pastor of 
First Church on Oct. 28, 1788. 


After selling the property the congregation purchased a new site at 1304 
Jefferson St., on Apr. 9, 1913, from Nellie Dure Townsend, et al. The present 
brick meeting-house was then built. The corner-stone is inscribed as follows: 
“Primitive Baptist Church organized and built at 1008 King St., in 1785. This 
house erected in 1913,” | 


The Second Baptist Church was organized on Sept. 7, 1835 by a group 
who had withdrawn from the First Church on Aug. 15, 1835. This split was 
caused by the anti-mission sentiment then existing in First Church. The agita- 
tion concerning missions started in 1830 and culminated when 13 members in 
favor of missions withdrew to organize Second Church. They Organized a 

_ Sunday School in 1836. At first, they met in a rented room on e. 6th St., 
and later in the old First Presbyterian Meeting-House at 10th and Market Sts. 
On May 31, 1837, they purchased the church which had been built by the 
Second Presbyterian Church at 5th and Walnut Sts. In 1843, the choir was 
granted permission to use a bass viol. In 1852, the church at Dover was or- 
ganized through the efforts of members of Second Church. On May 22, 1852, 
a lot was purchased, from John Pope, at the n. e. cor. of 4th and French Sts., 

, 48 a site upon which to build a church. Additional land was bought on Oct. 23, 
"1854 and on Mar. 12, 1855. The first service was held in the new church on 
Tues., May 9, 1854 at 2 o'clock. Those taking part included the Revs. D. B. 
Cheney, M. G. Clarke, Lansing Boroughs and John Dowling. The church was 
dedicated on May 3, 1855. The dedicatory prayer was offered by the Rev. Mr. 
Dowling. The Revs. Mr. Williams and Mr. Haines also took part. Services 
were held in the afternoon and evening. A ground rent, payable to the Swedish 
Lutheran Church, Old Swedes, was extinguished on Mar. 12, 1855 by the 
payment of $40.57. | 


This church conducted the Friendship Sunday School, probably among the 





WILMINGTON Pe 


poorer people, as the children of Friendship were treated to a turkey dinner 
at Christmas time in 1858. 

At the time of the Civil War the Rev. Mr. Dickinson appeared in the 
pulpit draped with an American flag, in an effort to inspire patriotism in the 
members. Abraham Lincoln later said that a little Baptist minister had saved 
Delaware for the Union. At a much earlier date John Adams had said that 
a Baptist had saved Delaware for the Federal Union. 

On May 29, 1865, fifteen members withdrew for the purpose of organizing 
Delaware Avenue Baptist Church. In 1867, an organ was installed in the 
church. In 1870, the Baptist City Mission was organized. On Dec. 1, 1875, the 
Rev. Richard B. Cook, D.D., became the pastor. His book ‘The Early and 
Later Delaware Baptists’ published in 1880, is today, a collector's item valued 
for its historical data. On Mar. 6, 1887, the newly installed electric lighting 
was used for the first time with much favorable comment. Land to be used as 
a site for a new church was purchased from Jos. L. Carpenter, Jr., on Nov. 2, 
1888 and on June 8, 1891. 

On June 6, 1891, ground was broken for a new church at 9th and Franklin 
Sts. The new chapel was dedicated on Sun., Mar. 13, 1892. The dedicatory 
sermon was preached by the Rev. Henry G. Weston, D.D., and the prayer 
was Offered by the Rev. Moses Heath. Most of the chapel furniture was donated 
by individual members. The east window was given as a memorial to Mrs. 
Mary A. Stroud and another window was given by the King’s Daughters. The 
property at 4th and French Sts. was sold on Aug. 21, 1902. 

On June 2, 1909, plans were adopted for building the present church. 
The ground was broken on July 5, 1909. The church was dedicated on Oct. 
30, 1910, at the morning service. The dedicatory sermon was preached by 
the Rev. John H. Harris, D.D., LL.D., President of Bucknell College. He was 
assisted by the Rev. Thomas P. Holloway, the pastor. Windows were pre- 
sented by the King’s Daughters, the Intermediate Christian Endeavor, the 
Junior Christian Endeavor and the Sunday School classes of Viola Fredericks, 
Mrs. W. W. Pusey, 2nd and Elsie Morrow. The pulpit furniture was given by 
Mrs. Alfred Gawthrop as a memorial to her husband. The Rev. Dr: Richard 
B. Cook, pastor from 1875 to 1893, spoke at the evening service. Other services 
were held during the week. : 

On Sept. 15, 1935, a pulpit in memory of Townsend W. Miller was 
dedicated by the Rev. F. Raymond Baker, the pastor. The Alfred Gawthrop 
pulpit was then placed in the lobby to serve as a desk for the visitor's register. 

On Jan. 5, 1941, the church received a gift of 100 mahogany Windsor 
chairs from Mrs. Edward H. Porter. 

The Little Chapel of Prayer was opened on Oct. 4, 1942, when services 
were conducted-by the Rev. Dr. Jesse R. Wilson and the Rev. F. Raymond 
Baker, the pastor. Seating 24 persons it was proposed to use the chapel for 
small affairs and to have it open at all times for meditation and prayer. The 
furnishings were presented by Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Maroney as a memorial 
to Mrs. Maroney’s mother, Mrs. Charles W. Horn. The oak paneling was a 
gift of Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Porter. | 


The East Baptist Church, formerly the First German Baptist Church, was 
founded by the Rev. Jeremiah Grimmell, who, in 1855, began to hold meetings 
in his home. The meetings were later transferred to the home of John Swager 
at 4th and Pine Sts. A church was formally organized on Apr. 17, 1856. They 
were incorporated on May 6, 1856. They purchased the “Old Stone Church’’ 
at the s. w. cor. of 5th and Walnut Sts., on May 9, 1856, from the Second 





24 WH. Eo GOH UR Gb Oba ELA WEA E 


Baptist Church. The first service was held on Sun., Apr. 27, 1856. The church 
was renovated in 1870. 

The construction of the present church was started in 1896. The corner- 
stone was laid on Aug. 16, 1896, at 4 P. M., by the Rev. A. P. Mihm, the 
pastor. A temporary floor had been laid and chairs arranged for the congre- 
gation. The Rev. George Knobloch and Professor Louis Keiser of the Ger- 
man Theological Seminary, Rochester, N. Y., made speeches in German. The 
Rev. F. G. Merrill spoke in English. 

The dedication services were held on Jan. 17, 1897, with the Rev. J. Cc 
Grimmell, the son of the founder, in charge. The dedication sermon was 
preached at the morning service by the Rev. J. C. Grimmell. In the afternoon 
a Sunday School rally was held with David Kaiser, J. A. Schultz and the Rev. 
F. F. Briggs taking part. The evening sermon was preached by the Rev. J. M. 
Hoeflin. The exercises were continued until Wed. evening when the Rev. A. P. 
Mihm, the pastor, delivered an address. 

On Apr. 8, 1931, the language used in the services was changed from 
German to English. The name “East Baptist Church” was adopted on Apr. 
15, 1936. 

The building was redecorated inside and outside in 1940. A rededication 
service was held on Dec. 8, 1940 with the Rev. Dr. Willard G. Purdy, of 
First-Central Presbyterian Church in charge. 

The church property was sold to the Shiloh Baptist Church, colored, on 
Dec. 31, 1945. A site for a new church at Linden and Wilmington Aves., Oak 
Grove, was purchased in March, 1946. It was proposed to start the erection of 
a new building during 1947. 


Immanuel Baptist Church. In 1865, a group of members withdrew from 
the Second Baptist Church for the purpose of organizing a new church. Their 
first get-together meeting was held on May 25, 1865. On May 29, letters 
were granted to them. The church was formally organized on Thurs., June 22, 
at the home of Anne Semple, 902 Market St., and the name, “Delaware Avenue 
Baptist Church,” was adopted. It was recognized as a regular Baptist* church 
at a meeting held on July 6, 1865. The church was incorporated on July 
28, 1865. 

Meetings were held in the Wil. Institute lecture-room and prayer-meetings 
were held in the Phoenix Volunteer Fire House, No. 209 e. 14th St. They 
rented the meeting-house of the Primitive Baptist Church at 1008 King St., 
where the first regular services were held in October, 1865. During that month 
they joined the Phila. Association. A site for a new church was secured at 
Delaware Ave. and Washington St., but this proved to be too small. On Mar. 
1, 1866 and Feb. 28, 1867 the present site on the s. e. cor. of Delaware Ave. 
and West St. was purchased. 

Ground was broken on June 27, 1866 and the lecture-room was dedi- 
cated on Jan. 2, 1868, by the Rev. J. Wheaton Smith, D.D. The baptistry was 
ready for use in July, 1868. Previous to this time, baptisms were held in the 
Brandywine Creek, the German Baptist Church and the Second Baptist Church. 
The church auditorium was dedicated on Oct. 13, 1870, by the Rev. P. S. Hen- 
son, D.D., assisted by the Rev. G. W. Folwell, the pastor and several other 
clergymen. The pulpit furniture was donated by the members of the Second 
Baptist Church. 

In 1871, Philip McDowell, of McDowellville, presented a lot, 80 ft. by 
100 ft., on the n. w. cor. of 11th and Dupont Sts., where he had built a chapel. 
The consideration was $1.00. The deed stipulated that a fence must be main- 





WILMINGTON 2D 





tained and it included a reversion clause in the event any of the land was used 
for other than church purposes. A mission school was conducted here. In 1885, 
a group of 60 members withdrew from the church to organize Grace Bap- 
tist Church. 

On Tues., Dec. 27, 1898, the church had been decorated with bunting in 
preparation for a Christmas celebration to be held that evening. When the 
sexton was lighting the gas fixtures, the bunting caught fire. Capt. Peter B. 
Ayars tore the bunting down, put out the fire with no damage and a few 
moments later the congregation began to assemble for the exercises. 

The church was improved in 1910. In 1925, the building was repointed, 
painted and new windows and new lights were installed. The parsonage at 
1018 w. 10th St. was purchased on May 19, 1925. 

The decision to merge with Bethany Baptist Church was made in 1931. 
Delaware Avenue-Bethany Baptist Church was incorporated on Sept. 30, 1931 
and on Oct. 16, 1931, the title to the property was assumed by the new trus- 
tees. The first service of the combined congregations was held on Sun., Oct. 
4, 1931. The Rev. Rittenhouse Neisser, D.D., the temporary pastor, delivered 
his farewell address and the Rev. John R. Humphreys, B.D., the new pastor, 
was welcomed by the congregation. 

On Sun., Mar. 29, 1942, an American flag and a Church flag were dedi- 
cated and unfurled in the church. 

At a congregational meeting held on Dec. 4, 1946 it was decided to 
change the name to “Immanuel Baptist Church.” The new name was dedicated 
by the Rev. John M. Ballbach on Sun., Dec. 8, 1946. 


Elm Street Baptist Church. The Elm Street Baptist Mission was organized 
on May 19, 1872, at Front and Madison Sts. On July 29, 1870, the Wil. Baptist 
City Mission had purchased a lot at n. w. cor. of Elm and Jackson Sts. On this 
plot the Elm Street Baptist Church was organized, in a temporary building, on 
July 30, 1873. Interest lagged and the church disbanded on Dec. 20, 1876. 


Bethany Baptist Church was located on the n. w. cor. of Elm and Jackson 
Sts. This church had its inception in meetings held in the W. & N. R. R. 
Station at Front and Madison Sts., under the leadership of Wm. H. Gregg. 
They were duly organized on Nov. 14, 1878 and secured the use of the former 
Elm Street Baptist Church. This was a frame building on Elm St., at the cor- 
ner of Porter St. The brick church facing Jackson St. was built in 1887. It was 
dedicated on Apr. 22, 1888 by the Rev. J. C. Long, D.D., of Crozer Theological 
Seminary. He was assisted by the Rev. T. M. Eastwood and the Rev. O. G. 
Buddington, the pastor. At the evening service Mr. Eastwood gave a history 
of the church. 

A new brick chapel was built at the rear of the church and facing Elm St. 
It was dedicated on Oct. 29, 1893, the preacher being the Rev. J. B. L'Hom- 
medieu of New York. The new building included two Sunday School rooms, 
pastor’s study, dining-room and kitchen. Title to the property was acquired 
by Bethany Church on Apr. 11, 1906. | 

Having agreed to merge with the Delaware Avenue Baptist Church, the 
property was turned over to the new trustees on Nov. 28, 1931. It was sold 
to the Boy’s Club on Dec. 31, 1931. 


Grace Baptist Church was organized on Oct. 1, 1885. It was founded by 
a group who had withdrawn from Detaware Avenue Baptist Church. A Sunday 
School was organized on Nov. 16, 1885. The church was incorporated on 


J 
: 
i 
Seer cmchmyg dhe’ Nth S 26 year oe Tutt NOOR ARGON NOI APP eta 





26 TUE! CHU RGHIBAGE DELAWARE 


Mar. 4, 1886. Grace was recognized as a regular Baptist Church on Sept. 14, 
1886. The first meetings were held in the First Baptist Church, 1008 King St. 
During 1888 the services were held in Gilbert Presbyterian Church, 13th and 
French Sts. From 1889 until 1891 the services were held in the First Baptist 
Church but the congregation became weak and decided to disband. 


Grace Baptist,-First Swedish Baptist Church of Wilmington. In 1873, oc- 
casional Swedish services were held in Delaware Avenue Baptist Church. Dur- 
ing the period 1874-84 no regular services were held but meetings were held 
occasionally under the leadership of A. P. Anderson. On Wed. evening, Jan. 
9, 1889, a meeting was held at Coffin’s Hall, 12th and Heald Sts. when it was 
decided to organize a church. The organization took place on Sat. evening, 
Jan. 12, 1889 and on Jan. 13, a baptismal service was held in the Second Bap- 
tist Church. The early meetings were held on Heald St., next door to the 
n. e. cor. of 12th St. 

A Ladies Aid Society was organized in Feb., 1889. A Sunday School was 
organized on Easter Sunday, Apr. 6, 1890. A lot on the corner of 12th and 
Heald Sts. was secured on July 4, 1891. The church was incorporated on 
Aug. 3, 1891. A small brick church was completed and was dedicated on Mar. 3, 
1893. On Apr. 5, 1902, it was decided to purchase a lot at the n. w. cor. Van- 
dever Ave. and Church St. The deed was executed on May 29, 1902. The 
plans for the new church were drawn by the pastor, the Rev. O. C. Wieden. 
The corner-stone was laid on Sat., Oct. 31, 1903 by Charles D. Bird, Mayor of 
Wilmington. The ceremony took place at 3 P. M. Assisting Mayor Bird were 
the Revs. O. C. Wieden and O. G. Buddington. | 

The dedication ceremonies began on Sat., Apr. 23, 1904 at 745: Pi Me 
with speeches, singing, etc. On Apr. 24, at the morning service, the dedication 
sermon was preached by the Rev. C. P. Eckman. A service in English was held 
at 3 P. M. The benches were the gift of the congregation at Dividing Creek, 
N. J., and some of these benches are still in use in the church balcony. The 
property at 12th and Heald Sts. was sold on Mar. 28, 1904. The parsonage 
was completed on Feb. 1, 1910. The church was remodeled after which it was 
rededicated on Oct. 9, 1921. The ceremonies began with a. meeting on Sat. 
evening. The church was rededicated on Sun. morning by the Rev. Wilhelm 
Justinius of Stockholm, Sweden. The afternoon services were conducted by the 
Rev. Dr. George D. Allison. In the evening Mr. Justinius preached a sermon 
in Swedish and the pastor preached in English. On the 1st and 3rd Sun. nights 
the services were to be in English. A new organ was dedicated on June 1, 1938, 
by the pastor, the Rev. Martin A. Larson. The chimes and the grill were 
donated as memorials. | 

The 50th Anniversary was celebrated with services lasting a full week. — 
On Mar. 7, 1943, the church name was changed to “Grace.” This was done 
because immigration from Sweden had virtually ceased and all of the services 
* were being held: in the English language. 


Judson Memorial Baptist Church at Elm and Franklin Sts. When Bethany 
Church merged with Delaware Avenue Baptist Church all activities were re- 
moved to Delaware Avenue Church. Some of Bethany’s members were not 
happy at the prospect of having no Baptist Church in the old neighborhood. 
On Fri., Oct. 16, 1931, twenty former members of Bethany met at the home 
of Ira P. Phillips at 1004 Elm St. and organized as the Elm Street Baptist 
Mission. Meetings were held at various homes. A Sunday School was organized 
and met at the home of J. I. Crossan. The Rev. L. Judson Westfall was very 








SECOND BAPTIST CHURCH 


(Page 22) 


Ce Ee ee 
eon ea Ne a, FPO oe 


ai LEGAL IPED Ley, Pete. 





ASBURY METHODIST CHURCH 


(Page 30) 


28 Tae Bie GH UPR GH ESO EDF EA Wea 


active in this organization and was always considered as their senior pastor 
and adviser. 

On Dec. 24, 1931, the meetings were transferred to the Polish Baptist 
Church at Elm and Franklin Sts. This Mission was an independent organiza- 
tion and paid $30.00 per month for the use of the church. The Polish con- 
gregation would meet at 10 A. M. on Sundays and the Elm Street Mission 
would meet at 11 o'clock. The mid-week meetings were held on different 
nights. The first pastor, the Rev. E. C. Osborne was called on Jan. 19, 1932. 
On Jan. 8, 1934, the Mission sent in a petition to the Delaware Baptist State 
Convention asking recognition as a church. The name “Judson Memorial” was 
selected in honor of the Rev. L. Judson Westfall, who, in the meantime had 
passed away. Much against the wishes of many of the members, the church 
was closed in October, 1941 and the members scattered to other Baptist 
Churches. The property was purchased on Feb. 11, 1942 by the Polish Army 
Veterans. 


North Baptist Church is located on Lincoln St., near Delaware Ave. Philip 
McDowell had coopershops located on the present site of the State Armory. 
He made barrels for the flour millers located on the Brandywine Creek. A 
small village surrounded these shops and it was called McDowellville. Mr. 
McDowell built a small chapel on the n. w. cor. of 11th and Dupont Sts., 
which he turned over to Delaware Avenue Baptist Church in 1871, to be used 
as a mission. It was known locally as the “Little Baptist Church.” Each year 
the members would gather up all of the children in the neighborhood and 
take them on a day-excursion to Penn’s Grove, N. J., where a pier and an 
amusement park were available. 


The Wil. Baptist City Mission built a small mission building on Lincoln. 


St., near Delaware Ave., where the Lincoln Street Baptist Mission was organ- 
ized in September, 1883. In December, 1888, Bethany Baptist Church pur- 
chased the property and took charge of the mission on Dec. 30, 1888. 

In October, 1887, the Little Baptist Church at McDowellville combined 
with the Lincoln Street Mission. The chapel on Lincoln St. was ?ebuilt, 
sheathed with slate and a corner-stone was laid. The Sunday School room was 
opened on Sun., Feb. 19, 1888. The chapel was dedicated on Sun., Feb. -26, 
1888, at 3 o'clock with the Rev. Moses Heath, presiding. The Rev. Henry G. 
Weston, D.D., President of Crozer Theological Seminary, preached the dedi- 
catory sermon. Talks were given by the Rev. R. B. Cook and Washington 


Jones. The evening service was conducted by the Rev. George W. Quick. 


On Dec. 4, 1894, a church was regularly organized and the name ‘North 
Baptist Church” was adopted. The church was recognized on Dec. 18, 1894. 
The congregation received title to the property on July 4, 1895 from Bethany 
Baptist Church. : : 

On Jan. 4, 1932, a committee was appointed to arrange for improvements 
to the building. More land was secured from James A. Steele on May 31, 1932. 


‘ The church was enlarged and a brick front was added. On June 15, 1932, the 


old corner-stone was replaced with due ceremony. 


Hope Baptist Church was organized in November, 1904 and met in the 
lower room of the First Swedish Baptist Church. On Sept. 19, 1905, the Del. 
Bap. Union Ass’n bought a plot of land on the n. e. cor. of 23rd and Pine 
Sts., where the congregation arranged to build a church of frame construc- 
tion. The corner-stone was laid on Sat., Feb. 10, 1906. Services were held 
in the Swedish Church with the Rev. R. B. Cook, presiding. The City of Wil- 





u 
js 
4 
4 
4 
FA 
‘ 

t 


WILMINGTON 29 


mington was represented by Mayor Horace Wilson. Among those taking part 
in the services were the Revs. L. Judson Westfall, E. B. Plummer and O. C. 
Weiden. Representing the congregation were Mrs. E. M. Cain and C. H. 
Cantwell. The congregation and visitors then proceeded to the church site 
where the corner-stone was laid by the Rev. R. C. Penney. 

The church was formally organized on Dec. 19, 1905. The congregation 
of Hope Church took title to the property on Sept. 6, 1906. The church was 
dedicated with services lasting a full week. The opening service held on Sun., 
Dec. 9, 1906, was participated in by George W. Twitmyer, Supt. of Public 
Schools, the Rev. C. W. W. Bishop, the pastor, and C. H. Cantwell, Supt. of 
the Sunday School. Interest lagged and the church decided to close. The 
property was sold on Dec. 22, 1919 to a Pentecostal group. 


Calvary Baptist Church. When the Second Baptist Church moved to 
9th and Franklin Sts., on Mar. 13, 1892, some of the members continued to 
worship in the church at 4th and French Sts., under the name of the Second 
Baptist Mission. They were formally organized as Calvary Baptist Church on 
Nov. 7, 1894. After'a rather uncertain existence the congregation disbanded 
in 1902. The property, which was owned by the Second Baptist Church, was 
sold on Aug. 21, 1902. The last meeting in this church was held on Sept. 30, 
1902, when Dr. Russell H. Conwell, founder of Temple University in Phila- 
delphia, delivered his famous lecture “Acres of Diamonds.” 


The Polish Baptist Church was organized at 1010 Linden St. by Mr. 
‘Schulke in 1916. In the fall of 1916 the Baptist Missionary Society purchased 
two plots of land on the s. w. cor. of Elm and Franklin Sts. In 1918, it was 
decided to build a Polish Church on this site. The church was dedicated on 
Sun., Sept. 1, 1918. Services in Polish were held at 10:30 A. M. and 7:30 P. M. 
- A service in English was held at 3 P. M. The congregation was disbanded in 
1933 when the last pastor moved to upper New York State. 


The King Street Baptist Mission met at 1008 King St. It was organized 
in 1885 and disbanded in 1899. 5 


The South Side Baptist Mission was located on Heald St. between A and 
B Sts. It was organized in 1887. On Oct. 13, 1893 the trustees took title to 
the property. Interest died out and the mission was closed in 1909. 


The East Side Baptist Mission was organized in 1886 at the home of Miss 
Amelia Taylor. The meetings were held in Coffin’s. Hall at 12th and Heald 
Sts. After the Swedish Baptist Church was built at 12th and Heald. Sts., in 
1891 the meetings were transferred to that church. Among the Superintendents 
serving this mission were E. W. Countiss, T. H. H. Messinger and Walter R. 
Hope. The mission was closed in 1899. | 


Silverbrook Baptist Mission was organized in 1894 and closed at the end 
of that year. 


Second Street Baptist Mission was established in January, 1897, by North 
Baptist Church but it was soon abandoned. 


Elliott Avenue Mission was established at Elliott Avenue, now Concord 
Ave. and Washington St., in 1892. On Nov. 23, 1892, Del. Ave. Baptist 
Church purchased the entire Washington St. front from 22nd St. to Elliott 
Ave. The mission was in charge of George B. Smedley. It was closed in 1901. 


REMAN te ear Meee me! CK ime 


20) SI APMC See rte meer seeonryina, a Boo kD Deere re errr gen Hie 4 we 


era at 


30 THE CH URGERESYOF sDEL AWARE 


Central Baptist Church was organized by a group who withdrew from 
North Baptist on Oct. 2, 1927. They held their meetings in Eden Hall. The 
group disbanded in 1929. 


The Union Street Baptist Mission was conducted during the period in- 
cluding Jan. 1, 1887, at 17th and Union Sts. 


The McDowellville Baptist Mission, at 11th and Dupont Sts., was built 
and donated to Delaware Ave. Baptist Church, in 1871, by Philip McDowell. 
The chapel was dedicated on May 18, 1879 at 3:30 P. M. by the Rev. Isaac 
W. Haldeman. 


The Third Baptist Church on 12th St., between Market and Orange Sts., 
was organized on Apr. 6, 1858 with the Rev. Samuel Earle, as pastor. 


METHODIST 


Asbury Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1766, Captain Thomas Webb, a 
retired British Army officer and one of the Methodism’s early missionaries, 
preached in a small grove of trees at 8th and King Sts. After a series of these 
meetings, the first indoor meeting of Methodists worshipped in the upper 
story of Jos. Gilpin’s storehouse on King St. wharf. A short time later they 
were invited to meet in the schoolhouse of John Thelwell at the s. e. cor. 3rd 
and King Sts. Some meetings were also held in the cooper-shop of Geo. Wit- 
sill, on Water St. east of Market St. It was in Mr. Thelwell’s school that an 
organization was effected. Francis Asbury preached in Wilmington on Aug. 14, 
1772 and again on Feb. 28, 1775. Preaching was held at times in the home 
of J. Stidham. 

Harry, the negro traveling companion and servant of Mr. Asbury, al- 
though illiterate, became quite famed for his preaching in Wilmington and 
at other places. On May 12, 1789, a lot of land near the s. e. cor. 3rd and 
Walnut Sts. was purchased as a site for a church, from Caleb Way, for 105 
pounds. | 

The corner-stone was laid in the summer of 1789 and the church was 

dedicated on Oct. 14, 1789, by Bishop Asbury for whom it was named. On that 
date Mr. Asbury notes in his Journal, “thus far we come after twenty years 
labor in this place.” The church had a high pulpit and a gallery. The Bible 
desk was built of open framework and the leader of the singing was seated 
directly beneath the desk. When a hymn was announced he would come out, 
to lead the singing, after which he would return to his bench. The seats were 
of plank with a single-rail back. A partition 4 ft. high extended down the 
center of the church, dividing the men from the women. Outside, a 7 ft. fence 
extended from the church to the wall at the front of the property, the men 
and women entering through separate gates. To the right and left of the pulpit 
were the “Amen corners” where the oldest members would be seated. 
During the first ten or twelve years the members of Asbury were sub- 
jected to many indignities and unruly men and boys disturbed all of the meet- 
ings. It became necessary for the safety of the members to hold the evening 
meetings early so that they could be dismissed before dark. On Sept. 23, 1800, 
a resolution was passed appointing a committee to combat this growing evil. 
Advertisements, threatening Prosecution of the offenders, were placed in the 
local papers. These advertisements seemed to have had the desired effect. 

The church was incorporated and trustees were elected on May 25, 1802. 
At a meeting of the trustees held on July 17, 1802 steps were taken to build 





WILMINGTON 31 





a parsonage. The parsonage, built of frame, was erected south of the church, 
in the fall of 1802. On June 18, 1808, Hannah Pierce donated 50 sq. perches 
of land to the church. On June 21, 1809, the parsonage was surrendered to 
the mortgagee, who moved it to the corner, north of the church. On Oct. 19, 
- 1818, Edward Worrell donated the corner lot to the church. The house was 
then used as a sexton’s home until 1853, when it was sold and moved to 7th 
and Church Sts. 

By 1805, Asbury Church had 100 negroes on its roll, who ordinarily used 
the galleries during services. The colored membership had become so large 
that it was felt necessary that they use the main floor for their class meetings. 
But their enthusiasm ran so high and some of them were so careless in their 
activities that on June 19, 1805, the trustees passed a resolution requiring the 
negroes to hold all of their meetings in the galleries. It was during this year 
that, through the efforts of Asbury Church, Ezion Church was organized and 
built. In 1809, a few of the members, who wished to sit in a group and lead 
in the singing, erected a door to one of the benches in the gallery in order to 
reserve this bench for themselves. This resulted in a resolution being passed 
on June 21, 1809, directing the sexton to remove the door and to keep the 
entrance to all benches open to anyone. 

In 1811, the length of the church was increased 20 ft. In 1818, the church 
was severely damaged by a storm but repairs were made immediately. In 1822, 
a building was erected, south of the church, for Sunday School and day-school 
purposes. On Dec. 2, 1824, the trustees decided to install sperm-oil lamps to 
replace the candles which had been used up to this time. On Mar. 11, 1828, it 
was decided to enlarge the church and to have galleries on three sides. In 
1829, the infant department built a two-story brick day-school on Shipley St., 
near 4th St. This school was very successful for a time but, burdened by debt, 


the building was surrendered, in 1832, to the trustees who converted it intoa — 


parsonage and it was used as such until 1843. 

It appears that some of the evening meetings would be continued until 
midnight or later. On Jan. 16, 1829, the trustees directed the sexton to close 
the building at 10 o'clock, with some exceptions. Space for graves tm the bury- 
ing-ground would be sold to non-members but members of the church were 
not required to pay. In 1826, it was decided that unless a member was paid up 
and in good standing, he would have to pay for graves. This decision was 
appealed on Aug. 14, 1830, but the trustees refused the appeal. 

On Aug. 20, 1832, the trustees decided that men and women could use 
the same doors but they must still be seated separately, the men on the left and 
the women on the right. Extensive enlargements were made in 1838, includ- 
ing two classrooms in back of the gallery. In 1839, one hundred years after 
Methodism was organized in England and fifty years after the dedication of 
Asbury, a Centenary celebration was held. The religious observance was held 
on Sun., Oct. 25, 1839. A modern pulpit was installed in 1840. While the 
Rev. Anthony Atwood was pastor, in 1845, the church was converted into a 
two-story building with a lecture-room for Sunday School purposes on the 
first floor. It was during this year that promiscuous sitting was first permitted. 
In 1846, a portion of the newly-built roof was blown off but repairs were 
made immediately. 

In 1851, after a discussion lasting five years, the sperm-oil lamps were 
replaced by gas illumination. In 1872, general improvements were made, in- 
cluding a recess pulpit. The rededication services were held on Sun., Jan. 19, 
1873. The guest of honor was the Rev. Father Boehm, aged 97 years. He had 
been Bishop Asbury’s traveling companion and served as Presiding Elder of 


Rie ents hae set eee ee YY Deca semanas bitterest 4) Wibrnbessant then Ngaio Aiamaamane 
. +h sre ame a, 





32 THES CHU RGHES@ OE <DEL AWW AIGE 


the Wilmington District in 1813. The morning service was conducted by the 
Rev. John Simms, D.D., LL.D., assisted by the Revs. J. B. Quigg and A. 
Atwood. The afternoon service was conducted by the Rev. Jacob Todd and 
Father Boehm gave a short talk. The dedicatory sermon was preached at the 
evening service by the Rev. Dr. Simms. 

In 1885, the building was enlarged and improved after which reopening 
services were held on Nov. 8, 1885. The services were in charge of the Rev. 
Dr. C. N. Simms and the Rev. Dr. J. Richards Boyle. After extensive im- 
provements the church was rededicated on Nov. 20, 1898, at the evening 
service by the Rev. Dr. B. I. Ives and Pres. Elder Robert Watt. The new 
pipe-organ was also dedicated. 

On Mar. 27, 1904, after the Rev. H. S. Dulaney had delivered his fare- 
well sermon, the congregation gathered around him, when a floor beam 
cracked but the floor held and no one was injured. Improvements were made 
in 1908. On Oct. 3, 1937, five memorial windows were dedicated. 

The Sunday School. In 1818, three of the women members of Asbury 
were inspired to open a Sunday School. The Sunday School was organized in 
the church but the trustees ruled that only girls could attend as boys were 
vandals by nature and would cut the benches and woodwork with their knives, 
which they probably would have done, unless restrained. The organizers would 
not agree to this but secured the use of a house on the s. w. cor. 2nd and 
Walnut Sts., owned by John Taylor, where both boys and girls were received. 
Later the school moved to the loft over David Bush’s storehouse at 6-8 e. 
Front St. The next move was to a frame building at the n. w. cor. Sixth and 
King Sts. Sunday school was held in the morning after which the entire 
school marched, two abreast, to Asbury Church for the preaching service. The 
school grew so fast and the interest was so great that the Asbury officials were 
obliged to recognize the work and to promise encouragement. 

On July 5, 1819, a meeting was called in the church and a Sunday School 
was duly organized with constitution, by-laws and elected officials. On Apr. 25, 
1822, the trustees decided to erect a frame building, south of the church, for 
the use of the Sunday School. The building was completed on Aug. 2,°1822 
and the Sunday School moved from 6th and King Sts. to their new building 
in the fall. Meetings were held here until 1835 when the main building was 
utilized. A lending library was established on Mar. 13, 1827. By 1837, the 
Sunday School had grown to such proportions that two schools had been or- 
ganized as No. 1 and No. 2 school, one meeting in the lecture-room and the 
other in the auditorium. In September, 1869, the two schools were combined. 


St. Paul’s Methodist Church (M.E.) was organized on Jan. 26, 1844, at 


’ the home of Hyland B. Pennington, s. e. cor. 4th and Market Sts. The Rev. 


John Kennaday, pastor of Asbury Church, was in charge of the meeting. 
Committees were appointed and on Mar. 7, 1844, a church site, on Market 


1 St., above 7th St., was purchased from John McKnight. The erection of a 


church was started immediately. The corner-stone was laid on June 4, 1844. 
The trustees adopted the pew system, quite an innovation in a Methodist 
church which resulted in St. Paul's being called “the silk-stocking church” for 
many years. The church was dedicated on Thurs. afternoon, Mar. 13, 1845. 

Prayer was offered by the Rev. Mr. Ridgeley and the dedicating sermon 
was preached by the Rev. Mr. Kennaday on the text—Psalms 27, verses 4 and 5. 
The benediction was pronounced by the Rev. Mr. Wynkoop. The services 
were continued on Sunday when the Rev. Levi Scott, A.M., preached in the 
morning and the Rev. Joseph Castle, A.M., in the afternoon. The amount col- 





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34 RHEE © ChHi UTR: COREE WOE ADE LAr eee 


lected, up to that time, for pews sold and rented was $8000.00. Dr. Kennaday 
became the first pastor. On Oct. 29, 1847, the building was damaged by fire. 
On Nov. 17, 1857, a parsonage on 7th St., between Tatnall and West Sts., was 
purchased from P. H. Mitchell. A morning Sunday School was started in 1858. 
In 1872, the church was improved and a pipe-organ was installed. In 1882, 
the audience-room was improved and the gallery was removed. During this 
year the trustees purchased the adjoining property. At a prayer service held 
on Dec. 1, 1882, Mrs. Hannah Mallison presented a communion service con- 
sisting of a bowl, two plates and chalices, all of silver. In 1886, the Sunday 
School building was extended back to Shipley St. New pews were installed 
in 1895. 

The 7th and Market Sts. property was sold to the Wil. Stores Co. on 
Sept. 23, 1910. The present site on Jackson St., north of 10th St., was pur- 
chased on Nov. 12, 1910. Ground was broken for the new church on Mar. 
4, 1911, by the pastor, the Rev. C. A. Hill. On that day the ground was 
covered with a thin layer of snow. The corner-stone was laid on July 9, 1911, 
with Dr. Thomas E. Martindale, presiding. The prayer was offered by the 
Rev. Thomas P. Holloway. The last service in the old church was held on 
Aug. 27, 1911, by the Rev. C. A. Hill, the pastor. 

The first service in the new building was a meeting of the Christian En- 
deavor Society, held in the Sunday School room on the evening of Sept. 3, 
1911. The church was dedicated at the evening service on Mar. 10, 1912, by 
Bishop Luther B. Wilson. Dr. John Krantz preached at the morning service. 
The 71th Anniversary was celebrated on Mar. 19, 1916. On Oct. 18, 1925, a 
new organ was dedicated by Bishop Wm. F. McDowell assisted by the Rev. 
Carlisle Hubbard, D.D. On May 6, 1928, a communion service was dedicated 
as a memorial to Mrs. Margaret E. Stradley. It was presented by her sister, 
Mrs. Emily C. Griffith. . 

The 100th Anniversary of the church was celebrated with services starting 
on Sun., Nov. 12, and closing on Sun., Nov. 19, 1944. The pastor, the Rev. 
Essell P. Thomas was in charge of the arrangements. Among those taking part 
were Bishop Charles Wesley Flint, the Rev. Dr. Oliver J. Collins, Dist. Supt., 
and a former pastor of St. Paul’s, former pastors, the Rev. Dr. Carlisle L. 
Hubbard and the Rev. Abram W. Woodward. Mr. A. O. H. Grier delivered 
an address entitled, “Wilmington Churches of Yesteryear.” 


Union Methodist Church (M.E.) was organized, in 1847, as the “Orange 
Street M. E. Mission” by the Rev. Edward Kennard. He had purchased the 
former M. P. church at 3rd and Orange Sts., and it was here that he organized 
the Society. In 1848, it was placed under the care of St. Paul’s Church with Mr. 
Kennard as supernumerary. In 1849, it was made a station and a regular pastor 
was assigned to the mission. During that year it was decided to build a new 
church in a better location. A lot was secured on Second St., east of Washing- 
ton St., on which the erection of a new church was started. The corner-stone 
was laid with Masonic ceremonies and this caused a furore among the members. 
It resulted in the disbanding of the congregation and the work on the building 
was stopped before the roof had been built. In the fall, through the efforts of 
Mrs. Margaret Rumford, a member of Asbury Church, enough money was 
contributed to have the roof built. In the meantime, Mr. Kennard resumed 
services in his church at 3rd and Orange Sts., which became known as ‘“Ken- 
nard’s Church.” 

In 1850, the Rev. Andrew Manship was appointed to Union Mission, as 
the church was then called. Having neither a congregation nor a church, Mr. 





WILMINGTON 35 





Manship arranged to hold meetings in the Odd Fellow’s Hall at 3rd and King 
Sts. Mr. Manship met with good success and built up a congregation that 
decided to finish the church building on Second St. Mr. Manship was a “past 
master’ at raising money for church work and he collected large sums outside 
of the city. The work of building was resumed and the church was completed 
after which the first service was held on Oct. 12, 1850. It was dedicated on 
the morning of Nov. 28, 1850, by Bishop E. S. Janes. He was assisted by the 
Rev. Henry Slicer, Ass’t. Chaplain of the U. S. Senate, of which he became 
Chaplain on Dec. 7, 1853. 

In 1865, it was decided to look for a site for a new church. Lots at 4th 
and Washington Sts. and 5th and Washington Sts. were considered and the 
present site at Sth and Washington Sts. was selected and purchased on Mar. 
10, 1866, from James L. Devou. The corner-stone was laid on Sat., June 9, 
1866, by Bishop E. R. Ames. He was assisted by the Rev. Alfred Scott and the 
Rev. J. D. Curtis, the pastor. The lecture-room was dedicated on Dec. 23, 
1866, at the evening service, by Bishop Ames assisted by Bishop Levi Scott. 
The morning service was conducted by Bishop Ames and in the afternoon a 
group of speakers entertained. In spite of inclement weather, large crowds 
attended all of the services. : 

The auditorium was dedicated on Nov. 17, 1867, by Bishop Ames. He was 
assisted by Bishop Scott and the Revs. Mr. England, Mr. Woolston and 
Mr. Houston. | 7 

After a general overhauling and refurnishing a reopening service was held 
on Mar. 7, 1880, by the Rev. O. W. Scott. In 1896, the Sunday School room 
was improved and the dwelling adjoining the church on Washington St. was 
purchased on Jan. 7, 1896 from Samuel A. Price, Jr., for a parsonage. Im- 
provements were made in 1901. After major improvements including 17 new 
memorial windows a service was held on Sept. 20, 1903. Those taking part 
included Pres. Elder Robert Watt, and the Revs. J. D. C. Hanna, A. W. Light- 
_ bourne and R. H. Adams, the pastor. 

Improvements were made in 1905. On Aug. 24, 1915, 507 Washington 
St. was purchased with the intention of using this property for a parsonage 
and converting 505 Washington St. into a church-house. Owing to war-time 
conditions this was postponed. A new pipe-organ was unveiled on May 
11, 1919. 

During 1925 extensive improvements were made to the church and the 
property at 505 Washington St. was converted into a church-house. The reopen- 
ing services.started on Sun., Oct. 11, 1925 with the pastor, the Rev. James A. 
Leach, D.D:, in charge. The morning services were conducted by the Rev. 
J. D. C. Hanna and the Rev. James W. Colona, D.D., preached in the evening. 
The services continued throughout the following week. 

The 95th Anniversary was celebrated with a full week of services starting 
on Sun., Nov. 1, 1942. Dr. Francis H. Green, of Pennington Seminary spoke 
at the 3 o’clock exercises. The church had been extensively improved in prep- 
aration for this event under the direction of the Rev. T. J. Sard, the pastor. 

' The 100th Anniversary of the church was celebrated with a full week of 
services starting on Sun., Apr. 19, 1947 under the direction of the Rev. T. J. 
Sard, the pastor. 


Mt. Salem Methodist Church (M.E.) was organized in 1847, at Riddle’s 


Banks, on the Brandywine Creek. The first meetings were held in the old | 


Lyceum Building. On May 4, 1847, Wm. Law donated a church site ‘‘on the 
road leading from the Kennett Pike to the Bancroft Mills.” This was a portion 


TNO IS i eR D5 RAO TIN em ty a 2: 


Da eR Nee: 


+4 


36 TAGE » C.H-U IR: GanseS AO DE LAW AskekE 


of the present site at 19th St. and Mt. Salem Lane. The erection of a stone 
church was started immediately. The dedication services were held on Apr. 23, 
1848, by the Rev. Thomas Hodgson. The graveyard across the street from 
the church was laid out and the oldest tombstone is on the grave of John B. 
Smith, who died on June 18, 1848. A Sunday School was opened at Riddle’s 
Banks in 1858. 

The first church was torn down and a new church was built in 1878. The 
dedication service was held on Nov. 3, 1878, with Dr. R. L. Dashiell in charge. 
Bishop Levi Scott was present but very feeble. Among those assisting were 
the Revs. Alfred T. Scott, Henry Sanderson, John L. Houston and C. F. 
Sheppard, the pastor. Over the main door there was a stone inscribed “To the 
memory of James Riddle—he being dead yet speaketh.” 

This church was destroyed by a fire that started at 2 A. M. on Feb. 2, 
1879. Work of rebuilding was started immediately and while the work was in 
progress, the congregation met in Greenhill Church. The Sunday School met 
in the Y. M. C. A. Hall at Rising Sun and in Riddle’s Chapel. , 

The new church was dedicated on July 13, 1879 by Dr. John H. Dashiell 
at the morning service. He was assisted by the Rev. C. F. Sheppard, the pastor. 
At 8 A. M. a reunion service was held when former pastors were greeted by the. 
congregation. Exercises were held in the afternoon and the Rev. Mr. Dashiell 
preached again in the evening. 

In rebuilding, the tower of the old church was used but the structure was 
almost entirely new. It was constructed of Brandywine blue rock from Philip 
P. Tyre’s quarry. The pews were ash, trimmed with walnut. There was a recess 
pulpit. The old altar rail was Pat in the lecture room. Mt. Salem Church 
was interested in missions conducted at Riddle’s Banks and at Centerville. In 
1893, having been weakened by explosions at the Du Pont Powder Yards on 
the Brandywine, the steeple was condemned and it was replaced by a frame 
cupola. On June 9, 1899, Wm. P. Bancroft donated a plot of land to the church. 
In 1902, the bell presented by the trustees of Riddle’s Chapel was placed in 
the tower. 

After extensive renovations, the church was reopened on Sept. 23,.1906, 
with the Rev. F. L. Carpenter, the pastor, in charge. A love feast was con- 
ducted by the Rev. Thomas L. Poulson. At a Sunday School rally speeches 
were delivered by Pres. Elder A. S. Mowbray and Pres. Elder S. M. Morgan. 

In 1917, an addition for a Sunday School was built. It was dedicated on 
Sun., Oct. 7, 1917. All-day services were held beginning with an old-fashioned 
class meeting at 9:30 A. M. The morning sermon was delivered by Dist. 
Supt. Robert Watt. In the afternoon the Sunday School orchestra gave a con- 
cert, after which a platform meeting was held. Speeches were made by Mr. 
Watt, the Rev. T. R. Van Dyke and others. The evening sermon was preached 
by the Rev. T. R. Van Dyke, former pastor. The dedication was then con- 
ducted by the Rev. Wm. E. Habbart assisted by Mr. Van Dyke. A. Edward 
Rhodes was the architect. 

The 75th Anniversary was celebrated with services lasting from Nov. 5 
to Nov. 19, 1922. 

A new tower was built in 1939. The dedication of the tower was held on 
Sun., Oct. 29, 1939. The Rev. W. E. Habbart preached in the morning and 
the Rev. L. E. Windsor in the evening. 

Two new flags and a set of stained glass windows were dedicated on 
Dec. 12, 1943. The Rev. F. D. Milbury, the pastor, was in charge of the 
services. The speaker was Dr. Samuel L. Hamilton, of the New York Univer- 
sity, a former member of Mt. Salem Church. 





WILMINGTON 37 





Scott Methodist Church (M.E.). On Sept. 28, 1851, a union Sunday 
School was established in Kennard’s Church at 7th and Walnut Sts. by the 
members of Asbury and Union M. E. Churches and Hanover Presbyterian 
Church. In 1852, the school was removed to the public school at 6th and 
French Sts. A chapel was built at 7th and Spruce Sts. The corner-stone was 
laid on Thurs., Sept. 30, 1852 by the Revs. Mr. Humphrey, A. Atwood and 
Mr. Hodgson. The address was delivered by Judge Willard Hall. The dedica- 
tion service was held in December, 1852. 


It was called the ‘Seventh Street Sabbath School.” The first meeting was 
held on Jan. 6, 1853. The Presbyterians gradually dropped out leaving the 
Methodists in charge. The Presbyterians claimed that the Methodists had 
stolen the chapel from them, at any rate, the name was changed to the “Seventh 
Street M. E. Church.” In 1855, the church was enlarged and the name “Scott 
M. E. Church” was adopted. Rumor has it that this was inspired by a desire 
to secure a $100.00 subscription from Bishop Levi Scott and that it was suc- 
cessful. The dedication service was held on Sept. 23, 1855, by the Revs. J. T. 
Cooper, Mr. Crooks and Mr. Longacre. 


The change in name was first noted in the minutes of Oct. 12, 1855. In 
1856, the first Sunday School excursion to a seashore resort, no doubt, was 
held and it was the beginning of an annual affair that was continued for pos- 
sibly sixty years. In 1863, promiscuous seating of men and women was first 
introduced at Scott Church. In December, 1863, it was decided to purchase a 
“harmonium” for the Sunday School. This was done and on May 6, 1864, the 
trustees decided to allow the ‘“harmonium”’ to be used at the church services. 
For technical reasons the church was attached to Grace Church in 1866 and 
named “Grace Chapel.’ In 1867, this connection was severed and the name 
“Scott’” was resumed. 


Improvements were started in 1867 and while the work was in progress 
the church met in Institute Hall and the City Hall while the Sunday School 
met in the public school at 7th and Spruce Sts. In October, 1867, the base- 
ment was completed and used for worship. While the rebuilding was being 
done, the front wall collapsed into the street, instantly killing a Rod-carrier 
who had stopped work at quarter to 6 o'clock. It was said that if he had not 
“knocked off” work 15 minutes ahead of time, he would not have been killed. 
The improvements were entirely completed and the dedication was held on 
Sun., May 26, 1872. The dedicatory sermon was delivered by the Rev. James 
Neall assisted by the Rev. T. L. Thompkinson, the pastor. A reunion service 


was held in the afternoon and the Rev. Jacob Todd preached in the evening. - 


A morning Sunday School was opened in March, 1873. Further improve- 
ments were made in 1882. The church was again improved in 1890, after 
which a reopening service was held on Oct. 20, 1890. The morning service 
was in charge of the Rev. George E. Reed, D.D., the Sunday School was 
addressed by Chief Justice Charles B. Lore, Joseph Pyle and others. A love- 
feast at 6 o'clock was in charge of the Rev. W. L. S. Murray. The evening 
service was conducted by the Rev. J. S. Willis assisted by the Rev. Vaughan 
S. Collins, the pastor. 

A reopening service was held on Nov. 26, 1899, by the Rev. Dr. B. I. 
Ives assisted by the Rev. Frank P. Harris, the pastor. The church had been 
greatly improved including the installation of a number of beautiful memorial 
windows. One of these was in memory of Bishop Levi Scott. 

A Community-House was presented by Wm. H. Todd, former Wilming- 
tonian, in memory of his parents. The furnishings were presented by Mr. 


SHOR IINICHE Sete meh a0 rts Ml Atteil9  Bhasnisermetmeniesdmnmen re 
5 Se ladies ee il den eee 





38 DHE CHU RGRES, OF JDL AW ARS 


Todd’s children. It was dedicated on Sat., Nov. 27, 1926, at 7:30 P. M., by 
Bishop W. F. McDowell. 


Brandywine Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1839, two women from As- 
bury Church opened a Sunday School in the old Academy, on Vandever Ave., 
in Brandywine Village. In 1853, the work was taken over by Union Church 
but in 1856 the work again passed into the care of Asbury Church. In the 
fall of 1856, a Methodist Society was formally organized. Trustees were elected 
on Nov. 19, 1857 and the Alpes was incorporated on May 3, 1858. A site 
was selected on the n. e. cor. 22nd and Market Sts. upon which the erection 
of a two-story brick church was started. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 
29, 1857 with the Revs. Alfred A. Cookman and Newton Heston officiating. 

The church was dedicated on Sun., Oct. 31, 1858, with Bishop Levi Scott 
in attendance. At 10 A. M. the Rev. Anthony Atwood preached, at 3 P. M. 
the Rev. A. Manship had charge and at 7 P. M. the Rev. Wm. Urie, Pres. 
Elder conducted the services. The struggle against the debt incurred was 
disheartening. The trustees became so discouraged that on Jan. 30, 1864, they 
went on record that the Sheriff should be allowed to sell the property for the 
benefit of the creditors. In the fall of that year the Sheriff did advertise the 
property for sale but a small group of Methodists came to the rescue. Joseph 
Pyle was one of these and he became Supt. of the Sunday School. He pre- 
sented an organ to the Sunday School and his daughter was the first to play it. 
This was the first musical instrument in Brandywine Church. 

In the early summer of 1865 an excursion, by boat, to Cape May, was 
arranged for the benefit of the church. It was an eminent success and marked 
the beginning of an annual affair looked forward to, in Brandywine Village. 
Most of the excursionists, led by a band, would march down to the embarka- 
tion point. In 1884, the church was enlarged and a recess pulpit was added. 
While this work was in progress a successful revival was held in a tent at 
24th and Market Sts. In 1889, cathedral glass windows were installed in the 
audience-room. The corner-stone of a chapel for Sunday School purposes was 
laid on Dec. 1, 1889. The services were conducted by the Revs. E. L. Hubbard 
and J. D. C. Hanna. It was opened for the first services on Feb. 13, 1890. The 
opening prayer was offered by the Rev. Adam Stengle and speeches were made 
by the Rev. Jacob Todd and other ministers. 

In 1897, the dwelling next door to the church, 2206 Market St., was 
purchased as a parsonage. The church was improved in 1899. After extensive 
repairs a reopening service was held on Oct. 4, 1908. In 1915, the church was 
enlarged. In 1928, the exterior was resurfaced and in 1938 improvements 
were again made. Sound equipment, the gift of the Busy Bee Class in memory 
of Mrs. Chas. Urner, was first used on Easter Sunday, 1945. 


Epworth Methodist Church (M.E.). At the s. e. cor. of 7th and Church 
Sts., is the entrance to Old Swedes Cemetery. On either side of the Gothic gate- 
way there is a building of stone and it was in one of these buildings that the 


‘effort to establish a Methodist Sunday School in that neighborhood was started 


on a Sunday in October, 1863. Organization was effected on Nov. 6, 1863, 
when officers were elected and the name ‘St. Paul’s M. E. Mission Sunday 
School” was adopted. The Sunday School was a success and the room was soon 
too small to accommodate the members. J. Taylor Gause erected a frame 
chapel, at his own expense, at 7th and Buttonwood Sts., to which the Sunday 
School was moved. This work, started by St. Paul’s Church was taken over by 
Grace Church and the name “Grace M. E. Sunday School, No. 2,” was adopted 
on Apr. 8, 1866. 





WILMINGTON 39 


In May, 1868, a lot on 10th St., extending from Bennett to Church Sts., 
was purchased and the erection of a chapel was started. The corner-stone was 
laid on Sat., Nov. 21, 1868, a cold, raw day. Taking part in the ceremonies 
were the Revs. Wm. J. Stevenson, B. Crist, A. T. Scott and T. F. Plummer. 
The chapel was dedicated in April, 1869, by the Rev. W. J. Stevenson. It was 
at this time that the name “Epworth” was adopted. 

Ten years later a new chapel was completed and it was dedicated on 
Mar. 17, 1879. A successful revival, started in September, 1888, was continued 
night after night until May, 1889. The increased membership could not pos- 
sibly be accommodated in the small chapel. Rebuilding was started in May and 
it was completed and was rededicated on July 28, 1889. There were three 
services, in charge of the Rev. J. D. C. Hanna, Pres. Elder W. L. S. Murray 
and the Rev. L. E. Barrett. 

On June 2, 1892, it was decided to sell the 10th and Bennett Sts. property 
and on June 4, a church site was purchased at 10th and Lombard Sts. A tent 
was erected on the new site and meetings were held beginning Sun., June 12, 
1892. The ground was broken for a new church on Wed. afternoon, Aug. 17, 
1892. The corner-stone was laid on Oct. 6, 1892, at 3 P. M. Those taking 
part in the services were the Rev. J. Y. Dobbins, D.D., who presided and the 
Revs. Merritt Hulburd, D.D., W. L. S. Murray, E. L. Hubbard and L. E. Bar- 
rett, Pres. Elder. The church was dedicated at the evening service on May 21, 
1893, by Bishop Willard F. Mallalieu, D.D., LL.D., who preached in the morn- 
ing and afternoon. He was assisted by Pres. Elder L. E. Barrett, the Rev. Dr. 
Hamilton and the Revs. John Y. Dobbins and T. Snowden Thomas. A full 
week of services followed. The pulpit furniture and communion service were 
presented by the Ladies’ Aid Society. The pulpit Bible and hymnal were pre- 
sented by J. Miller Thomas. The church was enlarged in 1915. 

_ The 75th Anniversary was celebrated with a one-week series of services 
which began Nov. 4, 1938. Due to radical changes in the neighborhood and 
with small hope of better times, the trustees decided, in April, 1942, to offer 
the property for sale. The last communion was held on Sun., Sept. 6, and the 
closing services were held on Sun., Sept. 13, 1942. The morning sermon was 
preached by the Rev. Essell P. Thomas, a former pastor and the evening ser- 
mon was delivered by the Rev. Dr. Oliver J. Collins, the Dist. Supt. The 
property was sold to the Mt. Carmel Methodist Church, a colored congrega- 
tion, on Sept. 16, 1942. 


Grace Methodist Church (M.E.) is a child of St. Paul’s Church. On Nov. 
17, 1864, a meeting was held, in the classrooms of St. Paul’s Church, by a 
small group, for the purpose of forming a new congregation and erecting a 
church. Trustees were elected and the name “Grace’’ was adopted on Jan. 27, 
1865. The first meeting of the trustees was held on Mar. 24, 1865. At a meet- 
ing of the trustees, held on Mar. 28, 1865, the plans for the new church were 
approved. A lot at n. w. cor. 9th and West Sts. was purchased on Apr. 6, 1865, 
as a church site. The corner-stone of the new building was laid on Oct. 7, 
1865, by Bishop Simpson. He was assisted by Pres. Elder J. Cunningham and 
the Revs. Wm. Aikman, Geo. F. Wiswell and George Quigley, the pastor. 

The first services in the new building were held on Mar. 25, 1866. While 
the services were being conducted some of the outside scaffolding was blown 
down, causing quite a commotion but no one was injured. A Sunday School 
was organized that afternoon. The pews were sold on Fri. eve., Mar. 30, 1866. 

The chapel was dedicated at 10:30 A. M. on June 10, 1866, by Bishop 
Ames. A resolution was passed, that a suitable stone bearing the inscription 


Mi ADRS Dan aOR NER NNER gb HIE 8) 9 stem moet-ahe od 





72 


40 THE CH U RO Bees DELAWARE 
NE een 


“Our Centenary Offering, 1866” be placed in a prominent place in the main 
church building. This intention was carried out, as can be seen in the east 
gable. The Sunday School room was dedicated on June 17, 1866. The church 
spire was built on the ground and then raised into place by means of two gin 
poles, a windlass and eight horses. This was quite an engineering feat and the 
pupils of Public School No. 2 at 11th and Washington Sts. were dismissed 
so that they could see the show. The church was completed and was dedi- 
cated on Thurs., Jan. 23, 1868, with Bishops Simpson, Scott and Ames taking 
part. The serpentine stone, used in building the church, was secured from 
the Brinton Quarry, located on the battlefield of the Battle of Brandywine. 


After major renovations, not the least of these being the installation of 
electric lighting a reopening service was held on Sun., Oct. 9, 1892. Those 
taking part included the Revs. T. Snowden Thomas, J. Y. Dobbins, D.D., W. J. 
Stevenson, D.D., J. E. Smith, D.D., and Pres. Elder L. E. Barrett. Services 
were continued for a full week. 

On Sun., Feb. 3, 1907, an individual communion service, the gift of Mrs. 
David Lindsay Gillespie, was consecrated. Four memorial windows were un- 
veiled on July 13, 1913. A new pipe-organ was installed in 1916. It was 
dedicated on Mar. 26, 1916, by Bishop Joseph F. Berry, assisted by Dist. Supt. 
E. L. Hoffecker and Dr. H. F. Randolph. A set of chimes presented by Mr. 
and Mrs. Melville Gambrill, were dedicated on Thanksgiving night, 1920, by 
Bishops Wm. F. McDowell and Charles L. Mead. Mr. Gambrill made a short 
response after which the chimes were played by Mr. Meneeley of the Meneeley 
Foundry who had cast the bells. On Feb. 5, 1922, two additional chime bells, 
the gift of Mr. Gambrill, were presented by Caleb E. Burchenal and accepted 
by John S. Mullin. 


The church was further improved in 1924 through the generosity of Mr. 
Gambrill. A memorial window was dedicated on Feb. 17, 1924, by Bishop Wm. 
F. McDowell assisted by the Rev. Benjamin M. Johns, D.D., the pastor. 


The property adjoining the church on West St. was purchased on Dec. 
20, 1915. The building was altered and placed in use as a church-house. Plans 
for building a modern church-house were perfected and the corner-stone was 
laid on Dec. 20, 1942, at 9:30 A. M., by Bishop Edwin Holt Hughes, assisted 
by the Dist. Supt. Oliver J. Collins, D.D., the Rev. B. M. Johns, D.D., the 
pastor and the Rev. Ralph L. Minker, the associate pastor. This was followed 
by a dedication sermon preached by Bishop Hughes. The church-house includes 
a chapel, class rooms, offices, a large fellowship-room with a stage, banquet 
tables and a kitchen. 


Riddle’s M. E. Chapel was built in 1871, a short distance from its present — 
site on Riddle Avenue. Mr. James Riddle, the owner of the Kentmere Cotton 
Mills on the Brandywine and also a Methodist local-preacher, built the chapel 
for the convenience of his employees. The chapel was dedicated on Christmas 
Day, 1871, by the Rev. Geo. Watson. 


The church bell was originally hung in a low tree but was later moved 
to a tall oak tree. The steam whistle was invented in 1826. It is first mentioned 
as being used on factories to call the men to their work, in 1842. Previous to 
this time most factories were equipped with bells to serve this purpose. The 
Riddle Mills apparently had neither a bell nor a whistle as the Riddle Chapel 
bell was rung to call the men to their duties in the mills. The chapel was 
moved to its present site, renovated and electric lighting was installed after 
which a reopening service was held on Sun., Feb. 7, 1897, at 2:30 P. M. Those 








Mr. SALEM METHODIST CHURCH 
(Page 35) / 





BRANDYWINE METHODIST CHURCH 
(Page 38) 


42 Tatiber Cc URC HE Sees DELAWARE 


taking part were the Revs. S. M. Morgan and John France. Addresses were 
made by the Hon. John Field and the Hon. Charles B. Lore. 

At a service held on Mar. 20, 1898, the title to the property was turned 
over to a board of trustees. Bishop Newman preached the sermon and Wm. 
M. Field delivered an address. The organ, a gift of Mr. and Mrs. Field was 
used for the first time on Jan. 29, 1899. It was formally opened on Feb.5; 
1899 with organists George W. Powick and George N. Maris doing the 
honors. 

Mr. Riddle, in his will, left an annuity to both Riddle’s Chapel and Mt. 
Salem Church. The last services in Riddle’s Chapel were held on Sun., Nov. 
29, 1925. In 1936, the Methodist Conference proposed to sell the property. 
After litigation by some of the Riddle heirs to secure possession of the site, 
the Chancellor ruled that the chapel belonged to the Methodist Conference. 
On Oct. 11, 1941, the Joseph Bancroft and Sons Co. purchased the chapel and 
it is now used as a Community Center. 


Madeley Methodist Church (M.E.). The site of Madeley Church at Clay- 
mont and B Sts. was purchased by the Sunday School Union of Grace Church 
on June 24, 1870 and May 5, 1873. A tent was erected and on Easter Sunday, 
Apr. 9, 1871, the Rev. Jacob Todd held a service. A temporary frame chapel 
was built and the opening service was held on Apr. 23, 1871. This building 
was later sold to a negro congregation and moved away. 

The corner-stone of a new church was laid in August, 1872. It was dedi- 
cated on Dec. 29, 1872, by Dr. J. W. Stevenson, assisted by the Revs. I. N. 
Foreman, Jacob Todd and H. H. Davis. Speeches were delivered by S. M. Har- 
rington, Esq., and Henry C. Conrad, Esq. 

The name “Madeley,” after a parish in England, was adopted. The church 
was incorporated on Apr. 19, 1894. Madeley Church took title to the property 
on June 19, 1894. After having been rebuilt, the church was reopened on 
July 23, 1899. The three services were conducted by the Revs. L. E. Barrett, 
J. P. Otis, Harvey W. Ewing and Van P. Northrup, the pastor. The parsonage, 
adjoining the church, was built in 1911. | | 


Kingswood Methodist Church (M.E.). In May, 1872, Mrs. Alice Rinker, 
a member of Brandywine Church, started a Sunday School in her home on 
Forrest St. It was named the “East Wilmington M. E. Sunday School.” As the 
work progressed, St. Paul’s Church assisted Mrs. Rinker. A mission was -or- 
ganized in February, 1873, and the name “St. Paul’s M. E. Mission” was 
adopted. On June 5, 1873, St. Paul’s Church purchased, from Eli Mendenhall, 
the church site at 14th and Claymont Sts. A chapel was built and it was 
opened on Nov. 1, 1873. It was dedicated later in that month and named 
“Kingswood Chapel of St. Paul’s M. E. Church.” 

After being enlarged and improved a reopening service was held on June 
3, 1883. It continued as a mission until 1884, when a regular pastor was in- 
stalled. The Sunday School was organized on Sun., Oct. 6, 1889. On June 10, 
1889, Kingswood was formally set apart from St. Paul’s Church and made 
a station. They were incorporated on Feb. 26, 1890. Kingswood took title 
to the property on Aug. 22, 1890. 

The ground was broken for a new church on July 13, 1891. The corner- 
stone was laid on Sept. 5, 1891. The ceremony took place on Sat. evening at 
6 o'clock. There was a brass band in attendance, quite a novelty for the Meth- 
odists. The corner-stone was laid by Pres. Elder W. L. S. Murray assisted by 
the Rev. H. S. Dulaney. 





WILMINGTON 43 


The basement was dedicated on Jan. 10, 1892, at the morning service. 
The service of dedication was read by the Rev. T. A. Fernley, D.D. Taking 
part in the services were Bishop Randolph S. Foster, the Revs. W. L. S. Murray 
and H. S. Dulaney and Mrs. Annie Rinker. The auditorium was dedicated on 
Oct. 6, 1895. The morning service was conducted by the Rev. Thomas Hanlon, 
Pres. of Pennington Seminary. The dedication service, by the Rev. Merritt 
Hulburd, D.D., was held in the afternoon. The organ was presented by Mr. 
and Mrs. George W. Todd in memory of their daughter. | 

The parsonage was purchased in 1917. Extensive improvements to the 
church were made in 1938. The 70th Anniversary of the church was celebrated 
on Nov. 8, 1942. One of the speakers was Mrs. Alice Detweiler of Camden, 
N. J., a grand-daughter of Mrs. Alice Rinker, the founder of Kingswood 
Church. 

In the fall of 1945 the project of erecting an unsectarian community 
center was started. It includes a two-story building and the conversion of the 
church auditorium on the second floor into a gymnasium. The first floor of 
the church was then remodeled for use as the church auditorium. 

The auditorium and sanctuary were dedicated on Sun., Nov. 24, 1946, at 
a 3 o'clock service. The Rev. Dr. Oliver J. Collins, Dist. Supt. performed the 
ceremony with the assistance of the Rev. Dr. A. J. Jackson of Newark. © 


Silverbrook ‘Methodist Church (M.E.). In June, 1880, a series of open- 
air meetings were started on Thawley St., under the leadership of Andrew J. 
Dolbow and Robert L. Rodgers. On June 22, 1881, a Methodist Society was 
formed, trustees were elected and they were incorporated as the “Silverbrook 
Chapel.” The open-air meetings were continued until October and then sus- 
pended. The meetings were resumed on May 27, 1883. Later, meetings were 
held in the home of Robert West and in a remodeled stable. Asbury Church 
took charge of it as a mission and in January, 1884, Charles Moore, a local- 
preacher, was assigned to it. 

‘On Nov. 24, 1884, a church site at 2nd and Rodman Sts. was, purchased 
from Mary E. Riley. A frame church, with a recess pulpit, was built. The 
corner-stone was laid on Thurs., Jan. 8, 1885, by the Revs. W. L. S. Murray 
and E. L. Hubbard. The church was dedicated on May 31, 1885, by the Rev. 
W. L. S. Murray. The pulpit furniture was donated by Dr. J. H. Simms of 
Asbury Church. The first regular pastor was assigned in 1887 and it was made 
a station in 1888. 


More land was purchased and the church was repaired after which a 


reopening service was held on Sept. 22, 1889. The three services were con- 
ducted by the Revs. W. L. S. Murray, L. E. Barrett and J. D. C. Hanna. Silver- 
brook M. E. Church was incorporated on June 9, 1890. 

More land was secured on Nov. 25, 1891, after which plans were made 
for building a new church. When the ground was broken for this building the 
first spadeful of earth was turned over by Willie Connell, a grandson of Joseph 
Pyle. Mr. Pyle had donated the site and contributed heavily toward the cost 
of the building. The corner-stone was laid on Oct. 15, 1892, by the Rev. T. E. 
Terry assisted by a large number of ministers. The Sunday School was opened 
on Sun., July 23, 1893. The church was dedicated on Sept. 24, 1893, at the 
evening service, by Bishop John P. Newman. 

Elwood P. Pyle donated additional land to the church on on Oct. 23. 
1907. After extensive repairs a reopening service was held on Sept. 19, 1909, 
by the Rev. W. E. Greenfield, the pastor. Additional land was purchased on 
Nov. 28, 1916. 


rant Nat 


Pope 


eS ee ee ee ee Oe ee 


a 


44 THE WC HO RiGee ES One Deka AW A RE 


The Joseph W. Coley Community House was built in 1921. The ground 
was broken on Tues. evening, May 3, 1921. The first spadeful of earth was 
turned by Joseph W. Coley who had been Supt. of the Sunday School for 
many years. 

It was dedicated on Oct. 30, 1921, at the evening service, by Bishop John 
W. Hamilton. He was assisted by the Revs. Robert Watt and John H. Willey. 
A new organ was dedicated on Apr. 3, 1938, by Bishop Fred T. Keeney as- 
sisted by the Rev. J. Harry Wright, the pastor. 


The Swedish Methodist Church (M.E.) was located on e. 11th St., near 
Heald St. It was started as a Sunday School in Kingswood Church in 1882. 
The members were children of Swedes who had lately arrived in this country. 
Capt. Alex Kelley and members of Grace Church took an active interest in 
this work. The lot on Eleventh St. was purchased in April, 1883, and the 
church was completed in the fall. 

The Rev. Carl O. Carlson, a native of Sweden, was assigned to take charge 
of the church. A board of trustees was elected on Oct. 22, 1883. On this date 
the church was dedicated by the Rev. Mr. Carlson assisted by the Rev. J. Rich- 
ards Boyle. The church was incorporated on June 15, 1921. After more than 
a half-century of good work, a radical change took pass in the neighborhood. 
These new conditions caused the congregation to become so small that they 
gave up the effort and the church was closed in January, 1942. The building 
was then rented to an independent: colored congregation known as the St. 
Beulah Apostolic Faith. 


Wesley M. E. Church. On Dec. 23, 1884, a meeting of Methodists was 
held in the home of James Shakespeare, 306 s. Jackson St. Wesley Church 
was the outgrowth of this meeting. On Jan. 11, 1885, a Sunday School was 
organized, under the auspices of Pres. Elder Charles Hill, in a store at Mary- 
land Ave. and Linden St. Jabez Hodson, a local-preacher from St. Paul’s 
Church was made Supt. The meeting place was later changed to Maryland 
Ave. and Bird St. A tent was purchased and meetings were held in it during 
the summer weather. The church was formally organized on June 4, 1885. 
Meetings were then held on the second floor of the Weccacoe Fire House, 
2nd and Jackson Sts. On Mar. 20, 1886 and June 5, 1886, a lot on the n. e. 
cor. of Linden and Jackson Sts. was purchased from Swithen Chandler and 
Jas. C. Johnson as a church site. A brick church, 39 ft. x 59 ft., was then 
built. The corner-stone was laid on Nov. 6, 1886, by Pres. Elder Hill assisted 
by the Revs. Jacob Todd, Adam Stengle, E. L. Hubbard and J. T. Gardner, 
the pastor. 

After many discouragements the church was completed and it was dedi- 
cated by Pres. Elder W. L. S. Murray at the evening service on Dec. 4, 1887. 
He was assisted by the Rev. E. L. Hubbard and the Rev. Dr. Jacob Todd. The 
pews were donated by St. Paul’s Church. Various equipment was donated 
by interested Methodists. 

This church soon became too small to accommodate the growing con- 
§tegation and it was torn down in 1890 and the erection of a new church, 
50 ft. by 75 ft. was started. The corner-stone was laid on Sat., June 14, 1890, 
by the Rev. W. G. Koons. He was assisted by Pres. Elder W. L. S. Murray 
and the Revs. J. D. C. Hanna, Adam Stengle and T. S. Thomas. The building 
was completed and was dedicated on Nov. 2, 1890. Those taking part in the 
services were Dr. S. F. Upham, Dr. Jacob Todd, the Rev. W. L. S. Murray and 
Joseph Pyle. 





WILMINGTON 45 


After being greatly improved, a reopening service was held on Nov. 12, 
1899, by Pres. Elder Robert Watt and the Rev. W. F. Dawson, the pastor. 

This church ceased activities in 1925 at which time, May 19, 1925, title 
to the property was assumed by the M. E. Mis. and Ch. Extension Society. 
The church was used then as a community-center. It was sold to the Knights 
of St. Hedwig on Jan. 30, 1934. 


Cookman M. E. Church was organized in 1888 and named for the Rev. 
Alfred Cookman. On July 4, 1888, the first floor of 1307 Scott St. was rented, 
the second floor being occupied by a fife and drum corps. The Rev. W. W. 
Taylor proceeded to prepare the room for services. The first meeting was 
held on the afternoon of July 29, 1888. Preaching was held immediately after 
the Sunday School meetings. On Aug. 26, a Sunday School Board was elected. 
The name “Cookman” was adopted on Aug. 30. On Sept. 1, Cookman was 
received as one of Asbury’s Sunday Schools. The Rev. W. W. Taylor died on 
Dec. 1 and the monument over his grave is inscribed “The founder of Cook- 
man M. E. Church.” When the members assembled on Dec. 31, for watch- 
night services, they found the fife and drum corps going “full tilt” on the 
second floor. The members were in a quandary but their problem was solved 
when the music subsided at five minutes of twelve. — 


As the congregation grew larger it was decided to erect a substantial 


church building. They were incorporated on May 29, 1891. A lot on the n. e. 
cor. of 14th and Dupont Sts. was purchased on Jan. 7, 1892. The ground was 
broken on Mar. 6, 1894. One of the Sunday School teachers paid $25.00 for 
the privilege of turning the first spadeful of earth. The Revs. John Y. Dob- 
bins, D.D., and A. T. Scott conducted the ceremonies. The corner-stone was 
laid on Apr. 9, 1894, by the Rev. L. E. Barrett, the Presiding Elder. 

The first service, in the new building, was held on July 15, 1894 and the 
dedication services were held on Dec. 30, 1894 by Pres. Elder L. E. Barrett. 
He was assisted by the Revs. E. Stubbs, M. Hulburd, F. B. Short, J. D. C. 
-Hanna and J. B. Quigg. : , ; 

The West End Reading Room property, adjoining Cookman Church, was 
purchased on Mar. 20, 1922. Because of declining membership. it was decided, 
on Mar. 5, 1936, to close the church. The property was sold to the First In- 
dependent Church on June 2, 1937. 7 


Eastlake Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1888, Jos. L. Carpenter, Jr., offered 
to donate one-half of the cost of a lot at 29th and West Sts. as a site for a 
Methodist chapel but for some reason the offer was not accepted. In 1889, a 
small group from Brandywine Church began to hold cottage prayer-meetings 
in what was then known as “East Lake Park.” In the fall of 1889 a store room 
on 31st St., west of Jefferson St., was secured and a Sunday School was started. 
The church was organized on Feb. 16, 1890. On May 17, 1890, a lot at s. w. 
cor. 30th and Tatnall Sts. was purchased by Brandywine Church. A frame 
chapel was built and it was dedicated on June 1, 1890. A formal opening was 
held on June 29, 1890, with Pres. Elder W. L. S. Murray and the Revs. J. T. 
Van Burkalow and C. A. Grise taking part. The name “Eastlake M. E. Church” 
was then adopted. 

At that time the sidewalks in that neighborhood consisted of ‘duck 
- boards.” The church was incorporated on Jan. 10, 1892. On Mar. 19, 1892, 
the title to the property was transferred to the Eastlake M. E. Church. The 
frame chapel was enlarged in 1895. In 1905, the frame chapel was torn down 
and the brick church was built. The corner-stone was laid on Sat., June 17, 


eae Wee OR ee a Ler debe Oca a ee ae a TELS rr 
DELON EI OTIS ATE TC tet 


46 TRH E & C:H_ UKé Ge BR Sat O LE aebolh L: AsW7 ARE 


1905, by the Revs. Hubert W. Wells, W. L. S. Murray and R. K. Stevenson. 
The dedication services were held on Oct. 15, 1905. Among those taking 
part where Chief Justice Charles B. Lore, the Rev. Dr. John Krantz and Pres. 
Elder A. S. Mowbray. 

Additional land was purchased on Jan. 2, 1906 and on June 28, 1909. In 
1916, the building was enlarged. The rededication services were held on Jan. 
7, 1917, at 10:30 A. M. The ceremonies were in charge of the Rev. Robert 
Watt, assisted by the Rev. John Krantz, D.D., the Rev. J. H. Gray, the Rev. 
H. Cunningham and the Rev. V. P. Northrup. 

The 50th Anniversary of the church was celebrated in 1940 with services 
lasting from Nov. 24, to Dec. 1. At this time a new organ was dedicated by 
the Rev. Walter E. Gunby, Dist. Supt., assisted by the pastor, the Rev. 
Ce Cy atiis. 


Harrison Street Methodist Church (M.E.). A Sunday School was organ- 
ized on Sept. 11, 1890, at the home of Howard L. George, 1303 w. 8th St. 
Meetings were held in two rooms at 800 n. Franklin St. It was known as the 
“Franklin Street Sunday School” and was sponsored by St. Paul's Church. The 
first sermon was preached on Oct. 5, 1890, by the Rev. Jabez Hodson. The 
church was formally organized on Oct. 25, 1890, by the Rev. L. E. Barrett, 
when the name “Harrison Street” was adopted. They were incorporated on 
Mar. 25, 1891. A lot on the s. w. cor. of 7th and Harrison Sts. was purchased 
on Apr. 21, 1891: 

A temporary frame chapel was built on the new site and it was opened on 
May 31, 1891. During the summer it was improved and a reopening service 
was held on Wed., Sept. 30, 1891, by the Rev. W. J. Duhadway. At that time 
the sidewalks in that section were built of boards and the plank that led into 
the chapel was referred to by scoffers as “the Heavenly bridge.” 

Additional land was purchased on Mar. 18, 1893. The erection of the 
present church, built of Avondale stone, was started and the corner-stone was 
laid on Mon., July 17, 1893, at 4 P. M. Chief Justice Charles B. Lore presided 
and the. corner-stone was laid by Pres. Elder L. E. Barrett. Among thdse as- 
sisting at the services were the Revs. O. G. Buddington, Jabez Hodson, John 
Y. Dobbins, D.D., J.D.C. Hanna, E. L. Hubbard, F. Burgette Short, Moses 
Heath, J. R. Milligan and T. E. Martindale, D.D., the pastor. 

The church was dedicated on the morning of Feb. 11, 1894, by Bishop 
Cyrus D. Foss, D.D. He was assisted by the Revs. F. Burgette Short, J. D. C. 
Hanna, T. E. Terry, Isaac Jewell, Thos. Hanlon, D.D., John Y. Dobbins, 
D.D., Mr. Joseph Pyle and Charles B. Lore, Esq. Improvements were made 
and a reopening service was held on Nov. 1, 1897. In 1908, the Epworth 
League and the Primary Department were added. A service of dedication 
was held on Sept. 6, 1908, by the Rev. Dr. H. W. Bolton at the morning 
service. The Rev. A. S. Mowbray delivered an address in the afternoon ana 
. the Rev. Clinton T. Wyatt preached in the evening. 

A pipe-organ was installed in 1915. Between 1919 and 1924 additions 
were built, including the parsonage and the church-house which is also 
equipped as a gymnasium. The dedication of the church-house was held on 
Apr. 1, 1923. Among those participating were the Revs. Robert Watt, Wm. 
E. Habbart, F. B. Short and Mayor Le Roy Harvey. Improvements were made 
in 1938. 


Trinity Methodist Church (M.E.). Methodist meetings were held in the 
store of Mr. Cottrell at 22nd and Church Sts., beginning on Sun., Jan. 1 








48 T HE CILU RiCHIBS ORY DE LASG ALE 


1905. Meetings were continued here until May 14, 1905. At that time Con- 
ference appointed the Rev. L. I. McDougal as pastor and he held tent meet- 
ings from May until October, 1905. During the winter a few faithful mem- 
bers met in private homes. In the spring of 1906, Mr. Cottrell, a devoted 
friend of the church, proceeded to erect a frame chapel on a lot which is part 
of the present site. The opening services were held on Mar. 4, 1906. This 
building was turnd over to the trustees of the church on June 30, 1906 and 
Mr. Cottrell was reimbursed. The chapel was sheathed with sheet iron which 
was pressed to imitate bricks and it was commonly called the “Little Tin 
Church.” In 1907, the building was greatly improved and slightly enlarged. 

The dedicatory service was held on Nov. 17, 1907. Those taking part 
included Pres. Elder A. S. Mowbray and the Revs. J. Howard Gray, C. T. 
Wyatt and J. H. Thornton, the pastor. The membership became greatly re- 
duced, with the outlook so poor that the trustees became discouraged and, 
on June 7, 1911, they turned the property over to the Methodist Conference. 

With the appointment of the Rev. R. High Adams, as pastor, in March 
1912, the church took on new life and the membership began to grow. Under 
Mr. Adams’ leadership plans were outlined to build a new church. The corner- 
stone of the present church was laid on Dec. 7, 1913, by Dist. Supt. E. L. 
Hoffecker assisted by the Revs. George E. Reed and E. C. Sunfield. On Mar. 
14, 1914, the Missionary Society turned the title over to the trustees of Trin- 
ity Church. : 

The building was completed and was dedicated on June 28, 1914. The 
morning service was conducted by Bishop Thomas B. Neeley and the Rev. 
E. L. Hoffecker, D.D. The dedication sermon was preached in the evening by 
Bishop Neeley. 

In 1920, extensive renovations were made. In August of that year ground 
was broken for a new parsonage, next door to the church. The corner-stone 
was laid in September and it was completed and occupied in December, 1920. 
A new pipe-organ was dedicated on Mar. 1, 1942. 

Fourteen memorial windows were dedicated on Mar. 23, 1947. Among 
those taking part in the services were the Revs. Dr. Oliver J. Collins, Howard 
Davis and W. S. Grant, the pastor. : 


Washington ar sea M. E. Church was located on the corner of 18th 
St. and Baynard Boulevard. The corner-stone was laid on July 4, 1905, at 7 
P. M. with the Rev. A. S. Mowbray, Presiding Elder, in charge. The dedication 
services were held on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 30, 1905, by Bishop Charles C. 
McCabe with the Rev. A. S. Mowbray assisting. Built of stone the entrance 
was surmounted with a battlemented tower on which there was a flag pole. 
After a rather precarious existence in a neighborhood that at that time was 
by no means built up, the property was sold to Hanover Presbyterian Church 
on Mar. 28, 1908. 


McCabe Methodist Church (M.E.) was organized at a meeting held at 
the home of Mrs. Lydia W. Slocomb, 1600 Washington St. This meeting was 
called after the Washington Heights Church had been sold. The first trustees 
were elected on Mar. 20, 1908. The first service was held on Sun., Mar. 29, 
1908. Later, a tent was pitched on a lot at 18th and Monroe Sts. In August, 
the tent was severely damaged by a storm, after which the services were held 
in a rented house at 227 Concord Ave. On Apr. 8, 1908, a plot at Baynard 
Boulevard and 22nd St. was selected as a site for a chapel. The corner-stone 
was laid on Oct. 3, 1908. Those taking part included the Revs. H. W. Bolton, 





VeRENM-PNeG-T-O2N 49 


ee ne ee ran EEE EERE 


H. A. Westerfield, C. G- Williams, C. T. Wyatt, H. C. Turner and H. W. 
Kellogg, D.D. An address was delivered by the Hon. H. C,. Conrad. 

The chapel was dedicated on Dec. 6, 1908. A love-feast was led by the 
Rev. W. L. S. Murray at the morning service. The dedicatory sermon was then 
preached by the Rev. Dr. John Krantz. The evening service was conducted by 
the Rev. A. S. Mowbray, Dist. Supt., assisted by the Rev. W. C. Poole, the 
pastor. The celebration was continued during the following week. 

The chapel was vacated on May 11, 1913 and it was torn down. The 
corner-stone of a new church was laid on July 20, 1913, by the Rev. F. C. 
MacSorley, the pastor. He was assisted by the Revs. E. L. Hoffecker, R. L. 
Jackson and John Watchorn. In the meantime, the congregation met in the 
basement of Public School, No. 30 until Aug. 31. On Sun., Sept. 7, the serv- 
ices were transferred to a dwelling at 505 w. 21st St. The new church was 
dedicated on Jan. 11, 1914, by Bishop Earl Cranston at the evening service. 
He was assisted by Dist. Supt. E. L. Hoffecker, the Rev. F. D. Bovard and the 
Rev. F. C. MacSorley, the pastor. 

On Apr. 5, 1922 a committee was appointed to look into the feasibility of 
building a larger church. The contract for a new building was awarded on 
June 5, 1923. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 9, 1923, by Bishop W. F. 
McDowell. The church was dedicated on May 18, 1924, by Bishop McDowell 
assisted by the Rev. Alan F. Poore, the pastor, and the Rev. James W. Colona, 
Dist. Supt. The evening service was in charge of the Rev. Victor Mills. Services 
were held for a full week. In 1928, the dwelling next to the church was pur- 
chased for a parsonage. 

On Dec. 22, 1940, the church received a gift of $10,000.00 from John 
C. Hook, in memory of his wife. This money was to be applied to the church 
debt. Mr. Hook gave a total of $30,000.00 for this purpose. 

Candelabra and flower vases, the gift of the Mizpah Class, were dedicated 
to the memory of Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hook on Sun., April 20, 1947. 


St. Paul’s Italian M. E. Church. In 1913, an Italian Mission was organized 
at Union Church. A dwelling on the east side of West St., south ‘of 3rd St., 
was purchased by the Wil. City Mission and Church Extension Soc., on Apr. 
30, 1913. The building was remodeled for church purposes and it was dedi- 
cated on June 15, 1913. Among those taking part in the ceremony were Dist. 
Supt. E. L. Hoffecker and the Revs. Ettori Di Stefano, W. F. Cochran, E. Cc: 
Sunfield, Geo. E. Reed and Frederick Wright. The services were conducted in 
Italian regardless of the fact that all of those who attended the services could 
speak English. The Missionary Society was compelled to carry the financial 
burden as the members would contribute little if anything. In spite of this, the 
members insisted that they wanted a regular church and not a home-made one. 

On June 23, 1917, the Missionary Society purchased a site at the s. w. cor. 
of 8th St. and Bancroft Parkway. Then they proceeded to build a brick church. 
The corner-stone was laid on Apr. 7, 1919, by the Rev. Robert Watt. On the 
same day the dedication services were conducted by the Rev. J. H. Beauchamp 
assisted by the Rev. Jos. A. Pignaltiello, the pastor. The Rev. N. A. Sabbarese 
preached a sermon in Italian. The name “‘St. Paul’s Italian M. E. Church” was 
adopted. 

Becoming discouraged with the results obtained, the conference decided 
to close the church in 1922. It was then taken over by St. Peter's Methodist 
Church, colored, who laid a cornerstone in 1923. They purchased the property 
on May 9, 1928. On Aug. 13, 1937, the property was acquired, at a Sheriff's 
sale, by the Wesleyan Methodist Church. 


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A RIT Somer ae 


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50 Dehee CH OR CRESS eres OSE Ta WARE 


St. Paul’s Wesley Mission. When Union Church moved from 2nd and 
Washington Sts. to their new home 4t 5th and Washington Sts., in 1866, the 
2nd St. church was occupied by St. Paul’s Wesley Mission, sponsored by St. 
Paul’s Church. This mission was active until 1879 at which time the building 
was taken over by the Reformed Episcopal Church of the Covenant. 


Grace Methodist Mission. In 1866, the temporary connection between 
Grace Church and Scott Church was severed. A new Grace Mission was opened 
on 7th St., near Locust St. It was abandoned after a few years’ service, 


The First Methodist Protestant Church. In 1844, a group of Methodist 
Protestants started the erection of a church at the n. w. cor. of Third and Or- 
ange Sts. During the week of Tues., Mar. 4, 1845, the women of the church con- 
ducted a Fair in Council room at City Hall to raise funds for the church in 
course of erection. This church ceased to function in 1848 and the building 
was sold to the Rev. Edward Kennard, a M. E. preacher. He conducted services 
here and organized the Orange Street M. E. Mission. It was this Mission that 
was the forerunner of Union M. E. Church. The chapel was later moved to 
7th and Walnut Sts. 


Calvary Methodist Church (M. P.) formerly the First Methodist Protest- 
ant Church was organized on Jan. 9, 1880. In March, it was constituted as a 
mission under the Home Missionary Society of the Maryland Conference. The 
first meetings were held at 7th and Walnut Sts., in the old building which 
originally stood at 3rd and Orange Sts., and which had: been bought by the 
Rev. Edward Kennard. This building was purchased on Sept. 1, 1880, from 
Nathaniel W. Gooken. ! . 

The second pastor, the Rev. F. C. Klein, resigned in September, 1882, 
to become the first male foreign missionary of the M. P. Church and he was 
stationed at Yokohama, Japan. 

In 1885, the building was remodeled and enlarged. The Sunday School 
room was opened on Nov. 29, 1885, by the Rev. G. F. Farring, the pastor. The 


built and new windows installed. The dedication service was conducted by the 
Rev. W. S. Hammond, in the morning. The evening service was in charge of 
the Rev. G. F. Farring, the pastor. The dwelling at 314 e. 7th St. was pur- 
chased on Apr. 8, 1920, to be used as a parsonage. 

On Feb. 25, 1927, a lot of land was purchased at 36th and Washington Sts., 
as a future church site. The last service was held in the old church on May 19, 
1929, by the Rev. E. T. Kirkley. On Aug. 18, 1929, a series of tent meetings 
were started at the new site. The old church had been sold to Grace A. M. E. 
Zion Church on May 20, 1929. 

The ground was broken for the new church on Oct. 13, 1929. The first 
’ spadeful of earth was turned by the Rev. J. L. Ward, the pastor. He was fol- 
lowed by the Rev. W. H. Litsinger, Mayor G. W. K. Forrest and Mrs. David 
A. Hay. The corner-stone was laid on Mar. 30, 1930. Among those taking part 


The dedication services were held on Oct. 12, 1930 at 11 A. M. with the 
Rev. Leonard B. Smith, Pres. of the M. P. Conference, in charge. He was as- 
sisted by the Revs. R. L. White, E. C. Makosky and J. L. Ward, the pastor. The 





WILMINGTON 51 





parsonage at 222 w. 36th St., was purchased on Nov. 25, 1935. The name 
“Calvary” was adopted in September, 1941. A new organ was dedicated on 
Sept. 19, 1943, by Dist. Supt. Oliver J. Collins, D.D., assisted by the Rev. A. T. 
McFarlin. 


The Second M. P. Church was organized and incorporated at a meeting 
held on Feb. 19, 1892. A lot on Fifth Ave., between Maryland Ave., and An- 
chorage St., was bought on Apr. 20, 1894, from Joseph L. Carpenter, Jr. 
Ground was broken for the church on Apr. 24, 1894. The corner-stone was 
laid on May 13, 1894 by the Rev. F. T. Tagg assisted by the Revs. B. F. Jester 
and G. A. Morris. The building was improved in 1907. All of the work was 
done by the members of the congregation under the leadership of the Rev. 
J. E. Massey. The last minister served in 1927. After a rather precarious ex- 
istence the church was closed in 1931. On Sept. 30, 1933, the property was 
sold to a congregation of Nazarenes. 


Peninsula Methodist Church (M. P.) was organized on May 16, 1920, at 
a meeting held in the Jr. O. U. A. M. Hall, 907 Tatnall St. They were incor- 
porated on Oct. 17, 1920. Meetings were continued here until their church 
was built. The present site at the n. w. cor. of 20th and Washington Sts. was 
purchased on Nov. 19, 1920. 

The ground was broken for the new church on Dec. 10, 1921, with the 
Revs. Leonard B. Smith, J. M. Sheridan, D.D., and F. G. Holloway conducting 
the exercises. 

The corner-stone was laid on Apr. 2, 1922, at 3 P. M. by the Rev. Leon- 
ard B. Smith. Assisting him were the Rt. Rev. Philip Cook, the Revs. Charles 
H. Bohner, George D. Allison, D.D., and Mayor LeRoy Harvey. Because of 
the extreme cold the music was omitted with the exception of the singing of 
two hymns. 

The first service was held in the new church on Dec. 3, 1922. The sermon 
was preached by the Rev. James H. Strong, D.D., Pres. of the Maryland M. P. 
Conference. The parsonage, adjoining the church on 20th St., was built in 
1928. A new organ was installed in 1942. It was dedicated by the pastor, the 
Rev. John W. Townsend on Dec. 20, 1942. The chimes of the organ were in 
honor of Mrs. Mollie Keatley, the oldest member of the congregation. 


Wesleyan Methodist Church. This church was organized on the east side 
of Wilmington and in 1932 they met at 719 e. 7th St. The church is now lo- 
cated at 8th St. and Bancroft Parkway. It has a corner-stone inscribed June 11, 
1937. The property was acquired by them at a Sheriff’s sale on Aug. 13, 1937. 


City M. P. Mission. This mission was organized early in the 1880's and 
met in the old Union Church on 2nd St., near Washington St. In April, 1884, 
dissention arose among the members which almost led to violence. At a result 
one group withdrew and started a church over the Market House on Madison 
St., between 3rd and 4th Sts. It was dedicated on Apr. 24, 1884 by the Rev. 
Elam Kirk. After a few years both groups were dissolved. 


Methodist Missions. Centennial Mission was organized at 11th and French 
Sts. in 1889. 

A mission was conducted at 622 Jefferson St. from 1919 until 1924. 

Browntown Mission was opened, in 1924, on 6th Ave., and it was closed 
in 1936. 

A mission was conducted at 502 w. 2nd St., from 1927 to 1931. 





52 THE CHURCHES }OF DIEDAWARE 


Wesley Chapel, at Sth and Jefferson Sts., was opened in 1932. 


e 


" EPISCOPAL 


Holy Trinity P. E. Church, better known as Old Swedes Church, was built, 
in 1698, by the Swedish Lutherans. When the Rev. Lawrence Girelius, the last 
Swedish Lutheran pastor, sailed away from Delaware, in 1791, the regime of 
the Swedish Lutheran Church in Delaware came to an end. The history of Old 
Swedes Church is divided into two distinct parts, from 1698 to 1791 when it 
was a Swedish Lutheran Church and from 1792 to the present time when it 
has been a Protestant Episcopal Church. The Rev. Joseph Clarkson of the P. E. 
Church conducted his first service at Old Swedes on Sept. 25, 1792. The tower 
and belfry were erected in 1802 and the bell was properly installed, having 
previously hung in a walnut tree. The town having grown westward a new 
Trinity Church was built at the n. e. cor. Fifth and King Sts. It was conse- 
crated on Apr. 6, 1830, by Bishop Henry U. Onderdonk. 

During the period 1830-1842 Old Swedes Church was unused and became 
very dilapidated. Under the will of Mrs. Henrietta Almond, money was pro- 
vided to have the building reconditioned, which was done. The old pews were 
replaced with benches, a wood floor was laid over the brick floor, the outside 
stairway to the gallery was removed and an inside stairway was built. The 
reopening service, in charge of Bishop Alfred Lee, was held on Aug. 21, 1842. 
Regular services were resumed, in 1847, with an assistant rector in charge. It 
still remains a part of Trinity Parish with a vicar in charge. A bell was placed 
in the tower on Oct. 1, 1848. The bell, having become cracked, it was recast, in 
1852, by E. C. Stotsenberg, a local foundryman. The vicarage, sexton’s lodge 
and gateway were built in 1855. The church was again repaired in 1856, by 
“the great liberality of the lamented Alexis I. du Pont.” 

Regular services were again restored in 1868. A reopening service was 
held on Aug. 6, 1882. The Bayard window was installed and was ready for 
the service held on Dec. 20, 1885. The chancel window, in memory of Mrs. 
Jane Elizabeth Breck, was unveiled in 1887. In 1889-90, the pulpit was refin- 
ished, a communion service was secured, a window in memory of Mrs. Wm. 
Forrest and a new organ were installed. On Feb. 17, 1892, the organ and a 
window in memory of the Rev. Eric Bjork were consecrated by Bishop Cole- 
man. In 1892-93, a window in memory of Jos. Milliken was unveiled. On 
March 25, 1894, a window in memory of Eleanor Vandever was unveiled. This 
completed the last available place for memorial windows. 

During the winter of 1893-94 when the nation was in the throes of a 
heavy depression, soup was sold by the church at a nominal price. 

The parish-house was completed and was dedicated on the evening of 
Tues., Mar. 27, 1894, by Bishop Leighton Coleman. He was assisted by the 
Revs. M. B. Dunlap, H. Ashton Henry, Dr. Horace Burr, Thomas F. Bayard, 
+ Esq., and Judge Ignatius C. Grubb. On Dec. 31, 1894, an ornamental stone 
font cover was presented by Wm. Montgomery. In 1895-96 the wall and fence 
were built. 

The 200th Anniversary of the laying of the corner-stone was celebrated 
on Sat., May 28, 1898. The rector, the Rev. H. Ashton Henry was assisted by 
the Revs. Martin B. Dunlap, Snyder B. Simes and Henry C. Conrad, Esq. 

The portrait of the Rev. Eric Bjork was presented to the church, in 1899, 
by the Great Copper Mountain Mining Co., of Sweden. It was at this time 
that the bi-centennial celebration of the church was held. In preparation for 
this event the church was entirely renovated. The brick floor was uncovered and 





WILMINGTON 53 


found to be in excellent condition, the box-pews were restored and the Original 
altar was enclosed in the present white marble altar which is a memorial to the 
ten Swedish pastors who served the church. A new roof was built at this time. 


The bi-centennial celebration of the consecration of the church was held 
on Trinity Sunday, May 28, 1899, when the Rt. Rev. Leighton Coleman, 
Bishop of Delaware, read the prayer of benediction, rededicating the church 
to its holy use. A Bishop’s chair, made of original wood from the building 
was presented, in memory of the Rev. Charles Breck, D.D., by his widow. In 
1901-02 an eagle lectern was installed. 


A large buttonwood tree, close to the church, having been struck by 
, lightning, then cut down, it was decided, in 1905, to remove the large stump. 
Dynamite was used to break up the wood and imbedded in the heart of the 
stump there was a small headstone inscribed M. B. It was set up again and is 
a memorial to Margaretta Bartenson, the daughter of an early Swedish settler. 


The church stands today practically the same as after the restoration in 
1899. In 1909 a new pipe-organ was installed in its present location as a 
memorial to Bishop Leighton Coleman. The organ was completed on Apr. 7, 
1909 and in the meantime the entire building had been reconditioned. 


On Irinity Sunday, 1916, at the anniversary service, a presentation service 
was held, at which time the $50,000.00 raised by the Rev. F. M. Kirkus, D.D., 
to be added to the endowment fund was turned over to the Diocese. A service 
of benediction was conducted by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman. 

A memorial tablet to Phoebe George Bradford and Edward Green Brad- 
ford was dedicated on Nov. 15, 1916. 

On Fri., Nov. 16, 1923 the church was visited by the Most Rev. Nathan 
Soederblom, Archbishop of Upsala, Sweden. He was introduced by the Rev. 
Frederick Doerr of St. Stephen’s Church. He was welcomed by the rector, the 
Rev. Dr. F. M. Kirkus. The Archbishop gave a friendly and informal talk. 

On Tues., Oct. 13, 1925, an altar cloth, the gift of Mrs. Bowden, of Balti- 
more, was blessed by the vicar. | : 

Crown Prince Gustavus Adolphus and Crown Princess Louise ‘Alexandra 
of Sweden made a flying visit to the church on Mon., May 31, 1926. A silver 
plaque bearing an engraving of the church and an inscription commemorating 
the occasion was presented to the Crown Prince by Bishop Philip Cook, D.D. 

At a special service held at 7:30 P. M., Sun., Oct. 9, 1927, Maurice A. 
Hogeland, Vice-Consul of Sweden at Philadelphia presented to the church on 
behalf of the Crown Prince and the Crown Princess a Swedish Bible and a 
Swedish flag. The Rev. F. M. Kirkus, D.D., received the gifts. At the Bishop's 
request, G. A. Flink, a Swede of Wilmington, read from the Bible the first 
nine verses of the Sermon on the Mount. 

The Ter-Centenary Celebration of the City of Wilmington was ushered in 
with a Thanksgiving service at Old Swedes Church on Mon., June 27, 1938. 
It also represented the 240th Anniversary of the building of Old Swedes 
Church. The service was conducted by the Rt. Rev. Dr. Henry St. George 
Tucker, presiding Bishop of the P. E. Church. Prince Bertel and Crown. Prin- 
cess Louise headed the delegation of prominent representatives from Sweden 
who were present. Bishop Gustaf Ljunggren presented to the church, on be- 
half of the clergy of Sweden, a Bible which is a facsimile of the 1541 Gustavus 
Vasa Bible. Crown Prince Gustavus Adolphus who, also, had come to America 
was ill, aboard his ship, and was unable to attend the celebration. 

The church has many beautiful memorial windows and plaques. The silver 
communion service consisting of a chalice, a paten and a ciborium was pre- 


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54 Ey © ACU. RA GiGE Sal O eR LAAs At RoE 


sented to the church in 1718 by the Great Copper Mountain Mining Co., 
of Sweden. 

The site of Old Swedes Church and graveyard was used as a burying- 
ground from the time of the first settlement and undoubtedly the bones of all 
of the Swedish colonists rest here. In the early days the church yard was en- 
closed with a wooden paling fence. The stone wall was built in 1837 and it 
was rebuilt in 1897. The oldest tombstone is over the grave of Wm. Vandever 
who died on Oct. 11, 1719. Many of Wilmington’s most prominent person- 
ages are buried here. Bishop Alfred Lee, D.D., members of the Bayard family, 
Major Peter Jacquett of Revolutionary fame, Mary Vining, noted beauty, and 
Elizabeth Montgomery, author of “Reminiscenses,” to mention only a few. 

There is an endowment fund of about $100,000.00 which insures that the 
church and grounds will be well taken care of, so long as the works of man last. 

On May 9, 1946, a campaign was started under the leadership of Mr. 
Pierre S. du Pont, III, to raise $250,000.00 with which to enlarge and equip the 
Christina Community Center. It will include facilities for all youth recrea- 
tional activities. Work was started in April, 1947, to alter the old parish- 
house and to build an addition to it. In furthering this work the old arched 
gateway was removed. It was planned to reopen the center in the fall of 1947. 

On June 22, 1829, the trustees secured possession of the plot on the n. e. 


cor. of Sth and King Sts., from Stephen Bonsall. There was an agreement in 


which the trustees agreed to pay $80.00 per year rental and upon payment of 
$1400.00, they were to receive title to the lot. This agreement was fulfilled on 
Mar. 29, 1855, at which time the trustees acquired title to the site. 

Trinity Chapel, at 5th and King Sts., was built during 1829. It was con- 
secrated, on Apr. 6, 1830, by Bishop Henry U. Onderdonk. The activities of 
Trinity Parish were then removed from Old Swedes Church to Trinity Chapel. 
The chapel was enlarged and improved in 1848. A rectory and porch were 
built and the erection of a spire was started. A reopening service was held on 
May 30, 1849. The spire was completed in 1851. In 1852, the bell having 
become cracked, it was recast by E. C. Stotsenberg, of Wilmington, as a gift 
of Mrs. Agnes Stothart and the bell was so inscribed. A new organ was 
installed in 1857. 

In 1866, the church was improved and refurnished. A memorial window 
was presented by John Anderson. The church was sold in 1881 and the last 
service in the church was held on July 30, 1882. When the church was sold, 
the bell having become cracked, it was stored at Del. Ave. and Adams St. In 
May, 1907, it was sold for $200.00 which was placed in the bell fund. 

The 5th and King Sts. property was sold on July 26, 1881. On Nov. 8, 
1881, a lot of land was purchased at Del. Ave. and Adams St., upon which to 
erect a new church. | 
_ Ground was broken about May 1, 1882. The church was completed and 
the opening service was held on Oct. 8, 1882. Bishop Alfred Lee, D.D., 


: preached at the morning service. At 3 P. M. a service was held for the chil- 


dren of Old Swedes and Trinity. At 7:30 P. M. an evening prayer service was 
held by the Rev. H. B. Martin, D.D., the rector, assisted by his father the 
Rev. John Martin, the Rev. Lewis K. Lewis and the Rev. D. M. Bates. The 
new church faced Adams St., some distance south of the corner. It measured 
40 ft. by 82 ft. and was built of Brandywine granite, quarry dressed, which 
was laid with dark mortar. A frame vestibule in front measured 6Y, ft. by 26 
ft. across. The pews were ash, trimmed with walnut, mounted on iron. The 
auditorium was wainscotted with pine. The chancel and the east memorial win- 
dow were moved from Sth and King Sts. It was planned to have the organ 











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56 DAHRES Go He RiGrH eis a OF es Dera 2 AAVe Auer: 


operated by a water-motor. At about this time, water-motors coming into gen- 
eral use, the city authorities decided that water meters should be installed and 
charges for water made accordingly. A rectory, opposite the church, was com- 
pleted in April, 1885. i 

On Trinity Sunday, May 27, 1888, at the 8 A. M. service, a new white 
marble altar, with the corners marked with red marble, was consecrated. At 
the same time, a brass altar cross, a memorial to George D. Armstrong, from 
his parents, was consecrated. At the conclusion of this service the entire con- 
gregation proceeded to Old Swedes Church to attend the Trinity Day services 
there. 

The erection of the present church was started when the ground was 
broken on Sept. 30, 1889, by Bishop Leighton Coleman, in a pouring rain- 
storm. The Bishop used a nickel-plated spade that had been presented to him 
when he broke the ground for the Church of the Redeemer, of which he was 
rector, at Sayre, Pa. 

The corner-stone was laid on the Feast of St. Philip and St. James, May 1, 
1890. The church was consecrated on Jan. 29, 1891, with a service of bene- 
diction of which Bishop Coleman was the celebrant. The sermon was preached 
by Bishop Henry C. Potter, of New York. The sentence of consecration was” 
read by the Rev. H. Ashton Henry, the rector. The first Sunday service was 
held on Feb. 1, 1891, at which time the Rev. Dr. H. B. Martin, a former rector, 
preached in the morning and Bishop Coleman preached in the evening. 

The former chapel was then converted into a parish-house. At Easter 
time, 1892, a memorial lectern was presented by Samuel C. Biddle. 

On July 5, 1892, a window in memory of Miss Margaret May Mealey was 
unveiled. On Feb. 12, 1893, a window in memory of Miss Helen Ware was 
unveiled. On Dec. 2, 1894, the George D. Armstrong memorial window was 
unveiled. | i, 

In 1900-01, a lantern for the lectern was presented as a memorial to 
Bertha Brengle Kemp. At Christmas time, 1901, Gen. James H. Wilson pre- 
sented a window in memory of his wife. On Easter Sunday, 1903, a new organ 
was used for the first time. , ie 

On May 15, 1906, Bishop Leighton Coleman consecrated the church. At 
the door he was challenged by Senior Warden Henry B. meas st After 
being admitted, he was escorted up the aisle by the wardens and vestrymen. 
The sermon was preached by Bishop Cortlandt Whitehead of Pittsburgh. As- — 
sisting in the services were Archdeacon Geo. C. Hall and the Revs. F. M. 


Kirkus, D.D., and Henry Olmstead. Most of the clergy of the diocese were 


present. After the services a luncheon was served at the New Century Club. 
Mrs. Eliza J. Armstrong died on Easter Sunday, 1907, and left $10,000.00 
to become the nucleus of a building fund. The ground was broken for the 
present parish-house and rectory on Thurs., May 5, 1910, by the rector, the 
Rev. Frederick M. Kirkus, D.D. The parish-house was completed and used 


for the first time on Mar. 12, 1911. The rectory was occupied on Mar. 15, 


1911. The parish-house was dedicated on St. Mark’s Day, Apr. 25, 1911, by 
ee Frederick J. Kinsman. An address was delivered by the Rev. Arthur 
H. Judge. 

The church was redecorated during January, 1911. A memorial window 
to Mrs. Andrews was unveiled on Feb. 2, 1911, the Feast of the Purification 
of St. Mary the Virgin. 

A new altar and reredos, a memorial to Mr. and Mrs. Victor du Pont and 
provided by their five daughters was used for the first time on Oct. ES SLO LL: 
It was consecrated on All Saint's Day, 1911. The altar cross is a memorial to 





WILMINGTON 57 
ot aM “TO SINR SRA 88 Na AIR RON Ne 


Greta du Pont. In 1912, the im>rovements were continued with stone wains- 
cotting, sedilia and Bishop’s chai:. In 1913, further improvements were made. 
The above memorial to Mr. ané Mrs. Victor du Pont was the gift of their 
five daughters, Mrs. Willard Szulsbury, Mrs. H. M. Barksdale, Mrs. T. C. 
du Pont, Mrs. Bruce Ford and Mrs. LeRoy Harvey. The stone pulpit was 
donated by Tilghman Johnson. The choir stalls and pulpit were consecrated, 
by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman. on Nov. 2, 1913. 

The question of completing the steeple as called for in the church plans 
was broached in June, 1924, by Dr. Kirkus. A set of chimes consisting of 
twelve bells was offered as a memorial to Mrs. Annie Dickie Tallman by her 
husband, Frank G. Tallman and his children. 

The erection of the steeple was started in the fall of 1924. The steeple 
and chimes were dedicated at a special service held on Sun., June 14, 1925, 
at 5:30 P. M. by Bishop Philip Cook, D.D., assisted by Dr. Kirkus. 

The stone altar from the first church at Del. Ave. and Adams St., which 
had been stored in the basement of the parish-house for 16 years was presented 
to St. James’ school, near Hagerstown, Md., one of the oldest church-schools in 
this country. 

The subject of buying a new organ was talked over in May, 1927. It was 
provided, as a memorial to Mrs. May du Pont Saulsbury and Mrs. Renee 
du Pont Harvey by their three surviving sisters, Mrs. Barksdale, Mrs. T. C. 
du Pont and Mrs. Ford. Included with the organ was a carved oaken screen 
to replace the display pipes. The organ was consecrated with a service of bene- 
diction held at 11 A. M. on Fri., Dec. 21, 1928, the Feast of St. Thomas the 
Apostle, by the Rev. Dr. Kirkus. A memorial window presented by Mrs. John 
B. Bird, in memory of her husband, was dedicated on Jan. 13, 1929. 

The will of former U. S. Senator Willard Saulsbury provided for four fine 
memorial windows, one at St. Paul’s Church, Georgetown, one at St. John the 
Baptist Church, Milton, one at Christ Church, Dover, and one at Trinity 
Church, Wilmington. The stonework necessary for the installation at Trinity 
was started in November, 1928. The window, a memorial to Mrs. May du Pont 
Saulsbury, was dedicated at the morning service on Sun., Oct. 6, 1929. 

The memorial window to George D. Armstrong was restored by Tiffany 
and replaced on June 1, 1929. Memorial oak doors, presented in memory of 
the Rev. Frederick M. Kirkus, D.D., by his family, were dedicated on May 26, 
1940, by the Rev. Charles F. Penniman, the rector. 


St. Andrew’s P. E. Church. On Apr. 26, 1815, “The Episcopal Association 
of Wilmington” was organized for the purpose of building a church located 
more conveniently than Old Swedes Church. The effort was abandoned during 
the depression of 1817. On May 7, 1828, “The Episcopal Congregation of 
Wilmington” was organized and on Dec. 23, 1828, it was decided to proceed 
with the erection of a new church. Services were held in the old First Presby- 
terian Church, on Market St., below 10th St. The lot at the s. w. cor. of 8th 
and Shipley Sts. was purchased. . | 

A stone church was erected and it was consecrated on Oct. 1, 1829, by 
Bishop Wm. White. On Easter Monday, Apr. 2, 1830, the first vestry was 
elected. On Mar. 20, 1835, they purchased the lot to the rear of the church 
from John B. Lewis. A parish-house and Sunday School were built the follow- 
ing year. In 1838, a new organ was installed. Also, a bell was purchased and 
suspended in the church yard. 

Improvements were made in 1839, including a spire. On Jan. 25, 1840, 
the church was destroyed by fire. The congregation worshipped in Hanover 


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58 IPE. CC A ORG ASE SO Fa cea 7A WV ter 


Presbyterian Church until a new church was completed and dedicated on Oct. 
15, 1840. The dedication was performed by Bishop H. U. Onderdonk. The 
sermon was preached by Bishop Whittingham of Maryland, who had been 
elevated only four weeks before this event. 

The Rev. Alfred Lee, D.D., was consecrated the first Bishop of Delaware 
on Oct. 12, 1841, in St. Paul’s Chapel in New York City. Bishop Lee as- 
sumed temporary charge of St. Andrew’s Church in June, 1842. He was made 
rector on July 30, 1843 and served both as Bishop and rector of St. Andrew's 
until his death in 1887. 

In 1852, a colored Sunday School named the “Robert Smith Sunday 
School” was organized and continued to meet at St. Andrew’s until 1883. 

The church was enlarged in 1854. The first service in the rebuilt church 
was held in the lecture-room on Nov. 5, 1854. The church was reopened on 
Jan. 14, 1855. A mission sponsored by St. Andrew's, in 1857, resulted in the 
building of Calvary Church in 1859. 

In 1890, the church was improved, at which time the entire interior layout 
was changed. A service of benediction was celebrated by Bishop Leighton 
Coleman on Nov. 30, 1890. A communion table, in memory of Bishop Lee, a 
baptismal font presented by the family of Bishop Lee, in his memory, a lectern 
in memory of Jesse Lane, a Bishop's chair presented by a girls’ class in the 
Sunday School and an altar desk in memory of E. T. Warner, late Senior 
Warden, were consecrated. 3 

~ On Apr. 28, 1891, by Legislative Act, the name was changed from ‘The 
Episcopal Congregation” to ‘St. Andrew’s Church.” ? 

A silver alms basin, in memory of the Rev. Bethel Judd and his son, 
Col. H. B. Judd, was blessed in 1894-95. An organ was presented by Wm. 
Luke in 1906-07. On Nov. 1, 1915, Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman consecrated 


_a Bible. 


The parish-house was erected in 1916. On the morning of St. Andrew’s 
Day, Nov. 30, 1917, a baptistry, in memory of the Rev. Charles E. Murray, 
former rector, was consecrated by Bishop Kinsman, assisted by the Rev. R. W. 
Trapnell, D.D., the rector. On the evening of the same day the parish-house 
was formally opened with a reception, at which time Dr. Trapnell was con- 
gtatulated upon the successful culmination of this project. 


The church is rich in memorials and has a large endowment fund. In 
1920, the dwelling at 1009 Park Place was purchased to serve as a rectory. 
After extensive renovations, a reopening service was held on Oct. 12, 1924, by 


the Rev. Dr. Richard W. Trapnell, the rector. ! 

The new chapel, donated by Daniel Moore Bates in memory of his brother, 
the late’ Charles Theodore Russell Bates, was consecrated. by Bishop Arthur R. 
McKinstry, at the morning service, on June 14, 1942. The chapel is modernis- 
tic in design and will seat about 30 persons. For the first time in Delaware, 
the altar equipment is made of hand-wrought iron instead of the usual brass. 
The altar is finished in natural oak. 


A crucifix and candlesticks, in memory of Chas. I. Kent and presented by 
Mrs. Kent, were dedicated on Oct. 22, 1944, by the Rev. John E. Large, 
the rector. 

A new organ, presented by Mrs. George Capelle, Jr., in memory of her 
late husband, was dedicated on Sun., May 27, 1945, by the rector, the Rev. John 
E. Large. A recital was given by J. Harrison Walker, the church Organist. 


John Lofland, the Milford bard, is buried in an unmarked gtave in the 
gtaveyard beside the church. 





WILMINGTON ao 


St. John’s P. E. Cathedral. The first Episcopal services, in what was then 
known as Brandywine Village, were held in private homes. About 1850, the 
Rev, Charles Breck, of Trinity Church, began holding services in the Brandy- 
wine Academy. On Aug. 7, 1855, at a meeting held in the home of Amor H. 
_ Harvey, 1801 Market St., the organization of a parish was effected and the 
mame “St. John’s” was selected. Three names, St. John’s, St. Paul’s and St. 
Peter's were suggested and after two ballots, St. John’s was selected over St. 
Paul’s by a vote of 4 to 3. 

On May 3, 1856, the Green Tree Inn property, at Concord Ave. and 
Market St., was purchased. The church took title to the property on Dec. 2, 
1856. In September, 1856, the erection of a brick building for Sunday School 
purposes was started. It was first used on Dec. 27, 1856, with Bishop Alfred Lee 
conducting the first ceremonies. A parish-school was opened in February, 1857. 

The corner-stone of a new church building was laid on June 4, 1857, by 
Bishop Lee, assisted by the Rev. John B. Clemson, D.D., and Alexis I. du Pont. 
An aides was delivered by the Rev. Benjamin Franklin. Mr. Alexis I. du Pont 
was one of the prime movers in establishing this church. On Aug. 23, 1857, 
Mr. du Pont died from injuries received the day before in a powder mill ex- 
plosion. Mrs. du Pont was most earnest in helping to have the plans of the 
congregation carried out. The frame-work of the steeple was raised at 7 A. M. 
on Sat., Aug. 14, 1858. 

The church was consecrated on Wed., Nov. 3, 1858. The procession 
‘formed in the Sunday School and then, headed by Bishop Alfred Lee and the 
Rev. Charles Breck, the rector, they marched to the door of the church where 
they were met by the members of the vestry. Bishop Lee preached the sermon 
and the Rev. Dr. Breck read the sentence of consecration. Also taking part 
were the Rev. Messrs. Odenheimer, Grammer, Brinkle and Mahan. The service 
at 3:30 P. M. was conducted by the Rev. Dr. Milo Mahan and the evening 
service was led by the Rev. John H. Hopkins. In spite of inclement weather 
all of the services were well attended. A full week of services followed. 

The church was built of Brandywine blue rock, in pure Gothic and in 
cruciform design. The roof was of three-colored slate. The tower was 65 ft. 
high and surmounted by a spire which was topped with a gilt ball upon which 
rested a ramshead cross. There was a gallery in the south transcept. The bap- 
tismal font was of white Caen stone. A white marble tablet with a black border 


was erected on one of the walls in memory of Alexis I. du Pont. A similar 


tablet in memory of his wife Joanna was erected at a later date. The chancel 
furniture was of dark oak. The pews were free, to be used by anyone, an inno- 
vation at that time. 

In 1863, a sewing-school and a colored Sunday School were opened. A 
night-school was opened in 1865. In 1866, missions were opened at Augustine 
Mills and at Riddle’s Banks. The Sunday School chapel was enlarged in 1866. 

In 1884, the old Sunday School chapel was torn down and on July 13, 
1884, ground was broken for a parish-house and Sunday School building. The 
corner-stone was laid on Aug. 15, 1884. The parish-house was opened on the 
evening of Nov. 3, 1885. At this time the 27th Anniversary of the consecra- 
tion of the church was celebrated. Those occupying the chancel included the 
Rev. Charles Breck, D.D., and the Rev. Messrs. Innes, McKim and R. M. 
Wright. The Sunday School room was first used on Mon. evening, Dec. 28, 
1885, with the rector, the Rev. T. Gardiner Littell, in charge of the services. 

In 1886, an organ chamber was built and a new organ was presented. The 
gallery in the east transcept was used for the infant Sunday School. In 1892-93, 
two memorial windows were unveiled and a kindergarten was opened. A chapel 





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60 THE CHURCHES OF, DELAWARE 


altar was presented by J. Cloud Elliott in memory of the Rev. Stevens Parker, 
D.D. It was blessed by Bishop Leighton Coleman at a service of benediction 
held on Sept. 16, 1894. Oe. 

A rectory, at 23rd and Baynard Boulevard was built in 1898. It was 
opened with a reception held on Jan. 23, 1899. In 1904-05, five memorial win- 
dows were unveiled. A new altar and reredos, and a chancel window, in 
memory of Francis G. du Pont were consecrated by Bishop Coleman on Christ- 
mas Day, 1906. 

A handsomely carved rood screen, in memory of Mrs. Francis Elizabeth 
du Pont Coleman, a gift of Bishop Coleman and a pulpit, in memory of Eleu- 
thera Paulina Bradford, a gift of Judge Edward G. Bradford, were consecrated 
on Dec. 1, 1907, by Bishop Coleman, assisted by Archdeacon George C. Hall. 

The 50th Anniversary of the church was celebrated with a week of services 
beginning on All Saint’s Day, Nov. 1, 1908. On Nov. 15, 1908, a window in 
memory of Laura J. Williamson was unveiled. A memorial tablet to Bishop 
Coleman was unveiled on June 13, 1909, by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman, who 
then delivered a memorial sermon. A lectern was consecrated on Dec. 17, 1911, 
by Bishop Kinsman in memory of the Rev. T. Gardiner Littell, D.D. 

On Nov. 1, 1914, the silver communion service was stolen. A new silver 
service was presented by Mrs. Lammot du Pont in memory of her mother, Mrs. 
Natalie Wilson. These sacred vessels were consecrated, by Bishop Kinsman, on 
Apr. 1, 1915. 

Five years later the stolen silver together with silver stolen from St. An- 
drew’s Church was accidentally dug up in the yard of a home on n. Broom St. 
All of the silver had been mutilated. 

Improvements were made to the church and on Oct. 13, 1915, Bishop 
F. J. Kinsman conducted a reopening service for a restored church. 

Land facing Tatnall St. and Concord Ave. was given to the church in 
May and June, 1917. The plan to build on this land was deferred because of 
the war. 

_ The contract to erect the new buildings was awarded in June, 1919. The 
ground was broken on July 1, 1919. It was such an extremely hot day that 
the participants selected a spot under a small shade tree for holding the cere- 
mony. After several delays because of inclement weather the afternoon of Sat., 
Mar. 13, 1920, was selected for the corner-stone laying. It so happened that a 
small blizzard was raging which held the attendance down to a very small 
group. The Rev. Dr. Alban Richey and his assistant, the Rev. Chas. H. 
Holmead, were masters of ceremony. The stone was placed in the wall of St. 
Mary’s Chapel. | 7 hae 

St. Mary’s Chapel was consecrated and the other buildings were blessed on 
Ascension Day, Thurs., May 5, 1921. The sentence of consecration was read 
by Dr. Richey and the instrument of donation was read by A. Felix du Pont. 
The service of benediction was conducted by Bishop Philip Cook and Dr. 


. Richey preached the sermon. The party proceeded through all of the new 


buildings where prayers of blessings were said. 
St. Mary’s Chapel, a gift of the late Mrs. Natalie Wilson du Pont, is lined 


_ with white Bedford limestone and the altar and steps are of green Westville 


marble. The altar is a solid block weighing five tons. The other buildings in- 
clude Bishop’s offices, parish office, an apartment for the sexton, Guild Hall 
with rooms for the choir, Men’s Club and Woman's Auxiliary. The rectory 
is a separate building. 

The church improvements were consecrated on the same day by Bishop 
Cook assisted by Dr. Richey. The floor of the chancel and church had been 








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PENINSULA METHODIST CHURCH 


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(Page 52) 





oa 


62 IE CHU Re Gael Pau Dok Ys Audie Alpor 


rebuilt, it had been refurnished with new choir and clergy stalls and a new 
organ with carved screens had been installed. The organ had been dedicated 
on Apr. 10, 1921, by Dr. Richey. 

On Dec. 22, 1929, a window in memory of Judge Edward G. Bradford 
was unveiled by Bishop Cook assisted by Dr. Richey. It was a gift of his daugh- 
ter, Mrs. H. Belin du Pont. The sermon was delivered by Father J. O. S. 
Huntington. The Bishop Coleman memorial window was dedicated on Jan. 6, 
1935, by Bishop Cook. It was presented by Mrs. H. Belin du Pont, a niece of 
Bishop Coleman. On Mar. 31, 1935, six brass candlesticks, in memory of the 
Rev. Alban Richey, D.D., former rector, were dedicated by the Rev. Wm. H. 
Darbie. They were to be used in St. Mary’s Chapel. 

St. John’s Church was designated the Cathedral Church of St. John by 


Wilmington, the candlesticks were a gift from Victor D. Hanby and the cross 
was a gift from James H. Lowe. 

One of the interesting features at St. John’s Church is the Prayer Garden, 
located between the Cathedral and the old parish-house. This garden-spot, for 


_reflection and Prayer, was designed and executed by Mrs. Pierre S. du Pont. 


The Diocesan Convention, on May 14, 1947, adopted canons changing 
the status of St. John’s into a fully designated cathedral. It will be governed 
by a Cathedral Chapter and will be the official seat of the Bishop. 


Rodney Sts. This church was Organized in a carriage shop at Front and Jus- 
tison Sts. as a mission of St. Andrew's Church, in 1857. A church was built 








WILMINGTON 63 


on the s. w. cor. of Third and Washington Sts. The opening service was con- 
ducted by Bishop Alfred Lee, on Oct. 30, 1859, at which time the name ‘‘Cal- 
vary’ was adopted. Title to the property was assumed by Calvary Church on 
Nov. 7, 1861. The church was consecrated, by Bishop Lee, on Jan. 29, 1863. 
It was organized as a separate parish on Apr. 15, 1868, and was received into 
union with the diocese on June 3, 1868. 

On May 7, 1872, the ground was broken for an addition to the rear of 
the church. After the rebuilding, which included a recess chancel, was com- 
pleted the church was reopened on the afternoon of Oct. 26, 1872. During the 
week of Jan. 5, 1873, the benches were removed from the basement Sunday 
School room. The floor was carpeted, table desks were placed for the teachers 
and chairs for the scholars. In 1879, a triplet chancel window of cathedral 
glass was presented by friends of the rector. 

In 1889, the tower was built to house the bell which had been purchased 
by the children of the Sunday School, in 1867, as a memorial to the Rev. James 
L. Hood. At this time a center aisle was added, new lighting fixtures and a 
new pipe-organ were installed and a portico was built over the front door. 
On Jan. 29, 1889, the dwelling at 505 w. 3rd St. was purchased for a rectory. 
In 1891, a stone font was presented. On Feb. 12, 1893, two memorial windows 
were unveiled. | | 

In 1894-95, a prayer desk and stall were presented as a memorial to George 
Cox. A credence shelf was installed in memory of the parents of Col. R. M. 
Floyd. After extensive alterations, a service of benediction was celebrated by 
Bishop Leighton Coleman, on Dec. 23, 1898. He was assisted by the Rev. 
Henry W. Cunningham, the rector. A new memorial pulpit was consecrated, 
by Bishop Coleman, on May 28, 1899. Memorial entice were dedicated on 
Sept. 24, 1899, by the Rev. Henry W. Cunningham. A new altar and rail 
were installed in 1907-08. 

This property was sold to the Wil. Board of Public Education on July 29, 
1925. On Aug. 2, 1925, Bishop Philip Cook conducted -a service to remove 
the sentence of consecration. This service marked the divorcing of the building 
from further service as a house of God. . 

The present site at 4th and Rodney Sts. was purchased on Mar. 14, 1923. 
The parish-house was built first and it was dedicated on Sept. 13, 1925, by 
Bishop Philip Cook. The church activities were transferred to the parish-house 
on Dec. 5, 1925. > 

. The corner-stone of the chugch building was laid on Nov. 4, 1928, by 
Bishop Philip Cook. He was assisted by the Revs. Frederick M. Kirkus, D.D., 
and Geo. C. Graham, D.D., the rector. The formal operiing of the church was 
held at a midnight service, on Christmas Eve., 1929. The church was conse- 
crated on Memorial Day, Fri., May 30, 1941, by Bishop Arthur R. McKinstry 
at the morning service, assisted by the Rev. Dr. George C. Graham, the rector. 
Bishop Francis M. Taitt of Pennsylvania preached one of the sermons. 

A litany desk, in memory of Mary R. Dickey was dedicated on Jan. 14, 
1945, by the rector, the Rev. Henry N. Herndon. On Sept. 29, 1946, a stone 
baptismal font shelf was dedicated by the Rev. Henry N. Herndon, the rector. 
It was given by Mrs. Harry M. Palmer in memory of her brother, the Rev. 
Samuel F. Lyons. Stands of the national flag and the church flag were dedi- 
cated on Feb. 17, 1947, by the rector. 3 


Immanuel P. E. Church, at 17th St. and Riverview Ave., was the outgrowth 
of cottage meetings held at the home of Mrs. McClees at Bancroft Banks 
by the Rev. I. Newton Stanger, rector of Christ Church, Christiana Hun- 


SAAD TONE Mati te ah nh Ae ine nadie d 2 Rate eRe TH Peleg eb mi hilt etree lot 





64 THE CHURCHES OF. DELAWARE 


dred. The first meeting was held on Oct. 5, 1870, and services were held 
monthly until 1881, at which time Mr. Stanger left Christ Church. 

A plot of land, at 17th St. and Riverview Ave., was donated by the chil- 
dren of the Rev. Samuel C. Brinckle on June 13, 1883. Plans were drawn for 
a frame church and the work was started in the spring of 1884. The church 
was consecrated on Advent Sunday, Nov. 30, 1884, by Bishop Alfred Lee. He 
was assisted by the Rev. D. D. Smith, rector of Christ Church and Immanuel 
Church, the Rev. Drs. Du Bois and Spencer and the Rev. Messrs. Hanson, 
Martin, Lightner, Higgins and Brown. 

One of the most active workers in the organization of this church was 
Miss Eliza Thomas, a descendant of George Read, the Signer and an_ active 
member of Immanuel Church at New Castle. As a reward for her work she 
was given the privilege of selecting a name for the new church. Her choice 
was the name “Immanuel” after her church at New Castle. 

On Dec. 9, 1887, the trustees met to organize a parish and the proper 
officers were elected. It was made a separate parish in January, 1888. A Sunday 
School was organized on Feb. 12, 1888. The Rev. Kensey Johns Hammond, 
the first rector, was installed on Sun., July 1, 1888. The church was incor- 
porated on Aug. 2, 1888. 

A lot adjoining the church property on 17th St. was donated as a site for 
a tectory. It was accepted by the vestry on Dec. 3, 1888. Ground was broken 
for the rectory on June 4, 1889. It was completed and occupied in January, 

_ 1890. At the same time the church was enlarged. Gas illumination in the 
church was used for the first time on Sun., Feb. 3, 1890. 

A pipe-organ was installed in the fall of 1903. In 1913, the pulpit, choir 
rail, clergy stalls, Bishop’s chair and prayer desk were secured from Trinity 
Church. : 

The corner-stone of a new church was laid on Oct. 11, 1914, by Bishop 
Frederick J. Kinsman assisted by the Revs. W. H. Laird and F. M. Kirkus. 
The church was dedicated on Apr. 11, 1915, by Bishop Kinsman. He was 
assisted by the rector, the Rev. William H. Laird, the Rev. Kinsey J. Ham- 
mond, former rector, the Rev. E. A. Clattenberg and the Rev. Hubert W. 
Wells. On the same day Bishop Kinsman conducted a service to remove the 
sentence of consecration from the chapel. | ; 

| The church was consecrated on All Saint's Day, Nov. 1, 1926, at 10:30 
A. M., by Bishop Philip Cook. At the same time, a window in the sanctuary, 
over the altar, in memory of the Rev. Wm. H. Laird and two small windows 
were dedicated. A window in memory of Mrs. Charles R. Miller was unveiled 
on Nov. 30, 1926. The organ from Trinity Church was secured, enlarged and 
rebuilt. It was dedicated on May 1, 1929. 

A window in memory of Charlotte Rothwell Bancroft, designed by Frank 
Schoonover, was dedicated by Bishop Philip Cook ,on Mar. 9, 1930. The 
parish-house was built in 1937 and put in use without any ceremony. A pro- 
cessional cross, in memory of Mrs. Marie C. S. Fischer, was danserricd on 

*Nov. 3, 1941, by the Rev. Dr. Charles W. Clash, the rector. Four memorial 
windows in honor of the Rev. Kinsey Johns Hammond, D.D., former rector, 
were dedicated, by Dr. Clash, on Apr. 18, 1943. 


The Chapel of the Good Shepherd. This chapel adjoined the Bishopstead 
at 14th and Orange Sts. It was built by Francis G. du Pont, while Leighton 
Coleman, his brother-in-law, was Bishop of Delaware. The corner-stone was 
laid on St. Thomas’ Day, Dec. 21, 1889. The chapel was consecrated on Tues. 
of Easter Week, Apr. 8, 1890, at an 11 o'clock service. Taking part were 





WILMINGTON 65 


Bishops Adams of Easton, Paret of Maryland and Coleman, also the Revs. 
W. A. Schouler, W. M. Jefferts, L. W. Gibson and Alexis I. du P. Coleman, 
a son of the Bishop. 

The chapel was torn down in October, 1944, at which time the Bishop's 
residence was removed to Rockford. The chapel was rebuilt, close to the 
Bishop's home, in substantially the same form as the original. 


The Silent Mission. Work among the deaf and dumb of Wilmington was 
started by Bishop Alfred Lee in 1879. On Nov. 17, 1879, Bishop Lee held a 
service for the deaf and dumb in Trinity Chapel. Job Turner, a missionary to 
the deaf and dumb, delivered the semon and the rector, the Rev. Wm. J. Frost, 
assisted with the services. By 1886, the services for the deaf had become or- 
ganized. On Apr. 4, 1886, four deaf mutes were confirmed by Bishop Lee. 
They were baptized by the Rev. Charles E. Murray. The Rev. Henry Winter 
Syle acted as the interpreter. Services were being held once a month. The 
Silent Mission was formally organized, in 1890, under the sponsorship of All 
Soul’s Church for Deaf-mutes in Philadelphia. Services were held once a 
month in the Chapel of St. Andrew’s Church. 

Weekly services were started on Jan. 7, 1945. Father Pulver of Phila. 
conducts one service a month and on the other Sundays the services are con- 
ducted by lay-reader Harry A. Nicholson, a normal child of deaf-mute parents. 


St. Michael’s P. E. Church. In 1888, the Rev. Alexis I. du P. Coleman, 
the son of Bishop Coleman, started St. Michael’s Mission at Front and Adams 
Sts. In 1889, a lot was purchased for a church site but this was not used. In 
1890-91, a day-nursery was opened at 109 Monroe St. On Apr. 2, 1892, Mr. 
Coleman purchased the former Olivet Church at the s. w. cor. of Adams and 
Chestnut Sts., and moved the mission to this location. 

Opening services were held on Mar. 27, 1892, with Bishop Leighton Cole- 
man in charge. He was assisted by the Revs. A. I. du P. Coleman, Wm. W. 
Webb and C. A. Hayden. For sentimental reasons the old altar was moved to 
the new church. An additional altar, a pulpit and a desk were built and they 
were blessed by Bishop Coleman on Nov. 9, 1893. During that winter, due to 
exceptional hard times, soup was sold by the church at nominal prices. 

A chapel was fitted up for week-day services. It was named “St. Mary’s 
Chapel” and was blessed, by Bishop Coleman, on Nov. 15, 1896. The mission 
was organized as “St. Michael’s P. E. Church,” on June 4, 1906. St. Michael’s 
was extremely “high church.” The church acquired title to the property on 
June 25, 1906. During that year a communion service, in memory of Eleuthera 
Pauline du Pont Bradford, was received and consecrated. 

The last service was held on Easter Sunday, 1912. The building was 
rented for a time and on June 13, 1914, the property was transferred to the 
New Castle Presbytery. On Oct. 6, 1920, the property was sold to the Polska 
Nardowa Casa Chorych, a Polish lodge who still occupy it. 


Covenant Reformed Episcopal Church. The initial meeting toward start- 
ing this church was held in the Institute Hall on July 12, 1878, when the Rev. 
Samuel Fallows, D.D., Presiding Bishop, addressed the meeting. At the close 
28 persons signed up with W. Y. Warner to become members of the new 
church. Mr. Warner had recently resigned as Supt. of Calvary P. E. Sunday 
School. This denomination had been introduced into this country in 1874. On 
Aug. 21, services were held in the Unitarian Church. The church was formally 
organized on Sat., Sept. 21, 1878, at a meeting held in the Board of Trade 





66 DHE CH U RCH ESP Ouk SDE A WARE 


room. The name “Church of the Covenant’’ was selected and trustees were 
elected. Sunday services were also held here. 

On Tues., Sept. 17, 1878, the Western Market House, on Front St., be- 
tween Jefferson and Madison Sts., was rented. Early Wed. morning 15 of the 
male members started in to tear out the stalls and to condition the Market 
House as a place of worship. By working evenings the place was in fine shape 
for the first meeting on Sun., Sept. 29, 1878. 

On Mar. 9, 1879, the meetings were transferred to the old Union M. E. 
Church building on Second St. near Washington St. On Mar. 25, 1881, they 
purchased the building. They sold this building on Mar. 23, 1889 and on Nov. 
16, 1889, they purchased a lot on West St., below Third St., as a site for a new 
church. The corner-stone was laid on Sat., June 7, 1890. Those taking part 
included Bishop W. R. Nicholson, the Revs. J. Simpson Trotter, J. Howard- 
Smith, Chas. F. Hendricks and Dr. J. H. Hoffman. 

On Sept. 6, 1890, services were first held in the Sunday School room of 
the new church. The church proper was opened on Sun., Oct. 26, 1890. The 
morning sermon was preached by the Rev. J. Howard-Smith. The Sunda 
School was addressed by Dr. Howard-Smith and J. R. King. The Rev. J. H. 
Hoffman preached in the evening. At a meeting held on Mon. evening ad- 
dresses were delivered by the Revs. A. N. Keigwin, R. B. Cook, Wm. P. Swartz 
and L. E. Barrett. 

The Church of the Covenant merged with the Church of Our Redeemer 
to form St. Luke’s Church in 1898. The church activities were then moved 
to the church at 8th and Monroe Sts. Title to the West St. property was as- 
sumed by St. Luke’s Church on Oct. 16, 1899. It was sold to the Grace 
A. M. E. Zion Church on Feb. 14, 1907 and it was purchased by Mt. Sinai 
Holy Church of America on Feb. 13, 1929. 


St. Luke’s Reformed Episcopal Church is located at 8th and Monroe Sts. 
In a separation from Covenant Church, the Church of our Redeemer was or- 
ganized on May 23, 1881. They purchased the chapel which Central Pres. 
Church had built, in 1860, at 8th and Monroe Sts. Having been used as a 
stair-builder’s shop for a number of years, considerable improvement was 
necessary. While this wogk was being done they met at the home of Benjamin 
Elliott on Shipley St. 

_. The Church of Our Redeemer merged with the Church of the Covenant 
in 1898 to form St. Luke’s Church. The opening service of the new organiza- 
tion was held on Oct. 16, 1898, with Bishop W. R. Nicholson in charge. He 
was assisted by the Rev. Dr. John Tracy. The title to the property was ac- 
quired by St. Luke’s Church on Nov. 22, 1899. 


Hedgeville Reformed Episcopal Mission. This mission was opened by the 
Church of the Covenant, in 1882, when they purchased the fe Retr at 
Fifth Ave. and Brown St. After a few years’ effort it was abandoned. 


St. Matthew’s P. E. Church, colored. This church was the outgrowth of the 
Robert Smith Sunday School for colored persons, which was founded at St. 
Andrew's Church, in 1852. They continued to meet there for many years. A 
mission was opened on Sun., Mar. 15, 1891, in a hall at No. 11 w. Twelfth St., 
with Bishop Leighton Coleman, Presiding. It was formally organized as a 
church in November, 1892, at St. Andrew’s Church. 

A church site was purchased at 1201 Chippey St., on Nov. 12, 1897. The 
gtound was broken for a church building, by Bishop Coleman, on All Saint’s 





CHURCH 


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TRINITY P 





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CHURCH 


St. ANDREW’S P. E. 


(Page 57) 


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4 


68 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


Day, Nov. 1, 1897, at 4:30 o'clock, during a heavy rainstorm. He was assisted 
by Archdeacon George C. Hall. Bishop Coleman used the nickle-plated spade 
that had been presented to him when he broke ground for the Church of the 
Redeemer, at Sayre, Pa. 

The corner-stone was laid on May 1, 1900, by Bishop Coleman assisted by 
Archdeacon Hall, the Rev. Charles B. Dubell and a number of the clergy. The 
trowel which the Bishop used, had been presented to him by St. Paul’s Sunday 
School when he laid the corner-stone of St. Paul’s Church at Toledo, Ohio. 

The church was formally opened on June 10, 1900. At 7:30 A. M. there 
was a service of benediction of the altar vessels, Cross, candlesticks, Bishop's 
chair and curate’s chair. The church was then declared open for use. Bisho 
Coleman celebrated Holy Communion. The Bishop preached at the 10:30 A. M. 
service and Archdeacon Hall preached in the evening. The Rev. Charles B. 
Dubell, the rector, assisted at all of the services. The solid silver altar vessels 
were donated by Mrs. Charles E. Dubell in memory of her mother, Mrs. 
Bratten. 

This church sponsored the Robert Smith Sunday School which was opened 
at 811 Buttonwood St., on Jan. 25, 1903. : 

The church appears to have run into difficulties and it was closed in 1915. 
On June 12, 1915, Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman conducted a service to remove 
the sentence of consecration. The property was sold on Jan. 28, 1916. The 
church services were then transferred to St. Andrew’s Church. For a short 
time the services were conducted at the Chapel of the Good Shepherd. In the 
fall of 1924 a house was rented at the corner of 8th and Wilson Sts., and 
adapted to church needs. | 

The present church at 706 French St. was a dwelling which Bishop Philip 
Cook bought on June 14, 1926 and adapted for church purposes. It was dedi- 
cated on Sun., Oct. 10, 1926, by Bishop Cook at the morning service. The 
afternoon sermon was delivered by the Rev. Frederick M. Kirkus, D.D. Title 
to the property was acquired by the trustees of the diocese on Feb. 19, 1927. 

Bishop McKinstry purchased 708 French St., on Sept. 17, 1946. It was 
proposed to convert this dawedt: into a parish-house until such time as a new 
building could be erected. 


St. Augustine P. E. Mission was started at Augustine Mills on the Brandy- 
wine, on Aug. 24, 1866, by the Rev. Leighton Coleman, rector of St. John’s 


Riddle’s Banks P. E. Mission was started in the schoolhouse, on Aug. 24, 
1866, by the Rev. Leighton Coleman of St. John’s Church. It was closed at the 
end of five years. 


St. Luke’s P. E. Mission was opened in South Wilmington in 1870. It 
ceased to function in 1883. 


St. Mark’s P. E. Mission was opened at 702 e. 7th St., on Apr. 1, 1883. It 
was started by a group from Old Swedes’ Church who were dissatisfied. It 
lasted but a short time. At the request of the vestry, the parish was dissolved, 
by Bishop Lee, on May 22, 1883. 


Holy Cross P. E. Mission was located at 8th Ave. and Brown St. It was 
Organized on Jan. 19, 1896, and met in a rented house. It was closed in 1903. 





WILMINGTON 69 


St. Thomas’ P. E. Mission. On June 6, 1886, the Rev. Charles Breck opened 
a mission over Weir's grocery store on the s. e. cor. of 5th and King Sts. It 
was organized formally on June 27, 1886. A library was established and 
services were held at 9 A. M. and 2 P. M. 


The P. E. Mission at 4th and Rodney Sts. This mission was started on July 
28, 1895, by the Rev. Harrington Littell. 


St. Raphael’s P. E. Chapel was located at 1009-11 Tatnall St. It was 
consecrated with a service of benediction on Sat., Aug. 24, 1895, by Bishop 
Leighton Coleman. He was assisted by the Revs. John S. Littell, Henry D. 
Speakman and Edward H. Eckel. 

At 3 P. M. on Wed., Sept. 25, 1895, St. Raphael’s was consecrated to the 
use of St. Michael’s Free Hospital for Babies, by Bishop Leighton Coleman. 
Speeches were made by the Revs. Chas. E. Murray and H. P. Roche. A large 
number of clergymen were present. A prayer was offered and a benediction 
was said in each room. The hospital was to be conducted by the Sisters of All 
Angels with Mother Mary Margaret as Superior. 


The Bishopstead and the Bishops. 

The Bishopstead, the home of the Bishops of the Diocese of Delaware, 
from 1841 to 1944, was located at 14th and Orange Sts., with its garden 
sloping down to Brandywine Park. It was built by Oliver Canby in 1741-42. 
It was purchased by Bishop Alfred Lee, in 1841, and used as his home. On 
Feb. 10, 1893,. Francis G. du Pont bought the property and presented it to the 
Diocese of Delaware to be used as the home of the Bishops of Delaware. 

This property was sold to W. W. Laird, Jr., on Dec. 23, 1944. 

On July 12, 1944, the Diocese purchased the former home of Joseph 
Bancroft, at No. 7 Woods Road, Rockford. After alterations during the sum- 
mer, Bishop McKinstry and his family moved in, early in November. 


Bishop Alfred Lee . 


The Rt. Rev. Alfred Lee, D.D., was born in Cambridge, Mass., on Sept. 
9, 1807, in the mansion which was the subject of Longfellow’s poem, “The 
Old House by the Lindens.” He was graduated from Harvard University after 
which he practiced law in New London, Conn. He studied at the General 
Theological Seminary in New York. 

He was ordered a deacon by Bishop Brownell in Trinity Church, Norwalk, 
Conn., and by the same Bishop he was ordained a priest in Christ Church, 
Hartford, Conn. 

He was appointed rector of Calvary Church at Rockdale, Pa., in 1838. He 
was elected Bishop of Delaware at Georgetown, Del., on May 26, 1841. He 
was consecrated on Oct. 12, 1841, at St. Paul’s Chapel, New York City, by 
Presiding Bishop Griswold. Bishops Moore, Chase, Brownell, Onderdonk, 
Meade and McIlvaine also took part. 

On Oct. 13, 1841, Bishop Lee took his seat in the House of Bishops as the 
youngest of twenty-one members, being 34 years of age. He outlived them all, 
to become the Senior Bishop of the Episcopal Church in America. 

In addition to his duties as Bishop, Bishop Lee took temporary charge of 
St. Andrew’s Parish in June, 1842, and accepted the rectorship on July 30, 1843. 

Bishop Lee died on Apr. 12, 1887. The funeral services were held in St. 
Andrew's Church on Apr. 16, with nine Bishops of the Church in attendance. 
He was buried in the family plot in Old Swedes’ Graveyard. 


SEE Sema uke 





70 TOBE. CHOU RG BE SnO FE DBA WAR 


Bishop Leighton Coleman 


The Rt. Rev. Leighton Coleman, LL.D., D.D., was born in Philadelphia, 
Pa., on May 3, 1837. His father was the Rev. John Coleman, D.D., rector of 
Trinity Church in that city. Bishop Coleman was educated at the Episcopal 
Academy, Phila. After several years in business, he entered the General 
Theological Seminary, N. Y., from which he was graduated in 1861. He was 
ordained in St. James’ Church, Phila., in July, 1860. His first work was in 
charge of missions on Blackwell and Randall’s Islands, N. Y. 

After graduation, he was placed in charge of St. Luke’s Parish, Bustleton. 
In 1862, he was ordained rector of St. Luke’s by Bishop Potter. In 1863, he 
came to St. John’s Church, in Wilmington. In 1866, he removed to Mauch 
Chunk, Pa., where he built a fine church. In 1874, he became rector of Trinity 
Church, Toledo, Ohio. In February, 1875, he was elected Bishop of Northern 
Wisconsin but he declined the election. Because of his wife’s ill health he re- 
signed in 1881 and spent nearly eight years in Europe. On his return, in 1889, 
he was chosen rector at Sayre, Pa., where he built a fine stone church. 

He was elected Bishop of Delaware, in Dover, on June 6, 1888. He was 
consecrated on St. Luke’s Day, Oct. 18, 1888, in St. John’s Church, Wilmington. 
Bishop Howe of Central Pennsylvania was the consecrator and Bishop White- 
head, of Pittsburgh, was the preacher. 

Bishop Coleman, died on Dec. 14, 1907. Funeral services were held at 
St. John’s Church on Tues., Dec. 17, at 2 P. M. He is buried in the du Pont 
family graveyard. 


Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman 


The Rt. Rev. Frederick J. Kinsman, D.D., was born on Sept. 27, 1868, at 
Warren, Ohio. He was educated at St. Paul’s School and at Keble College, 
Oxford University, England. He served as Master of St. Paul’s School, Con- 
cord, N. H., as rector of St. Martin’s Church, New Bedford, Mass., as pro- 
fessor of ecclesiastical history at Berkley Divinity School, Middletown, Conn., 
and had served in the same capacity for five years at the General Theological 
Seminary, in New York. ; 

He was elected Bishop of Delaware on June 3, 1908. He was consecrated 
on Oct. 28, 1908, in Trinity Church, Wilmington, by Bishop Daniel S. Tuttle 


Bishop Kinsman submitted his resignation in 1919 and it was accepted in 
October. He was received into the Roman Catholic Church by James Cardinal 


The Rt. Rev. Philip Cook, D.D., was born in Kansas City, Mo., on July 
4, 1875. He was graduated from Trinity College in 1898 and from the Gen- 


War I. During that war he served as a Y. M. C. A. field secretary in France. 
He survived the sinking of the S. S. Orona which was torpedoed, 





WILMINGTON at 


He was elected Bishop of Delaware, at Wilmington, on May 12, 1920. 
He was consecrated in St. Michael’s and All Angel’s Church, on Oct. 14, 1920, 
by Bishop Daniel S. Tuttle. Bishops John G. Murray and Frederick F. Reese 
were co-consecrators. The sermon was delivered by Bishop Cameron Mann. 
Bishops C. Fiske and H. L. Burleson were the presentors. 

Bishop Cook died on Mar. 25, 1938, and is buried in old St. Anne’s grave- 
yard below Middletown. 


Bishop Arthur R. McKinstry 


The Rt. Rev. Arthur R. McKinstry, D.D., was born on July 26, 1895, in 
Greeley, Kansas. He received his education in the public schools of Chanute, 
Kansas, Kenyon College, the Episcopal Theological Seminary, Harvard Univer- 
sity and the University of the South. He was ordered a deacon in 1919 and 
ordained a priest in 1920. 

He served as canon of Grace Cathedral, Topeka, Kansas, as rector of the 
Church of Incarnation, Cleveland, Ohio, three years as Secretary of the Field 
Department of the National Council of the church, as rector of St. Paul’s 
Church, Albany, N. Y., of St. Mark’s Church, San Antonio, Texas and of 
Christ Church, Nashville, Tenn. While in Albany, he served a term as one 
of the chaplains of the State Legislature. Dr. McKinstry was elected Bishop of 
Delaware on Nov. 15, 1938. 

He was consecrated Bishop of Delaware on Feb. 17, 1939, by Bishop 
Henry St. George Tucker. The co-consecrators were Bishops Frank W. Sterrett 
and James M. Maxon. Bishop Oldham preached the sermon. Among the other 
Bishops present were F. D. Goodwin, R. B. Mitchell, J. C. Ward, W. B. 
Stevens, W. Brown, C. Fiske, E. M. Stires, F. M. Taitt, W. J. Gardner, S. H. 
Littell, G. W. Davenport, E. P. Dandridge and Bishop-elect of Easton, W. 
McClelland. The Rev. Cornelius J. Sivigoon, rector of St. Michael’s Russian 
Orthodox Catholic Church, also attended the consecration. A silver chalice, once 
owned by Bishop Samuel Seabury, the first Bishop of the American church, 
was used in the services. 


& 


ROMAN CATHOLIC 


St. Peter’s Pro-Cathedral R. C. Church at 6th and West Sts. The first 
church, a small brick building, was built in 1816 by the Rev. Patrick Kenney. 
Father Kenney blessed the church in 1818. He became the first pastor, coming 
in from Coffee Run twice a month to hold services. Trustees were elected on 
July 20, 1820. On Feb. 5, 1825, an Act was passed by the General Assembly 
authorizing that a lottery be held to raise $3000.00 for the benefit of St. Peter’s. 
By an Act of Jan. 26, 1827, the time for holding the lottery was extended. It 
is not certain that it was ever held. 

In 1829, the Rev. George A. Carroll was appointed the first resident pastor. 
More land was secured on Mar. 3, and July 23, 1829. Under Father Carroll’s 
auspices the Sisters of Charity established, in 1830, an academy for girls at the 
corner of Third and West Sts., which they developed into an orphanage and a 
parochial school. In 1830, Father Carroll enlarged St. Peter’s Church. Father 
Patrick Reilly became assistant pastor in 1834 and pastor in 1842. 

On Aug. 15, 1841, Father Reilly opened a school for boys in the rectory. 
This school prospered and he bought the Bradford farm on Delaware Ave., 
between Jefferson and Madison Sts., and extending in irregular lines to Ninth 
St., and to Monroe St. He moved his school into the Bradford home and 
later built a four-story schoolhouse surmounted with a large bell in a belfry. 


iB adie oor 


i ee ae wir ARN RRS RN re het gibiE ino Asi: 





72 THE CHURCGCHESVOR DELAWARE 





St. Mary’s College was chartered by the Legislature on Jan. 29, 1847, with 
power to confer scholastic degrees. The Civil War took away so many students 
from Southern States that the College was closed in 1866 and in a short time 
the buildings were torn down. 

In 1852-53, the cemetery at 12th and Madison Sts. was established; a new 
parochial school and a new rectory were built. The cemetery was consecrated 
on Sun., Sept. 26, 1852, by Vicar-General E. J. Lourin. 

In 1858, at the suggestion of Bishop Newman, Father Reilly organized 
St. Mary’s Parish. St. Peter’s was improved inside and out in 1867. It was in 
fine condition when it was made the Pro-Cathedral with the establishment of 
the Diocese of Wilmington in 1868. At this time Father Reilly was made the 
first Vicar-General of the Diocese. The Most Rev. Thomas A. Becker was 
consecrated the first Bishop of Wilmington on Aug. 23, 1868. 

The first priest to be ordained in the Diocese of Wilmington was the Rev. 
John A. Lyons, who was ordained at St. Peter’s on July 31, 1870. He was 
assigned to St. Peter’s as an assistant to Bishop Becker. At this time many im- 
provements were made to the church including the frescoes, stained-glass 
windows, marble baptistry, bronze memorial tablets and angel fonts. The 
three wooden altars were replaced with marble altars and a new brick orphan- 
age was built on the opposite corner. The corner-stone of the orphanage was 
laid on Sun., July 6, 1873, by Bishop Becker, assisted by Fathers McGrane, 
Lyons and Fallon. 

On Sun., Nov. 21, 1886, Bishop Alfred A. Curtis was installed at St. 
Peter’s by Cardinal Gibbons. He was assisted by Archbishop Ryan of Phila., 
Bishop Becker and Bishop Moore of Florida. Cardinal Gibbons preached 
the sermon. | 

On Sun., May 9, 1897, the Most Rev. John J. Monaghan was consecrated 
Bishop of Wilmington in St. Peter's Church, by Cardinal Gibbons. He was 
assisted by Bishops H. P. Northrup and Alfred A. Curtis, Vicar-General John 
A. Lyons and the Rev. Fathers M. X. Fallon and Geo. J. Kelley. Vespers were 
celebrated by Bishop Monaghan. 

During the year 1905, Bishop Monaghan remodeled St. Peter's, extensively. 
A dedication service, as a Cathedral, was held on Oct. 29, 1905. Large crowds 
attended the services which were held at 10:30 A. M. The City of Wilmington 
was represented by Mayor Horace Wilson. His Excellency Diomede Falconie, 
the Apostolic Delegate, blessed the main altar. The two side altars were 
bicseath to the Blessed Mother and to St. Joseph. The walls of the building 
were also blessed. Taking part in the services were Bishops Monaghan and 
Curtis, the Most Rev. Benj. J. Keiley, Bishop of Savannah and former Vicar- 
General of Wilmington, and the Most Rev. Edmond F. Prendegast, Auxiliary 
Bishop of Philadelphia, who celebrated Pontifical High Mass. 

The parochial school was opened in Sept., 1906. On Dec. 7, 1906, the 
Golden Jubilee of the establishment of the Sodality of the children of Mary, 
«was celebrated. 

On July 4, 1909, memorial tablets to Bishops Thomas A. Becker and 
Alfred A. Curtis, a gift of Bishop Monaghan were unveiled by Vicar-General 
John A. Lyons. Mass was celebrated by Father Lyons and the sermon was 
preached by Father James Timmons. . 

The Centenary of St. Peter’s Church was celebrated on Christmas Day, 
1916. The services began at 5 A. M., when Bishop Monaghan celebrated 
Pontifical High Mass. Low Masses were said at 8, 9 and 11 o'clock. The 9 
o'clock Mass was for the Italian communicants. 

A new organ was blessed by Bishop Monaghan on Feb. 2, 1919, at which 


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time the sermon was delivered by the Rev. Dr. Wm. Temple. The corner- 
stone of a new parochial school was laid on May 3, 1925, by Bishop Monaghan. 
He was assisted by the Rev. Fathers Leonard Walter, Wm. Temple, D.D., Mar- 
tin M. Ryan and Albert G. Brown. The school was blessed on Jan. 31, 1926, 
by the Most Rev. Edmond J. FitzMaurice, Bishop of Wilmington. 

The Chapel of the Blessed Virgin was seriously damaged by fire on 
Dec. 20, 1928. 


The Church of St. Mary of the Immaculate Conception, R. C. In 1858, 
Father Patrick Reilly was assigned, by Bishop Newman, to organize a parish 
on the east side of Wilmington. Land at 6th and Pine Sts. had been purchased 
as a church site on Sept. 5, 1849, by the Diocese of Philadelphia of which 
Wilmington was then a part. On Oct. 19, 1869, Bishop James Frederick Wood 
transferred the property to Bishop Becker who transferred it to St. Mary’s 
Church on Jan. 29, 1878. 

A meeting: was held in St. Mary’s College on Jan. 17, 1858, at which 
time plans were outlined for the organization of St. Mary’s Parish. The new 
church building was started and the corner-stone was laid on Sun., May 2, 
1858, at 3 P. M., by Father Reilly. The consecration services were held on 
Sun., Oct. 31, 1858. The consecration took place at a 6 A. M. Mass offered by 
Bishop Newman before a large group of visiting priests. At 10 o'clock the 
church was opened to the general public at which time the sermon was deliv- 
ered by the Most Rev. Bishop Carroll of Covington, Ky., a former pastor of 
St. Peter's Church. Bishop Carroll also preached at the 4 o'clock Vespers. 
Tickets of admission were necessary, tickets for the morning service costing 
50 cts. and for the afternoon service 25 cts., but no collections were taken. 

In May, 1864, an adjoining lot was purchased upon which a parochial 
school was built in 1866. The school was soon discontinued and the building 
was leased to the Wil. Board of Public Education and became Public School 
No. 13. In 1871, the central tower was built and other improvements were 
made to the church building. The pastoral residence was built in 1881. The 
church was incorporated on Jan. 20, 1881. i 

On Sun., Aug. 24, 1884, Father Reilly celebrated his Golden Jubilee, 
having been an ordained priest for 50 years. The new altar which had recently 
been erected was a mass of flowers. Father Reilly offered Mass at 7 A. M. and 
served communion at 10 o'clock, Bishop Becker celebrated Pontifical High 
Mass. After the service Father Reilly was escorted to the basement where a 
gteat number of valuable gifts had been placed on display. The presentation 
of these gifts, on behalf of Father Reilly's friends, was made by the Rev. D. J. 
Flynn. In the afternoon there was a parade starting from 6th and West Sts. 
It consisted of four divisions with 1200 men in line. Father Reilly died on 
July 30, 1885, in his 78th year. - 

In September, 1887, the parochial school was reopened. The corner-stone 
of the Convent of St. Francis was laid on Aug. 4, 1895, by Bishop Alfred A. 
Curtis assisted by the Rev. Wm. J. Bermingham. 

Father M. X. Fallon organized the Reilly Lyceum, an active religious and 
social organization. Its annual one-day excursion to Atlantic City was an out- 
standing event. A torch-light parade would be held on the night before to 
whip up interest throughout the city. It was customary to carry three train 
loads on this excursion. 

In 1905, the gallery was removed, the sanctuary was enlarged, a new 
sacristy was built and electric lighting was installed. A service of dedication 
was held on Dec. 8, 1907, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception. The pastor, 





WT E-M-I-N-G-T-O°N bs 


the Rev. Edward L. Brady was in charge. The dedication service was conducted 
by the Apostolic Delegate, the Most Rev. Archbishop Diomede Falconie, after 
which he celebrated High Mass. Bishops Benj. T. Keiley, Alfred A. Curtis and 
John J. Monaghan together with a large delegation of clergy were present. 
Bishop Keiley was at one time Vicar-General of the Diocese of Wilmington. 


St. Paul’s R. C. Church is located at 4th and Jackson Sts. The ground was 
broken for the first church on Mon., May 24, 1869. At 7 o'clock on that day 
200 men armed with picks and shovels converged upon the church site from 
every section of the parish. They started digging and worked as only the 
Irishmen of that day could work and by sundown the entire cellar had been 
excavated and cleaned up, ready for the stone-masons. The corner-stone was 
laid on June 6, 1869. The church was dedicated on Sun., Dec. 19, 1869, by 
Bishop Thomas A. Becker. He was assisted by the Rev. Jos. Plunkett and all 
of the clergy of the Peninsula. At the Vesper service, at 4:30 P. M., the Rev. 
M. X. Fallon was formally appointed the first pastor. 

At that time Third St. was opened only to Madison St., and Van Buren 
St. was opened only between Front and Second Sts. In 1873, the spire was 
added to the church and a bell was installed. The church was incorporated on 
Apr. 29, 1887. 

The corner-stone of the parochial school was laid on Apr. 29, 1888, at 4 
o'clock. There was a procession of school children. Vicar-General John A. 
Lyons was in charge of the exercises. He was assisted by Father M. X. Fallon 
and other priests. 


The school was dedicated on Sun., Sept. 2, 1888, by the Rev. M. X. Fallon 7 


assisted by Fathers Bermingham, Donaghy, Bradford and Ott. The exercises 
started at 4 P. M. with services in the basement of the church. The church 
was again incorporated on Jan. 7, 1894. 

After extensive repairs, the church was reopened on Nov. 21, 1897. Pon- 
tifical High Mass was celebrated by the Most Rev. John J. Monaghan. He was 
assisted by Fathers M. X. Fallon, J. P. Quigley, S. B. Sice and Leo Goltz. The 
sermon was delivered, by the Rev. Dennis J. Flynn. In February, 1899, Bishop 
Monaghan assumed the pastorship of. St. Paul's Parish in addition to his duties 
as Bishop. The school was enlarged and opened for inspection on Nov. 5, 1905. 

The last service in the old church was held on Apr. 21, 1913, at which time 
Father Waldron celebrated High Mass. The basement of the old church was 
used for services during the construction of a new church. : 

This church was dedicated on May 3, 1914. Early that morning Bishop 
Monaghan led a large group of St. Paul's men to the railroad station to meet 
Cardinal Gibbons and to escort him to the church. At 10:30 A. M., Pontifical 
High Mass was celebrated by Bishop B. J. Keiley of Savannah, Ga. The sermon 
was preached by the Rt. Rev. Mgr. McDevitt of Philadelphia. Cardinal Gibbons 
gave a talk and he was followed by Bishop Monaghan. A service was held at 
4 o'clock for the children with a sermon by the Rev. J. Francis Tucker, O.S.F.S. 
Bishop Monaghan had charge at the 7:30 o'clock Vespers, when a sermon was 
delivered by Bishop Keiley. Cardinal Gibbons occupied a throne within 
the chancel. 

The main altar was donated as a memorial to Michael Costello, the Blessed 
Virgin altar was given by the Sodality of the church, St. Joseph's altar was 
given by Mrs. Patrick Cahill and the 14 stations of the cross were presented in 
memory of Dr. John C. Fahey. 

A series of 14 stained glass windows were blessed by the Most Rev. Ed- 
mond J. FitzMaurice, Bishop of Wilmington, on Nov. 5, 1944. He was as- 


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76 Ie Eo 6-H U RGA ESS GO Fas DE TAN dik FE 


sisted by the Rev. Dr. Jos. A. Lee, the pastor. The sermon was preached by 
the Very Rev. Dr. J. Francis Tucker. 

On Mar. 1-July 15, 1946 the church acquired title to the land on the 
easterly side of Jackson St., from 4th to 5th Sts. This is the proposed site of a 
new parochial school. 


St. James’ R. C. Church. James Riddle, owner of the Kentmere Cotton 
Mills on the Brandywine, a local-preacher and a member of Mt. Salem M. E. 
Church, having erected Riddle’s Chapel for his Protestant employees wished to 
have a church built to take care of his Catholic employees. He took the matter 
up with Mrs. James Bradford and they enlisted the help of William Bowe and 
Edward Mahoney. On Sept. 16, 1869, Bishop Thomas A. Becker purchased a 
lot measuring 50 ft. x 90 ft. on the n. e. cor. of Lovering Ave. and Dupont St. 
A frame chapel was erected here and consecrated as St. James’ R. C. Church. 

The first service after the consecration was held on May 29, 1870. Mass 
was celebrated by Bishop Thomas A. Becker assisted by Father Hagan. The 
first pastor was installed in Dec., 1870. During the winter of 1872, Father 
Sorrentini established a night school. Both Catholic and Protestant boys at- 
tended and no religious subjects were taught. | 

Bishop Becker, on Oct. 25, 1870, purchased the balance of the land front- 
ing on Lovering Ave., and extending to Clayton St. On Nov. 26, 1877, the 
Bishop purchased a lot on the westerly side of Dupont St., extending from 
Lovering Ave. to Wawaset St. 

There was a commodious dwelling adjoining the church and the Bishop 
decided to equip it as St. James’ Protectory for orphan boys. Here, on Sept. 24, 
1879, under the management of three Sisters of St. Francis, it was opened as a 
parochial school and orphanage. By Christmas there were ten orphans in resi- 
dence there. On Mar. 10, 1883, the Bishop sold a section of the land west of 
Dupont St., to the Phila. and Balto. R. R. Co., and it became a part of the 
right of way of the present B. & O. R. R. which was opened on Dec. 12, 1884. 

On Nov. 4, 1886, the Bishop sold the plot on Lovering Ave., between 
Clayton and Dupont Sts., to the Mayor and City Council of Wilmington and 
it was incorporated in Brandywine Park. After this, St. James’ Church was 
closed and it was succeeded by St. Ann’s Church at Gilpin Ave. and Union St. 
One of the first tasks of Bishop Alfred A. Curtis, who was ordained Bishop of 
Wilmington on Nov. 14, 1886, was to look for a suitable site for St. James’ 
Protectory. He purchased the Clark farm at Reybold, consisting of 96 acres, 
and remodeled the house for use as an orphanage. The move was made and on 
Aug. 8, 1888, St. James’ Protectory for Boys was opened at Reybold: The 
barn to the rear of the vacated orphanage was destroyed by fire on the evening 
of Nov. 7, 1888. 


Sacred Heart R. C. Church. For one year beginning in 1857 services for 
German Catholics were held in the chapel of St. Mary’s College. In 1874, a 
mission for German Catholics was established at St. Mary’s Church. In August, 
1874, a lot was purchased on w. 10th St., between Madison and Monroe Sts. 
The corner-stone of a new church was laid on Sun., Aug. 16, 1874. The base- 
ment was used for services from Aug. 16, 1875 until Sept. 2, 1883, on which 
date the church was dedicated by Bishop Thomas A. Becker at 11 A. M. The 
services were preceded by a parade of Catholic societies. The Bishop celebrated 
Pontifical High Mass. The Very Rev. Father Gerard preached in German 
after which the Bishop gave talks first in German and then in English. Vesper 
services were held in the evening. A parochial school was opened in the parish- 
house and later moved to the basement of the church. 





WILMINGTON red 


The corner-stone of the parochial school. was laid on Apr. 3,. 1898, by 
Bishop John J. Monaghan. He was assisted by the Very Rev. Leonard Walter 
and the Revs. Isenring, Fallon, Flynn, Hugo, McGill and Kellog. A pro- 
cession, headed by a band, marched from the church to the school site. The 
school was blessed by Father Hugo, O.S.B., on Sept. 11, 1898. | 

The convent of the Sisters of St. Benedict was dedicated on Dec. 7, 1906, 
by Father Corbinian, O.S.B., assisted by Father Hugo and Father Albert. 

The Rev. Wendelin Mayer, O.S.B., known as the founder of Sacred Heart 
Church, is buried in a shrine in the basement of the church. Buried with him 
are scores of crutches and braces donated by crippled persons who were cured 
by his intercessory prayers. In 1940, the shrine was enclosed in a small chapel 
where it is proposed to celebrate Mass on National holidays. The first Mass 
was celebrated on July 4, 1940. The chapel is open for visitors on Sundays. 


St. Patrick’s R. C. Church is located on the s. e. cor. of 15th and King 
Sts. The site was purchased by Dennis J. Menton from Henry Danby on Oct. 
9, 1880. The first Mass was said, in a frame shed which stood in the present 
school-yard, on July 3, 1881. The corner-stone of the church was laid on the 
same day at 4 o'clock by Bishop Thomas A. Becker. Masses were continued in 
the frame shed until Christmas Day, 1881, when the basement of the church was 
completed and put into use. Trustees were elected on Dec. 7, 1881. On Dec. 
21, 1881, the “Big Bell’ was blessed by Bishop Becker and named “St. Thomas” 
in his honor. St. Patrick's Church took title to the site on Mar. 17, 1882. 

The church was dedicated on Mar. 19, 1882, at 11 A. M., by Bishop Becker. 
The first pastor was the Rev. M. X. Fallon. The stations of the Cross were 
blessed and erected by Bishop Becker on Friday of Passion Week, Mar. 31, 
1882. Father George S. Bradford became pastor on Sept. 9, 1885. The parochial 
school was opened on Sept. 3, 1888. The Sisters of St. Francis occupied the 
basement of the church for both school and convent. Four schoolrooms were 
formed by movable wood and glass partitions. The convent was built on 
French St., in 1889. The church was almost overwhelmed with debt. At this 
time, the land on King St., extending from the rectory to 14th St., was sold. 
This afforded temporary relief. Bishop Alfred A. Curtis undertook to reduce 

_the debt and for this purpose he authorized a contest between Fathers Berming- 
ham and Flynn, to raise funds, during one of St. Mary’s fairs. The prize 
offered was a trip to Europe. On Jan. 29, 1891, a concert was held at St. Mary’s 
to raise funds for Father Flynn. When the contest ended Father Flynn had 
collected $13,000.00 and Father Bermingham had collected $10,000.00, which 
was enough to pay off the debt on St. Patrick’s Church. 

The contest was so close and the feeling aroused on both sides was so 
bitter that the Bishop gave both priests the trip, Father Flynn, the winner, 
going one year and Father Bermingham, the next year. When Father Flynn 
returned to Wilmington, from his trip, on Sept. 14, 1891, a large parade met 
him at the station and escorted him to St. Mary’s Church where a reception 
was held. Father Bermingham sailed from New York on Wed., Apr. 27, 1892. 
On the Sunday previous to his departure, his parishioners, including the mem- 
bers of the Brownson Library Ass'n presented him with a purse of $2000.00. 

Bishop Curtis always lamented that he had authorized the contest because 
of the bad blood that it had caused. Incidentally, both Father Flynn and Father 
Bermingham later became pastors of St. Patrick’s Church. The church was in- 
corporated on Jan. 7, 1894. 

Father Bradford resigned as pastor of St. Patrick's Church because of ill 


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78 L0H E* CoH URC BRE SAO Fe Dik 1 iA Wee 


health. He took a trip for several months, then served at Elkton and at St. 
Joseph’s-on-the-Brandywine where he died on June‘20, 1895. 

The third pastor was the Rev. Dennis J. Flynn, the winner of the above- 
mentioned contest. He was installed in October, 1894. The parochial school 
was built in 1895. The corner-stone was laid on May 26, 1895, by Monsignor 
Satolfi, Papal Delegate to the United States, in a heavy rain. He was assisted 
by Vicar-General Lyons, the Rev. J. McCarthy, the Rev. D. J. Flynn, U. S. 
Senator George Gray and Judge David T. Marvel. 

In 1897, the size of the rectory was doubled. In 1899, Father Flynn ac- 
cepted an invitation to join the faculty of Mt. St. Mary’s College at Emmits- 
burg, Md., of which he later became President. He was succeeded by Father 
Fallon, the first pastor, who died in 1900. 

Father Wm. J. Bermingham was the next pastor. He made a number of 
improvements to the church including the entrance, the sacristy, a covered 
passage between the church and the rectory, windows, stations and side altars. 
The church was dedicated on Oct. 8, 1905, by Bishop John J. Monaghan at the 
10:30 o'clock service. The Bishop was assisted by the Revs. Fromentin, Wm. J. 
Scott, Edward C. Higgins and Vicar-General John A. Lyons. The pastor, Father 
Bermingham celebrated High Mass and Father Fedigan delivered the sermon. 
Vesper services were conducted by the Very Rev. John A. Lyons. 

| Father Bermingham purchased the building on the s. w. cor. of 15th and 
King Sts., with the intention of converting it into a convent but this plan was 
not carried out. Father Bermingham died on Dec. 12, 1907. 

In January, 1908, the Rev. James F. Quigley became the pastor. During 
his pastorship the dwelling on the corner was converted into apartments, an 
addition was built to the school and the convent was enlarged. Father Quigley 
died on May 3, 1925. 

The Rev. James L. McSweeney was ‘installed on June 1, 1925. Father 
McSweeney has made a great many improvements including a new organ 
which was dedicated on Feb. 23, 1930. 

St. Patrick’s Church took title to the St. Theresa, the Little Flower, 
Mission at 16th and Thatcher Sts., on Feb. 11, 1927. This was formerly 
Public School No. 26. | 


Church and it was assumed that it would have,the same name. At this time, 
Vicar-General John A. Lyons offered to contribute a large sum of money 
toward the building provided it should be named “St. Ann’s” in honor of his 
mother, whose name was Ann. 

The corner-stone was laid on July 31, 1887, by Bishop Curtis, assisted by 
Father Lyons. Every Catholic Society in Wilmington was represented in the 


this basement church. Father Lyons provided the High Altar, Mrs. Spottswood 
Garland presented St. Joseph’s Altar and the Blessed Virgin Altar was donated 
by a friend. The Rev. Wm. Dollard, the founder of the church, donated 
the organ. 


Under Father Dollard’s supervision another story, with a high tower was 





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80 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


added to the church. It was the intention to surmount this tower with a spire. 
During the construction of the tower, it collapsed. Fortunately, this happened 
on a Sat. afternoon, when no one was closeby, and no one was injured. This 
accident caused the plans to be changed and the height of the tower was 
lowered and it was just squared off. Being completed, it was planned to hold 
the dedication services on Sun., Oct. 16, 1892, but as Father Dollard died on 
the 14th, the service was postponed. The dedication was held on Nov. 20, 
at the morning service. After the dedication exercises, Bishop Curtis cele- 
brated Pontifical High Mass. He occupied the throne and also preached the 
sermon. Pontifical Vespers, at 4 o'clock, were celebrated by Vicar-General 
Lyons, at which time the sermon was preached by the Rev. J. F. Nolan, D.D. 
The church was incorporated on Jan. 7, 1894. } 

The rectory was built in 1898. In 1899, St. Ann’s Parochial School was 
built by the Rev. Peter Donaghy. The corner-stone was laid on May 28, 1899, 


3 P. M., by Bishop John J. Monaghan. He was assisted by the Revs. John J. 


the Blessed Virgin Mary, on Sun. morning, Mar. 17, 1935, by the Most Rev. 
Edmond J. FitzMaurice, Bishop of Wilmington. He was assisted by the Rev. 
John J. Bolen. The sermon was preached by the Bishop. 
Ground was broken for the pees rectory on Mon., Oct. 27, 1941. On 
eaf was inaugurated at St. Ann’s Church by 
Father John J. Bolen. It was announced that these services would be conducted 
on the 4th Sunday of each month at 7:30 P. M. 


continued. Interest gtadually died out and the property was transferred to 
Spottswood Garland on June 6, 1899. He sold it to the Home of Merciful 
Rest Society on July 31, 1901. 


St. Joseph’s R. C. Church. St. Joseph’s Colored Mission was started on 
Oct. 10, 1889, by the Rev. John A. de Ruyter, S.S.J. This mission was held in 
the basement of St. Mary’s Church. St. Joseph's Society for Colored Missions 
was incorporated on Tues., Mar. 4, 1890. On May 12, 1890, five candidates 
were confirmed in St. Mary's Church. A plot of land was purchased on French 
St., near 11th St. on June 10 and on July 3, 1890. The corner-stone of the 





WILMINGTON 81 


school building was laid on July 6, 1890. The ceremony was preceded by a 
large parade starting at 4 P. M. In the line were delegations from New Castle, 
Chester, Baltimore and Washington. The sermon was preached by the Very 
Rev. Father Leeson, Provincial of the Josephites. The stone was blessed by 
Bishop Alfred A. Curtis. The stone was a gift of J. L. Malone, a local 
stone-cutter. 

On Sun. morning, Oct. 5, 1890, the building was blessed by the Most 
Rev. Alfred A. Curtis, Bishop of Wilmington. The sermon was delivered by 
the Rev. Walter Elliott, a Paulist Father from New York. At the 4 o'clock 
service the sermon was preached by the Rev. John Slattery. One section of the 
building was adapted to be used as a temporary church. In 1891, two more 
buildings were built and these served as a school and a home for the sisters. 

In August, 1892, Father de Ruyter opened an orphanage for colored boys, 
the first Catholic home of this type on the Atlantic seaboard. Additional land 
was purchased on Oct. 4, 1892. 

The corner-stone of the orphanage was laid on May 28, 1893, by Bishop 
Alfred A. Curtis. He was assisted by Vicar-General J. B. Slatterly of Boston 
and Father de Ruyter. Addresses were delivered by Judge J. Frank Ball and 
former Mayor Austin Harrington. . 

St. Joseph’s Industrial School for Colored Boys at Clayton was established 
by Father de Ruyter, in 1895, and at the age of 14 years the boys were trans- 
ferred there. In 1893, a free dispensary was established on the corner of 11th 
and Walnut Sts. It was closed in 1896. Father de Ruyter died on Wed., Aug. 
23, 1896, before the school at Clayton was completed. At his request, he was 
buried in Clayton, first beneath St. Joseph’s Chapel and later in a private 
graveyard on the school grounds. : 

The home in Wilmington was closed on Apr. 1, 1928, and all of the work 
was transferred to Clayton. The parochial school was established in September, 
1928, with an enrollment of 60 boys and girls. On July 6, 1933, an assistant 
priest was added to the parish. 

The church was enlarged, altered and renovated in 1934. The corner-stone 
was blessed and laid by the Rev. James F. Didas, S.S.J:, assistant to Father 
Conrad F. Rebesher, S.S.J., on Apr. 10, 1934. 

The church was dedicated on Sun., Sept. 30, 1934, by the Most Rev. Ed- 
mond J. FitzMaurice, Bishop of Wilmington. The Very Rev. John J. Sheehy 
acted as master of ceremonies. Solemn High Mass was celebrated by the Very 
“Rev. Louis B. Pastorelli, S.S.J., and the sermon was preached by the Rev. Dr. 
John Gillard, S.S.J. Bishop FitzMaurice, who had recently visited Rome, con- 
ferred the Papal Blessing upon those in attendance. 

St. Joseph’s Church was seriously damaged by fire on Sun., Dec. 30, 1945. 
The cause of the fire was not determined. The pastor, the Rev. Michael J. 
O’Neal immediately had preliminary plans drawn for an entire new layout in- 
cluding a church, a school and a rectory. In the meantime a temporary chapel 
was constructed in the parochial school and was first used on Sun., Jan. 13, 
1946. Later in the year the damaged building was torn down. 


St. Hedwig’s R. C. Church. In 1883, a group of Polish families arrived 
in Wilmington from Posen Province, Poland. They spoke German and attended 
Sacred Heart Church. Sometime later the Order of St. Benedict sent Father 
Richard Aust, a Polish priest, to Wilmington to look after their spiritual 
welfare. a 

On Aug. 13 and Sept. 27, 1890, the Benedictine Order of the Sacred 
Heart purchased the lots on the s. e. and n. e. corners of Linden and Harrison 


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82 THE CHURCHES OE DEL AWARE 


Sts. The corner-stone of a church on Linden St., east of Harrison St., was laid 
in 1890. 

The dedication services were held on Jan. 25, 1891, at which time the 
Most Rev. Abbott Hillary celebrated Pontifical High Mass. The sermon was 
preached by Father Chowaniecz. Vespers were conducted by Father Ambrose 
and Father Skretni preached the sermon. St. Joseph’s Beneficial Society and 
the Knights of St. Hedwig, in colorful new uniforms, attended the ceremonies. 
The parochial school was opened on Apr. 7, 1891. 

The second pastor was the Rev. Leon Szczepanaski who served from 1891 
until illness caused his retirement in 1895. The parish was in a dormant con- 
dition until the Rev. John S. Gulcz arrived in October, 1896. It was decided 
to build a new church and rectory. The church was incorporated on Jan. 
8, 1898. 

On Feb. 5, 1898, the Order of St. Benedict of Delaware deeded to the 
church the two corner properties purchased in 1890 under their former name. 
On Mar. 8, 1898, Bishop Monaghan deeded to the church land on Harrison 
St., which he had purchased on Sept. 23, 1897. 

The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Sun., July 3, 1904, at 
3:30 P. M. A large parade was formed and marched to the Bishop’s home at 
3rd and Jackson Sts. Several barouches were provided for the clergy. The 
pee then proceeded to the old church on Linden St. The corner-stone was e 

lessed and laid by Bishop John J. Monaghan assisted by the Very Rev. John ae 
A. Lyons, the Rev. Edward C. Higgins and the Rev. John S. Gulcz, the pastor. Se 
The old church, across the street, was lavishly decorated with bunting and 
flags. A sermon in Polish was delivered by the Rey. Stanislaus Josinski. Bishop 
Monaghan delivered an address in English. 

The church was dedicated on Apr. 2, 1905, by Bishop Monaghan at 10 
o'clock. He was assisted by the Rev. E. C. Higgins and the Rev. John S. Gulcz. 
The sermon was preached by Father Kleyna. The old church was remodeled 
for use as a parochial school. , 

The new parochial school- was dedicated on May 3, 1925, by the Rev. M. 
Kopitkiecz. He was assisted by Dr. John Turasicwig and the Rev. Jobn S. 
Gulcz. There was a procession of Polish Societies led by a band. 

In the front garden of the rectory there is a shrine of Our Lady of Lourdes 
which was erected and blessed in the late 1930's. In the meantime the interior 
of the church has been constantly improved until it is today one of Delaware's 
most beautiful churches. «: 


St. Thomas’ R. C. Church is located at 4th St. and Grant Ave. The church 
site was purchased by Bishop John J. Monaghan on July 9, 1902. There was a 
frame building on the site which was used as a chape! for a short time. The 
first Mass was celebrated on July 12, 1903. The erection of a combined church 

and school had been started. 
The corner-stone was laid on May 24, 1903, by Bishop Monaghan assisted 
“by Vicar-General John A. Lyons and a large group of priests. The procession 
moved from the Home of the Little Sisters of the Poor to the church site. A 
large wooden Cross had been erected at the spot where the altar would stand. 
The Bishop blessed this spot, then consecrated and laid the corner-stone after 
which he blessed the foundations. He conferred the Pontifical blessing upon 
all of those present. The sermon was preached by the Rev. Francis T. McCarthy, 
S.J. The name of the church was adopted in honor of the Most Rev. Thomas 
: A. Becker, the first Bishop of Wilmington. Large groups of the Catholic So- 
cieties of Wilmington, accompanied by a band, were present. The building, of 





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84 EAE GH OR CHESMO FD ELAS ALE 


brick, was arranged to accommodate a parochial school on the second floor. 

The school was opened on Sept. 8, 1903. The church took title to the 
property on July 9, 1904. 

Ground was broken for the present church in January, 1927. The corner- 
stone was laid on May 15, 1927, at 4 P. M., by Bishop Edmond J. FitzMaurice 
assisted by Vicar-General John J. Dougherty, the Very Rev. J. Francis Tucker 
and the Rev. John J. Connelly, the pastor. A temporary altar had been erected 
and seats arranged for the guests. Large delegations from the Catholic Societies 
were present. Speeches were made by U. S. Senator Thomas F. Bayard, Mayor 
George W. K. Forrest and John S. Rossell. 

The church was formally opened on Feb. 19, 1928. High Mass was cele- 
brated at 11 o'clock by the Rev. John N. Dougherty assisted by the Rev. 
Michael McGarry and Father Auscar. In the evening the stations were blessed 
and erected. The sermon was delivered by the Rev. Wm. F. McLaughlin. 

On Feb. 26, 1928, the statue of St. Theresa, a memorial to Marie Conner, 
was moved from the old church to the new church. The ceremony was in 
charge of Father Dougherty. 

On Mar. 4, 1928, a large delegation from St. Anthony’s Church moved - 
the statue of St. Anthony from the old to the new church. The Very Rev. J. 
Francis Tucker was in charge of the ceremony. : 

The church was dedicated on Apr. 29, 1928, by Bishop Edmond J. Fitz- 
Maurice, assisted by the Rev. John N. Dougherty, the pastor. High Mass was 
celebrated by the Rev. Wm. F. McLaughlin and the sermon was preached by 
the Rev. John F. Vanston. | | 

On Sun., June 5, 1938, a new organ was dedicated by Bishop FitzMaurice. 
The services were attended by Governor Richard C. McMullen and Lieut. Gov. 
Edward W. Cooch. Ground was broken for the present convent on Oct. 16, 
1941 and the corner-stone was laid on July 19,1942. “ 

In September, 1941, a bell was installed in the 106 ft. tower of the church. — 

When the Union Volunteer Fire Co. disbanded in 1920, their bell was pre- © 
sented to St. Thomas’ Church. The old frame and steel tower from the, fire- 
house was erected in the church yard and the bell was used until 1941. Then, 
it was remodeled, refinished, two sets of clappers installed and it was placed in ~ 
the tower of the church. The bells were blessed at a special service by the ~ 
Rev. John N. Dougherty. : 


_ St. Elizabeth’s R. C. Church. On Aug. 31, 1907, Bishop John J. Monaghan 
purchased the Wilmington Military Academy property at Oak and Broom Sts. 
Early in 1908, the Rev. William Temple, D.D., was appointed by Bishop 
Monaghan to establish a new parish in the southern part of Wilmington. The 
old Gregg mansion which stood on the purchased property was remodeled 
for use as a parochial school and convent. The Military School building was 

.temodeled, the first floor to be used as a church and the second floor as a rec- 
‘tory. The first Mass was celebrated on May 24, 1908. 


The church was dedicated on Sun., May 31, 1908, by the Most Rev. John 
J. Monaghan, Bishop of Wilmington. The services were in charge of the Rev. 
Dr. Temple, the pastor. A procession, including the Catholic Societies of Wil- 
mington, formed at the Bishop's rectory, 3rd and Jackson Sts., and paraded to 
the church. The outer walls were blessed at 10 A. M. by the Bishop, assisted by 
Chancellor E. C. Higgins and the Rev. F. G. O'Neill. The inner walls were 
blessed at 10:30 A. M. by the Very Rev. John A. Lyons, The sermon was de- 
livered by the Rev. M. F. Foley. 





WILMINGTON 85 


On Jan. 13, 1909, the Bishop transferred the property to St. Elizabeth's 
Church. 

A few years later an addition was built, almost doubling the seating 
capacity of the church. The Banning property, 809 s. Broom St. was purchased 
on Sept. 21, 1922. The rectory was established here. The second floor of the 
church building was then remodeled for school purposes. 

The corner-stone of the present parochial school was laid on Nov. 10, 
1929, by Monsignor J. J. Dougherty assisted by Father Temple. On Mar. 17, 
1940, six gold altar vases, in memory of Patrick and Elizabeth Quigley, were 
used for the first time. 

In 1943, a campaign was started to raise $150,000.00 with which to re- 
place St. Elizabeth's Church with a new church to be known as the Father 
Temple Memorial Church. 

The ground was broken for the new church at s. Clayton and Cedar Sts. 
on Sun., afternoon, Oct. 21, 1945. The first spadeful of earth was turned by 
the Most Rev. Edmond J. FitzMaurice, Bishop of Wilmington. A wooden cross 
.had been erected on the spot from which the main altar would rise and this 
ground was blessed previous to the ground-breaking. The Bishop celebrated 
Benediction from a wooden altar erected on the rear porch of the rectory. 
Among those present were Fathers E. J. McDonough, Francis J. Desmond, Jos. 
P. Kenny, V. Kenny, Francis S. Lynch and James M. Grant, the pastor. 

As this is written the building is under roof and it bids fair to be one of 
Delaware's outstanding churches. 


Holy Trinity Polish National R. C. Church was incorporated on May 21, 
1913. They met in the former Olivet Church building at Chestnut and Adams 
Sts. The life of this church was very short. 


St. Stanislaus Kostka Church, R. C., is located at 7th and Buttonwood 
Sts. The corner-stone of the church was laid on Nov. 23, 1913, by Bishop 
John J. Monaghan. He was assisted by the Most Rev. Fromentine and the Rev. 
Fathers Thomas F. Waldron, Mahoney, John S. Gulcz and Jabowiskie, the 
pastor. Large delegations of Polish Catholic societies were present. 

The church was dedicated on Mar. 22, 1914, at 3 o'clock, by Bishop 
Monaghan. He was assisted by the Rev. John S. Gulcz and the pastor, the Rev. 
Simon Nawrocki. Many members of Polish Catholic societies turned out. 

After being seriously damaged by fire, the church was rebuilt. It was 
dedicated on Mar. 22, 1925, by Bishop Monaghan. He was assisted by Mon- 
signor Stanislaus Wachowiak and the Rev. Martin Ryan. The Mass was cele- 
brated by the Rev. Anthony C. Olexinski. Led by a band, a procession from 
the rectory, 901 e. 7th St., to the church was held. 

On July 24, 1927, the statue of St. Anna was blessed by Monsignor 
Wachowiak assisted by Father Olexinski, the pastor. 


St. Anthony’s R. C. Church. On Sept. 13, 1924, Bishop John J. Mon- 
aghan appointed the Very Rev. J. Francis Tucker, O.S.F.S., as pastor of St. 
Anthony's Parish with instructions to proceed with the erection of a church. 
The parish limits included all of the Italians in Wilmington. Subscriptions 
toward the building were started in December, 1924. The first Mass was 
offered on Christmas Day, 1924, in a temporary building later used as St. 
Anthony's Hall. The church was incorporated on Jan. 4, 1925. The title to 
the church site at 9th and Dupont Sts. was acquired on Mar. 25, 1925. Ground 
was broken on Mar. 8, 1925. At 4:30 P. M. there was a procession to the tem- 
porary chancel. Father Tucker made a short speech as did each of the building 


ee eee ed 





86 THE CHU RC HESYOLODELAW ARE 


committee: Ernest Di Sabitino, Alexander Petrillo, P. Del Campo and Louis 
Fidance. Father Tucker turned the first spadeful of earth using a spade trimmed 
with brown and white ribbon. He was followed by Father Fournier, O.S.F.S., 
who was followed by the committee. The earth was placed on the platform 
and all of it was carried away as souvenirs. The spade is being preserved to 
break ground for a parish school. A Mass was then offered. 

The corner-stone of the church was laid on Sun., June 14, 1925, by the 
Most Rev. John J. Monaghan assisted by the Very Rev. J. Francis Tucker, the 
pastor. The benediction was pronounced by the Rev. John Knight, O.S.F:S. 
This was the last public appearance of Bishop Monaghan previous to his re- 
tirement because of failing health. On this occasion an address was delivered 
by U. S. Senator Thomas F. Bayard."There was a large parade accompanied 
by two bands. 

The first Mass was celebrated in the new building on Palm Sunday, Mar. 
28, 1926. The church was dedicated on Sun., June 13, 1926. Masses were 
offered at 6:30 and 7:30 A. M. At 9:30 a large procession formed at the 
Bishop's home, 1301 Delaware Ave., to escort the dignitaries to the church.. 
Pontifical High Mass was celebrated by Archbishop Pietro. Fumasoni-Blondi, 
Papal Delegate to the United States, assisted by the Most Rev. Edmond J. 
FitzMaurice, Bishop of Wilmington. At the same time, for the benefit of the 


' crowds who could not get into the church, a Mass was offered outside of the 


church at a temporary chancel. A banquet was held at the Hotel Du Pont, at 
which time Ernest Di Sabitind presented to Archbishop Fumasoni-Blondi a 
golden key with a picture of the church. The Archbishop, in turn, presented 
the key to Bishop FitzMaurice, believing that the most fitting place for the 
key was in the home of the Bishop of Wilmington. 

On Oct. 14, 1928, the Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes was blessed by 


Monsignor J. J. Dougherty, assisted by the Very Rev. J. Francis Tucker. 


The carnivoles held by St. Anthony’s Church were famous throughout this 
section. All sorts of amusements were provided, Italian dishes were to be had 


_and Italian folk dances and songs were presented. , 


Father Tucker’s Silver- Jubilee as an ordained priest was observed with a 
three-day celebration. A Solemn Mass of Thanksgiving was celebrated on Sun., 
Oct. 4, 1936 and the services were brought to a close with a testimonial dinner 


- at the Hotel Du.Pont on the evening of Oct. 6. 


The campanile, or bell tower, was completed in 1938. The dedication 
will not be held until the interior is fully completed. The baptistry was com- 
pleted in 1943, but the stained-glass windows have not been installed, as yet. 
Work on the interior of the church is still in progress. Little by little as they 
could afford it, the first of the lateral chapels, the columns, the arches, the 
lateral ceiling, small windows and medalions have been completed. It is Father 
Tucker's idea that the work should be done through the generations, leaving 
to succeeding ones a share in the erection of an enduring monument to the 
&reater Glory of God. : : 

On Dec. 8, 1944, the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, the Most Rev. 
Edmond J. FitzMaurice blessed a hand-carved walnut pulpit and a hand-carved 
walnut shrine of the Miraculous Medal. The pulpit was a gift of St. Anthony’s 
Catholic Club and the shrine was a gift of the boys and girls in the armed 
services. Bishop FitzMaurice preached the first sermon from the new pulpit. 

Plans were announced on Feb. 17, 1946 for the erection of the Paul M. 
Fournier Memorial Hall as sponsored by the St. Anthony Catholic Club. It is 
to be located on the southerly side of Howland St., between Dupont and Scott 
Sts. It will include an auditorium, game rooms, library, kitchen and a gym- 





<<. 


WILMINGTON 87 


nasium. Father Fournier was the founder and the first chaplain of the club. 

Something new in ground-breaking ceremonies, in Delaware, was accom- 
plished on Sun. morning. Mar. 9, 1947, when Father Tucker, fully attired in his 
priestly garments, climbed aboard a steam shovel, snatched the levers and took 
a huge bite of earth to start the work on the Fournier Building. 

Previous to this Father Tucker, assisted by the Revs. N. Di Ienno and J. E. 
Woods after the celebration of Mass in the church proceeded to bles$ the 
ground of the site. 


| Christ Our King R. C. Church. This parish was designated in March, 
1926, by the Most Rev. Edmond J. FitzMaurice, Bishop of Wilmington and 
the Rev. John J. Lynch was appointed pastor. His first task was to erect the 
necessary parish buildings. On Mar. 1, 1926, Bishop FitzMaurice purchased 
land at 28th and Madison Sts. Father Lynch had a temporary chapel built on 
the s. w. cor. of 28th and Madison Sts. The first Mass was celebrated on Sun., 
Sept. 5, 1926. ! 
This temporary chapel was dedicated on the feast day of Christ Our King, 
Oct. 31, 1926, by Bishop FitzMaurice. He was assisted by Vicar-General J. J. 
Dougherty, the Rev. J. J. Corrigan and Father John J. Lynch, the pastor. This 
was believed to be the first church in the world to bear the name “Christ 
Our King.” pais 
At a meeting held on Jan. 2, 1927, trustees. were elected and Christ Our 
King Church assumed title to the property on May 27, 1927. The contract for 
building the parochial school was awarded during the week of July 10, 1927. 
The first anniversary of the temporary church was celebrated on Sept. 4, 1927. 
The corner-stone of the parochial school was laid on Jan. 22, 1928, by 
Bishop FitzMaurice, assisted by Father J. J. Lynch. The dedication services 
were held on Sept. 9, 1928, at which time each room was blessed separately by 
Bishop FitzMaurice. A procession from the chapel to the school was held. The 
Bishop was assisted by Vicar-General J. J. Dougherty, Chancellor J. J. Bolen 
and Father Lynch. An oration was delivered by the Rev. Dr. W. A. Scullen. 
A benediction was said in the chapel. 


The convent was completed and was opened for inspection on the morning — 


of May 15, 1932. It was blessed by Bishop. FitzMaurice on that day. 


In July, 1934, Masses were transferred to a chapel in the basement of the 


school building and the temporary chapel was torn down. 

During the summer of 1943, the altar from the Chapel of St. Catherine 
of Siena at St. James’ Protectory was installed in Christ Our King Chapel to 
be used as the Altar of the Blessed Virgin. 


The Chapel of the Blessed Sacrament, R.C., colored. This property, at 
712 Scott St., was purchased by the Diocese of Wilmington on Nov. 22, 1935. 
The house was remodeled for chapel purposes and the garage in the rear was 
converted into a tiny parochial school. The chapel was dedicated on May 16, 
1943, by Bishop Edmond J. FitzMaurice. | : 

He was assisted by the Revs. Conrad F. Rebesher, S.S.J., and James Didas, 
S.S.J. Mass was celebrated by the Most Rev. Louis B. Pastorelli, S.S.J., and the 
sermon was delivered by the Very Rev. J. Francis Tucker. The work at this 
chapel is conducted by the Josephite Fathers. 


The Chapel of St. Theresa, the Little Flower, R. C. On Feb. 11, 1927, St. 
Patrick’s Church purchased former public school No. 26 at 14th and Thatcher 





STS AE MS 6 te Merv erie: 








88 THE CHU R.C HESWOE tO AW ARE 


Sts. An addition was built to form a vestibule for the chapel. The first Mass 
was celebrated by the Rev. James L. McSweeney. A parochial school is con- 
ducted which includes the 4th grade. 


BISHOPS OF WILMINGTON 


The Most Rev. Thomas A. Becker, first Bishop of Wilmington was born 
near Pittsburgh, Pa., on Dec. 20, 1832. His parents were German Lutherans. 
He was reared in the Presbyterian Church. He attended the University of 
Virginia where, at the age of 21 years, he entered the Catholic Church. His 
father sent him to Rome where he spent several years in the College of the 
Propaganda in preparation for a future post as a professor, which was his 
ambition. He was ordained in Rome, on June 18, 1859, by Cardinal Patrizzi. 
He was assigned to Virginia, then to West Virginia and at the end of the Civil 
War he went to Baltimore. Attached to St. Peter’s Church, he was secretary to 
Archbishop Spalding. Later, he was sent to St. Mary’s Seminary, Emmitsburg, 
Md., where he taught theology, ecclesiastical history and sacred scripture. 
Later, he was assigned to the Cathedral at Richmond, Va., where he remained 
until 1868. 

He was consecrated Bishop of Wilmington on Aug. 23, 1868, which post 
he held until May, 1886, when he was transferred to Savannah, Ga. He died 
at Washington, Ga., on July 29, 1899. 


The Most Rev. Alfred A. Curtis, second Bishop of Wilmington, was born 
in Somerset, Md. After studying for the ministry of the P. E. Church, he was 
ordained in 1859. He became rector of Mt. Calvary Church in Baltimore. He 
resigned in 1870 and went to England where he was received into the Catholic 
Church in 1871. He returned to Baltimore and entered the Seminary of St. 
Sulpice where he remained until he was ordained in 1874. He served as secre- 
tary to Archbishop Bayley and Cardinal Gibbons in Baltimore. 

He was consecrated Bishop of Wilmington on Nov. 14, 1886, by Cardinal 
Gibbons, in Washington. A special train left Wilmington at 7 A. M. to take 
Wilmingtonians to attend the services. Bishop Becker was in attendance. Bishop 


Curtis was installed at St. Peter’s Church, Wilmington, on Sun., Nov. 21, 1886, 


_ by Cardinal Gibbons. Bishop Curtis resigned in 1895 and returned to Balti- 
more as assistant to Cardinal Gibbons. He died on July 11, 1908. 


The Most Rev. John J. Monaghan, third Bishop of Wilmington was born 
in Sumter, So. Carolina, on May 3, 1856. After being graduated from St. 
Charles’, Elliott City, Md., he entered St. Mary’s Seminary at Baltimore. He 
was ordained on Dec. 19, 1880. He was consecrated Bishop of Wilmington on 
May 9, 1897, by Cardinal Gibbons, in St. Peter’s Church. Assisting in the 
consecration were Bishops H. P. Northrup and Alfred A. Curtis, Vicar-General 
John A. Lyons and the Rev. Fathers M: X. Fallon and Geo. J. Kelley. Vespers 
were celebrated by Bishop Monaghan. 

Bishop Monaghan resigned on Aug.-1, 1925, due to ill health, but he 
remained in Wilmington, where he died in St. Francis’ Hospital on Jan. 7, 
1935. He was at that time the oldest Catholic Bishop in the United States. 


The Most Rev. Edmond J. FitzMaurice, fourth Bishop of Wilmington, 
was born in Tarbert, County Kerry, Ireland, on June 24, 1881. He studied 
at St. Brendan’s College, Ireland, the College of St. Stroud, Belgium, and the 
North American College at Rome. He was ordained in 1904 and came to the 
United States during that year. He became curate at Annunciation Church, 





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90 PAE GH RCE S MO ROE Waa E 


Phila., until 1906, then professor of theology until 1914 and later rector at 
St. Charles’ Seminary, Overbrook. During the period 1920 to 1925 he was 
also Chancellor of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. 

He was consecrated Bishop of Wilmington on Nov. 30, 1925, by his 
Eminence Cardinal Dougherty. The consecration was held in the Cathedral of 
S. S. Peter and Paul, Philadelphia, on the Feast of St. Andrew. Cardinal 
Dougherty was assisted by Bishops J. J. Swint and A. J. Brennan. The sermon 
was delivered by Archbishop McNicholas. The Rev. Dr. Wm. Temple deliv- 
ered an address as did Bishop FitzMaurice. A luncheon was served in the 
Cathedral School. 

Bishop FitzMaurice was installed as Bishop of Wilmington in St. Peter’s 
Pro-Cathedral Church, on Dec. 10, 1925, by Archbishop Michael J. Curley. 
Pontifical High Mass was celebrated by Bishop Curley. All of the clergy of the 
Diocese were present. Addresses of welcome were delivered by the Rev. Ed- 
ward Mickle, on behalf of the clergy, and by John S. Rossell, on behalf of 
the laity. 

At the same time the retiring Bishop, John J. Monaghan was installed 
at titular Bishop of Lidda in ancient Syria. The ceremonies were followed by a 
luncheon in the Du Barry Room of the Hotel Du Pont. In the evening, a 
dinner in honor of Bishop FitzMaurice was given in the Gold Ballroom of 
the Hotel. | 


THE BISHOPS’ HOME 


The early Bishops made their home in St. Peter's rectory. In February, 
1899, Bishop Monaghan assumed the pastorship of St. Paul’s Parish in addition 
to his duties as Bishop. At this time he moved into St. Paul’s rectory. On Mar. 
11, 1910, the Diocese purchased the John M. Rodgers’ home at 1301 Dela-. 
ware Ave. to be used as a home for the Bishop. Bishop Monaghan moved into 
the new home in August, 1910. | 


LUTHERAN’ : 


Zion Evangelical Lutheran Church. The first attempt to establish a Ger- 
man Lutheran Church in Wilmington was made by 37 persons, on Aug. 6, 
1848, but was abandoned in November. A petition to the Ministerium asking 
for a pastor was answered in December when the Rev. Frederick Walz arrived 
in Wilmington. He held two services on Dec. 3, 1848, on the second floor of a 
small house on the East Side. An organization meeting was held the next day 
and arrangements were made to hold meetings in Central Hall, on the n. w. 
cor. of 4th and King Sts. The church was recognized by the Ministerium of 
Pa., in 1849. 

On Feb. 24, 1857, a church site on Walnut St., above 6th St., was pur- 
chased from James Morrow. A church building was completed and it was 
Wedicated on Mar. 8, 1857, by the Rev. E. Deubkert. The property proved too 
small for both church and school activities so it was sold on Oct. 9, 1865, to 
Bethel A. M. E. Church. 

On July 23, 1866, the schoolhouse at the s. w. cor. of 6th and French Sts. 
was purchased from the Board of Education. In the basement a church-school 
was established, the first floor was converted into a place of worship and the 
second floor was rented to the city for school purposes. In 1870, the buildin 
was remodeled for church and Sunday School purposes exclusively, the day- 
school being discontinued. 

Land at 6th and Jackson Sts. was purchased on May 19 and May 26, 1893, 











WILMINGTON 91 


from H. J. Stoeckle and Patrick Fahey. On May 28, 1897, more land for the 
new church site was donated by Harry J. Stoeckle and his mother, Johanna 
Stoeckle. The corner-stone of a new church was laid on Jan. 2, 1898, at 3 P. M. 
by the Rev. Paul Isenschmidt, assisted by the Rev. Frederick Doerr. The church 
was dedicated on Sun., June 26, 1898. The congregation met in the old church 
for farewell devotional services and then marched in a body to the new church. 
The services were in charge of the Rev. J. ¥. Kuendig, D.D., of Reading, Pa., 
assisted by the Rev. Paul Isenschmidt, the pastor. 

The property at 6th and French Sts. was sold to the Congregation Adas 
Kodesch on Mar. 4, 1898. 

The new pipe-organ was dedicated on Dec. 18, 1898. The chime bells, 
presented by Mrs. Johanna Stoeckle, were dedicated on Apr. 15, 1900, by the 
Rev. Dr. Isenschmidt. 

After extensive alterations and improvements including a memorial win- 
dow to Mrs. Johanna Stoeckle, a dedication service was held on Sept. 9, 1923. 
A service in German was conducted by the Rev. Dr. R. Bielinski and an English 
service was conducted by the Rev. H. A. Weller. 

The corner-stone of an addition to the Sunday School, to the rear of the 
church, was laid on Mar. 24, 1929, by the Rev. Frederick M. Hasskarl. The 
building was dedicated on the morning of June 30, 1929, by the Rev. Charles 
P. Wiles. On Oct. 4, 1931, a baptismal font, in memory of Mrs. Luise E. 
Croney was dedicated by the Rev. Mr. Hasskarl. 


After renovations and redecorating, a dedication service was held on June 


7, 1936. Those participating in the service included the Revs. Sterling F. 
Bashore, Dr. J. Frederick Stolte and Carl F. Yeager. 

The 90th Anniversary of the church was celebrated on Dec. 4, 1938. In 
July, 1942, the use of the German language was abandonted and all services 
are now conducted in the English language. 

After extensive remodeling, the church was rededicated and a new pulpit 
was blessed at a service held on Sun., Sept. 15, 1946. 


St. Stephen’s Evangelical Lutheran Church. This was the first English 
congregation of this denomination in Delaware. Meetings were held in the 
Wil. Institute Building. Temporary organization was effected on Aug. 31, 1888. 
Sunday School services were inaugurated on Sept. 7, 1888. Meetings were 
then transferred to Fletcher Hall, 604 Market St. The first church service was 
held on Oct. 7, 1888. The church was permanently organized on Dec. 7, 1888. 
The first pastor, the Rev. Wm. A. Sadtler, was installed on Dec. 9, 1888. The 
church was incorporated on Feb. 8, 1889. On Apr. 7, 1889, they purchased the 
church on Tatnall St., below 8th St., formerly occupied by the Household 
of Faith. 

This building was remodeled and was dedicated on Apr. 7, 1889. The 
services were in charge of the pastor, the Rev. W. A. Sadtler. The dedication 


ceremony was conducted by the Rev. Dr. Benjamin Sadtler, the father of the 


pastor, assisted by the Rev. W. Ashmead Schaeffer. The evening sermon was 
preached by the Rev. Dr. Samuel Laird. St. Andrew's Choir assisted with the 


music. A new pipe-organ was consecrated on Apr. 4, 1897. On Dec. 13, 1908, | 


a new chancel and new windows were dedicated by the Rev. Dr. H. E. Jacobs. 
The present church site, at 13th and Broom Sts., was purchased on Mar. 7, 1925. 

Ground was broken for the present church on Jan. 9, 1927, Governor 
Robinson and Mayor Forrest both taking part in the exercises. The first spade- 
ful of earth was turned by the Rev. Park W. Huntington, the pastor, followed 
by the Governor and the Mayor. The corner-stone was laid on Apr. 24, 1927, 


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92 DHE CCH UR CAESROR MDE eA WARE 





by the Rev. Park W. Huntington, assisted by the Revs. Frederick Hasskarl, 
James F. Kelly and Frank S. Kurtz. 

Built of Holmesburg granite, the church was dedicated on Sun., Mar. 4, 
1928. The dedication sermon was preached by Dr. Charles M. Jacobs, Pres. 
of the Lutheran Theological Seminary at Mt. Airy, Pa. This was followed by a 
five-day festival of rejoicing. The parsonage, 806 w. 25th St. was purchased 
in1927. 

On Sun., Nov. 16, 1930, two bronze tablets were unveiled by Mrs. Ann 
Hiller. There were a number of memorial windows in the Tatnall St. church 
that could not be used in the new building. These tablets bore a list of those in 
whose memory the windows had been dedicated. On Feb. 23, 1941, a pair 
of brass candelabra, in memory of the Rev. Frederick Doerr, were dedicated and 
blessed by the Rev. E. T. Bachman. 

The will of William F. Frederick, a prominent member of St. Stephen's 
Church, provided funds for the erection of a church-house. Ground was broken 
for the Wm. F. Frederick Memorial Church-House on Sun., Sept. 28, 1941. 
The spade used was the same one used in breaking ground for the church. 
The first spadeful of earth was turned by Mrs. Lydia Oberly and she was 
followed by Lucile Burkhard, Mrs. P. J. Isaacs and the Rev. Dr. Samuel E. 
Wicker. 

The church-house was dedicated on Sun., June 7, 1942. The Rev. Dr. Earl 
Rudisill of Phila., preached, the Rev. E. T. Bachman was the liturgist and he 
also preached. The Rev. Dr. S. E. Wicker, assistant pastor and Arloe R. Olsen 
assisted with the services. 


The spade and trowel used in the ceremonies of ground breaking and 
corner-stone laying are preserved, in a glass case, in the church parlor. 


On Jan. 28, 1945, a memorial cross. and an altar were dedicated in memory 
of Pfc. H. Herbert Hirzel, Jr., who was killed in action in France on Sept. 16, 
1944. The cross was given by Private Hirzel’s parents and the altar was given 
by Mr. and Mrs. Wing Leong. The altar was built by the Rev. S. F. Bashore 
of Zion Lutheran Church in the pursuance of his hobby, cabinet-makigg. It 
was placed in the Sunday School room. 


Holy Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church. This congregation was organ- 
ized on Jan. 24, 1906, at a meeting held at 301 w. 21st St. on Feb. 21, 1906, 
the meetings were transferred to the A. O. U. W. Hall. The congregation was 
formally organized on Palm Sunday. On Sept. 3, 1906, they secured a church , 
site at Concord Ave, and Madison St. A temporary frame chapel was built. It 
was dedicated on Sun., Oct. 28, 1906, with services at 10:30 A. M. led by the 
Revs. S. D. Daugherty and A. S. Hartman. The pastor, the Rev. J. Harry Main 
was installed at the evening service at which time the sermon was preached 
by the Rev. W. L. S. Murray. A Sunday School was organized on Nov. 4, 1906. 


The. ground was broken for the Present church on the evening of Aug. 
18, 1907, by the Rev. J. H. Main, after all-day services. Title to the site was 
secured on Sept. 28, 1907. The corner-stone was laid on Sun., Oct. 6, 1907, 
at 4 P. M., by the Rev. J. H. Main. He used a trowel which his brother had 
used to lay the corner-stone of St. Matthews Church in Brooklyn, N. Y. Mr. 
Main was assisted by the Revs. Edwin H. Delk, S. D. Daugherty and W. L. S. 
Murray. The first service in the new building was held on Mar. 8, 1908. 

The church was dedicated by the Rev. J. H. Main, the pastor, on the after- 
noon on Sun., Mar. 29, 1908. The sermon was preached by the Rev. Charles 
S. Albert, D.D. The morning sermon was delivered by the Rev. A. Stewart 





VILMINGTON 23 
sa 





Hartman and in the evening, the Rev. S. D. Daugherty preached. A full week 
of services followed. 

The Torkillus tower was dedicated on Nov. 18, 1917, by the pastor, the 
Rev. Dr. Milton H. Stine. Several Prominent speakers took part. This tower 
was dedicated to the honor of the Rev. Reorus Torkillus, the first Swedish 
Lutheran minister in Delaware. He atrived in 1639 and held his first services 
in Fort Christina. | 

The ground was broken for an addition to the church on Aug. 3, 1919. 
The corner-stone was laid on June 27, 1920. The services lasted all day with 
the corner-stone ceremony taking place at 10 P. M. Among those assisting 
the pastor, the Rev. M. H. Stine were the Revs. C. H. Bohner, E. C. Sunfield, 
P. Hi Pearson, S)G. Von’ Bosse and Frederick Doerr, 

These improvements which included the installation of a new Moller 
Pipe-organ were dedicated on Sun., Dec. 10, 1922. The services were in charge 
of the Rev. Samuel E. Wicker, D.D., the pastor. The three services were con- 
ducted by the Revs. J. Chantry Hoffman, D.D., Marion G. Richard and D, 
Burt Smith. 

The Rev. James F. Kelly, the pastor, arranged for a Thanksgiving service 
on Feb, 20, 1944, at which time the mortgage was burned. The morning sermon 
was preached by the Rev. M. R. Hamsher, D.D., after which the mortgage was 
burned by Mrs. Charles Zeofla, the oldest charter member. The evening service 
was conducted by the Rev. Samuel E. Wicker, D.D., a former pastor. 

After extensive renovations the church was rededicated on Sun., Sept. 29, 
1946, at 11 A. M., by the Rev. James F. Kelly, who had been the pastor for 
twenty years. The sermon was delivered by the Rev. Philip H. Pearson, who 
had served as the second pastor of the congregation. 

The Keen Memorial Chimes were dedicated on Sun., Nov. 17, 1946, by 
the Rev. James F. Kelly. These cathedral chimes are a memorial to Walter G. 
Keen, Jr., who lost his life in the invasion of Southern France. 


Concordia Evangelical Lutheran Church is located at Washington St. and 
Lea Boulevard. This church was organized at Claymont in 1931. * Meetings 
were held in the Community Hall until 1936 when they were transferred to 
_ 900 Washington St., in Wilmington. On April 6, 1941, the mission was moved 
to Newport where the services were held in the Woman's Club Building. 

The present site was purchased on Mar. 20, 1944. Construction was 
started during the week of Sept. 17, 1945. The corner-stone was laid on Sun., 
Dec. 9, 1945, with the pastor, the Rev. George H. Mueller, presiding. The 
Revs. Wm. von Spreckelson and Gilbert O. Pfeiffer assisted in the ceremonies. 

The church was dedicated on Sun., Oct. 20, 1946. A farewell service, in 
the Woman’s Club at Newport was held at 9:45 A. M., with the Rev. G. H. 
Mueller, the pastor, in charge. 

The dedication sermon was preached by the Rev. O. A. Sauer, of Rich- 
mond, Va., Pres. of the Southeastern Dist of the Missouri Synod. The dedica- 
tion was performed by the Rev. Mr. Mueller. He was assisted by the Revs. 
George Horn, F. A. Freed, G. O. Pfeiffer and P. E. Holls. 

The altar is a memorial to Mrs. Henriette Miller, given by Arthur H. 
Miller and the altar vases were given by Mr. and Mrs, Curt E. Jantz in memory 
of their son Roger. 


SWEDENBORGIAN 


The First Society of New Jerusalem or the Swedenborgian Church. The 
first meetings of this group were held in private homes in 1824. Meetings 


Fa bale oe ee ee “ 








94 THE CHURGH ESS OFM DEL AW ARE 


were later held in a hall on Market St., and in Central Hall on the n. w. corner 
of Fourth-and King Sts. Under the leadership of Daniel Lamotte a church was 
organized in 1857. The first pastor was installed on July 29, 1857. A lot on 
the n. e. cor. of Delaware Ave. and Washington St. was secured from Edward 
W. Gilpin as a church site. 

Excavation for the cellar was started on July 21, 1857. The corner-stone 
of a new church, of Brandywine granite, was laid on Adg. 6, 1857, at 11:30 
A. M. Although it was a rainy day there was a good turnout. Trustees were 
elected on Feb. 10, 1858. The first meeting in the new building was held on 
Apr. 30, 1858. Title to the church site was secured on June 23, 1858. The 
church was dedicated on Apr. 29, 1859. 

On Mar. 23, 1897, they purchased the dwelling at 413 Delaware Ave. to 
be used as a parsonage. 

When the Pierre S. du Pont project of widening the streets adjacent to the 
church was started, it was proposed to move the church stone by stone and 
to erect it substantially in the same form on a new site. The property was sold 
to Pierre S. du Pont on Apr. 9, 1917. 


The present church site at Pennsylvania Ave. and Broom St. was pur- 
chased on May 2, 1917. During the time the church was peing built, services 
were held in the old parish-house until Oct. 1, 1918, after which they were 
held in the new parish-house recently built on the new site. 


_ The first service in the new church was held on Apr. 6, 1919, by the Rev. 
George Henry Dole, the pastor. The church was dedicated on Oct. 19, 1919, 
at the morning service. The dedicatory sermon was delivered by the Rev. Wm. 
L. Worcester. The Revs. J..K. Smyth and George Henry Dole, the pastor, 
assisted in the services. 7 


Windows in memory of the Misses Lamotte were unveiled on the same day. 


UNITARIAN 


The First Unitarian Society of Wilmington. In November, 1865, a few 
persons, chiefly Welshmen, of this faith took under consideration the building 
of a church. On Jan. 21, 1866, they entered into correspondence with the Rev. 
Charles Lowe, secretary of the American Unitarian Association, who encour- 
aged them to proceed and agreed to furnish preaching. In February, the Rev. 
Dr. F. A. Farley arrived in Wilmington to assist the members. They arranged 
to hold meetings in the Wilmington Institute. | 


On Apr. 8, 1866, the first sermon was preached by the Rev. Dr. C. Y. 
DeNormandie. He was followed by Dr. Farley and the Rev. Joseph Angus. 
A Society was formed on Sun., June 24, 1866. It was duly organized on July 7 
and trustees were elected. The Rev. Fielder Israel was installed as the first 
pastor on Oct. 7, 1866. | 


The church site at 807 West St. was secured. At the ground-breaking cere- 
“mony on Sept. 16, 1867, Mrs. Lydia B. Sisson turned the first spadeful of 
earth. She was followed by Mrs. Drayton, Mrs. Israel and S. M. Felton. The 
corner-stone was laid on Oct. 17, 1867, at 2:30 P. M. with the Revs. F. A. 
Farley, J. F. W. Ware and Fielder Israel taking part in the ceremonies. 

The church was dedicated on Thurs., Mar. 5, 1868. The discourse was 
delivered by the Rev. Wm. H. Turner, D.D., after which he invoked the 
prayer of consecration. Also taking part in the ceremonies were the Revs. C. Y. 
Vineland, O. S. Osgood, Alonzo Hill, D.D., and R. P. Stebbins, D.D. The 
New Jerusalem Church choir assisted with the music, 





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96 PSHE 6 CH USR Got SiGe \aDer L Aa APRae 


On Dec. 31, 1893, a window in memory of Lydia B. Sisson and Heywood 
Conant was dedicated. A new pipe-organ was dedicated on Aug. 26, 1894, 

On Jan. 25, 1925, a window in memory of A. D. Warner, Sr., and the 
Founders’ window were dedicated. On Dec. 19, 1937, N. C. Wyeth, nationally 
known artist and a pupil of Howard Pyle, presented a painting of Christ and 
the little child symbolizing the parable of the little boy. 

The dwelling at 800 Washington St. was purchased on Aug. 5, 1941. It 
was remodeled for use as a parish-house and the first exercises were held there 
on Sun., Oct. 12, 1941. 


HEBREW 


Congregation Ahovith Achim was organized in 1880 and met in the 
Morrow Building, 211 Market St. In 1881, they moved to the Lieberman 
Building, 428 Market St. In 1890, they merged with the Congregation Adas 
Kodesch and met at 211 Market St. and later at 3rd and Shipley Sts. 


Congregation Adas Kodesch Synagogue is located on the s. w. cor. of 6th 
and French Sts. This congregation is Orthodox Hebrew. It was Organized in 
the early 1880's when services were held in private homes. A synagogue, at 
308 w. Front St., was dedicated on Aug. 16, 1885, with Rabbi Stern as pastor. 
Rabbi Morais conducted a service in Hebrew and Rabbi Caro conducted one 
in English. | 

The Congregation was incorporated on Sept. 9, 1889, at 211 Market St. 
In 1890, the Congregation Ahovith Achim merged with it, the meetings were 
held at 211 Market St., and later at 3rd and Shipley Sts. On Mar. 4, 1898, 
they purchased the German Lutheran Church at 6th and French Sts. A Sunday 
School was opened in 1898 and in 1904 a Hebrew day-school was opened. 

_The present Moorish-style synagogue was started in 1907. The cellar 
having been excavated, the foundation stone was laid on June 16, 1907. A plat- 
form was erected in the excavation and the services were held here at 2 P. M. 
Addresses were made by Rabbis B. L. Leventhal and H. Resitz. The bricks, to 
be laid, were sold to the highest bidder. About 100 bricks were sold, «after 
which Gershen Zucher, who had purchased the first, laid his brick. He was 
followed by the others, each of whom laid the brick that he had purchased. 

The corner-stone was laid on Aug. 18, 1907, at 6:30 P. M. The privilege 
of laying the stope was bought by Daniel Leshem. An address was delivered 
by Rabbi Levi Rosenthal. 

The Synagogue was dedicated on Sept. 20, 1908. The congregation met 
in their temporary quarters at 3rd and Market Sts., where they removed the 
banners and scrolls. Led by a band, they marched to the new building. The 
dedication address was delivered by Dr. Louis S. Dunn. Assisting in the cere- 


_ mony were Rabbis H. Resitz, B. L. Leventhal and James M. Gold. A banquet 


was held at the close of the exercises. The Synagogue contains three massive 
«chandeliers and a memorial tablet. ? 

The Annex was built in 1922. It was dedicated on Feb. 4, 1923, by Rabbis 
B. L. Leventhal and Lee J. Levinger. The Synagogue was rebuilt, enlarged and 
beautified for the Golden Jubilee Year, 1941. 

The Community Center was built in 1927. The corner-stone was laid on 
June 12, 1927. The privileges were auctioned off and Louis Topkis paid 
$2500.00 for the privilege of laying the corner-stone while David Topkis paid 
$700.00 for the trowel that had been used. Taking part in the exercises were 
Rabbi B. L. Leventhal, who spoke in Yiddish, Rabbi L. A. Mischkind and 
Mayor G. W. K. Forrest. 





WILMINGTON 97 


The dedication service was held on Jan. 29, 1928. The ceremony began 
in the Synagogue after which they proceeded to the Center. Among those tak- 
ing part were Rabbi L. A. Mischkind, Rabbi A. E. Milgrim and Mayor G. W. K. 
Forrest. The various privileges were auctioned off, Simon Tuff paying $3000.00 
for the privilege of opening the main doors. 

On Nov. 5, 1944, the chapel was consecrated after having been renovated 
and furnished with a new Ark by members of the Keil family. On the same 
day the Synagogue auditorium was consecrated as the “Esther M. Topkis 
Auditorium.” Rabbi Mortimer J. Cohen was the speaker. A portrait of Mrs. 
Topkis was presented and unveiled. 


Congregation Beth Emeth Temple, Reformed Hebrew, is located at 904 
Washington St. It was organized in 1895 as Congregation Sholom Chel. They 
met in Smith’s Hall, 610 Market St. In May, 1905, most of the members to- 
gether with others of similar mind, met at the Y. M. H. A., 4th and Shipley 
Sts., to found a modern Jewish Congregation. Congregation Beth Emeth was 
incorporated on July 18, 1905. Sholom Chel became defunct. Services were 
continued at 610 Market St. The corner-stone of the present Temple was laid 
on Sun., May 17, 1908. A tent had been erected in the event of bad weather. 
The ceremonies started at 3 o'clock with a prayer by Rabbi Rubenstein. 
Speeches were made by former U. S. Senator George Gray, Chief Justice 
Charles B. Lore, Mayor Horace Wilson and Rabbi Krauskopf. The stone was 
laid.and blessed by Rabbi Rubenstein. 

The Temple was dedicated on Aug. 30, 1908, by Rabbi Joseph Kraus- 
kopf assisted by Rabbi Rubenstein. The Temple Center, a two-story residence 


at 911 Washington St. was purchased and remodeled for social activities 


in 1924, . 


Congregation Chesed Shel Emeth Synagogue, Unaffiliated Hebrew, is lo- 
cated at 227 Shipley St. It was organized in 1901 by a group of thirteen men 
and was incorporated on Dec. 23, 1901. Services were held in the home of 
Morris Chaikin at 205 w. 4th St. From 1903 to 1915 services wére held in 
the home of Rabbi Hillel Subrisky at 226 Shipley St. During this period, spe- 
cial holiday services were held in either the Polish Hall, 2nd and Justison Sts., 
or in the Odd Fellow’s Hall, 3rd and King Sts. The property at 227 Shipley 
St. was purchased on Jan. 13, 1914. 

The corner-stone of the present Moorish style Synagogue was laid on June 
21, 1914. Among those taking part in the ceremonies were Rabbis H. Zubrit- 
sky, Dr. H. Masliansky, Hyman Resitz and Mayor Harrison W. Howell. The 
dedication services were held on Feb. 21, 1915, at 2 P. M. The congregation 
assembled at 6th and French Sts. After removing the Scrolls from the Ark 
they marched to the new Synagogue. As is their custom they sold the privileges 
such as unveiling the corner-stone, unveiling the memorial windows and light- 
ing the everlasting light, to the highest bidders. Rabbi Hyman Resitz offered 
the prayer, Rabbi D. A. Leventhal delivered the principal address and Rabbi 
H. Zubritsky chanted the hymns of dedication. | 

The erection of a school annex was started in 1925. The corner-stone 
was laid on Sept. 6, 1925, with Rabbi Joseph Kroll in charge. He was assisted 
by Rabbi B. L. Leventhal. The corner-stone was laid by Mr. and Mrs. Max 
Cohen, assisted by Benjamin Slutsky and Mrs. Max Green. 


Congregation Beth Shalom Synagogue, Conservative Hebrew, is located 
at the n. e. cor. 18th and Washington Sts. It was organized and dedicated in 


TAIN ot Ate Sas RAPT NORTE SR RON eg TN gH ct oom eS Bt. Deer: 








98 LAE CAO ER Gee SO ae a WA 


1922. It was the result of a schism in the Congregation Beth Emeth, Their 
first meetings were held at 728 King St. They purchased the Gallagher prop- 
erty in April, 1922, and remodeled it for synagogue purposes. 

The dedication service was held on Mar. 11, 1923, and was conducted 
by Rabbis Moses J. Abels, Lee J. Levinger and Hyman Resitz. 

The Congregation purchased the Shaw property at 18th and Baynard 
Boulevard on Feb. 25, 1946. It was proposed to use the house as a day-school 
for the time being. The opening day rally for the school was held in the 
Temple on Sept. 8, 1946. 


Congregation Macheziky Hedaas, unaffiliated Hebrew Synagogue, was 
originally located at 715 Monroe St. It was organized and dedicated in 1929. 
Services were held on the first Sabbath of each month at the Y. M. H. A. 
building, 515 French St. It has no national. affiliation. On May 10, 1943, the 
congregation purchased, at a Sheriff's sale, 602 Washington St., which they 
adapted for synagogue purposes. 


SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST 


First Seventh Day Adventist Church. This church was organized on July 
30, 1892. Their first meeting place was in the Red Men’s Hall where they 


met from Sept. 25, 1892, until December, 1902. They then met in Eden Hall . 


for nine months and in September, 1903, they rented the Baptist Church at 
1008 King St., where they met until 1914. 


They had purchased a lot on Howland St., west of Clayton St., on Sept. 
18, 1902. In 1914, they proceeded to erect a brick church on this site and they 
moved in during that year. The complexion of this neighborhood having 
changed, they sold the church to Manitoo Tribe of the Red Men on June 26, 
1924. For the next two years they met in the First United Presbyterian Church 
and in the Swedish Methodist Church. They purchased the dwelling at the 
northeast corner of Eleventh and Adams Sts., on Jan. 13, 1926, and held their 
first meeting in their new home on Sept. 4, 1926. 


The church was dedicated on Sept. 15, 1945. The speakers included Elders 
F. H. Robbins, C. V. Leach and Horace E. Walsh, the pastor, who read a 
history of the church. ) 


CHRIST SCIENTIST 


The First Church of Christ Scientist. This church was organized in 1902-03 
at meetings held at 917 Gilpin Ave. During 1904 the meetings were held in the 
Garrick Theatre. On Nov. 20, 1903, a portion of the present church site at Park 
Place and Van Buren St. was purchased. The erection of a frame chapel was © 
started on Sept. 25, 1904. It was dedicated on Oct. 16, 1904. The members 
faking part included David W. Masters, William Savery and Louise de L. 
Radzinski. More land was purchased on June 20, 1908. 


The ground was broken for the present church on Mon., Oct. 28, 1912, 
at 7 A. M. by Norman E. John, chairman of the building committee. The 
exercises were in charge of G. Harold Pim and Eva B. Rearick, the first and 
second readers. The frame church was moved to the rear of the lot and was 
used during the construction of the new church. The first lecture was held, in 
the new church, on Mar. 20, 1914, with Wm. P. McKenzie and David W. 
Masters in charge. 





WILMINGTON 99, 


The church was dedicated on Dec. 29, 1918, at 11 A. M. The services 
were in charge of First Reader Joseph H. Mendinhall and Second Reader Mrs. 
Frances F. Thatcher. 


CATHOLIC 


St. Nicholas Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church is located at 612 s. Heald 
St. Saint Michael’s Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church was incorporated on 
Apr. 10, 1905. The church site was purchased on Jan. 8, 1906. St. Michael’s 
Church assumed the title to the site on Dec. 17, 1909. The church was 
built in 1911. 

On Apr. 15, 1911, it passed into private hands. On Nov. 1, 1911, the 
Property was purchased by the Rt. Rev. Stephen S. Ortynsky. St. Nicholas 
Ruthenian Greek Catholic Church was incorporated on Aug. 2, 1913. They 
assumed title to the church on Dec. 21, 1925. 

The church had been consecrated on Sun., Sept. 27, 1925, by Bishop 
Bohackewski of Philadelphia. He was assisted by the Revs. Lotowich and 
Kuzinak. 


The Russian Orthodox Greek Catholic Church of St. Michael the Arch- 
angel is located at 431 s. Claymont St. This church was organized in January, 
1915, with a membership consisting of 25 families. The church was incor- 
porated on Jan. 23, 1915. The two-story house on the present site was pur- 
chased on Mar. 11, 1915. It was remodeled for use as a church on the first 
floor and for a school and priest’s apartment on the second floor. The church 
was consecrated by Bishop Alexander, the head of the church in the United 
States and Canada. A few years later the brick parish-house was built adjoin- 
ing the church. It is also used as a school and contains an apartment for 
the priest. 


St. Peter and St. Paul Ukrainian Orthodox Church is located at 623 south 
Heald St. The site was purchased on Nov. 12, 1932. The parish-house was 
built and was used for church services. 

The ground was broken for the present church on Jan. 9, 1938. The 
ground was broken and blessed at an afternoon Mass celebrated by the Rev. 
John Paley assisted by the Rev. H. H. Wroblewsky. Three shovels-full of 
earth were turned up at each of the four corners and at the spot where the 
altar would be. On May 8, 1938, a procession was formed at the parish-house 
which marked into the newly-finished church. The church was blessed and the 
first Mass was celebrated by the Rev. John Paley, the pastor. 

The church was dedicated on Sept. 18, 1938, by Bishop, the Rt. Rev. 
Theodore Bohdan, of New York, who celebrated High Mass at 10 A. M. He 
was assisted by the Rev. John Paley. The corner-stone was laid after the Mass. 
A banquet was then served in the parish-house. | 

A _new altar was dedicated on July 12, 1942, by Bishop Bohdan. He was 
assisted by the Very Rev. N. Podhorecky and three other priests. The Rev. 
Basil Macknik, the pastor, was in charge. 


The Greek Orthodox Catholic Church was founded in 1939. They pur- 
chased the former site of the T. Coleman du Pont town house at 808 n. Broom 
St. on July 31, 1939. Here, they proposed to build a church sometime in the 
future. In the meantime they adapted the large garage building at the rear of 
the lot to be used for their services. 


i 
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a 


100 PACE CHURCHES OP t GA WAKE 


MISCELLANEOUS 


The Christian and Missionary Alliance at 504 w. Fifth St. It was organ- 
ized on July 9, 1897, and met at the home of Ashton R. Tatnall, 1403 Jackson 
St. The present church was dedicated on Sun., Oct. 31, 1915. A prayer service 
was held at 9:30 A. M. and at 10:30 A. M. The principal speaker was Dr. 
A. B. Simpson. A meeting was held at 2:30 P. M. and the evening service 
was in charge of the Rev. John Coxe. A full week of services followed. 


The First Pentecostal Church, Assemblies of God, was organized in 1918. 
The church was incorporated on Dec. 10, 1919. They bought Hope Baptist 
Church at the n. e. cor. of 23rd and Pine Sts., on Dec. 22, 1919. In 1927, a 
brick addition to the frame chapel was built. The present church was built 
about 1930. The parsonage at 3118 Harrison St. was purchased on Jan. 14, 1931. 


The First Church of the Nazarene. In 1924, Andrew Dolbow opened a 
mission of the Nazarenes at 709 Poplar St. In 1930, the mission was moved 
to 719 e. 7th St. The church at No. 16 Fifth Ave. was purchased from the 
Methodist Protestants on Sept. 30, 1933, by a group of the Nazarenes. The 
church was opened and named the “Dolbow Memorial.” In 1939, the name 
was changed to the “First Church of the Nazarenes.” The church was incor- 
porated on Aug. 28, 1941., They assumed title to the church property on 
Dec. 23, 1941. é 


Calvary Pentecostal Church was organized on Apr. 7, 1932, in the Odd 
Fellow’s Hall, 10th and King Sts. They moved to Pythian Castle in 1936. 
The church was incorporated on Aug. 26, 1943. On Sept. 17, 1943, they pur- 
chased the Hebb property at Pennsylvania Ave. and Franklin St. as a site for 
a new church. In the meantime they adapted the dwelling for church purposes. 


The First Independent Church was organized by the Rev. Dr. Harold S. 
Laird. They held their first meeting on June 21, 1936. The first meeting in 
their church was held on June 28, 1936. The church was regularly organized 
on Sept. 16, 1936. It was incorporated on Oct. 26, 1936. They took title to 
the Cookman M. E. Church property at 14th and Dupont Sts. on June 2, 1937. 


The Church of God. This church was organized at 6th and Tatnall Sts. 
in 1943. In the fall of 1946 their meetings were transferred to the old Coven- 
ant Church at 224 West St. 


Jehovah’s Witnesses hold their meetings at 604 Market St. 


The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Mormon) hold their 
meetings at 10th and King Sts. . 


The Salvation Army is located-at 4th and Shipley Sts. 

The Volunteers of America are located at 532 e. 4th St. 

The American Rescue Workers are located at 406 w. Front St. 

The Sunday Breakfast Mission is at 115 Shipley St. 

The Christian Assembly of Apostolic Faith (Italian) is at 1720 Chestnut St. 
The Wilmington Baha’ i’ Group meet at 3100 Monroe St. 

God’s Full Gospel Mission is at 4th and Market Sts. 





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102 TECH ORS CASE S520 Baap i hal A Wer, 


The Wilmington City Mission is at 201 w. Front St. 


The Christian Spiritualists meet at 706 Delaware Ave. They were incor- 
porated on Dec. 2, 1928. 


The First Gospel Temple is at 218 w. 2nd St. 
Unity Chapel is at 1207 w. 7th St. 


The First Congregational Church of Wilmington and Brandywine. This 
church was organized in the Athenaeum on May 24, 1843. They were served 
at first by ministers of the Methodist Protestant Church. On Feb. 18, 1844, they 
adopted the Congregational service. The church was formally organized on 
Mar. 14, 1844, in the Glazier Building, at Third and Market Sts. with the 
following trustees: Joseph C. Carpenter, John A. Willard, Wm. P. Colmary, 
Jacob F, Sharpe and John Fields. 


The First Congregational Church was organized in November, 1897, by j 
a gtoup from Olivet Presbyterian Church under the leadership of the Rev. i 
T. E. Montgomery. They met at 311 Madison St. and were formally recognized 
on Feb. 3, 1898. In 1900, the meetings were moved to 1028 Lancaster Ave. 
They were incorporated on Mar. 29, 1900. On July 12, 1900, they purchased 
a4 property at Second and Connell Sts. It was sold on July 16, 1917. 


An Independent Methodist Church was organized in 1850. They met in 
Kennard’s Church, at 7th and Walnut Sts., which had been rebuilt. The Rev. 
Andrew Thomas, the first pastor, was installed on Oct. 25, 1850. In 1888, they 

_ met on Madison St. below 4th St., with the Rev. J. M. Taylor as pastor. 


The First Universalist Society was organized in the Wilmington Institute 
Building in 1866. They held their services in the Edward Kennard Church, at 
7th and Walnut Sts. They were incorporated on Sept. 30, 1868. They pur- 
Chased the Kennard Church from Wm. M. Kennard on Mar. 26, 1869.* 


The Household of Faith, a denomination that rejected the theories of 
eternal punishment and infant baptism was founded on June 24, 1877. The 
founder was the Rev. George R. Kramer, a former pastor of Asbury M. E. 
Church who gathered together a small group of former Asbury members. 
Their first meetings were held in a tent at 4th and Lombard Sts., and later 
they met in the McClary Building on Market St. In 1880, they built a church 
on Tatnall St., below 8th St., which was dedicated on Dec. 3, 1881. In 1887, 
with a heavy debt, services were discontinued and the property was surrendered 
for sale. Meetings were then transferred to the Red Men’s Hall. Meeting in 
Messick’s Hall the congregation finally disbanded in 1891. The Tatnall St. 

, Pfoperty was purchased by St. Stephen’s Lutheran Church on Apr. 7, 1889. 


The Heavenly Recruits were organized at tent meetings held on the s. e. 
cor. of 13th and Market Sts., in 1886. In November, they rented Gilbert 
Chapel on the s. e. cor. of 13th and French Sts. In 1888, they moved to 4th 
and Shipley Sts. They met on lower Walnut St. during the early 1900's and 
disbanded in 1915, 





The First Church of Christian Companions was Organized, in 1911, at 826 
Orange St. It was closed in 1913. 


VOTO LIN. GTO: 103 
er nr at aes 


The Reformed Church of the U. S. was organized in Gilbert Chapel on 
Jan. 4, 1885. Services were conducted by the Revs. George H. Johnson and 
Theodore Appel. Apparently the life of this Organization was very short. 


The Free Methodists met at 7th and Bennett Sts., in 1917. 


The Church of the First Born met on the 3rd floor of the Davidson 
Building at least from Jan. 8, 1888, to Sept. 15, 1888. 


The Holiness Christian Ass’n was organized on Aug. 19, 1895, at Front 
and Madison Sts. Their ritual included foot-washing. 


The First Progressive Spiritualists were incorporated at 613 Washington 
St. on Jan. 28, 1917, 


COLORED 


Ezion M. E. Church, colored, Organized in 1805, was the first offspring of 
Asbury Methodist Church. The original members were members of Asbury 
Church and worshipped at the regular services. In 1805, they began to hold 
separate meetings in private homes. In 1805, with the aid of Asbury, they 
withdrew to found their own church. 

They built a stone meeting-house at Ninth and French Sts. They selected 
the name “Ezion” from Ezion Gaber, a town in the land of Edom, where 
Solomon's vessels were built. In December, 1812, a group withdraw under 
the leadership of Peter Spencer, a local-preacher, and formed the Union Church 
of Africans. 

In 1838, another division occurred but the old group continued and, in 
1844, they enlarged the church building. In 1870, it was decided to build a 
new church. The last service in the old church was held on Sun., May 22, 
1870, by the Revs. Jos. D. Elbard, Charles-Hill and Peter Buroughs, the pastor. 
During the construction, services were held in the basement of Institute Hall. 

The corner-stone of the new church was laid on July 17, 187Q. The pre- 
liminary services were held in Institute Hall after which the congregation 
marched to the church site. The stone was laid by Bishop Levi Scott who was 
assisted by the Revs. Chas. Hill and A. Manship. The finished portion of the 
church was dedicated on Nov. 6, 1870, by the Rev. Messrs. Smith, Hill 
and Kennard. 

On the afternoon of Jan. 6, 1886, the church was severely damaged by 
fire and it was rebuilt during that year. During the rebuilding operations serv- 


ices were held in the Grand Opera House. The corner-stone was relaid on Apr. . 


18, 1886, with the Revs. Vaughn Smith, N. M. Browne and H. A. Monroe, the 
pastor, taking part. The church was dedicated on July 25, 1886, at the morning 
service. Those taking part included Bishop Andrews, Pres. Elder I. H. White 
and the Revs. J. D. Elbard, H. Jolly, J. Emery Webb and H. A. Monroe, the 
pastor. A full week of jubilee services followed. 

The parsonage adjoining the church was built in 1917. 


Mother A. U. M. P. Church is located at 819 French St. Peter Spencer 
originally was a member of Asbury Church. He helped to found Ezion Church 
and in December, 1812, founded the Mother Union Church of African Mem- 
bers. This was the first church in the United States to be Organized and en- 
tirely controlled by colored people. 

The church site extending through to King St. was purchased on July 21, 
1813, from Thomas Gilpin. The list of trustees was recorded on Sept. 18, 


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104 T. ALEC AUR: GAESAO fDi aA ACRE 


1813. The church was built in 1813, rebuilt in 1827 and enlarged in 1842. 
There is a small graveyard to the rear of the church. The corner-stone of the 
parsonage was laid on July 2, 1905 with prominent speakers taking part. 


Union American M. E. Church, colored, is located at 1206 French St. In 
1851, a group from the African Union M. P. Church formed a new group. 
They worshipped for three years in the home of John W. Benton. They pur- 
chased the church site on Dec. 11, 1855, from Samuel C. Tatum and erected a 
board tent. A meeting-house was built in 1856. 

In 1882, a new church was built. The corner-stone was laid on Nov. 12, 
1882, by the Rev. William Billingsley. During the building operation services 
were held in a tent to the rear of the church. The dedication service was held 
on Aug. 12, 1883, with Supt. Edward Williams presiding. The morning service 
was conducted by Pres. Elder White and the Rev. Mr. Beckett, the afternoon 
service, by the Rev. Mr. Gassner and the evening service, by the Rev. Asbury 
Smith. There is a graveyard to the rear of the church. 


Bethel A. M. E. Church was founded in 1845. It was formally organized 
on May 10, 1846. On Sept. 1, 1846, they purchased a lot on the n. e. cor. of 
12th and Elizabeth Sts. from Samuel: McCaulley. The consideration was $1.00, 
subject to a yearly ground-rent of $10.80. The extinguishing fee was set at 
$180.00. A frame church was built and it was dedicated in April, 1847. 


Meetings were held for a time in the Odd Fellow’s Hall and at 6th and 
Walnut Sts. On Aug. 30, 1853, they purchased a lot on the e. side of Penn 
St., between 6th and 7th Sts. A brick church was built on this site. The 
property was sold on Sept. 29, 1865. On Oct. 9, 1865, they purchased the 
former German Lutheran Church on their present site at 602 Walnut St. A 
new church was built in 1878. The corner-stone was laid on Oct. 13, 1878, 
by Bishop A. W. Wayman. In the evening he preached in Institute Hall. The 
basement was dedicated on June 8, 1879, by Bishop Wayman. The completed 
church was dedicated on Sun., Apr. 23, 1882, by Bishop Campbell, assisted by 
the Rev. T. G. Stewart. On June 11, 1890, they purchased a property at 12th 
and Bowers Sts., where they opened a mission. 


The church was destroyed by fire on Jan. 1, 1935. Services were then held 
in the Howard High School. The ground was broken for a new church on 
Oct. 27, 1935. The ceremonies were in charge of the Rev. A. Chester Clark, 
the pastor. Among those taking part was the Rt. Rev. Philip Cook, Bishop 
of the Episcopal Diocese of Delaware. The corner-stone was laid on Jan. 26, 
1936, by Bishop Wm. Heard. Relics from Jerusalem were placed in the stone. 


The sealed box that was placed in the corner-stone was the same one used for © 


that purpose in 1878. The first service was held in the new church on Apr. 12, 
1936. It was dedicated on Mar. 5, 1939, by Bishop David H. Sims. 


] 


St. Peter’s U. M. P. Church, colored. The first services of this church were 
held in the colored cemetery on Union St., near Front St. They purchased a 
lot at 2nd and Union Sts. The corner-stone of a brick church was laid on May 
1, 1870, by the Rev. B. Scott, the pastor. The church was dedicated on Sept. 
18, 1870. 


Mt. Joy M. E. Church—Whittington M. E. Chapel, colored. Whittington 
Chapel was founded as a mission of Ezion Church on June 10, 1870, when 
meetings were held in private homes. A chapel was built on Buttonwood St. 


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WILMINGTON 105 


in 1873 and named for a former pastor of Ezion Church. It was dedicated in 
October, 1873. 

In February, 1875, the chapel was destroyed by fire. Meetings were con- 
tinued in private homes. A new chapel was built in 1876. In September, 1876, 
the entire neighborhood was flooded and the chapel suffered some damage. 
On July 17, 1882, Ezion, for a small consideration, turned the property over 
to a board of trustees of Whittington Chapel. 

A lot on Townsend St. was purchased in 1883. In 1884, the chapel was 
made a station. They were incorporated on Feb. 10, 1886. On Apr. 29, 1889, 
ground was broken for a new church of brick. The corner-stone was laid on 
June 23, 1889. The name was changed to Mt. Joy because of the joy of having 
a creditable church. Mt. Joy Church took title to the property on Jan. 27, 1890. 


Shiloh Baptist Church, colored, was organized on May 31, 1876. They 
received letters from the First Baptist Church of 1008 King St. They met 
in a hall on Twelfth St., west of Market St. The erection of the church at 
12th and Orange Sts. was started in 1881. The corner-stone was laid in 1882. 
The basement was dedicated in September, 1885. 

- The building was dedicated on Nov. 3, 1889, with the Rev. B. T. Moore, 
the pastor, presiding. The morning service was led by the Rev. Dr. T. D. 
Mitler, the afternoon service, by the Rev. Dr. R. B. Cook and the evening 
service by the Rev. W. B. Burrows. 

. After renovations a reopening service was held on Oct. 23, 1938. 

They purchased the East Baptist Church property on Dec. 31, 1945, for 
their future home. On Jan. 11, 1946, they sold the 12th and Orange Sts. prop- 
erty to the Du Pont Co. 


Haven M. E. Church, colored, was founded in 1869 at which time Sunday 
School services were held in a private home by an exhorter from Ezion Church. | 
_Dr. Brown, for whom Browntown was named, sold them land upon which a 
chapel was built and named Mt. Zion M. E. Chapel. In 1876, it was placed on 
a circuit with Whittington Chapel. On Dec. 15, 1879, the property was sold 
to the P. W. & B. R. R. Co. 

The present site on Third St., near Dupont St., was then purchased and in 
1880 a new frame building was completed. The name “Haven,” in honor of 
Bishop Gilbert Haven, was then adopted. On July 5, 1882, a board of trustees 
from Haven Church purchased the property from Ezion Church for a small 
consideration. In 1883, a gallery was added. 

The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Sun., Jan. 19, 1908. 
Those taking part included the Revs. R. W. Pickland, J. E. A. Johns, J. H. 
Nutter and E. H. Webb, the pastor.. 


The Eighth Street Baptist Church, colored. This church was built at 8th 
and Scott Sts., in 1894. They took title to the site on Feb. 20, 1895. Addi- 
tional land was purchased on Mar. 13, 1901, and July 30, 1907. The church 
was rebuilt in 1911. 


Gilbert Presbyterian Church, colored. This church was organized in the 
Gawthrop Building, at the s. w. cor. of 4th and Shipley Sts. in 1889. They 
then rented Gilbert Chapel, on the s. e. cor. of 13th and French Sts. They 
held their first service there on Mar. 30, 1890, at which time the name “Gilbert” 
was adopted. Services were held regularly until 1925 at which time they moved 
into the former Italian Pres. Church at 619 Dupont St. 








106 LHE CHURCHES) OE DELAWARE 


The new church was opened with an all-day service on Sept. 13, 1925. 
The church was consecrated on Sept. 20, 1925 at 3 P. M., by the Rev. A. W. 
Gonne, D.D. The property which was owned by the New Castle Presbytery, 
was sold on Jan. 3, 1930, to the Seventh Day Adventists. 

Gilbert Church transferred its activities to 1700 W. 7th St. After meeting 
at various locations, Gilbert was merged with another church. 


St. Paul’s U. A. M. E. Church at 408 e. 11th St. The U. A. M. E. Con- 
ference purchased this Property on May 4, 1905, at which time the church 
was built. St. Paul’s took title to the property on Dec. 31, 1919. 


Grace A. M. E. Zion Church. This congregation purchased the church at 
11th and Dupont Sts. on May 6, 1898. On Feb. 14, 1907, they bought the old 


Seventh St., east of Walnut St., on May 20, 1929, where they are still holding 
services. The church was damaged by fire on Feb, 22, 1942. 


Opening services were held by the Revs. B. Wroten and I. S. Holmes, the 
pastor. They took title to the property on Jan. 29, 1943. 


Mt. Enon Baptist Church was incorporated on June 28, 1899. They pur- 
chased the property at 901 French St. on July 25, 1940, where they held their, 
services. On Mar. 16, 1946, they bought the former Public School No. 7 at 7th 
and Spruce Sts., which they rebuilt for church and social purposes. 


Mt. Carmel M. E. Church, colored, bought the site at 504 e. 11th St., on 
Feb. 19, 1924, at which time the church was built. They sold the church on ; 
Jan. 29, 1943, to the Tabernacle Baptist Church. 

Mt. Carmel purchased the Property of Epworth Methodist Church on 
Sept. 16, 1942. The Opening service was held on Sept. 21, 1942, with Bishop 
Alexander D. Shaw, LL.D., preaching the sermon. Dist Supt. W. C. Thomp- 
son and the pastor, the Rev. J. T. Ayres assisted. 


St. James A. U. M. P. Church is located ‘on e. 16th St., near Claymont St. 
The church site was purchased on Jan. 13, 1872. The corner-stone of the 
*present church was laid on Oct. 12, 1884. Additional land was purchased 
on May 2, 1894, | 


Mt. Vernon C. M. E. Church was incorporated on Mar. 10, 1939. They 
purchased the church Property at 11th and Dupont Sts., on Mar. 25, 1940. 


Mt. Zion A. U. M. P. Church was organized about 1886 and was located 
on Logan St. It was then known as the “Hedgeville Church.” They were in- 
corporated on July 15, 1892. They bought the Murray's A. U. M. P. Church 
Property on Logan’s Court on Jan. 31, 1905, Later, they moved to 108 West 








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BETH EMETH TEMPLE, REF. HEBREW 
(Page 97) 








108 TORCE. CH U RiG-A ES Cor Diiain AW Abie 


St. The present church property at 422 w. 2nd St. was purchased on July 1, 
1941. The corner-stone, dated 1904-1941, was laid on July 27, 1941. The 
services were conducted by the Rev. Dr. J. W. Brown and the Rev. Ernest 
Furrowh, the pastor. 


Boulden’s U. A. M. E. Church is located at 8th and Locust Sts. This site 
was purchased by the U. A. M. E. Conference on May 1, 1896, at which time 
the church was built. Boulden’s took title to the church on Nov. 3, 1930, after 
which, the building was remodeled. 


New Mt. Bethel Baptist Church. On Jan. 1, 1939, they purchased the 
dwelling at 713 French St. They proceeded to make extensive alterations and 
improvements to adapt it to their needs. 


Ezion Fair Baptist Church was organized by the Rev. J. L. Givens at 313 
s. Heald St., in 1921. They moved to the former Gilbert Chapel at 13th and 
French Sts., in August, 1928. They purchased the property from the First- 
Central Church on July 31, 1945, and set to work reconditioning the building 
inside and outside. The dedication services were held on Sun., Apr. 6, 1947, 
with the pastor in charge. He was assisted by the Revs. W. Jones, P. Lips- 
combe, Dr. W. G. Purdy, S. H. Barker, H. L. James, James Peaco and O. C. 
Carrington. 


Friendship Baptist Church at 400 e. 7th St., was incorporated on July 
28, 1941. The property was enlarged after which a dedication service was 
held on Dec. 8, 1941, at 2 P. M., by the Rev. C. C. Dixon, the pastor. 


Ebenezer Baptist Church was incorporated on Nov. 12, 1931. They pur- 
chased the property at 811 Walnut St., Jan. 17, 1940. 


St. Paul’s A. U. M. P. Church at 1201 Apple St. It was started as a mission 
in 1874. A church was built in 1875. , 


Some of the smaller missions and churches are as follows: 
Ch. of God and Saints of Christ, 841 Walnut St. 
St. Philip’s M. E. Church. 

Mt. Zion Baptist Church, 1118 e. 14th St. 

True Vine | Holiness Church, 717 e. 7th St. 

St. Daniel’s A. M. E. Zion, 235 Delamore Place. 
New Calvary Bap. Church, 208 Wal. St. 

St. Beulah Apostolic Faith. ty 

Highway Ch. of Christ, 5071, w. Front St. 

New Jerusalem Baptist Mis., 319 w. Front St. 
United House of Prayer, 1100 Lombard St. 
Mission of the Open Door, 216 w. 2nd St. 

Holy Trinity Baptist Ch., A and Buttonwood Sts. 
Church of God in Christ, 506 Poplar St. 

Church of God in Christ, 12th and Lombard Sts. 








WILMINGTON 109 


Star of Bethlehem U. A. M. E. 

Triumphing Ch. and King. of God, Lord and Spruce Sts. 
Weeping Mary Bap. Church, 303 e. 2nd St. 

Calvary A. M. E. Zion, 8th and Pine Sts. 

Central Bap. Church, 800 Kirkwood St. 

Mt. Sinai Holy Church. 

Starlight H. Ch. of God in Christ, 319 w. Front St. 
Gethsemane Ch. of G. in Christ, 2nd and Washington Sts. 
Glorious Ch. of God, 302 Poplar St. 

Mt. Calvary Ch. of God, 507 w. Front St. 

St. James A. U. Church, 124 Poplar St. 

St. James A. M. E. Zion, 315 Orange St. 

St. Luke’s Ch. of God, 108 West St. 

Seven Seal Ch. of God, 706 Walnut St. 


The Howard High School Sunday School was organized on Mar. 6, 1870, 
by the Rev. J. F. Clymer of St. Paul’s M. E. Church. 


Moore’s A. M. E. Chapel was located on Ford St., between Scott and Lin- 
coln Sts. The church was built in 1875. | 


The Congregation Baptist Church was organized at a meeting held in the 
Mt. Salem No. 2 Baptist Church, in the 9th Ward, on Mar. 23, 1896. 


Union Church purchased their church site on the Wil. and Lancaster 
Pike on May 12, 1860. . 


African Wesley A. M. E. Church was located on Second St., between 
Tatnall and West Sts. They purchased their site on Mar. 13, 1838, and bought 
more land on Sept. 23, 1847. | 


__ African M. E. Church on R. R. Ave., near 7th Ave., bought their site on 
’ Feb. 16, 1872. 


Peter Spencer A. U. M. P. Church at s. Market and D Sts., purchased their 
site on Nov. 21, 1903. 


Murray’s Af. Union Church on Logan’s Court was organized on Sept. 
9, 1887. 


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THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 
PART II 


NEW CASTLE COUNTY 


Chester-Bethel Methodist Church (M.E.) is located, on the Faulk Road, 
near Zebley’s Corner. As early as 1765 Captain Thomas Webb, a pensioned 
British officer, was preaching Methodism at Marcus Hook and in the Isaac 
Tussey home at the top of Penny Hill. Several residents of Brandywine Hun- 
dred, near Zebley’s Corner, became converted and they formed a Methodist 
Society in 1775. Meetings were held in the home of David Ford. In 1780, a 
log chapel was built on the Cloud farm, near the State line, and it was called 
“Cloud’s Chapel.” In fact, the Cloud farm was so close to the line that for 
several years after purchasing the property Mr. Cloud was compelled to pay 
taxes in both Counties; Delaware, at that time, being a part of Pennsylvania. 

On Aug. 14, 1797, Robert Cloud and his wife Magdalene, for a considera- 
tion of five shillings, deeded one acre of land, as a church site, to Powell 
Clayton, Aaron Mattson, Thomas Webster, Robert Pyle, Jr., Daniel Pyle, David 
Ford, Wm. Ford, Wm. Hanby and Benj. Hanby, trustees. The deed recites 
that they are to build a house of worship for the M. E. Church, it also pro- 
vides that any vacancies on the board shall be filled by the trustees with the 
pastor of the church having a casting vote. The church was built of stone 
and there was a gable-stone dated 1799. It had a gallery around three sides. 
The name, “Bethel M. E. Church” was then adopted. 


Situated in a strictly rural section, the church prospered and grew, with 
no major difficulties until the year 1847. Thén dissention did rear its ugly 
head and resulted in the building of Siloam Church, just across the Pennsyl- 
vania line. The bitterness between these two congregations continued for 
more than sixty years. The cause of this split, while seemingly very childish 
to us, was very serious and very real to them. It appears that the boys and 
girls of Bethel. formed a singing society which would meet at the different 
member’s homes and practice singing, including the hymns then being sung 
in the Methodist churches. As their singing ability developed they decided to 
ask the trustees to allow them to sit in a group at the church services and to 
be allowed to nail a four-inch strip of wood upon the pews in front of them 
upon which to rest their hymnals. In other words, they wished to form a 
church choir. Then the trouble started, part of the congregation being in 
favor and others decidedly opposed to the innovation. The arguments waxed 
back and forth and resulted in the anti-choir faction withdrawing from Bethel 
and building Siloam in 1852. 


There have been several versions of the cause of this schism in Bethel 
Church. This version is taken from “Some Personal Recollections of Bethel 
and Brandywine Hundred” included in a book entitled “Rambles and Reflec- 
tions” published in 1892, by Judge Thomas J. Clayton. As a young man, Judge 
Clayton was a member of the choir of Bethel Church at the time the choir 
was organized. The members of Bethel who opposed the choir “looked upon 
it as a step toward Ritualism and High Church practices.’’ Samuel Grubb, ‘a 
blacksmith of Grubb’s Corner said: “Anybody with common sense ought to 
know that it will not help the voice to look, when you sing, upon those things 
that you call keys and bars, with black and white tadpoles, some with their 





442 (AOS Ko Mery re Sans 





oat 


112 Deh EC. AUK CEO DEM, Alt ARP 


tails up, some with their tails down, decorated with black flags and trying to 
crawl through the fence. It’s all the work of the devil.”’ 

In 1873, the members decided to build a new church at the Opposite end 
of the graveyard. In preparation for this, on July 30, 1873, they entered into 
an agreement with John B. McCay, who owned the adjoining farm. The 
trustees agreed to transfer to Mr. McCay the lower end of the property, con- 
sisting of 69 perches upon which the stone church stood and Mr. McCay agreed 
to transfer to the trustees two acres on the upper end of the lot and to pay 
one-tenth of the cost of the new church, the payment not to exceed $1200.00. 

The church was built of serpentine stone and brick. It was dedicated on 
Dec. 13, 1874. The old church did yeoman service as a farm building until 
1940, when it was torn down. On Mar. 1, 1914, a storm unroofed the church, 
caved in the rear wall and damaged the interior. Repairs were made imme- 
diately. The old horse-sheds were removed in 1938. There is a large and well- 
kept cemetery beside the church. There are a number of gtaves with field stones 
for markers. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find is that of Thomas 
Webster who died on Oct. 25, 1800. On the tombstone of Mary Galbreath 
who died on Apr. 17, 1861 is the following inscription: 

“Remember me as you pass by 
As you are now so once was I 
As I am now so you must be 
Prepare yourself to follow me.” 


This inscription, slightly varied, appears on several tombstones in Dela- 
ware. During the last century it was popular to have a four-line verse in- 
scribed on tombstones. According to Mr. Wm. V. Sipple of Milford, the 
monument dealers had booklets containing a large number of verses appro- 
priate for tombstones from which many customers would make selections. The 
above-mentioned verse appeared in these booklets, which resulted in its se- 
lection, very often. 

__ Additional land was purchased from W. P. Missimer on Sept. 25, 1907 
and Apr. 8, 1913. : mt 


New Wark Friend’s Meeting and Newark-Union Methodist Church 
(M.E.). In December, 1685, a group of Friends living in Brandywine Hundred 
were given permission, by the Chester Quarterly Meeting, to hold meetings 
and to build a meeting-house. In 1687-88 meetings were held at Valentine 
Hollingsworth’s home and at the home of Morgan Drewett. In 1688, Valen- 
tine Hollingsworth donated land, on the Carr Road near Carrcroft, to be used 
as a site for a Friends Meeting-House. New Wark was the name Mr. Hollings- 
worth had adopted for his extensive property. The meeting-house was built, 
presumbaly of logs, and was known as New Wark Friend’s Meeting. Monthly 
meetings were held here until 1704 after which they alternated with Center 
Meeting, near Centerville. In 1707, the Monthly Meetings at New Wark were 
abandoned. Weekly meetings were continued until 1754 when they were 
also “‘raised,” the membership having become so small. 


With the pesing years, the graveyard beside the meeting-house became 
very dilapidated. In 1845, a group of nearby residents, of whom George W. 
Weldin was one, raised money to build a stone wall around the graveyard. 
At the same time a church building was erected to be used as an undenomina- 
tional church. It was given the name “Newark-Union Church.” The church 
was built by Lewes Zebley and John Sharpley at their bid of $800.00. The 
senior partner of this firm was the writer's grandfather. Services were held 





CHESTER-BETHEL METHODIST CHURCH, ZEBLEY’S Cor. 
(Page 111) 


HOMER: 


NEWARK-UNION METHODIST CHURCH, NR. CARRCROFT 
(Page 112) 





114 THE CHURCHESWOFR DELLA WAgCE 


here by nearly every denomination worshipping in this part of the Hundred. 


‘ The church and grounds are owned and supervised by a self-perpetuating 


board of trustees. 
On Feb. 26, 1888, the trustees asked to be taken into the Methodist Epis- 


copal Conference. The committee reported, on Mar. 2, 1888, that the trustees 
would comply with the conditions set by the Conference and they were subse- 
quently admitted. The name “Newark-Union M. E. Church” was adopted. 
During the year 1906, the building was entirely remodeled, with the location 
of the doorway and windows changed to their present position. A portion of 
the old horse-sheds was removed in 1940. 

On Nov. 1, 1945, the trustees purchased land fronting on Carr Road from 
Anna G. Seymour. The celebration of the 100th Anniversary of the church 
was arranged for Nov. 25, 1945. Those taking part included the Revs. E. H. 
Ehart, E. Leon Dage, the pastor and Dr. Oliver J. Collins, Dist. Supt. 

In 1935, the descendants of Valentine Hollingsworth erected, in the 
graveyard, a six-ton stone memorial inscribed as follows: “To the memory 
of Valentine Hollingsworth, with his family he came to America with William 
Penn in 1682 obtained a patent for 986 acres of land which he called New 
Wark. A member of the Society of Friends, their meetings were held at his 
house, adjoining this half-acre which he gave for a burying-ground. A mem- 
ber of the Assembly from New Castle County, 1683, 1687, 1695. Died about 
1711 and with his second wife—Ann Calvert, is buried here. Erected by 
descendants 1935.” ., 

The oldest tombstone is dated 1759. The rest of the inscription is worn 
away. 


Calvary P. E. Church at Carrcroft and at Hillcrest. In 1855, a congrega- 
tion was formed by Episcopalians living near Carrcroft and meetings were 
held in Newark-Union Church. A parish was organized in November, 1855. 
Mrs. Rebecca Carr donated a piece of land, a short distance from the Newark- 
Union Church on the opposite side of the road, upon which to build a church. 
The corner-stone was laid on Sat., Sept. 25, 1862, by Bishop Alfred Lee. The 
church was designed by Emlen T. Littell. It was built of Brandywine granite 
and was in the Gothic style. The church was dedicated on Jan. 29, 1863, by 
Bishop Lee and the name “Calvary” was adopted. A pulpit Bible was presented 
by the Church of the Atonement of Phila. The Rev. S. F. Hotchkin, assistant 
rector of the Church of the Ascension at Claymont, assumed charge of the 
parish. 

In 1863, a stone wall was built in front of the church. Horse-sheds were 
added in 1874. After renovations, a reopening service was held by Bishop 
Lee, on Oct. 17, 1885. After a closed period, the church was reopened on Oct. 
11, 1891. Improvements were made in 1892-03. Repairs were made in 1900-01. 
The last service was held in 1902. By 1909, the church was in a state of ruin. 

The building was decaying rapidly when a thief entered the church and 


_ stole a roll of carpet which he sold in Wilmington, The police traced the’ theft 


through a prayer-book which had been rolled up in the carpet. This incident 
brought home to the Episcopalians living in that section, the fact that the 
Diocese owned this unused building. Under the leadership of the Rev. J. Harry 
Chesley, rector of the Church of the Ascension, it was decided to move the 
church to the fast growing section known as Hillcrest. 

A lot at Lore and Woodside Aves. was donated by Ernest B. McNair as a 
church site. Proving too small, additional land was purchased by the congre- 
gation. The Rev. S. F. Hotchkin, of Phila., the first rector, became interested 
in the work. One of the contributors toward building the Carrcroft church 





NEWCASTLE "COUN BY 115 


was Thomas Clyde of Claymont. He was the head of the company which 
operated the Delaware River excursion steamer Thomas Clyde, a side-wheeler, 
well known to Wilmingtonians of that day. It was Mr. Hotchkin’s idea to 
make the new church a memorial ta the elder Clydes. He interested Wm. C. 
Clyde, a descendant of Thomas Clyde and Mr. Clyde contributed generously to 
the work and provided the beautiful memorial window in the chancel. The 
old church was torn down and the stone was used in building the new church. 
The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 26, 1909, by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman. 
After the corner-stone was laid a ceremony was performed under unique cir- 
cumstances when Clara, the infant daughter of Charles B. Palmer was baptized 
by the Rev. Dr. Hubert W. Wells of St. Andrew’s Church, Wilmington. 

The following morning the stonemasons arrived slightly “potted” and 
they decided to lay a corner-stone of their own before the boss arrived. They 
built a pocket in the n. w. corner of the wall into which they placed a copy of 
the Wilmington Morning News, fifteen pennies, a paper listing their names 
and a half-pint bottle of whiskey. They then sealed the pocket and proceeded 
to build the wall. | 

The church was dedicated on Sun. afternoon, Sept. 23, 1910, as “Calvary 
P. E. Church, Clyde Memorial,” by the Rt. Rev. Frederick J. Kinsman, Bishop 
of Delaware. The Rev. S. F. Hotchkin delivered an address. Also taking part 
were Wm. H. Graef, former lay-leader at the Carrcroft church and the Rev. 
J. Leighton McKim of Milford. The pews from the old church were used for 
a few years. The cross in the chancel was from the old church. 

The formal opening of the new Sunday School building took place on 
Feb. 6, 1927, with the Rev. Charles A. Rantz in charge of the exercises. The 
building was equipped to serve as a social-center. 

Calvary Church has been the recipient of numerous gifts including the 
misal desk from the Rev. P. B. Lightner, a book of memory from Mrs. Henry 
R. Higgins, a grand-daughter of Bishop Lee, an altar cross as a memorial to 
Mrs. Frederick W. Queripel and the rebinding, in red leather, of the pulpit 
Bible from Christopher S. Glover. An organ was presented by the Rev. Ed- 
ward H. Ford and friends on Dec. 31, 1931. On July 1, 1942, a rectory, on 
Lore Ave., was purchased. . ; 

Ground was broken for a new church, to be known as the “Bishop Philip 
Cook Memorial” on Tues., Jan. 15, 1946. The ceremonies were in charge of 
the Rt. Rev. Arthur R. McKinstry, Bishop of Delaware. The first spadeful of 
earth was turned by the Rev. Chas. A. Rantz, former rector of Calvary Church. 
Also taking part were the Rev. Jos. C. Wood, former rector, John M. Stewart, 
W. Albert Haddock, Wm. Heyl Thompson, the architect and the Rev. Francis 
D. Daley, the rector. Charles Petit Weldin, the contractor who built the first 
church on this site, was present as were nearly all-of the clergy of the Diocese 
of Delaware. 

The corner-stone of the new church was laid on Mon., Oct. 14, 1946, by 
the Rt. Rev. Arthur R. McKinstry, Bishop of Delaware. Assisting in the cere- 
monies were the Rev. Charles W. Clash, D.D., the Rev. John Ellis Large, the 
Rev. Francis D. Daley, the rector, John M. Stewart, Senior Warden, Wm. Heyl 
Thompson, the architect and Oscar S. Tally, the contractor. A large delega- 
tion of clergymen was present. The ceremony marked the 26th anniversary 
of the consecration of Bishop Cook as Bishop of Delaware. 

The new church was used for the first time on Easter Sunday, Apr. 6, 
1947 at which time services were conducted in the basement. 


The Protestant Episcopal Church of the Ascension, at Claymont. As early 
as 1843, Bishop Alfred Lee held Episcopal services in a schoolhouse at Naa- 











2 


116 THE CHURCHES (OF. DELAWARE 


man’s Creek, Claymont. A church was organized on Nov. 7, 1850. Stated 
meetings were held and in January, 1851, a committee was appointed to ar- 
range the erection of a church building. A rector was appointed on Dec. 1, 
1851. On Feb. 18, 1854, a lot of land at the cor. of Philadelphia Pike and 
Church Lane, was donated by the Rev. J. B. Clemson, who lived in the neigh- 
borhood. He conducted a private school patronized by many Wilmingtonians. 

The church, of frame construction, was completed and was consecrated 
on Sept. 14, 1854, by Bishop Alfred Lee. It was named “The Protestant 
Episcopal Church of the Ascension.” Horse-sheds were built in 1861. 

A bell was purchased in 1863. A rectory was built in 1868. The Sunday 
School room was enlarged and improved in 1870. In 1874, a recess chancel 
and a bell-tower were built. Reopening services were held on July 4, 1875. On 
Easter Sunday, 1878, a silver communion set, in memory of a former warden, 
was blessed. The old set was to be given to some Indian congregation in 
the West. 

The altar was reconstructed as a memorial to the late rector, the Rev. 
Wm. H. Moffett, in 1890-91. The church was improved in 1892-93 and new 
horse-sheds were built in 1895-96. A colored Sunday School was opened in 
1903-04. A new altar rail was consecrated by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman, on 
July 11, 1915. | 

On Sun., April 7, 1918, a new organ was dedicated by Bishop Kinsman. 
It was a memorial to Mrs. Emma A. Lodge presented by her daughters, Mrs. 
George Lodge and Mrs. Annie Parrish. New pews and furnishings were in- 
stalled in 1924-25. 3 | 

In 1926, under the leadership of the rector, the Rev. Chas. A. Rantz, a 
lot adjoining the rectory property on the westerly side of the Phila. Pike was 
purchased. The original church was moved to the new site in 1927. At the 
same time a new parish-house, of stone, was erected, at right angles to the 
church and connected to it. The corner-stone of the parish-house was laid on 
June 26, 1927, by Bishop Philip Cook assisted: by the rector. The dedication 
services were held on Nov. 13, 1927, with Bishop Philip Cook’and the Rev. 
Chas. A. Rantz officiating. | 

A new organ was installed in 1940-41. 


a 


Holy Rosary Church (R.C.) at Claymont. This parish was started on Jan. 
7, 1920 when 17 members in the northern end of St. Patrick's parish, assem- 
bled for Mass at the home of Joel D. Gillen in Worthland. Mass was offered 
by the Rev. James M. Grant, D.D., assistant pastor of St. Patrick’s parish. 
The congregation doubled on the second Sunday and on the third Sunday, 
Mass was said in the Community Hall at Overlook. Lenton devotions were 
also held in the hall. . 

In September, 1921, this congregation was constituted a parish with the 
Rev. F. X. Fitzpatrick as the first resident pastor. Work was begun in October 
on a new chapel, “Our Lady of Prompt Succor,” and the first Mass was cele- 
brated in the new chapel on Dec. 8, 1921. The dedication service was held on © 


‘Oct. 15, 1922, with the Most Rev. John J. Monaghan, Bishop of Wilmington, 


officiating. He was assisted by the Very Rev. J. Francis Tucker, the Rev. T. F. 
Waldron and the Rev. Francis X. Fitzpatrick, the pastor. | 

A Sunday School was established under the guidance of sisters from the 
Ursuline Academy, in Wilmington. 

A new church site, consisting of 6.6 acres, was purchased on July 24, 
1930, on the easterly side of the Phila. Pike, facing Overlook Colony. A new 
stone rectory was built on this site in 1936. It was completed and opened on 
Sept. 25, 1936. 





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118 DHE CH UR CHE SMORGD BLAWARE 


Atonement Methodist Church (M.E.) at Claymont, was the outgrowth 
of a Sunday School organized, in 1864, in a room over Frank Ford's grocery 
store which stood opposite the present Naaman’s Tea House. At a meeting 
held on June 2, 1866, it was decided to build a church. Thomas Kimber, a 
Quaker, donated the site on June 7, 1866 and subscribed $2500.00 toward the 
building. The church was dedicated during the following November. In 1885, 
the Sunday School was built. 

After major improvements, reopening services were held on July 24, 
1898, with Pres. Elder Robert Watt in charge. The church was damaged in 
the storm of Mar. 1, 1914. A large addition to house the Sunday School was 
built in 1927. The corner-stone was laid on the afternoon of June 26, 1927, by 
the Rev. J. W. Colona. The silver trowel was to be encased in glass and placed 
in the vestibule of the church. The dedication services were held on Nov. 13, 
1927. Memorial windows were installed in 1940. A new Moller Pipe-organ 
was dedicated on June 22, 1941. During the 75th Anniversary celebration on 
Nov. 16, 1941, a grove of trees, to be planted in honor of Thomas Kimber, 
the Quaker, was presented to the trustees. 

A new chancel was built and it was used for the first time on Sun., June 
17, 1945. The chancel and a large number of memorial gifts were dedicated 
on Sun., July 1, 1945, by Dist. Supt. Dr. Oliver J. Collins, assisted by the pas- 
tor, the Rev. Preston W. Spence, Jr. 


Arden Branch, First Independent Church. A Sunday School was organ- 
ized in the schoolhouse, by the Rev. Dr. Harold S. Laird, in June, 1941. These 
meetings were continued there until June, 1942, when they were transferred 
to the Odd Fellows’ Hall and preaching services were started. The church has 
not been formally organized although they are served by a pastor. The mem- 
bers who join become associate members of the First Independent Church in 
Wilmington. 


Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church (M.E.) is located, on the Philadelphia 
Pike, between Bellevue and Holly Oak. It had its inception at a camp-meeting 
held in Adam Talley’s woods in August, 1833. The meetings were held in 
the Shellpot and Cartmell Schools. The church was organized in Mt. Pleasant 
School. Trustees were chosen in 1837. On Mar. 3, 1838, the trustees decided 
to buy an acre of land from George Cartmell. On Mar. 21, 1838, for a con- 
sideration of $40.00, Mr. Cartmell deeded one acre 26 perches of land to Geo. 
McCorkle, Wm. R. Weldin, Jesse Kendall, Harmon Justison, Richard Kellam, 
Samuel Lodge, Joseph Lloyd, Joseph Grubb and Jacob S. Weldin, trustees. 
Mr. Cartmell donated extra land and all of the stone for the building. It was 
dedicated on Mar. 28, 1841, by the Rev. Joseph Lybrand, of Asbury Church, 
Wilmington. Repairs were made in 1866. 


In 1893, the church was remodeled and the old gallery was removed. It 
was rededicated on Dec. 10, 1893, by Bishop Cyrus D. Foss, assisted by the 
Rev. W. E. Tomkinson, the pastor. Among those taking part were the Revs. 
J. H. Conner, John Y. Dobbins, W. C. Johnson and the Hon. Charles B. Lore. 


The church was damaged in the storm of Mar. 1, 1914 and repaired. 
After having been closed for ten years, except for annual meetings, the church 
was reopened for regular services in 1941. These meetings were not successful 
and the church reverted to annual meetings, only. 


There is a graveyard to the rear of the church. The earliest tombstone is 
that of John Wesley Weldin who died on Oct. 30, 1842. 





WENO CCAS LE COWNTY 119 


Jersey View M. E. Church. In 1873, a group withdrew from Mt. Pleasant 
Church and held their first meetings in Newark-Union Church. They planned 
to erect a stone church at S. G. Weldin’s Corner and to call it “Jersey View 
M. E. Chutch.”’ . 


Holly Oak Methodist Church (M.E.) On Jan. 2, 1916, a Sunday School | 


was started in the home of Daniel Wilhelm at Holly Oak. Prayer meetings 
were also held. A house and lot were purchased by Mrs. Josephine L. Camp- 
bell and Miss Erna Wilhelm (Mrs. McClure), to be used as a church-house. 
It was dedicated on Easter Sunday, 1917 by the Rev. Robert Watt, Dist. Supt. 
and the pastor, the Rev. Hugh B. Kelso. Regular preaching services were 
inaugurated on Sun., May 5, 1918. On June 21, the Rev. Geo. W. Weldin 
presented a walnut collection plate and on June 28, Grace Church of Wilming- 
ton presented some pews. The church was organized on July 1, 1920, it was 
incorporated on July 2 and on July 15 the property was duly transferred to 
the trustees. An addition to the Sunday School building was dedicated on 
Nov. 13, 1927, by the Rev. J. W. Colona assisted by the Rev. J. E. Layton. 

At the present time (1947) a movement is on foot to build a new church 
and a parsonage. 


Bellefonte Methodist Church (M.E.) A Methodist Society was organized, 
in 1915, at Bellefonte. They were incorporated on Dec. 10, 1919. The present 
church was built in 1919 and it was dedicated on Jan. 4, 1920, at the morning 
service, by the Rev. Robert Watt. 


Edge Moor M. E. Church. On Jan. 29, 1871, a Sunday School was organ- 
ized in the gatehouse of the Edge Moor Iron Co. It was closed at the end of 
one year. In September, 1874, it was reopened in the home of George Mor- 
rison. It was again closed in October, 1875. The Sunday School was reorgan- 
ized in the Company’s schoolhouse in March, 1876. Prayer meetings and 
preaching services were also held. On Mar. 8, 1886, Edge Moor M. E. Church 
was incorporated. On Mar. 26, 1886, the company donated a lot at the corner 
of Second Ave. and B St. The deed contained a reversion clause and stipulated 
that any building erected must be approved by the company. 

Ground was broken on Aug. 17, 1886 and the corner-stone was laid on 
Sept. 18, 1886. It was dedicated on May 29, 1887, by the Rev. W. L. S. Mur- 
ray, Presiding Elder. It was on a circuit with Mt. Pleasant Church until 1891 


when it was attached to Eastlake Church. The last services in the church were | 


held in September, 1934, by the pastor, the Rev. Walter E. Fosnocht. 

In disposing of the church furniture on Aug. 31, 1935, the bell was given 
to the Rev. Walter E. Fosnocht and is now used by Mt. Lebanon Church. The 
pulpit was given to the Rev. R. High Adams to be used at Brack-Ex Church 
and the communion service was given to the Rev. J. E. Layton for use at Holly 
Oak Church. The balance of the furnishings were auctioned off. 

The church, which was owned solely by the people of Edge Moor was 
sold, in 1936, to make way for industrial development. 


St. George’s P. E. Mission was located at Edge Moor. It was organized 
by St. John’s Church of Wilmington and met in the schoolhouse. The first 
service was held on Nov. 24, 1889. After 20 years of service, it was closed, 
with the consent of the Bishop, in 1909. 


St. Helena R. C. Church, located on Bellefonte Ave. just off the Phila. 
Pike, was built in 1936. The church was dedicated on Nov. 22, 1936, by Bishop 


RIOTS 2 NC hme ye psu pene an 


N. HpenPSti 4 Rhee sr epee art pt pe 





120 CHE CHURCHES TOFS DEL AW ARE 


Edmond J. FitzMaurice, assisted by the Rev. John J. Dougherty and other 
priests. A procession marched around the church as the Bishop blessed the 
four corners of the building. The Rev. John J. Lynch celebrated High Mass 
and the Rev. Dr. Wm. Temple preached the sermon. The Bishop explained 
that the church was named in honor of St. Helena, the mother of Constantine 
the Great, the first Christian Emperor of Rome. It also honored Mrs. Helena 
Raskob, wife of John J. Raskob, because of their numerous benefactions to 
the Church. 

The church was erected by the Catholic Foundation of the Diocese of 
Wilmington to which Mr. Raskob had been the principal contributor. The 
parish furnished the interior of the church. After the ceremonies, a dinner 
was served at the Brandywine Hundred Fire-House. 


Hillcrest Methodist Church (M.E.) A Methodist Society was formed at 
Hillcrest in 1909 and a temporary tabernacle was built. The site for a church 
was donated on Apr. 3, 1912, by Martin Beadenkopf. The ground was broken 
for a new church on Mar. 1, 1913, by Dist. Supt. E. L. Hoffecker and the Rev. 
Thomas H. Harding, the pastor. The corner-stone of the stone church was 
laid on Aug. 3, 1913, at 3 P. M., by Dist. Supt. E. L. Hoffecker, assisted by 
the Revs. T. H. Harding, Vaughn S. Collins and three other clergymen. 

The church was dedicated on May 31, 1914, with Bishop Thomas B. 
Neeley in charge. He was assisted by Dist. Supt. E. L. Hoffecker and the Revs. 
F. C. MacSorley, W. F. Cochran, George W. Dawson and Thos. H. Harding, 
the pastor. A new organ was dedicated on Dec. 24, 1939. On Feb. 4, 1945, a 
communion service was dedicated in honor of the men and women in the 
armed forces by the Rev. Chas. S. Clarkson, the pastor. 

A new communion table, a gift of the Woman's Society of Christian 
Service, was dedicated on June 3, 1945, by the Rev. Mr. Clarkson. Plans were 
under way in 1947 to erect a new church. 


The Presbyterian Church of the Covenant. This church was organized in 
the Blue Rock Clubhouse at Gordon Heights on Dec. 14, 1941. The name 
“Presbyterian Church of the Covenant” was adopted on Sept. 14, 1942. The 
church was admitted to the Presbytery on Oct. 6, 1942. | 

On Oct. 13, 1944, it was announced that a church site of one acre had 
been secured on Duncan Road opposite Mt. Pleasant School. 

A new pulpit was dedicated in memory of Pvt. Geo. M. Searle, Jr., who 
died in the Mariana Islands, by the Rev. Mr. Hunt, on Mar. 4, 1945. The 
pulpit was made by Mr. Searle, Sr. At a dawn service held on Easter Sunday, 
1945, the new church Site was dedicated by the Rev. Geo. L. Hunt. © 


St. Mark’s Evangelical Lutheran Church was organized, in the Brandy- 

wine Hundred Fire-House on Jan. 11, 1942. On Sun., Mar. 22, 1942, an 
«American flag and a Church flag were presented and unfurled in the meeting- 
place. The church was incorporated on Apr. 12, 1942. 

The new church site on Duncan Road at Villa Place, Cragmere, was 
dedicated on Sun., Nov. 17, 1946, by the Rev. W. Robert Miller, the pastor 
and the congregation. Because of rain the ceremony was held in Mt. Pleasant 
School. 


The Edge Moor Gardens Baptist Church School was organized on Apr. 
22, 1945, in the Civilian Defense Hal!. The meetings were later transferred 
to private homes. The dwelling at No. 20 South Rodney Drive was purchased 





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. 


ATONEMENT METHODIST CHURCH 


(Page 118) 


CLAYMONT 





PLEASANT METHODIST CHURCH 


(Page 118) 


MT 





122 TSP E Go UK GLAS ESS CP Dek LAs Aas 


in the spring of 1946 to take care of the growing school. Grace Baptist Church | 
of Wilmington is the sponsor of this work. 


Grace P. E. Church is located one mile north of Talleyville. On Dec. 30, 
1835, a meeting was held in Talley’s schoolhouse, built in 1806, about one 
mile east of Perry’s Tavern, for the purpose of forming an Episcopalian con- 
gregation. On Feb. 20, 1836, the schoolhouse was purchased from Eli Bald- 
win Talley for $275.00 and fitted up as a church. It was given the name 
“Grace P. E. Church.” It was consecrated by Bishop H. U. Onderdonk on 
June 11, 1835. Interest in Grace Church became very low by 1860. In 1861, 
new life was instilled and the chapel was improved. The old high pulpit was 
replaced with modern furnishings. 

In the fall of 1872, they purchased ten acres of land, north of Talleyville, 
to be used as a site for a church and a graveyard. On Oct. 1, 1874, the corner- 
stone of the present stone church was laid by Bishop Alfred Lee. It was opened 
for worship on July 4, 1875. In 1883, a rectory was presented by a lady friend 
of the parish. In 1887, the carriage-porch was built and the roof was rebuilt. 
Horse-sheds were built in 1889. 

After major improvements, including the addition of the chancel and 
sanctuary, a reopening service was held on Sept. 4, 1892, with Bishop Leighton 
Coleman in charge. He was assisted by the Revs. J. H. Berghaus and R. L. 
Stevens. A new organ had also been installed. 

The parish-house was built in 1928. It was dedicated on Feb. 17, 1929, 
by Bishop Philip Cook, assisted by the Rev. Charles A. Rantz, the rector. New 
pews, a desk and other furnishings were dedicated on May 21, 1944. The 
speaker was Kilsoo Haan, Washington representative of the Sino-Korean Peo- 
ples League. New organ chimes were dedicated on Sun., Mar. 30, 1947 by 
the rector, the Rev. E. H. Ehart, Jr. Mrs. Pearla Morton was at the console. 
The chimes with an amplifying set were given by Mr. and Mrs. Curtis L. 
Talley in memory of their son, Staff Sergt. Millard Talley who had served in 
the Pacific area during World War II. 

The church tower was struck by lightning on Wed. eve., Apr. 30, 1947 
but there was little damage. The tombstones in the adjoining graveyard date 
back to 1880. 


Mt. Lebanon Methodist Church (M-E.) was organized in 1833, at Rock- 
land..On Mar. 7, 1834, Thomas J. Aldred donated 165 perches of land to 
Curtis Talley, Charles Talley, Casper Munden, John Frame and Thomas Under- 
wood, trustees. A stone church was built in 1834. In 1876, a fine organ was 
installed and an addition was made to the library. The building was remodeled 
in 1888. A heater was installed in 1931. In 1932, memorial windows were — 
installed and a new roof was built. In 1935, the male members pitched in and 
made substantial improvements to the grounds. The Rev. Walter E, Fosnocht, 
the pastor, had been the last minister to serve at Edge Moor Church. When 
this church was torn down, the bell was presented to Mr. Fosnocht who, in 
turn, presented it to Mt. Lebanon Church. The bell was installed on Sept. 3, 
1936. The bell and belfry were dedicated, at an all-day service, on Sept. 13, 
1936. In 1937, extensive improvements and refurnishings were made. In 
1938, a memorial window was installed by Miss Mary S. Lecarpentier of Rock- 
land. So far as possible the labor for the many improvements from 1935 to 
1938 was furnished by the men of Mt. Lebanon. There is a large, enclosed 
gtaveyard. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find is that of Ezra 
Evans who died on Aug. 9, 1836. : ) 





STD | lind Grog WANN ball bod Sled Gol 2d Gilly fH 5) 123 


On Aug. 14, 1905, Mt. Lebanon purchased from the Du Pont Co. a par- 
sonage at the top of Rockland Hill. The deed contained two covenants that 
ran with the land. They were that the buyer assumed the risk of all injuries 
resulting from explosions at the powder mills and that no liquor should be 
sold on the property either retail or wholesale. The church sold this parson- 
age to Lammot duPont on Aug. 26, 1931. On Feb. 4, 1932, they purchased a 
lot at McDaniel Heights and built a new parsonage. 


Rockland Presbyterian Church. Wm. Young, a Philadelphia printer, built 
a paper mill at Rockland about 1793. In the early 1800's, Mr. Young built a 
stone church at Rockland a short distance up the hill on the road to Talley- 
ville. He had the church conducted as an independent church for many years 
and would invite theological students to hold services. About 1820, the church 
passed into the hands of the Philadelphia Presbytery. It was attached to Lower 
Brandywine Church and regular services were held. In 1854, Rockland Church 
was attached to Greenhill Church and services were held every second Sunda 
afternoon. The church was closed for several years. It was reopened in 1884 
and preaching was continued until 1890. On Aug. 11, 1884, a Sunday School 
was organized by Elder W. H. Oliver, Sr. with the help of Frank B. Stirling, 
assistant superintendent of Greenhill Sunday School. They built up the interest 
until there was a membership of ninety. Mr. Stirling became superintendent 
upon Elder Oliver’s retirement. The Sunday School was closed, in 1892, out 
of deference to the members of Mt. Lebanon Church who were doing fine 
work a short distance up the hill. Only the ruins of the stone walls are stand- 
ing today. 


Christ P. E. Church is located, just off Buck Road, two miles outside of 
Wilmington. This church was the outgrowth of what is believed to have been 
the first Sunday School in America. 

The site of the Simmelville Mill, later known as Walker’s Mill, was pur- 
chased from Peter Bauduy by Joseph B. Sims in August, 1813 and Mr. Sims 
proceeded to build the mill. In 1815, John Siddall and his nephew James were 
employed at the mill. The first Sunday School in England was established, in 
1780, by Robert Raikes at Gloucester. James Siddall had attended the Raikes 
Sunday School iP tans to his coming to America. In the spring of 1815 James 
and his uncle decided to open a Sunday School in the home of John Siddall. 
Both children and adults attended and were taught the 3 R’s and also moral 
subjects. This was the first Sunday School in America. 

Victorine E. duPont, the eldest daughter of Eleuthere Irene duPont, 
the founder of the Du Pont Company married the son of Peter Bauduy who 
was associated with Mr. duPont in the early days of powder making. The 
bridegroom lived only three months and Victorine was left a widow at a 
very early age. 

_ When E. I. du Pont learned of the Sunday School, which had been moved 
to the Simmelville Mill, he prevailed upon Victorine to attend the school and 
to teach a class there. Her younger sisters Eleuthera and Sophie, later Mrs. 
Admiral duPont, also assisted in this work. The Brandywine Manufacturer's 
Sunday School was incorporated on Jan. 29, 1817. As the Sunday School grew, 
larger and more central quarters were needed, so it was moved to the top floor 
of Henry Clay Factory. In 1821, Victorine assumed full charge of the school. 

During the year 1823, E. I. duPont donated a site near the Blacksmith- 
shop Gate and probably some of the building materials. The men of the Sun- 
day School furnished the labor and a Sunday School building was erected and 


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ital tie 4 Bose IF crt gti ot 


124 THE CHURGHESAOR DELAWARE 


occupied. To quote Mrs. Admiral duPont: ‘Money was scarce in those days 
and my father was not a rich man.” Among the Brandywiners the Admiral’s 
wife was always called “Mrs. Admiral.” 

There were separate classes for the various denominations where each one 
would be taught the tenents of his religion. When St. Joseph’s Church was 
built in 1841, the Catholic members withdrew from the Sunday School. In 
1844, when Greenhill was founded the Presbyterian members withdrew and in 
1847, when Mt. Salem was founded the Methodists withdrew. This left the 
Sunday School predominantly Episcopalian. 

The forms of the Episcopal Church were adopted in 1848. After having 
been tastefully reconditioned, the building was reopened on Aug. 17, 1851 
by Bishop Alfred Lee. On May 2, 1852, a class of seven members was con- 
firmed by Bishop Lee. 

The movement to erect a creditable church building was pushed forward 
by some of the members, notably, Mrs. Bauduy and Captain, later Admiral 
duPont and his wife. They ran into difficulty in securing a site as some were 
in favor of building the church close to the duPont graveyard and General 
Henry duPont the senior partner of the duPont firm, was opposed to having 


the church built on duPont land. 


These difficulties were gradually overcome and the present site was se- 
cured. The work of cellar digging was started in August, 1854. During the 
early part of May, 1855 a Fair was held in Wilmington and $540.00 was 
cleared and placed in a fund to purchase an organ. The five-ton spire was 
placed in position on Nov. 5, 1855. 

The windows were placed in the spire on April 23, 1856. It is claimed 
that Lammot duPont agreed to make a contribution toward the building fund 
provided windows were placed in the spire.so that he could climb up the 
ladder in the spire and see the surrounding countryside from these windows. 

The last church service was held in the Sunday School building on Apr. 
27, 1856. The first service in the new church was held on May 4, 1856. The 
name “‘Christ’’ was chosen as being preferable to the name of a saint. 

The church bell weighing 1240 pounds and inscribed ‘Make a joyful 
noise unto God all ye lands” was rung for the first time on Mar. 27, 1859. 
The plated communion set was stolen on May 20, 1860. The church was in- 
corporated on Feb. 13, 1872. 


Victorine remained in charge of the Sunday School until her death in 


_ 1861. The Sunday School building was used for that purpose until 1899 when 


the present parish-house was built. The old Sunday School building was later 
used as Hagley Office and is now in use as a dwelling. 


The church was improved in 1892-93. The corner-stone of the parish- 


house was laid on Jan. 4, 1899, by Bishop Leighton Coleman. It was built of 
Brandywine granite to conform with the church building. The windows of the 


church were equipped with new cathedral glass in 1904-05. Extensive rebuild- 


ing was done in 1914 and on Easter Sunday, Apr. 4, 1915, Bishop Frederick J. 
Kinsman conducted a reopening service. 

A mosaic altar and a new organ in memory of Mrs. Mary Pauline Foster 
duPont were consecrated, by Bishop Kinsman, on June 3, 1917. The interior 
of the church was materially improved in 1929. In 1942-43 new altar lights 
and candelabra were installed. The custom of renting pews, one method of 
raising church funds, was abolished on Jan. 1, 1943. 

A nine-room addition for Sunday School purposes was built during the 
summer of 1945 and was opened for use on Sept. 23, 1945. It was designed 
for temporary use until a more permanent building could be erected. 











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HILLCREST METHODIST CHURCH 


ST. HELENA R. C. CHURCH 
(Page 120) 


(Page 119) 





\ 





126 THE GHURGHES BOR BDE RAK ARE 


Imbedded in the walls of Christ Church is a full pint bottle of whiskey 
and this is the authentic story of how it happens to be there. During the 
construction of the stone-work, when it was about scaffold-high, one of the 
stonemasons arrived on the job with a pint bottle of whiskey on his hip, as 
usual. The superintendent arrived early that day and fearing detection, the 
stonemason laid the bottle upon the wall. He then dashed mortar over it and 

began to lay stone, lightly, above and beside it, expecting to retrieve it in a 
few moments. It happened that the superintendent remained on the job all 
day so the mason had no opportunity to take the bottle out and, of course, 
next day it was too late. 


St. Joseph’s-on-the-Brandywine R. C. Church is located on Church Road 
between the Kennett Pike and Montchanin Road. The first Mass, along the 
Brandywine, was said by the Rev. Patrick Kenney in the home of Mrs. Victor 
duPont. Masses were said here, at stated times, until 1841. Then, ‘St. Joe's,” 
as it was affectionately called, was erected, with generous help from members 
of the duPont family. 

On Mar. 27, 1839, Charles I. duPont purchased from Jos. S. Dixon and 
Wm. Breck, 95 acres of land extending from the Brandywine to the Kennett 
Pike. On the upper end of this tract Mr. duPont laid out a section in building 
lots and named the division “Charleston.” On Aug. 25, 1841, he sold lot 
No. 2, a one-acre plot, to the Most Rev. Francis Patrick Kenrick, Bishop of 
Phila., in trust for St. Joseph’s-on-the-Brandywine Parish. On Feb. 17, 1844, 
Bishop Kenrick bought lots No. 4 and No. 5. The cost of these three plots 
was $200.00. It was on this land that St. Joseph’s Church was built. 

A rectory and the first Parochial School in Delaware were erected in 
1850. In July 1866, a new rectory was under construction, the old rectory 
having been burned a few months before. The church was incorporated on 
May 23, 1882. ns 4 

An addition to the school was started in 1889. The corner-stone was 
laid on Sept. 29, 1889, at 4 o'clock, by Bishop Alfred A. Curtis. He was as- 
sisted by Vicar-General Lyons and the Rev. Fathers Kelley, Brady, Fallon, 
Bradford, Dollard and Donaghy, the pastor. A special train on the W. & N. 
R. R. carried a large delegation from the Wilmington Catholic Societies to 
the ceremony. 

The dedication was held on May 18, 1890. Bishop Curtis conducted the 


_ ceremony, assisted by the Rev. Fathers Fallon, Dollard and Donaghy. The ex- 


ercises started with a procession to the school. Father Fallon delivered an 
address on the history of education in St. Joseph’s Parish. : 

The church was equipped with three new altars, new pews and furnish- 
ings, after which a reopening service was held on June 24, 1894. Bishop 
Curtis celebrated Mass and the Rev. Dennis J. Flynn preached the sermon. 
_ After major improvements, a reopening service was held on Aug. 28, 

, 1898, at 10 a.m., with Bishop John J. Monaghan in charge of the ceremonies. 


‘He was assisted by the Rev. Wm. J. Bermingham, the pastor and the Rev. J. H. | 


McGill. The main altar was the gift of J. Smith Brennan and his sisters. There 
were a number of new memorial windows. 

The church was rebuilt in 1941 after which centennial services were held 
on Sun., Dec. 14, 1941. Bishop Edmond J. FitzMaurice was in charge and he 
was assisted by Monsignor J. J. Dougherty, rector of St. Peter's. At 11 a.m., 
High Mass was celebrated by the Rev. John J. Lynch. A dinner was served in 
the school for the clergy and in the convent for the nuns present. 

There is a large cemetery beside the church and an additional graveyard 











Nel ennho A Solo L EC OLENA. 127 


a short distance down the road. The oldest tombstone is on the grave of 
Bridget Durnin, who died on Feb. 17, 1844. 


Greenhill Presbyterian Church is located to the south of the Kennett 
Pike just beyond the Wilmington city limits. It was organized in the fall of 
1844 at the home of Alex. Stephens, by members of the Rockland Presbyterian 
Church. The first meetings were held in the Brandywine Lyceum which they 
rented. The church was formally established on June 5, 1848. The corner- 
stone of the present church was laid on Nov. 15, 1848. It was dedicated on 
Sept. 14, 1851, by the Rev. Wm. Blackwood. A two-story frame manse was 
built in 1856. On May 6, 1857, additional land was bought from John Wood. 

A large remodeling job was done in the early 1870’s at which time the 
pointed roof was added. In 1897, the gallery and the old box-pews were re- 
moved and the two sides aisles were changed to one center aisle. A reopen- 
ing service was held on Sept. 26, 1897, at which time the Rev. W. C. Cattell, 
D.D., LL.D., was the guest preacher, with the pastor, the Rev. Edwin W. 
Long, in charge. 

In 1936, extensive renovations took place. The stained glass windows 
were replaced with a plain translucent glass. The chancel was done over with 
a dark panelling and a new pulpit and reredos were installed. A rededication 
service was held on Oct. 25, 1936, in which the pastor, the Rev. Harley B. 
Kline was assisted by the Rev. Charles L. Candee, D.D., and the Rev. J. Her- 
rick Darling, Moderator of the New Castle Presbytery. A new Hammond or- 
gan was dedicated on Sun., Apr. 7, 1946 by the Rev. J. Edward Paul, the pastor. 

The church stands in the center of a large cemetery. Close to the entrance 
is a small grave with a headstone inscribed: “Unknown drummer boy 1861-63.” 
During the Civil War this boy arrived along the Brandywine with his troops. 
During the time they were stationed here the boy was taken care of by Mrs. 
John Moore of Walker's Banks. Sometime later he was killed in battle and 
his body was brought here for interment. The headstone was contributed by 
John Windett, a marble cutter, from the Banks of the Brandywine. An Ameri- 
can flag is kept flying over the grave at all times by the sexton, who takes great 
pride in keeping the grave in fine condition. The oldest inscription the writer 
could find is on a memorial to Lydia Love who died on Sept. 19, 1817. This 
is undoubtedly a reinterment. 


Lower Brandywine Presbyterian Church is located on the Kennett Pike, 
one mile east of Centerville. Lower Brandywine was originally located on the 
easterly side of the Brandywine Creek below Pyle’s Twin Bridges and on the 
present estate of Harry Haskell. This site, of 81 sq. perches, was donated by 
Ralph Pyle to the trustees of the Presbyterian Meeting-House of Birmingham, 
in the Province of Pennsylvania, on Oct. 15, 1720. Mr. Pyle reserved for 
himself and his heirs the liberty to build a pew six feet square and to make 
use of the same and also burial rights for their dead, forever. It was customary 
in those days to buy or rent space in a meeting-house and to build and own 
one’s individual family box pew. The deed stipulated that a meeting-house 
was to be erected. 

This log church was used until 1773, when, after quite a controversy, 
it was decided to build a new church on the present site of Lower Brandywine 
Church. Only a few field stones, placed upright to mark graves, remain today 
to show the location of the old log church. 

One acre of land at the Kennett Pike and Lewis’ Road was donated as a 
church site on Aug, 22, 1774, by Jeremiah Smith. A log church was then built. 


Ml tle Hl Bor i TOADS NH lr Aer gel ho il bnindy TA ek din Amertwnse 





128 TAE CHURCHES .O% Dp EL AWARE 





It stood in front of the present church where the old graveyard is located. In 
1835, the building was weather-boarded and plastered. In 1860, a new brick 
building was erected and the timbers of the old church were used to build 
horse-sheds. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 1, 1859 and dedication serv- 
ices were held on Nov. 8, 1860. 

, A group of members developed a cemetery adjoining the church prop- 
erty and on Jan. 15, 1863, they transferred the property, consisting of 85 
perches, to the church trustees for $106.25. 

In. 1890, an outside vestibule was added which allowed several extra rows 
of pews to be installed. Stained-glass windows were installed at this time. On 
Apr. 2, 1892, an additional one-eighth of an acre was purchased from Samuel 
Frizzell. In 1928, an organ-room was added, a steeple was built over the vesti- 
bule and the building was generally reconditioned. In addition to the old 
graveyard there is a large modern cemetery. 

In 1828, the Presbytery of New Castle met here and it is claimed that it 
was the first time in their history that they were entertained without the serv- 
ing of any hard liquor. 

Framed and hanging on the walls of the church are photostatic copies of 
the Ralph Pyle and Jeremiah Smith deeds. | 

The oldest tombstone the writer could find is that of James McCulaugh 
who died on Sept. 16, 1798. 


Center Friend’s Meeting-House is located one mile east of Centerville on 
the road to Granogue. The Irish immigrants who were Friends and who lived 
in this neighborhood seriously objected to traveling across the Brandywine 
Creek to attend New Wark Meeting in the winter-time. On Oct. 7, 1687, a 
Meeting was organized for worship during the winter months. In 1690, a 
permanent Meeting was organized, the meetings alternating with New Wark 
Meeting. In 1708, it was decided to build a meeting-house. In 1710, they 
arranged to buy not more than six acres of land from Alphonsus Kirk at seven 
shillings, six pence per acre. On Sept. 3, 1711, a committee was appointed to 
proceed with the erection of a frame or log meeting-house and to lay out a 
burying-ground. In 1795, the wooden structure was replaced with the present 
brick building. On Feb. 2, 1808, Center was united with Hockessin as a 
Monthly Meeting. Center Monthly Meeting was visited by Elias Hicks on 
Sept. 20, 1828, their first meeting after the separation. On Sat., Nov. 15, 1851, 
the meeting-house was unroofed in a violent storm. The burying-ground was 
improved in 1857 and again in 1873. 

The two front doors and one of the rear doors are hinged vertically so 

that they can be folded back when the doors are open. The old benches are 
still in place on the right side, as you enter, but on the left side they have been 
replaced with regulation pews. This innovation was decided upon at a 
Monthly Meeting held on Apr. 3, 1899. At the same time new cushions, a 
new bookcase and the oiling of the woodwork on that side of the meeting- 
shouse were ordered. On Oct. 7, 1907, Center Meeting requested permission 
‘to discontinue worship Meetings from the 12 mo. 1st day until the 4 mo. 1st 
day. New shingle roofs were placed on the meeting-house and the horse- 
sheds in 1943. At the present time, regular Meetings are held on the last first 
day in the month from the 4th month 1st day until the 12th month 1st day, 
at 10 o'clock in the morning. The “upping block” is unusual in having a 
double approach. The property is well maintained, the burying-ground being 
enclosed with a stone wall. There are a number of graves marked ‘only with 
field stones. The oldest legible tombstone is that of R. Jefferis, who died 
in 1810. 








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Centerville M. E. Mission was established in 1859 by members from Mt. 
Salem Church. This effort was abandoned after a short time. In November, 
1870, cottage meetings were held and when the attendance increased, the 
meetings were transferred to the bar-room of the local tavern. 


Centerville Undenominational Church. Previous to 1843, any religious 
services or public meetings in Centerville were, of necessity, held in the school- 
house. It developed that the school was too small for satisfactory meetings 
and, in 1842, public-spirited citizens took up a subscription to erect a suitable 
building. Seventy-four persons subscribed from $1.00 to $10.00 each. On Nov. 
2, 1842, the subscribers held a meeting in the school at which time trustees 
were elected and a building committee was selected. 

On May 26, 1843, John McCullough, James Delaplain and Bennett Jefferis, 
the trustees, purchased a half-acre of land from Ann Matson, for $75.00. It 
was located on the Wil. and Kennett Turnpike adjoining Levi Walker's land 
in Centerville. It was agreed that the trustees would erect a church building 
free for the use of all Christian denominations who wished to use it and for 
the use of community meetings. 

On Aug. 5, 1843, it was reported that the building was completed at a 
cost of $625.00, leaving an indebtedness of $200.00. By-laws were adopted on 
Nov. 4, 1843 and the name “Centerville Hall’. was selected. The building was 
heated with a wood-stove and was lighted with candles. The fees for the use 
of the building were set at from 25 cents to $1.00. During the following eight 
years services were held here by the Methodists, the Mormons, the Presby- 


_ terians, the Plumerites, the Episcopalians and the Friends. 


Diligent research has failed to locate a religious group named ‘“Plumer- 
ites.” In 1838, there was a division among the Presbyterians when the con- 
gregation became “Old School” or ‘New School.” The Rev. Wm. S. Plumer 
was most active in the ‘Old School” group and was made Moderator in 1838. 
The writer believes that the ‘“Plumerites’” were “Old School” Presbyterians 
who adopted the name ‘‘Plumerites” as followers of the Rev. Mr. Plumer. 

Among the secular meetings held in the hall were temperance, “ anti- 
slavery, lectures, musicals, Horse Association, Brandywine Club, a geography 
school and a singing school. By 1851, the trustees had become discouraged 
because of their inability to pay off the debt of $200.00. At a meeting held 
on Mar. 1, 1851, it was unanimously decided to sell the building, pay off the 
debt and distribute the balance among the subscribers. On Mar. 15, 1851, the 
building was sold to Emma Perin for $400.00. The benches, stove and wood 
were sold separately. The building was later acquired by Dr. Jos. H. Chandler 
who used it for a stable. At the present time it is serving as a garage at the 
home of Philip Kimball. 


Oak Hill Pres. Sunday School was conducted in the District School lo- 
cated on the Lancaster Pike a half-mile beyond the DuPont airfield. It was 


‘established, in 1875, by members of Red Clay Pres. Church. The Sunday 


School was closed in 1910, 


St. Mary’s R. C. Church was located, four miles outside of Wilmington, 
on the old Lancaster Pike. This was the first Roman Catholic Church in Dela- 
ware and was built by Father Whalen, in 1785, on land purchased in 1772. It 
was commonly called “Coffee Run Church” from the name of a nearby stream. 
A new church was built, in 1805, by the Rev. Patrick Kenney. It was used 
until 1884 and was torn down in 1908. The graveyard is still there, enclosed 





Nebo W na GAS T-Ts-E COUNTY 131 


with an iron fence. Father Kenney, who died in 1842, is buried here under a 
flat tombstone. At the entrance, leading to the 8raveyard and facing the road, 
is an ornamental Sate over which is the name “Coffee Run Cemetery.” For 
several years, during the 1920's, an annual field Mass was celebrated here. 
The oldest tombstone is that of Barney Trainer, who died on June 30, 1805. 


John W. Sharpless for $15.00. The deed specified that this money would be 
used in the maintenance of the church. 


excellent condition, the oldest of these is dated 1857. The enclosure is well 
filled with saplings and trees but the wall is in good condition. 


St. John’s R. C. Church at Mt. Cuba. Some historians claim that this church 
was built at an early date. The writer has been unable to verify this. 


Elsmere Presbyterian Church was Organized, in the schoolhouse, in 1889, | 


by Miss Ada Warren, Principal of the school. Robert P. Robinson, afterwards 


Wilmington for the event. It was 1911 before the church was recognized by 
the Presbytery. 

The 52nd Anniversary of the Sunday School and the 30th Anniversary 
of the church organization were celebrated on Sun., Jan, 12, 1941. The anni- 
versaty sermon was preached in the morning by the Rev. A. N. Stubblebine, 


the pastor. The Rev. Dr. John W. Christie Preached in the evening. The bene- 


In the fall of 1944, the Crawford Property at New Road and Ohio Ave. 
was purchased as a site for a new church. The house was reconditioned to be 
used as a manse. 

Four hammered brass offering plates, in memory of Miss Sarah Snod- 


NS Se Pe Renner rstrsentes eye oi TRIM ae eee 


132 ROE CHUR 6 HES Se Bl) Eki Ww Ain 


grass, were dedicated on Oct. 21, 1945, by the Rev. Clarence S. Hoffman, 
the pastor. 


Elsmere M. E. Church was organized in 1889, and the corner-stone of a 
frame church was laid on Mon., Nov. 3, 1890, by Pres. Elder W. L. S. Murray 
assisted by the Revs. L. E. Barrett and Adam Stengle. The church was incor- 
porated on July 9, 1891. 

The formal opening was held on June 28, 1891. The Rev. J. S. Willis 
preached in the morning, the Sunday School was addressed by H. S. Goldey 
and Joseph Pyle and the evening sermon was preached by the Rev. W. W. 
Wilson. The church was dedicated on June 26, 1892, by the Rev. John Y. 
Dobbins, D.D., assisted by the Rev. E. L. Hubbard, the Rev. A. S. Mowbray, 
the pastor and the Hon. Henry C. Conrad. The church was eventually closed 
and was sold on Aug. 5, 1921, to the Elsmere Civic Club. On Dec. 24, 1943, 
it was purchased by the Church of Christ. 


The Wilmington Church of Christ in Elsmere. This congregation was 
established in 1943, when services were started in the home of John W. Allen, 
Jr., at Edge Moor Gardens. After a tent revival held on Vandever Ave., Wil- 
mington, a room was secured in the Odd Fellows’ Hall where church services 
were held. On Dec. 24, 1943 the congregation purchased the Elsmere Com- 
munity Building which they renovated and adapted to church needs. The 
church was incorporated on June 25, 1944. The opening service was held on - 
Sun., Aug. 27, 1944, with the Rev. Willard Collins in charge. He was assisted | 
by the Rev. Clyde P. Findlay, the pastor. 


Brack-Ex Methodist Church (M.E.). The first Sunday School session was 
held at Brack-Ex on July 10, 1913. It was in charge of the Rev. John Thorn- 
ton, a local-preacher, who had charge of Elsmere M. E. Church. The meeting- 
place, complete. with chairs, an organ and a desk was donated by Edward 
Woodward, a prominent Presbyterian. The church was incorporated on Nov. 
16, 1914, under the name “Brack-Ex M. E. Church.” A. K. Taylor donated a 
plot of land upon which the erection of a church was started. The corner-$tone 
was laid on May 2, 1915, with the Rev. E. L. Hoffecker, Dist. Supt., officiating 
and the Silverbrook Church choir furnishing the music. The Rev. Penrose R. 
Talley was selected as the first minister. The dedication services were held on 
Sun. afternoon, May 23, 1915, with the Rev. E. L. Hoffecker, presiding and 

the Richardson Park Church choir furnishing the music. The afternoon ser- 
mon was preached by the Rev. C. T. Wyatt and the evening sermon by Dr. 
Hoffecker. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. C. Shorters presented a Bible and an Organ to | 
the church. Fx j 

An addition for a Sunday School was built in 1928. The corner-stone 
was laid on the evening of July 22, 1928, by Dist. Supt. James W. Colona as- 
sisted by the Rev. R. High Adams, the pastor. The dedication service was held — 

.0n Nov. 4, 1928, by the Revs. Dr. Colona and Mr. Adams. The building was 
“equipped to serve as a Sunday School and a social-center. A new bell was in- 
stalled in November, 1940. During the summer of 1942, improvements were 
made to the sanctuary. All-day re-opening services were held on Sept. 6, 1942. 
On Mar. 28, 1943, six memorial windows were dedicated by the Revs. J. L. 
Sparklin, Wm. H. Briggs and John E. Jones, the pastor. 

A pipe-organ with Deagan chimes and a polished bronze tablet bearing 
the names of the 39 young men and one young woman who were in the armed 

i forces during World War II was dedicated on Sun., Apr. 14, 1946, by the 
Rev. John E. Jones, the pastor. 





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134 Ter - CH UR GATES AOE RD TEL ASA TREE 


The Community Fellowship Church, at Roselle, was founded on Easter 
Sunday, Apr. 25, 1943, by the Rev. R. High Adams. The meetings were held 
at 13 Elliott Ave. on Sun. mornings and evenings. A Sunday School was 
organized in February, 1944. On Mar. 3, 1944, it was announced that a lot 
had been purchased at Armstrong and Virginia Aves., Brookland Terrace, upon 
which to build a church. 

On Nov. 19, 1944, a pulpit desk, chairs and a communion table were 
presented by Mrs. Martha Ritchie in memory of her brother, Ralph L. Moore. 

Ground was broken for a church on Jan. 9, 1947 at 10 A. M. by the Rev. 
R. High Adams, the pastor. 


Marshallton Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1885, Union Sabbath School 
was organized just outside of Marshallton by Wm. A. Mullen, Richard H. 
Williams and George M. Bennett. Meetings were held in the schoolhouse with 
Wm. A. Mullen as Superintendent. This was an undenominational effort. On 
July 12, 1886, a plot of land was purchased from Edwin J. Cranston. A frame 
chapel was built and it was dedicated, in 1887, with the name “Union Church.” 
On Feb. 10, 1888, the property was sold to the Union M. E. Church of Mar- 
shallton. It was dedicated to the service of Methodism on Mar. 4, 1888. More 
land was acquired on Mar. 1, 1893 and on May 24, 1922. On July 3, 1922, the | 
name was changed to “Marshallton M. E. Church” by the trustees. 

The church was rebuilt and enlarged. The corner-stone was laid on Sat., 
\July 29, 1922, at 3 P. M., by the Rev. J. D. C. Hanna, D.D. He was assisted 
by the Rev. J. P. Otis and the Rev. Ivanhoe Willis, the pastor. A supper, given 
by the Ladies’ Aid Society, followed the ceremony with U. S. Senator L. Heisler 
Ball, presiding. The church was dedicated on Sun. evening, Nov. 26, 1922, by 
the Rev. Robert Watt, assisted by the pastor. The Rev. Carlisle L. Hubbard 
preached at the afternoon service. In 1940, extensive improvements were made 
to the building and furnishings including the installation of oil heat. 

Early in 1947 plans were outlined and subscriptions started for the erec- 
tion of a church-house. It will include Sunday School rooms, recreation rooms 
and facilities for the social activities of the congregation. ‘ 

The parsonage lot was purchased on Sept. 26, 1914 from Wm. A. Mullen. 
The parsonage was completed April 30, 1915. 


St. Barnabas P. E. Church, at Marshallton, was organized, in 1890, as 
“Trinity Memorial Chapel.’ Services were held in the schoolhouse from 1890 
until the first church was built. The corner-stone of the first church was laid 
on Oct. 29, 1892. In the meantime the name “St. Barnabas” had been chosen. 
Bishop Leighton Coleman laid the stone assisted by the Rev. E. K. Miller and 
five other clergymen. It was dedicated on May 12, 1893. The service of bene- 
diction was celebrated by Bishop Coleman. The Rev. Wm. L. Schouler preached 
in the morning and the Rev. P. B. Lightner in the afternoon. This church was 
a memorial to Wm. Robinson who had been killed on the railroad about one 
year previous to this time. The altar was a gift from the church at Center- 
ville, Md. 

The church was burned to the ground on Christmas Day, 1898. A new 
church was built and it was consecrated on June 27, 1899. The service was 
conducted by Bishop Coleman, assisted by Archdeacon George C. Hall, D.D., 
the Rev. K. J. Hammond and the Rev. E. K. Miller, the rector. The bronze 
chandeliers had formerly graced Christ Church in Christiana Hundred. They 
had been presented to Christ Church by Admiral S. F. duPont. A stone font 
was installed in 1903-04. On Easter Sunday, Apr. 15, 1906, Bishop Coleman 





NeEeNen CAA SE LOE COU NOT Y 135 


blessed new altar vessels. On June 18, 1909, a new choir room was dedicated 
by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman. 

A new bell and belfry were dedicated on July 9, 1911, by the Rev. John 
Rigg. The corner-stone of the parish-house was laid on June 17, 1932. It 
was dedicated on Oct. 9, 1932, by Bishop Philip Cook, assisted by the Revs. 
Edward H. Ford, C. Bayard Traill, Walden Pell and Milward W. Riker, the 
rector. Built of brick, the parish-house is a large and substantial building. 
There is a graveyard to the rear of the church, the tombstones dating back 
to 1889. 


Cedar Heights Methodist Chapel (M.E.) was organized on Feb. 28, 1907. 
Meetings were held in private homes until 1908. The church site was pur- 
chased on Jan. 9, 1908 from Annie Cloud. The corner-stone of the chapel was 
laid on Dec. 5, 1908. 


Brandywine Springs M. E. Mission was established in 1859. 


Brandywine Springs P. E. Chapel also known as “Faulkland Chapel.” 
Sometime in the 1870's, Matthew Newkirk opened an Episcopalian Boys 
School on the hill at Brandywine Springs. It was called ‘St. John’s School for 
Boys.” When the Landenburg Branch of the Wil. and Western R. R. was 
built and opened in October, 1872, the station at this point was named 
Faulkland. 

This school occupied two cottages. Through the interest of Wm. Jenks 
Fell, a chapel was built in the wing of one cottage, on the first floor. 

The first service was held on August 9, 1874, by Wm. Jenks Fell, lay- 
reader. The chapel was consecrated by Bishop Alfred Lee, on Sept. 6, 1874. 
After a few years, the school and chapel were abandoned. The cottages were 
converted into a hotel which was torn down about 1920. 

On Apr. 14, 1895, Bishop Leighton Coleman visited St. Columba’s Sun- 
day School at Faulkland. ; 


Richardson Park Methodist Church (M.E.) was formally organized and 
incorporated on Oct. 24, 1907. A church site was purchased on Dec. 9, 1908 
from A. K. Taylor. A church was built of concrete blocks. The corner-stone 
was laid on Sat., Aug. 16, 1908, by the Rev. C. T. Sharpless. Improvements 
were made in 1911. The church was dedicated on Mar. 29, 1914, at 10:45 
a.m., with Dist. Supt. E. L. Hoffecker, in charge. The Rev. George E. Reed, 
D.D., preached the sermon. Assisting in the services were the Revs. Blair S. 
Latshaw, C. D. Sharpless and R. P. Nichols. Additional land was spurchaved 
on Sept. 20, 1916 and on Nov. 20, 1917. The church was improved in 1918. 

The present site, on Maryland Ave., was purchased on Oct. 29, 1925. The 
corner-stone of the present stone church was laid on Oct. 17, 1926, by Bishop 
Wm. F. McDowell, assisted by Dist. Supt. J. W. Colona and the Revs. J. Albert 
Leach, J. L. Johnson and Louis B. Morgan, the pastor. The opening service in 
the new church was held on Oct. 3, 1926. 


The Church of the Brethren at Richardson Park was Organized as a mis- 
sion in 1916. It was then located at Clayton and Maple Sts. in Wilmington. 
This building was burned in 1922. Meetings were then held in private homes, 
until 1924, at which time they were transferred to the Community Hall at 
Richardson Park. The present church-house was completed and was dedicated 


on Sept. 12, 1926. The church was incorporated on Jan. 4, 1927. - 


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136 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


St. Matthew’s R. C. Church. A mission was organized at Woodcrest in 
1941. On July 10, 1941, Bishop Edmond J. FitzMaurice established it as a 
parish. The first Mass was said on July 20, 1941, by the Rev. John J. Foley, 
the pastor, in the Community Hall at Richardson Park. The erection of a 
school was started and the Masses were transferred to the basement of the 
school building on June 28, 1942. 

The corner-stone of the church building, on s. Maryland Ave., was laid 
on June 7, 1942. It was attended by 3500 Holy Name Society men from a 
dozen parishes. They were accompanied by ten bands and bugle and drum 
corps. The corner-stone was laid by Bishop FitzMaurice. A silver-plated trowel 
used in the ceremony was preserved by Father Foley. The principal address 
was delivered by U. S. Senator Patrick A. McCarran of Nevada. He was in- 
troduced by E. Ennalls Berl, Esq., general chairman. 

A statue entitled “Our Lady of Victory” was presented in memory of 
Staff Sergt. George J. Murphy, by his parents. Sgt. Murphy, a waist gunner 
on a Flying Fortress, was killed in action over Italy in February, 1944, after 
having completed more than 40 missions. The statue, on the lawn of the 
church, was blessed by the Rev. Chas. J. McGinley on Sept. 10, 1944. Father 
John J. Foley presided and Jos. A. L. Errigo, Esq., delivered the address. 
There was a large turnout of the Veterans of Foreign Wars, the Boy Scouts, 
the Holy Name Society and the Five Points Fire Co. A color guard from the 
New Castle Air Base and a firing squad from the State Guard were present. 

On Sun., Oct. 20, 1946, it was announced by Bishop FitzMaurice that 
the church would be named “St. Matthew's.” 


Calvary United Presbyterian Church at Hayden Park. This congregation 
was organized at meetings held in the Crest Theatre, Woodcrest, beginning on 
Oct. 1, 1944. In the meantime a church site had been purchased on the New- 
port Pike at Hayden Ave. The Rev. J. O. McDonald became the first pastor. 
The enly other church of this denomination, in Delaware, is the first United 
Presbyterian Church of Wilmington. _ 

The name “Calvary” was selected in October. Formal organization took 
place on Feb. 18, 1945. A campaign to raise funds for the new church, start- 
ing on Sun., Mar. 1, 1947, was announced by Herbert S. Lilly, the finance 
chairman. | 


Our Mother of Mercy R. C. Church, at Belvedere, was organized, built 


_ and is conducted by the Josephite Fathers. Sometime previous to March, 1928, © 


Father Conrad F. Rebesher, S.S.J., established a mission, at Belvedere, in a 
tiny cottage and gathered a small congregation. On Oct. 28, 1928, the owner 
of the house requested that it be returned to her. In the meantime, ground had. 
been broken and wask well advanced on the erection of a brick church. It 
was dedicated on Nov. 25, 1928. 
The dedication service was conducted by the Most Rev. Edmond J. Fitz- 
aurice, D.D., Bishop of Wilmington. He was assisted by Fathers Daniel Rice 
and Rebesher. Father Rebesher became the first pastor in addition to his duties 
as pastor of St. Joseph’s Church in Wilmington. 

The rectory, built of brick, was begun in the fall of 1935 and was com- 
pleted about Apr. 1, 1936. The first resident pastor moved in on May 18. 
The Rev. James F. Didas, S.S.J., became the second pastor on Oct. 1, 1938 and 
served the church until Mar. 24, 1942. 

During 1943-44, the interior of the church was improved and beautified 
under the direction of Father Bernard A. Lyons, S.S.J., the pastor. 





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CENTER -FRIENDS’ MEETING-HOUSE, NR. CENTERVILLE 
(Page 128) 


MARSHALLTON METHODIST CHURCH 
(Page 134) 








138 PHE: CHURCH ESSGt aE LAWATICE 





In the district between Newport and Marshallton which includes Belve- 
dere and Homestead there are several colored churches. Nazareth Baptist 
Church, Alpha Baptist Church, who purchased their church site on Oct. 7, 
1925, Elizabeth A. M. E. Church, founded on Oct. 24, 1921 and who pur- 
chased their property on Aug. 19, 1926. Rock of Ages Church, the Union Band 
of Holiness, who were incorporated on Aug. 23, 1928, and the Simpson M. E. 
Church. The latter church was burned by youthful incendiaries and then 
rebuilt of brick in 1908. There are a number of graves surrounding the church. 


Peneil Methodist Church (M.E.), at Newport, was the outgrowth of 
meetings instituted sometime between 1786 and 1797. These meetings were 
held in private homes and in the schoolhouse. A permanent Society was formed 
in 1803. The church was organized and trustees were elected on May 16, 1810. 
On June 22, 1810, Thomas Latimer conveyed for $1.00, a plot of land to the 
board of trustees. 

A small frame church was built and used until 1864 when a brick church 
was built on the same site. It was dedicated on Sept. 17, 1865. On Nov. 7, 
1842, Sybilla Ann Stone donated a brick house for a parsonage and an acre 
of land for the support of the church. The church was rebuilt in 1890. It was 
redecorated in 1911 and 1924. The 140th Anniversary was celebrated on Oct. 
17, 1926. Additional land was donated by Ella W. Johnson, et al. on Feb. 
20, 1937. The corner-stone for an addition to the church was laid on Sept. 26, 
1937, by the Revs. W. A. Wise, J. H. Geoghegan and J. C. McCoy. The reopen- 
ing service was held on Dec. 12, 1937. 

On May 27, 1945, the Rev. Paul E. McCoy dedicated four brass offering 
plates presented as a memorial to Kenneth Jones, who gave his life in World 
War II. On July 1, 1945, the pastor dedicated an individual communion service 
in memory of John R. Boyd who lost his life in the naval service. 


Nazareth Protestant Methodist Church at Newport. On Oct. 27, 1841, 
David Lamphigh transferred, for $1.00, to the trustees of Nazareth Church, 
85 sq. perches of land located just north of Newport, on the Newport and 
Lancaster Pike, now James St., upon which to erect a church and to maigtain 
a graveyard. This plot was on the northeasterly side of the Pike and had a 
frontage of 5 perches and a depth of 17 perches. A church was built of stone 
and brick. After a few years the church ran into financial difficulties and it 
was sold by the Sheriff, on Nov. 3, 1855, to Bishop Alfred Lee, et al., of the 
Episcopal Church. 


The Star of Bethlehem Church, A-.U.M.P., at Newport. This church was 
originally called the African Union First Colored M. P. Church. They pur- 
chased the old Protestant Methodist Church from Bishop Alfred Lee, et al., 
on Feb. 13, 1871. They used this church until 1892 when the present church 
was built. There is a graveyard to the rear of the church. 


: St. James’ P. E. Church at Newport. On Feb. 7, 1767, Wm. Armstrong 
‘deeded to a board of trustees 78.9 perches of land to be used as a church site. 
The consideration was five shillings. Tradition says that funds to erect a church 
were raised by a lottery. It was 1769 before the rafters were in place. On Dec. 
17, 1770, Thomas Barton, a Church of England missionary, reported that the 
church, built of brick, was nearing completion. The unfinished building was 
used during the Revolution to stable a troop of British cavalry. 

The church was used intermittently to hold services. When the Newport 
church would be closed the members attended St. James’ Church at Stanton. 





MEM GAS T LE COUNTY 139 


The church was incorporated on June 14, 1787. From 1800 to 1802 services 
were conducted by the Rev. Wm. Pryce of Old Swedes Church in Wilming- 
ton. On Feb. 14, 1804, John Armstrong transferred to the board of trustees, 
21% acres of land fronting on the Wilmington Road. He charged them $86.00 
for 134 acres and gave them 1/ of an acre. The deed was recorded on Apr. 
13, 1807. 

Services were abandoned sometime before 1810. The Church was burned 
about 1810 and part of its walls remained standing for a time. The bricks were 
then salvaged and used in building a barn on the John R. Lambson farm. This 
barn has since been torn down. The church stood on the n. e. cor. of the church 
property, known as “old church hill.” It faced the road which at that time was 
on a line with Market St. The outline of the foundations can still be 
distinguished. - 

On Aug. 3, 1851, Bishop Lee conducted services at Newport and reported 
that the congregation was making progress. The meeting-place was furnished 
by a private individual. 

On Nov. 3, 1855, Bishop Alfred Lee, et al., purchased, at a Sheriff's sale, 
the Nazareth Protestant Methodist Church, on the Newport and Lancaster 
Pike just north of the village of Newport. This was a brick and stone building 
on a site measuring 85 sq. perches. Regular services were again established in 
Newport on Dec. 2, 1855. In the meantime the church was reconditioned and 
the opening service was held on May 17, 1857. The church was readmitted into 
diocesan relations on June 2, 1857. In 1860, a stone font was presented by 
Grace Church of Philadelphia. Services were discontinued sometime previous 
to 1870. On Feb. 13, 1871, Bishop Alfred Lee, et al., sold the property to 
the African Union First Colored M. P. Church. 

On Jan. 23, 1875, a service was conducted in the schoolhouse under the 
leadership of William Jenks Fell, a lay-reader, and an active Episcopalian. 
_ This service was so well attended that at a meeting held on Apr. 20, 1875, it 
was decided to build the present church. The corner-stone was laid on June 
17, 1875, by Bishop Alfred Lee. On the following Saturday the corner-stone 
was torn out and the contents strewn about. The thieves were disappointed, 
as no money had been placed in the stone. 


The first service in the new church was held on Sun., Oct. 3, 1875, by 
William Jenks Fell. The formal opening, on Nov. 11, 1875, was conducted by 
the Rev. C. N. Calloway, of Grace Church near Talleyville. At this service a 
chancel window and three chandeliers were blessed to the memory of Franklin 
Fell. The church was consecrated on Wed., Sept. 5, 1877, by Bishop Alfred 
Lee. He was assisted by the Rev. Drs. Clemson and Frost and the Rev. Messrs. 
Spencer, Stone, Betticher, Latrobe and W. D. Hanson, the rector. 


In 1889, Newport and Stanton parishes joined in purchasing a rectory in 
Newport. In 1889-90, hangings for the chancel were ds page by St. Paul's 
Church in Brooklyn, N. Y. The sacristy was enlarged in 1891. The church 
was redecorated as a memorial to Bishop Leighton Coleman, after which a 
service for a restored church was conducted by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman 
on May 8, 1910. On May 6, 1917, Bishop Kinsman consecrated new altar 
furnishings. The old schoolhouse, adjoining the church property was purchased 
on Nov. 25, 1940 and converted into a parish-house. 

A processional cross, a memorial to Mrs. Mary Davidson Crawford, was 
blessed on July 1, 1945, by Bishop A. R. McKinstry. 

In April, 1946, Architect Wm. Heyl Thompson was commissioned to pre- 
pare plans for a new church of masonry construction. The plans call for the 
church to face Augustine St., and to be connected with the brick parish-house 





140 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 
Sicha AI ah cet sis SP scence Sea 


by a cloister. A campaign to raise the necessary funds starting on Ash Wed., 
Feb. 19, 1947 was announced by the rector, the Rev. Alex. W. Boyer and Wm. 
Milne, chairman of the building fund committee. 

There is a large well-kept cemetery beside the church. The oldest legible 
tombstone is that of Harry Frist, who died in 1821. 


St. James’ P. E. Church at Stanton. The first services on the site of this 
church were held on July 4, 1677, by the Rev. Mr. Roe. In 1708, Missionary 
Thomas Jenkins reported that he would meet the parishioners here to preach 
and to catechise the children. In 1716, it was decided to build a church as a 
chapel-of-ease for Immanuel Church at New Castle. The members of St. James 
seriously objected to the term ‘‘Chapel-of-ease’” and maintained that they 
warranted being a parish separate from New Castle. The frame of the church 
was raised on Dec. 4, 1716. The opening service was held on July 4, 1717. 
Andreas Hesselius, his brother Samuel and Peter Tranberg, rectors at Old 
Swedes Church served St. James’ Church when there was no regular rector, for 
which they were paid a small fee by the Church of England. 


Ten acres of land were deeded, in 1720, to the Society for the Propaga- 
tion of the Gospel in Foreign Parts, for the use of St. James Church by James 
Robinson. The preamble of the deed is addressed “To All Christians” and 
recites that this plot is a portion of the land granted by William Penn to 
Aaron Johnson Vandonburg on the 12th day of the 5th month, called July, 
1685. “In consideration of the dutiful affection, love and good will which I 
have and do bear unto the Church of England and members of the said church 
as at present by law established, of which I profess myself a member to further 
* * * of the said church and schoolhouse wherein youths may be educated ac- 
cording to the rules and principles of the said church * * * commonly known 
and distinguished by the name of St. James’ at White Clay Creek * * *.” 

This deed was acknowledged at the Court in New Castle, in 1720, and 
it was recorded on Apr. 5, 1727. ; 

. The Rev. George Ross, missionary, reported on Nov. 7, 1732, after the 
death of Mr. Robinson, ‘that the congregation was now without a head and 
heart since his death, a true and zealous son-of the church.” " 

The church was repaired in 1729. This church was burned in 1820, and 
the present stone church was built immediately. It was consecrated on Aug. 14, 


1823, by the Rev. William White, Bishop of the P. E. Church in Pennsylvania. 


The church wardens were Joseph Barker and John Foot. On Jan. 31, 1824, an 
Act was passed by the Legislature authorizing that a lottery could be held to 
raise $1200.00 to pay off the indebtedness of the church. | 

On May 10, 1827, the trustees leased to John Foot, for a term of 9,999 
years, seven acres of their land for $350.00. It is evident that drastic measures 
had to be taken to clear the church of debt. At least a portion of this land has 
been bought back by the church. 

A melodeon was purchased in 1857. In 1859, additional land for the 
temetery was purchased. A wall was built around this land and horse-sheds 
were built. In 1890-91, a new altar was built. In 1896-97, a new organ was 
purchased and the horse-sheds were rebuilt. 

After major repairs and renovations, a reopening service was held on 
June 3, 1894, with Bishop Leighton Coleman, presiding. He was assisted by 
the Rev. E. K. Miller, the rector. The chancel had been rebuilt and new furni- 
ture installed. A stained glass window had been presented by Mr. and Mrs. J. 
Poulson Armstrong and candlesticks had been donated by Mr. and Mrs. Rich- 
ard Pilling. The tower and belfry were in course of erection. The bell was duly 





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142 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


installed. During 1904-05, a mission Sunday School was conducted in Chris- 
tiana Village and, in 1911, a Sunday School was opened in the town of Stanton. 

On Easter Sunday, Mar. 22, 1913, Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman blessed 
a new chalice and paten. During that year it was decided to furnish the rector 
with an automobile. 

During the summer of 1942, the church was renovated, the original pews, 
still in use, were painted white with mahogany trim, the walls were painted 
ivory with white trim, Venetian blinds were installed, the belfry was rebuilt 
and the exterior woodwork was painted white. 

Reopening services were held on Sun., Oct. 4, 1942, with representatives 
from Immanuel Church of New Castle, the mother of St. James’, present by 
invitation. The service was in charge of the Rev. E. Kenneth Albaugh, the 
rector. i 

There is a large cemetery. The oldest inscription is on the tomb of John 
Armstrong who died on Nov. 23, 1726. There is a slate tombstone, very thin, 
that is dated 1743. 

Across the road from the church there is a tract of land that was donated 
as a site for a schoolhouse. The deed stipulated that if the time arrived when 
it was not used for school purposes the land should revert to St. James’ Church. 
A small stone schoolhouse was built in 1807. The school was closed in 1863 
and the property reverted to St. James’ Church. The school was converted into 
a home for the sexton. In 1916, the school was torn down and the stone was 
used to build a house. It was occupied by the sexton and a Sunday School room 
until 1928, after which it was converted into a Sunday School building. An 
addition was built in 1934, to be used as a parish-house. The rectory was 
built in 1921. 


Stanton Methodist Church (M.E.) was the outgrowth of meetings begun 
in 1868. From 1868 untiki877 services were held in a loft over the tavern of 
B. F. Dickey on Main St., by the Methodists of Newport. The corner-stone of 
a frame church was laid on June 12, 1877, with Bishop Levi Scott in charge. 
It was dedicated on Nov. 1, 1877, by the Rev. R. L. Dashiell, D.D. The church 
was rebuilt in 1924. Additional land was purchased on May 10, 1939. 

On Sun., Oct. 27, 1946, the pastor, the Rev. Ellwood W. Cursey dedi- 
cated a new electric organ and memorial gifts as follows: a communion table 
in memory of Mrs. Emily R. Cochran; a lectern in memory of Mr. and Mrs. 
Harry L. Simmons, brass candlesticks for the altar and an American flag and 
a Christian flag in memory of the young men of the church who served in 
World War II, some of whom gave their lives. 


Union Presbyterian Chapel, at Stanton, was erected and dedicated, in 
1875, through the efforts of the Rev. Robert Graham. The dedication services 
were conducted by the Rev. Dr. L. Marks. The chapel was incorporated on waned 

sAug. 10, 1877. It reached the height of its prosperity about two years later { 

and, by 1885, it was just struggling along. It was later closed for a time. 

Then, an evangelist endeavored to arouse a new interest and while he was 

successful to a certain extent, it developed that he was not entirely above sus- 

picion, with the result that the church was closed permanently. The building | | 

was purchased by the Stanton Lodge of Odd Fellows who added a second | 
| 
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story and still use it as lodge-room. 


Stanton Friend’s Meeting. In June, 1687, some of the settlers around 
White Clay Creek petitioned the New Castle Monthly Meeting for permission 





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‘his daughter-in-law, who died in 1766, aged 65 years. 


144 Pee CHOU SR CunG ESS Oe Lane od eR eds 


to hold a weekly meeting at ‘“Whitely Creek.” This was granted and a Meeting 
was set up. It was laid down on Feb. 7, 1688, the members transferring to 
the New Castle Meeting. 

In 1772, Meetings for worship were held in Marshall’s Mill, Stanton, in 
conjunction with Christiana Meeting. In 1779 a former schoolhouse was se- 
cured for the meetings. On June 13, 1779, a site for a burying-ground and 
upon which to build a meeting-house was leased from Thomas Stapler by 
Robert Johnson, Robert Philips, Joseph Chambers, Wm. Wollaston and Wm. 
Byrnes, trustees. The yearly rental of pepper corn was to be paid on June 13, 
each year, forever, if demanded. The trustees were also required to keep the 
fences in repair. 

White Clay Creek Meeting was established in 1781, by consent of the 
Chester Quarterly Meeting. In 1784, they were permitted to hold Preparative 
Meetings. In 1803, a meeting-house was built and the name was changed to 
“Stanton Meeting” at the request of the members. The brick meeting-house 
was built in 1873. In 1891, the Preparative Meeting and the mid-week Meeting 
were laid down. In 1894, the time of meeting was changed to 10:30 a. m. The 
Meeting was laid down in 1921. Since that time the building has been used 
for community meetings including the Grange meetings. The burying-ground 
is still in use. There are two tiny headstones close to the meeting-house dated 
1823 and 1827. The oldest inscribed tombstone is that of Susanna Jones, who 
died in 1835. 


White Clay Presbyterian Church is located on the Capitol Trail, two and 
one-quarter miles n. e. of Newark. Meetings were held in this neighborhood 
beginning in 1712. A congregation was organized, in 1722, by the Rev. George 
Gillespie and a log meeting-house was built. The Rev. Thomas Creaghead was 
installed as the first pastor on Sept. 22, 1724. The site, of this church was 


about one mile to the north, at Polly Drummond's Hill. 


Mr. Creaghead owned the farm upon which the church was built and on 
Apr. 10, 1727, he deeded the church site to a board of trustees. The consid- 


eration was one pepper corn yearly, if demanded. A few tombstones can be. 


seen marking the site. There are two undated headstones over the graves of 
the sons of John Crossan. A flat slab over a vault is inscribed. to the memory 


-of Margaret, the wife of the Rev. Thomas Creaghead, who died in 1738, aged 


74 years, Thomas, his son, who died in 1735, aged 33 years and Margaret, 

. The deed for the present site was given by Joseph England to a board 
of trustees on May 25, 1752. A church was built and stood for 103 years. 
The stone wall around the church was built in 1785. The church was incor- 
porated on Sept. 11, 1787. The present church was built, of brick, in 1855. 
It was dedicated on May 1, 1856, by the Rev. H. S. Clarke. There is a large 
graveyard enclosed with an iron fence in front of the church. The oldest 
legible inscription that the writer could find is on the tomb of Wm. Mc- 
Mechen, who died in October, 1738. Mr. McMechen was a member of the first 
board of trustees. 


Red Clay Presbyterian Church is located one and one-half miles n. w. of 
the Cedars. Services were held in the neighborhood as early as 1713. In 1722, 
a group was constituted as a church. The first minister, the Rev. Wm. Mc- 
Kennan served this church from 1755 to 1809. A stone tablet on the outside 
church wall states that it was founded in 1761 and rebuilt in 1853. The lec- 
ture-room in the basement was dedicated on Nov. 15, 1853 and the church was 





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146 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


dedicated on May 11, 1854, by the Revs. Robert P. DuBois, James Lutta and 
Thomas Lane, the pastor. Into the gable of the loft above the church audi- 
torium is built a piece of trap-rock with the figures 1761" rudely carved upon 
it, which was taken from the old building. 

The church property comprised two and one-quarter acres yet the exact 
boundary lines were very uncertain. To correct this, the church trustees en- 
tered into an agreement, on May 15, 1858, with James Clarnen, defining the 
future lines of the property. On Mar. 7, 1865, two additional acres were pur- 
chased from Samuel Yearsley. 

The pastor, the Rev. John D. Blake, died on May 15, 1942, having com- 
pleted 55 years service at this church. He came to Red Clay as a supply in 
May and was installed as pastor on Nov. 17, 1887. There is a large enclosed 
graveyard. There are literally dozens of tombstones dated in the 1700's. The 
oldest legible tombstone the writer could find is that of Elizabeth Wiley, who 
died on Sept. 6, 1766. The church surroundings are well landscaped and in- 
clude a paved parking space. 


Ebenezer Methodist Church (M.E.) is located one and three-quarter 
miles s. e. of Corner Ketch. In the 1820's, the Methodists in that section met 
in private homes. In 1824, a stone church was built. In 1859, the old stone 


church was replaced with a frame building. It was repaired extensively in © 


1883. The Ladies’ Mite Society was organized in 1885. The parsonage was 
built in 1898. The church was remodeled and on July 6, 1924, reopening 
exercises were held under the direction of the Rev. Gilbert P. Gehman. At the 
same time the 100th Anniversary was celebrated. In 1939,.an annex was built 
including a social-hall and kitchen. 

An open-air prepuce was presented to the church by Samuel Little, one 


of the church stewards, and it was erected on the rear lawn of the parsonage. » 


It was dedicated at a special outdoor service by the Methodist Youth Fellow- 
ship on Sun. evening, Aug. 30, 1942. A new Wick’s pipe-organ with chimes 
was dedicated on Sun., Sept. 22, 1946, by the Rev. A. Du ley Ward, the pastor, 
assisted by the Rev. Roy L. Tawes. A recital was given by Wilmer C. Highfield. 

“Viewed NELCLES a.graveyard to the rear of the church. The oldest tombstone is 
| that of John Guthrie who died on July 31, 1849. 


“Mill Creek Friend’s Meeting-House is located one mile north of Corner 


| Ketch. In 1838, James Thompson and thirty-two Friends requested New Gar- 


den Meeting for the indulgence of a Meeting in Mill Cree Hundred. At a 
meeting held at his home on Oct. 16, 1838, the request was granted. Mr. 
Thompson's home is still standing and is located adjoining the meeting-house 
property on the north. The privilege of building a meeting-house was also 
granted. The present stone meeting-house was then built. 

It was completed and had been in use by Feb. 19, 1841. On that date, 
James Thompson, for a consideration of $1.00 deeded the meeting-house site, 
consisting of one and one-half acres of land, to David Eastburn, John Thomp- 
son, Jr., Thomas Mitchel, Samuel Loyd, Lewis Fell and Marshall Yeatman, 
members of the Mill Creek Meeting who acted as trustees. In the deed Mr. 
Thompson reserved the timber which he could cut at his convenience. The 
meeting-house faces south as is customary with Friend’s Meeting-Houses and 
there is a date-stone in the western gable but it is undated. There is the usual 
“horse block” known also as an “upping block” and an “up and on block.” 

In 1901, the mid-week Meetings, with the exception of the Preparative 
Meetings, were discontinued. The time of holding the Preparative Meetings 





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MILL CREEK FRIENDS’ MEETING-HOUSE 
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148 fo EC HIULR CR Ee Oley EL AW a kok 


was changed in 1903. In 1914, the Meetings were suspended during the winter. 
In 1915, all Meetings were discontinued except on the first first-day of each 
month. In 1925, the Preparative Meetings were discontinued. Since 1930, only 
occasional Meetings are held. An annual Meeting is held on the first-day be- 
fore Labor Day. 

In common with most Friend’s Meetings, there is a fund for maintenance 
of the property, provided chiefly by bequests from members. The meeting- 
house and burial-ground are kept in immaculate condition. The old horse- 
sheds were removed in 1937. The oldest tombstone is that of an infant, George 
F. Tyson, who died on July 24, 1844. Several fighting Quakers are buried here 
and their graves are decorated with the insignia of the Grand Army of the 
Republic. 

A plot in the burial-ground is set aside for the burial of indigent persons 
who are not Friends. At midnight on each Feb. 28, the neighbors claim they 
hear a shotgun discharged near stranger’s row. William Lozone, Dutch Billy, 
was a hard-working man-of-all-work in that section, especially noted for his 
ability as a butcher. He lived alone, with his hunting dogs, in a small shack 
in the woods on the Lamborn farm. He was famous as a hunter and could be 
heard at all hours of the night firing his shotgun. In 1921, Dutch Billy, be- 
coming despondent, gradually gave away his dogs and on the night of Feb. 28, 
set fire to his shack, went deep into the woods and with his shotgun com- 
mitted suicide. He would have been buried in Potter’s Field except for the fact 
that the good neighbors of that section, led by J. Leslie Eastburn, took up a 
_ “camptown.” This was sufficient to give him a good burial in the stranger's 
row in the meeting-house burial-ground and to place a stone marker over his 
grave. The question arose as to the disposal of his gun, his only earthly pos- 
session, and it was decided to bury it with him. This was done with the gun © 
resting in his arms. It is this gun that the neighbors believe they hear fired at _ 
midnight each year on the anniversary of his death. 3 


_ The Orthodox Friend’s Meeting-House at Hockessin was located on 
Meeting-House Road, one-eighth of a mile south of the Yorklyn-Hockessin 
Road. After the split in the Society of Friends in 1827, the Hicksites continued 
to meet in the Hockessin Meeting House on the mornings of the first and 
fifth days. The Orthodox members met at the same place on first-day after- 
noons and fourth-day mornings. Although occupying the same house seems an 
unusual arrangement there were a number of similar instances. At Nantmeal, 
N. J., the two groups met at the same time with the dividing partitions left 
open most of the time. At Rancocas, N. J., each group used one-half of the 
house with the Meetings being held at the same time. At Woodbury, N. J., 
there existed a more obstinate feeling between the two groups, for the Ortho- 
dox members built a doubling of the dividing partition so as to avoid hearing 
the preaching on the Hicksite side. 


The arrangement at Hockessin continued until May 22, 1835 at which 
‘time it was reported that Aquilla Lamborn had erected, on his land, a meet- 
ing-house of frame-log construction to be used by the Orthodox Friends be- 
ginning on June 1, 1835. This meeting-house was used until early in 1855. 
Then the Meetings were held at the home of Isaac Pyle, presumably because 
of his illness and the smallness of the congregation. Mr. Pyle died on Aug. 
11, 1855 and on May 25, 1856 it was reported that Hockessin Orthodox 
Meeting had been dissolved, the few remaining members becoming attached 
to Kennett Meeting. The old meeting-house is still standing and has been 
converted into a dwelling. 





etek de, (oO UE IN. bey 149 


Hockessin Friend’s Meeting took its name from the name of an Indian 
town closeby. In 1730, sixth-day Meetings were held in the home of Wm. 
Cox, now the home of John C. Mitchell, by permission of the New Wark 
Preparative Meeting, which was granted on Apr. 6, 1730. Permission to build 
a meeting-house was granted on Feb. 30, 1737. 

On Oct. 17, 1737, land upon which to build a meeting-house and to estab- 
lish a burying-ground, was deeded to a board of trustees. In 1738, a meeting- 
house, part of which is included in the present meeting-house was erected. It 
was enlarged in 1745. Additions to the meeting-house were made in 1941. 
There is a large burying-ground on the opposite side of the road. The earliest 
legible tombstone is dated 1837. 


Hockessin Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1881, a Methodist meeting was 
held in the wheel-wright shop at Brackenville. A Sunday School called 
“Friendship” was organized. In the fall of that year a room in the Odd Fel- 
low’s Hall at Hockessin was secured for the meetings. On July 21, 1882, trus- 
tees were elected and on Aug. 28, 1882, one-half acre of land was purchased 
from Taylor S. Mitchell as a church site. The erection of the church had been 
started on Aug. 21, 1882. The corner-stone was laid on Nov. 5, 1882, by the 
Rev. J. E. Bryan. The dedication ceremonies were held on Feb. 18, 1883. 
There were three services which were conducted by the Revs. Theodore 
Stevens, Madison A. Richards, D.D., and Adam Wallace, D.D. The parsonage 
was built in 1891. The church was improved in 1916. 


The Kenneth Douglass Jones Memorial Chapel at Sunny Hills School 
near Hockessin. This chapel was built in honor of Mr. Jones of Auckland, 
New Zealand, a former member of the staff at Sanford Preparatory School, 
who was killed in action in North Africa in January, 1943. The corner-stone 
was laid on May 3, 1943. The chapel had been designed by Mr. Jones previous 
to his entry in the service of the British Army in 1939. It was opened for the 
use of the students on Sept. 24, 1945. The bronze bell, cast in Croydon, Eng- 
land was presented to Mrs. Ellen Q. Sawin, the headmistress by hex son-in-law 
Kenneth H. Matthewson. The chapel is essentially a place for prayer and 
meditation by the students of the school. 


Chippy A. U. M. P. Church at Hockessin. On Sept. 24, 1886, the A. U. 1st 
col. M. P. Church purchased a lot at Grant St. and Mill Creek Ave., from 
D. H. Kent. A frame church was then built and used until 1896 when the 
present church was built. Title to the property passed to the Chippy A. U. M. P. 
Church on Mar. 27, 1897. On Dec. 8, 1925, they purchased a dwelling on Mill 
Creek Ave., from H. V. McVaugh. 


St. John’s R. C. Church at Hockessin was founded in 1882. The corner- 
stone of the church was laid on Sun., Sept. 17, 1882, by Bishop Thomas A. 
Becker. assisted by the Rev. Patrick Donaghy, the pastor of St. Patrick’s Church 
at Ashland. A special train was run from Wilmington for the event. Bishop 
Becker was driven there in a private carriage. The church was incorporated on 
Jan. 7, 1894. 

On June 1, 1925, the Rev. James M. Grant took charge of St. John’s 
Church. He arranged for the purchase of the Dr. Taylor S. Mitchell estate on 
the Lancaster Pike in Hockessin. The title to the property, consisting of 22 
acres, was transferred to the church on Mar. 3, 1927. The house was used as 
a rectory. Father Grant then opened a parochial school and convent in the 











150 THE CHURCHES 10% DELAWARE 


former rectory beside the church. A school-bus was used to transport the 
pupils. In 1934, the number of pupils having greatly diminished the school 
was closed. The first rectory was again used by Father Grant and the Dr. 
Mitchell property was sold on Sept. 30, 1937. 


St. Luke’s M. E. Church, colored, at Hockessin. The church site, located 
between Quarry St. and Railroad St., was purchased from Henry S. Kent on 
Nov. 9, 1899 and a small frame church was built. The church became defunct 
and the property was sold to M. M. and Hickman Wirt on Jan. 5, 1915. For 
a time the building was used as a warehouse and is now used as a dwelling 
on the original site. 


Pleasant Grove Church, colored, was located on the Newport and Gap 
Road between Swamp Road and Hockessin Road. On June 7, 1856, it was 
sold by John Tilghman to the First United African Wesley Society. 


Christiana Methodist Church (M.E.) was organized in 1827, when a 
frame church was built. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 17, 1827, and 
“they raised the building” on Sept. 25, 1827. The church site was transferred 
to the church by Abraham Egbert, for $20.00, on Dec. 24, 1827. It was 
located on the easterly side of the Christiana-Wilmington Pike, adjoined the 
land of Mary McMechen, had a frontage of 54 ft. 6 in. and comprised 2362 
sq. ft. of land. This is the present site of the colored school. 


This church was used until 1857. On July 9, 1857, the trustees, who had 
been elected on June 27, 1854, purchased from Abraham Cannon, for $312.00 
the present church site comprising one and one-quarter acres. It was described 
as being on the main road to Newark and contiguous to the village of 
Christiana. 


The erection of the present brick church was then started. The corner- 
stone was laid on Sept. 10, 1857, and it was dedicated on Jan. 28, 1858, by 
Bishop Levi Scott. It was renovated and reopened on June 26, 1892. The 
services were conducted by the Revs. J. D. C. Hanna, T. E. Terry and I. L. 
Wood. It was remodeled in 1929. A new pipe-organ was installed in Septem- 
ber, 1942. It was dedicated in March, 1943, by the pastor. | 


The Church of the Mediator, P. E., at Christiana Village. This church was 
organized, in 1865, at meetings held in the home of J. R. C. Oldham, by the 
Rev. J. P. DuHamel of Delaware City. A lot was purchased as a church site. 
In 1866, the meetings were transferred to the Good Templar’s Hall. Bishop 
Alfred Lee paid his first visit to the church on July 14, 1867, at which time he 
confirmed five members. No church was ever built. 


. Christiana Friend’s Meeting. A Friend’s Meeting was formed, in 1772, at 
Christiana Bridge. Permission to meet on the first and fourth days of each 
week was granted by the Wilmington Monthly Meeting. This action was later 
approved by the Chester Quarterly Meeting. The meetings alternated between 
Christiana Bridge and Stanton. The Christiana Bridge meetings were held at 
the home of Hannah Lewden, which is still standing on the easterly side of 
Christina Creek a short distance from the bridge. The Stanton meetings were 
held at Marshall’s Mill. These meetings continued until 1781, when the White 
Clay Creek Meeting at Stanton was established by permission of the Chester 
Quarterly Meeting. 





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152 THE CHURCHESVOR IDELAWARE 


Christiana Presbyterian Church. On May 18, 1708, at a meeting of the 
Philadelphia Presbytery, a letter was received from the residents of the White 
Clay Creek section asking that the gospel be administered nearer their place 
of dbode. Letters from the New Castle congregation were read objecting “to 
disrupting this congregation.” The Presbytery ordered that there should be 
no division but that the Rev. Mr. Wilson should preach in New Castle on one 
Sunday and in the country on the following Sunday. 

Tradition and circumstantial evidence set the period 1730-38 as the time 
when this church was founded. A plot made on July 28, 1738 showed the 
church as standing at that time. It was of frame construction and measured 
26 ft. by 36 ft. Ata later date 20 ft. were added to the western end of the 
building. 3 

At the time of-the schism in the Presbyterian Church, in 1741, the Chris- 
tiana Church attached itself to the ‘‘new side.” This breach was healed in 1758. 
In the meantime, the “new side” records during that period have been lost. 

The church site, of 80 sq. perches, was donated by Rees Jones on Aug. 
19, 1752, in the 26th year of the reign of King George, II, of England. 

On June 11, 1800, the sexton’s pay was set at $4.00 per year and the prices 
on digging graves were set at 75 cts, $1.00 and $1.50. The church was incor- 
porated on Mar. 13, 1800. In 1802, the front stone wall and a new church 
roof were built. 3 

On Oct. 14, 1837, one of the church members was reported to the Session 
as having been seen intoxicated. A committee was appointed to call on him; 
which they did and he was very repentent and promised not to drink liquor 
in the future. At a later date, he was reported to have fallen a victim again 
and he was expelled from the church. When the Moderator checked the 
Session minutes he disapproved the action of expulsion without written 
charges and a trial. The former action was rescinded and he was again re- 
ceived into the church. It is to be hoped that his reformation was complete as 
no further mention of him appears in the minutes. . 

On Nov. 28, 1856, the project of building a new church was discussed. 


A building committee was appointed on Dec. 28, 1856. The old frame church | 


was sold at public auction on Sat., July 4, 1857. 

The corner-stone of a new church was laid on Sept. 8, 1857. Those taking 
part included the Revs. Dr. D. H. Emerson, George Foot, Wm. Aikman, Geo. 
F. Wiswell and Mr. Gaylord. 

The dedication services were held on June 8, 1858. The sermon was 
delivered by the Rev. J. Jinkins and the dedicatory prayer was offered by the 
Rev. Geo. Foot. This was followed by a series of meetings during the. next 
two weeks. 

The church seal was adopted on June 21, 1860. The first communion 
service, of pewter, is still used on special occasions. 

After extensive renovations, a reopening service was held on Sept. 4, 1921, 
by the Rev. David A. Reed. Colonel John Read, father of George Read, the 
Signer, who died on June 15, 1756, and his wife are both buried in the ad- 
joining graveyard. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find is that of 
Ruth Adams, who died on Dec. 6, 1754. 


There are two colored churches at Christiana. R. Trinity A. M. E. Church 
was founded in 1884, and Union A. M. E. Church was incorporated on May 6, 
1854. The present church was built in 1897. 


Salem Methodist Church (M.E.) is located three miles s. e. of Christiana. 
Meetings were held as early as 1771 in the home of Isaac Hersey. Trustees were 








ee . = ame a ee 


IER ort Ci SoTL EB. C.OLUL NUT Y” 153 


elected on May 12, 1807. The first meeting of the board of trustees was held 
on Oct. 10, 1807. On Oct. 15, 1807, Robert McFarlin, at a cost of $20.00, 
deeded a plot of land to the trustees of Salem Methodist Meeting-House upon 
which the first church was built. The church wag incorporated on Oct. 16, 1807. 
It was dedicated in 1809. The building was repaired in 1848 and 1883. In 
1904 the church was rebuilt. 

There is a well-kept graveyard beside the church. The oldest legible tomb- 
stone is that of Jane Hersey who died on Dec. 18, 1804. There is at least one 
oaken grave marker. 


St. Thomas’ P. E. Church at Newark was organized on Aug. 1, 1842. 
The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Aug. 24, 1843, and it was 
dedicated on Feb. 25, 1845, by Bishop Alfred Lee, at 11:00 a. m. He was as- 
sisted by the Revs. W. E. Franklin, J. W. McCullough and five other clergy- 
men. A rectory was purchased in 1852-53. The tower was erected in 1866. 

A window in memory of Thomas and Frances P. S. Blandy was unveiled 
on Mar. 30, 1890. During that year a parish-house was built. The rectory was 
blessed with a service of benediction by Bishop Leighton Coleman on Dec. 23, 
1895. In 1901-02, the chancel was improved and a brass altar desk was installed 
as memorials. 3 

In 1911, extensive alterations were made to the church including a center 
aisle, removal of part of the gallery and new windows. A special service for a 
restored church was conducted by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman on Easter Sun- 
day, Apr. 16, 1911. A window in memory of Frederic A. Curtis was also dedi- 
cated. In 1916-17 a new organ was purchased. 

On Christmas Eve, 1943, memorials were dedicated in honor of Dr. 
George A. Harter, former President of the University of Delaware, as well as 
Junior Warden of St. Thomas’ Church for 24 years and in honor of the 
members of the parish in the armed services. 


The Church of St. John, the Baptist (R.C.) at Newark. The first Roman 
Catholic service was held in Newark by Father Sarentine in 1850. Liter, both 
Newark and Elkton were served from Havre de Grace. In 1866, the Rev. Wm. 
Blake, pastor of the church at Elkton, was assigned as pastor of the mission at 
Newark, celebrating Mass once a month in the homes of parishioners. He 
would make the trip to Newark, on Sunday morning, on a P. R. R. Co., hand- 
car which was furnished by the Company. On other Sundays some of the par- 
ishioners would walk to Elkton to attend services. Later, they too, were given 
the use of a hand-car to make the trip. 

On July 31, 1868, Charles A. Murphey purchased, from the trustees of the 
First Presbyterian Church, the old Village Presbyterian Church and site, at the 
corner of Main and Chapel Sts. The church was of frame construction and the 
site comprised about one-half of an acre of land. The purchase price was 
$2230.00. : 

Mr. Murphey donated the property to the Diocese to be used as a Cath- 
olic Church. It was neatly furnished and was dedicated by the Most Rev. 
Bishop O’Hara of Scranton, Pa. The name “St. Patrick” was chosen for the 
church. Mr. Murphey transferred the title to the property on May 12, 1870, 
for the nominal sum of $1.00. 

In 1876, the frame rectory on Chapel St., adjoining the church was built 
by the Rev. Wm. Dollard, who served the parish from 1876 to 1879. The Rev. 
Peter Donaghy then served for a few months. From 1880 to 1886, the parish 
was served by the Rev. John A. Lyons, afterwards Monsignor and Vicar-Gen- 


en ae OMe ee 








1 154 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


eral of the Diocese. On Christmas morning, 1880, the floor of the old church 
gave way. Fortunately, no one was injured and the accident resulted in the 
building of the present brick church. Services were held in the Grange Hall 
while this work was in progress. Father Lyons is given full credit for furnishing 
this church to the Newark Parish. On June 24, 1883, the corner-stone of the 
Church of St. John, the Baptist, was laid, with St. John the Baptist as the pa- 
tron saint of the new church, instead of St. Patrick. The ceremony took place 
on Sun. afternoon at 3:15 o'clock. The foundation had been floored over and 
the church altar erected temporarily. A large tent cover had been erected in 
the event of rain. The stone was blessed and laid by Bishop Thomas A. Becker, 
assisted by the Rev. John A. Lyons. 

The new bell, one of the largest in Delaware, was blessed by the Rev. 
J. A. Lyons, assisted by Father Kelley, on Oct. 16, 1883. The church was dedi- 
cated on Dec. 16, 1883, by Bishop Keane of Richmond, Va. He was attended 
by the Revs. M. X. Fallon, Wm. Dollard, P. Donaghy, B. J. Keiley, T. Corbin- 
ian and John A. Lyons, the pastor. 

The church was consecrated on June 28, 1885, by Bishop Thomas A. 
Becker. He was assisted by the Rev. Fathers Kelley, Flynn, Fallon, Brady, 
Bermingham and Lyons. A special train brought a large delegation from 
the Catholic Societies of Wilmington, also St. Peter’s choir and Mayor-elect 
Rhoades. Justin J. Pie placed his estate “Deer Park” now the Red Men’s Fra- 
ternal Home, at the disposal of the visitors. 

On June. 11, 1887, Justin J. Pie transferred to St. John’s Church, for the 
nominal sum of $1.00, one acre, 34 sq. perches of land on Elkton Road at 
West Park Place, and the present cemetery was established there. 

On May 12, 1898, the church was struck by lightning with only slight 
damage. | 

The S. J. Wright property was purchased on Nov. 8, 1945. It is the pro- 
posed site for a new parochial school. 

During 1946, the interior of the church was beautified under the direction 
of the pastor, the Rev. Eugene J. Kraemer. This included twelve art glass 
memorial windows, a large rose window over the entrance and all new fur- 
nishings except the pews. | 


Newark Methodist Church (M.E.) The first Methodist meetings in New- 
ark were held in private homes and in the Academy. A church was formally 
organized on Apr. 8, 1813. On that same day the trustees purchased one-half 
of an acre of land from Isaac Tyson upon which a church building was under 
construction. It was located on Chapel St., in the present Methodist Cemetery. 
The oldest tombstone is that of Webster Tyson, who died on Apr. 4, 1812. In 
the meantime the Cemetery has been enlarged several times. Chapel St. took — 
its name from the old Methodist chapel. 

_ On July 12, 1851, a plot of 67 sq. perches of land was purchased on the 
south side of Main St., from David W. Black. The corner-stone of a new church 
on Main St. was laid on Tues., July 25, 1851. A procession was held. Among 
those taking part in the ceremonies were Pres. Elder James Smith, the Rev. 
F. Hodgson, D.D., President Graham of Delaware College and the Rev. S. 
Townsend, the pastor. 

The church was dedicated on Mar. 21, 1852, by Bishop Waugh. The church 
was burned on July 16, 1861 and services were then held in the Village Pres- 
byterian Church. A new church building was started in 1862 and it was com- 
pleted in 1864. Dedication services were held on Jan. 8, 1865, by the Rev. 
Pennell Combs. The church was improved in 1904. 





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NEWARK METHODIST CHURCH 
(Page 154) 


ST. JOHN’s R. 








156 THE CHURCHES |O BAD BLAIARE 


The ground was broken for an educational building on Easter Sunday, 
1932. The corner-stone was laid in June. The building was dedicated on Oct. 
16, 1932, by Bishop Edwin H. Hughes, assisted by the Rev. W. E. Gunby. The 
evening service was conducted by Dist. Supt. D. W. Jacobs. Special services 
were conducted for a full week. The building contains Sunday School rooms, 
parlors for various meetings, a dining-hall and a kitchen. 


The Village Presbyterian Church and the First Presbyterian Church at 
Newark. The Village Presbyterian Church, New School, was organized in 1835. 

The schism in the Presbyterian Church which resulted in the establish- 
ment of ‘Old Side’’ and ‘New Side’ groups was officially recognized in 1838 
at which time the Rev. W. S. Plumer was made Moderator of the ‘Old Side”’ 
group. They were also known as “Old School’ and “New School.” The breach 
was officially healed in 1870. 

The meetings, at Newark, were held in the schoolhouse. Some years pre- 
vious to the death of Dr. Jos. Chamberlain on Mar. 7, 1849, the congregation 
arranged to purchase from him, for $400.00, the corner lot at what is now 
Main and Chapel Sts. This deed was executed by his heirs on Jan. 31, 1852. 

The corner-stone of a church building was laid on Sept. 25, 1843, and the 
dedication service was held on Mar. 28, 1844. In 1860, they united with the 
First Presbyterian Church. The former Village Church was transferred to the 
First Church on Apr. 20, 1867. On July 31, 1868, they sold the old church 
to Charles A. Murphey who donated it to the Roman Catholic Diocese. 

The First Presbyterian Church, old school, was organized on Aug. 31, 
1839. The church was erected between 1842 and 1846. On June 1, 1855, they 
_ purchased more land from John M. Ferguson. The present church was com- 
pleted and was dedicated on June 13, 1872. It is built of Brandywine granite, 
trimmed with brownstone that was secured at Iron Hill, nearby. On Nov. 30, 
1876, Nathan H. Clark donated additional land. The first deed restricted its 
use for a parsonage but this restriction was removed in a deed dated Oct. 
25, 1877. Pa 

The corner-stone of a new Sunday School building was laid on Nov. 13, 
1927. Among those taking part in the ceremonies were the Revs. Dr. J. Ross 


Stevenson, H. Everett Hallman and Mr. H. K. Preston. The stone is believed 


to be the one taken from the old Village Presbyterian Church. 

The Sunday School addition was first used on June 10, 1928, for Children’s 
Day exercises. It was dedicated on Sun., Oct. 28, 1928, by the Rev. Dr. Wm. 
C. Covert. On Mon. evening, a Church Night was held. Talks were given by 
the Revs. R. B. Mathews, Harvey W. Ewing and others. Music was furnished 
by the Newark High School Band. | 


The Bible Presbyterian Church at Newark was organized as a church on 
Apr. 12, 1942, at which time two elders were elected. The preliminary meet- 
ings were held in the New Century Club where the services were continued 
for a time after which they were transferred to the Red Men’s Fraternal Home. 
They purchased a property on e. Main St., on Jan. 5, 1944. 

Ground was broken for a church on July 11, 1945. A service was con- 
ducted by the pastor, the Rev. Thomas G. Cross who also turned the first 
spadeful of earth. The first service in the brick church was held on Jan. 20, 
1946. It was conducted by the Rev. Thos. G. Cross, the pastor. 

The church was dedicated on Thurs., Nov. 7, 1946 by the Rev. Thomas 
G. Cross assisted by the Rev. Dr. Harold S. Laird of Wilmington. A modern 
Hammond organ had recently been installed. 


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LUNGS bile Be SOO Ge Nab av iy 


Grace Pentecostal Church, at Newark, was organized and held their early 
meetings in Fraternal Hall. The present church, on Lovett Ave., was built in 
1935. It was dedicated in April of that year by the Rev. Fleming Van Meter, 
District Superintendent of the Assemblies of God. The church was incorporated 
on Jan. 24, 1939. 


A Christian Church was organized at Newark in 1884. It passed out of 
existence in a few years. 


The First Nazarene Church at Newark was organized in Fraternal Hall 
on Nov. 3, 1940. Formal organization took place on Jan. 21, 1941. In July, 
1944, they purchased the dwelling at No. 27 Chapel St., and converted it for 
church and parsonage uses. 


The Holiness Christian Church at Newark. In 1917, a holiness group, 
called the “Heavenly Recruits,” began holding meetings in Fraternal Hall. A 
few years later, when the Recruits became one of the so-called “tonguers’’ 
group, the Newark church changed to Holiness Christian. They were incor- 
porated on Oct. 2, 1925. On Nov. 7, 1925, they purchased a church site at 
College and Cleveland Aves. No church was ever built and the lot was even- 
tually sold. Services were held regularly until Oct. 27, 1940, when the church 
was closed. 


There are four colored churches in Newark. Mt. Zion A. M. E., the Pil- 
gtim Baptist Church, built in 1913, the Church of God, who were organized 
in 1941 and meet in the Newark Community Center, and St. John’s A. U. M. P. 
St. John’s was organized in 1855 when the meetings were held in a log house 
on the site of the present church. This church was erected in 1867 and was 
dedicated on Jan. 30, 1870. It was remodeled in 1916. 


Wesley M. E. Church at McClellandsville was built at a date that cannot 
now be determined. The first church was burned on Nov. 3, 1850, just as the 
Rev. Mr. Westbrook was starting his sermon. The present church was built in 
1854. On the afternoon of Feb. 9, 1890, the church caught fire and was se- 


verely damaged. The church was rebuilt and refurnished, after which a reopen- | 


ing service was held on Sun., Oct. 12, 1890. It was conducted by the Revs. T. E. 
Terry, C. R. Jones and Pres. Elder W. L. S. Murray. The church ceased to 
function in 1927. hy 

In 1932, it was purchased by a group of four private individuals. They 
reconditioned the building at a large expense and arranged to hold a Sunday 
School. It is also used as a community-center. On Jan. 5, 1939, W. Austin Hill, 
a local-preacher, began to hold undenominational meetings on Sundays and a 
prayer meeting on Wednesday evenings. 

Mr. Hill received a regular charge at the 1944 Conference and since that 
time services are held with guest speakers. 


The Head of Christiana Presbyterian Church is located two miles n. w. 
of Newark, close to the Maryland line. It was organized between 1706 and 
1708. The first meeting-house was built of logs, on land owned by John Steel 
and was located just north of the present church. It was known as “Gillespie's 
Meeting-House’’ from the name of the first regular pastor, the Rev. George 
Gillespie, who was installed on May 28, 1713. A new church was built in 
1750. It was incorporated on Sept. 1, 1787. 


LYS Ls ee NG hone 


158 THE CHURCHES Veer Prag eos a 


On Sept. 20, 1806, Allen and James Steel deeded an acre and two rods of 
| Jand to the church subject to a ground rent of six cents to be paid annually on 
| March 25, if demanded. The deed contained a reversion clause with any land 

used for the graveyard excepted. The church was burned on Sun., Mar. 14, 


1858, just as the congregation was assembling for morning services. A new 
{ church was built immediately and was dedicated on Mar. 19, 1859. 

Additional land was purchased from Thomas Steel on Sept. 12, 1859 and 
on Dec. 10, 1875. Major improvements were made in 1905. The large grave- 
yard dates back to the first church. The tomb of the Rev. George Gillespie is 
located where the pulpit of the old log church stood. The inscription states 
that “he was ordained in Glasgo in 1712, ordained here in 1713 and died on 
Jan. 2, 1760." The oldest legible tombstone that the writer could find is that 
of Androw Wallace who died on Mar. 3, 1751. 





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Welsh Tract Primitive Baptist Church is located, two and one-quarter 
miles south of Newark, at the foot of Iron Hill. The first church was built, 
in 1703, by a group of Baptists who had settled on a grant of land known as 
Welsh Tract. The present church was built in 1746 on a lot of six acres, four 
of which had been donated by James James. The church was incorporated on 
Feb. 9, 1788. 

The gable-stone dated 1746 1s, so far as the writer can determine, the 
oldest gable-stone or corner-stone on any church in Delaware. It was the 
mother church from. which sprang the churches at Wilmington, Kenton, Cow 
March and Mispillion. Patches in the side brick walls show where a cannon- 
ball from the battle of Cooch’s Bridge passed through the church taking an 
angular course with a heavy descending angle. 

Additional land adjoining the church property was purchased from Alex- 
ander Coulter on Apr. 23, 1853 and from Levi G. Cooch on Sept. 3, 1863. 
There is a large and well-kept graveyard. The oldest tombstone that the writer 
could find is dated 1707. It bears an inscription in a combination of Welsh 
and Latin. Translated it reads:— - 


“Riceus Rychiough, born at Danwenog county Cardiganshire and buried ae 
here in the year of our Lord 1707. Aged 87.” . Reece 


As this tombstone does not have a more definite date it ranks as the third os 
oldest legible tombstone in Delaware. Nearby is a field-stone inscribed, Elis v3 
Price, 1712. Services are now held monthly with an annual home-coming in 
the fall. ej 

The 200th Anniversary was celebrated on Oct. 17, 18 and 19, 1903. The 
exercises were conducted by Elders J. G. Eubanks and N. W. Meredith. 


Se ea lt ary tom 


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‘ 


The African Union Church of Iron Hill was incorporated on Sept. 
20, 1867. 


A St. Daniel’s A. M. E. Church is located, one and one-half miles s. w. of 
"Newark, at the base of Iron Hill. The first church was built in 1838 and the 
present church was built in 1927. 





The First Methodist Church at Glasgow was built, of brick, in 1832 and 
dedicated in 1833, by the Rev. Matthew Sorin. A new church, of sandstone, 
was built in 1857. It was dedicated by the Rev. Mr. Hickman. The present 
frame church was dedicated on Oct. 5, 1884, by the Rev. Andrew Manship 
assisted by the Rev. W. L. S. Murray. 





WELSH TRACT BAPTIST CHURCH, COOCH’S BRIDGE 
(Page 158) 





PENCADER PRES. CHURCH, GLASGOW 
(Page 160) 





160 THE  GHIUR GIES BO eE GAVE 


7 Pencader Presbyterian Church at Glasgow was organized between 1707 
and 1710. It was then known as “Welsh Tract Presbyterian Church.” In 1719, 
they adopted the name ‘'Pencader”’ which, in Welsh, means ‘‘chief chair.” On 
Nov. 2, 1742, Margaret Williams conveyed to a board of trustees a plot of 
land upon which a meéeting-house had been built. It was used as a hospital 
after the Battle of Cooch’s Bridge. The church was incorporated on June 1, 
1789. The present church was built in 1852. There is a large graveyard beside 
the church. Among the oldest tombstones are those of Benjamin Evans who 
died on May 7, 1721, Joseph Griffith and Margaret Griffith, both of whom 
died in 1746. The writer suspects that the first church was located on this 
knoll on the eastern side of the church land, close to these old graves. 
Implanted in the church stone step is a bronze marker placed by the 
U. S. Geological Survey in 1904 which states that it is 69 feet above sea level. 


Bethasady M. E. Church, colored, of Pencader Hundred, was formally or- 
ganized, at the home of Robert Price, on Apr. 6, 1859. A church site consist- 
ing of 9 sq. perches was purchased from Causden Johnson, for $5.00, on Apr. 
30, 1859. 


Ott’s Chapel is located, at the base of Chestnut Hill, three and one-half 
miles n. w. of Glasgow. It was built by Elder Stephen Ott in 1871. Mr. Ott 
was a Methodist but at the end of the Civil War he became a member of the 
Christian Church. He conducted services in his home for years and then, with 
the help of some of his neighbors, he built the chapel. He conducted Sunday 
School and preaching services until his death on July 22, 1875. His wife, Jane, 
then continued the services until her death. The chapel has always been un- 
denominational and meetings are held regularly with different persons in 
charge. The property is in the hands of a board of trustees who maintain the 
chapel and the graveyard in excellent condition. 


St. Thomas’ A. M. P. Church is located one and one-half miles s. w. of 
Glasgow, close to the Maryland line, on the old Frenchtown and New Castle 
Pike. The church was incorporated on Jan. 30, 1857 and again on Apr. 17, 
1890. On Oct. 27, 1897, they purchased an additional acre of land from John 
R. Hogg, et al. A new church was built and the first church is used as 
a social-hall. 


State Road Chapel was built, in 1900, by the nearby residents, to be used 
for Sunday School services and as a community-center. A few years later, it was 
burned and rebuilt. It is owned by a self-perpetuating board of trustees and 
Sunday School is held regularly. 


The Chapel at the State Hospital, Farnhurst. This chapel was dedicated 
on Sept. 28, 1939, during the celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the found- 
ing of the Hospital. The dedication services were conducted by the Hospital 

Chaplains, the Rev. Joseph H. Earp, Rabbi Henry Tavel and the Rev. Roderick 
“Dwyer. The dedicatory sermon was preached by the Rt. Rev. Arthur R. Mc- 
Kinstry, D.D., Episcopal Bishop of Delaware. The principal address was de- 
livered by Dr. Edward A. Strecker. A feature of the ceremonies was the play- 
ing of the light-color-organ by its inventor, Mrs. Mary H. Greenawalt. Large 
delegations of prominent citizens from all parts of the State, were present. 








The Minquadale Baptist Mission was organized, in 1929, by the Rev. Erby 
Davis. For two years the meetings were held in Kilvington’s store. Then the 


Print eicten erat bee daa Dra Ee make Dcldir Neca Xe 161 


services were transferred to the new schoolhouse. About 1936, the basement 
of the home of the Rev. Richard Ludtke was remodeled for use as a chapel. 
The work was quite prosperous for a time but later the membership dwindled 
and the effort was abandoned in 1941. 


Minquadale Community Methodist Church. On Easter Sunday, Apr. 25, 
1943, the Rev. Robert G. Conner, of Madeley Church in Wilmington, organ- 
ized a Sunday School at Minquadale. The meetings were held in the home of 
Walter Denney for seven months and then transferred to the home of Ottie 
Collins. A congregation was organized and the erection of a church building 
was started. The first service was held in the basement of the church on Easter 
Sunday, Apr. 9, 1944. The Rev. Mr. Conner presided and the sermon was 
delivered by Dist. Supt. Dr. Oliver J. Collins. On Sun., Apr. 23, 1944, the first 
service was held in the church auditorium. The interior of this church is pat- 
terned after Old North Church of Boston, made famous by the ride of Paul 
Revere. 


Minquadale Church of God. The Minquadale Gospel Church, Assemblies 
of God, was founded, in 1940, by the Rev. W. C. Harper, as a Sunday School. 
Classes were held in the homes of Mr. Harper and D. J. Nichols. In 1944, a 
building was secured and remodeled for church purposes. The dedication serv- 
ices were held on Sun., May 21, 1944, at 2:30 P. M. by the Rev. Mr. Harper 
and Dist. Supt. Newton Chase. 


The Wilmington Manor Church, Christian and Missionary Alliance. The 
first services of this congregation were held on Sun., July 16, 1944. As a tem- 
porary meeting-place, the basement of the home of Lester Pettie was remodeled 
to suit the needs of the church work. 


Wilmington Manor Methodist Church was founded on June 3, 1945. 
The first meetings were held in the roller-skating rink. A church site at 
Du Pont Highway and Roosevelt Boulevard was secured on Feb. 7-23, 1946. 


Ground was broken for the new church on Sun., Mar. 17, 1946: The cere-. 


monies were in charge of the Rev. Brooks Reynolds, the pastor. A sermon was 
delivered by the Rev. Dr. Oliver J. Collins, the Dist. Supt. The first spadeful 
of earth was turned by the Rev. Mr. Reynolds; he was followed by Dr. Collins 
and a number of the church officials. 

On Sept. 1, 1946, the place of meeting was changed to the home of J. 
Oswald Beeby. It was proposed to use the lawn in good weather and later 
to use the basement. 

The corner-stone was laid on Sun., Dec. 1, 1946. The ceremonies were in 
charge of the Rev. B. E. Reynolds. The stone was laid by Dist. Supt. Dr. Oliver 
J. Collins with a trowel furnished by Mr. Beeby. The Scripture was read by 
the Rev. A. J. Jackson of Newark. 


The People’s Baptist Church at Hamilton Park was organized in April, 
1917. They had been given the use of an old gun-club building on the Lobdell 
property. The present site was purchased on June 24, 1930 and the church 
was erected during that year. They were incorporated on Sept. 12, 1932. New 
pews were dedicated on Oct. 28, 1945, by the Rev. Erby P. Davis. 


The First Baptist Church at Holloway Terrace was incorporated on Nov. 
4, 1923. The church was dedicated on June 29, 1924, by the Rev. A. F. 


¥ RIE ALE St IO Tse i ee -~ 





162 TCE CSUR Che Se Oia Er Cia Wd RE 





Williamson, D.D. He was assisted by the Revs. George D. Allison, H. C. 
Broughton, George F. Hanson, Zack W. Wells and Harry J. Cable, the pastor. 
A Holy Bible and an American flag were presented by George F. Irwin on 
behalf of the P. O. S. of A. 


Buttonwood M. E. Church, colored, is located at the Buttonwoods. Ground 
was broken for a church on a new site at Buttonwood and Arbutus Avenues 
on Sun., June 30, 1946, with the pastor, the Rev. J. H. Russum, in charge. 
The corner-stone was laid on Mar. 5, 1947 by Bishop A. P. Shaw assisted by 
the Rev. W. C. Thompson. 


Swanwyck Swedish Lutheran Church. Swanwyck was a Swedish settle- 
ment, facing the Delaware River, one mile north of New Castle. The settle- 
ment extended about one-third of a mile. The first church in Delaware was 
built here, previous to 1655, but it was abandoned when Crane Hook Church 
was built in 1667. 


Crane Hook Swedish Lutheran Church was located near the present Ma- 
rine Terminal. It was built of logs in 1667. After Old Swede’s Church was 
built, it was abandoned. The last service was held on the 4th Sunday after 
Easter, 1699. The site was marked with a stone monument, on Oct. 17, 1896, 
by the Historical Society of Delaware. Bishop Leighton Coleman delivered an 
address at the unveiling. 


Immanuel P. E. Church at New Castle was founded in 1689, when meet- 
ings were held in private homes with preaching by missionaries of the Church 
of England. Previous to 1819, the name was always spelled “Emanuel.” In 
1703, a movement to build a church was started. The site pre-empted by the 
congregation was the site of the original fort built in 1672 and abandoned in 
1698. The congregation figured that, as the land belonged to the Crown 
there would be no objection to using it as a site for a Church of England. 
This was the situation until the Delaware General Assembly, on June 13, 1772, 
passed an Act, one section of which granted title to the plot to the rector and 
vestry of Immanuel Church. The church was partly finished in 1703 and 
opened for services. On Aug. 11, 1703, the congregation petitioned the Bishop 
of London for a regular pastor. The church building was entirely completed in 
1708. Queen Anne presented to the church a damask covering for the pulpit 
and communion table, among other gifts. On Dec. 4, 1716, Richard Halliwell, 
a heavy contributor to the efforts of the church, willed a glebe, just north of 
New Castle, comprising 67 acres, “to the proper use and behoof of the minis- 
ter that from time to time shall serve the said Emanuel Church, forever.” In 
1724, the walls were strengthened and a gallery was added. The pews were 
built by the individual members who owned them and paid rent for the space. 
Until they became vacant the vestry had no control over them. 

During the Revolution, this church stood almost alone in the midst of 
the dilapidation of the Episcopal churches on the Peninsula and was the pillar 
of the Episcopacy in this region. In 1791, a brick wall was built around the 
graveyard. In 1802, the church was thoroughly repaired, the expense of which 
was paid by the rector, the Rev. Robert Clay. A new roof was built in 1817. 
In 1818, extensive remodeling was started and was completed in 1822. Wm. 
Strickland, a Philadelphia architect, contributed his services. On Oct. 25551822; 
the pews were sold by auction. The building was consecrated on Oct. 29, 1822, 
by Bishop William White. Among the contributors were Commodore Thomas 








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164 LHE CHOU RCHES 2OweD ELA VAs 





MacDonough and the Rev. John E. Latta, pastor of the Presbyterian Church, 
which indicates that the early antagonism between the two sects had been out- 
grown. It was at this time that the clock was installed in the tower, to serve 
as a town clock. A Sunday School was started in 1826. An organ was installed 
and it was first used on Christmas Day, 1827. In 1839, a Sunday School build- 
ing was erected. The ornamental entrance gate was installed in 1843. In 1850, 
extensive remodeling took place and the six-foot cross was erected on the 
tower replacing a smaller one. Reopening services were held on Dec. 15, 1850. 
The bell was cracked in 1855 and a new one was installed. In 1857, a new 
organ was installed and it was first used on Sept. 12, 1857. In 1860, the 
building was enlarged. A reopening service was held on Sept. 26, 1860. 

During the winter of 1878 a Free Reading Room was opened. The church 
was repaired in 1880. In 1882, the bell having become cracked, it was replaced. 
The rectory was built in 1886. In 1889, the graveyard being too small, Glebe 
Cemetery was laid out in accordance with the authority granted by an Act of 
the General Assembly passed on Apr. 8, 1873. This cemetery was consecrated 
on June 3, 1890, by Bishop Leighton Coleman. On Apr. 6, 1891, a silver 
paten, a brass altar cross and two brass altar vases were blessed. 

In 1895-96, by an arrangement with Mrs. Eliza Thomas, a parish-house . 
was established. The Rev. George Ross tablet was erected, in 1897-98, by his 
descendants. An eagle lectern, in memory of the Rogers family was blessed in 
1899-1900. In 1900-01, a silver chalice and paten were presented by Miss 
Virginia Long. A tablet, in memory of Capt. Richard Halliwell, was blessed 
with a service of benediction, by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman, on Nov. 5, 1911. 

On All Saint’s Day, 1913, the corner-stone was laid for a Sunday School 
building which includes an auditorium with a stage and a gymnasium. It was 
formally opened on Easter Tuesday, Apr. 14, 1914, by Bishop Kinsman. 

Many famous Delawareans are buried in the graveyard including four 
former Governors: George Read, Nicholas VanDyke, Gunning Bedford and 
Thomas Stockton. 

In a vault in the northerly end of the church is the tomb of Hercules 
Coutts. The upright brownstone slab, set flush with the church, after describ- 
ing the merits of Mr. Coutts states that “he yielded to a premature fate by 
fever and running dysentary on Sept. 30, 1707.’ This is the second oldest 
tombstone in Delaware. The Latin inscription was translated into English and 
inscribed on the lower half of the stone in 1881. __ ; 

The following persons are buried beneath the main aisle of the church. 
Eliza Thomas, died Sept. 9, 1799, Lewis E. Thomas, died July 10, 1811, Fleet- 
wood M. VanDyke, died July 5, 1818, the Rev. Robert Clay, died Dec. 27, 
1831 and the Rev. Stephen W. Presstman, died Sept. 1, 1843. 


| New Castle Friend’s Meeting. George Fox, who founded the Religious 
Society of Friends in England, in 1654, paid a pastoral visit to America early 
‘in 1672. On his arrival in New Castle, he was invited to stay at Governor 
Lovelace’s home on Harmony Street. On Sept. 14, 1672, Mr. Fox held a meet- 
ing at the Governor’s home. This was the introduction of Quakerism into 
Delaware. On Jan. 2, 1684, permission to hold Meetings at New Castle was 
granted by the Philadelphia Quarterly Meeting. During 1686, Meetings were 
held in the home of Widow Welsh. She is believed to have been the widow of 
Wm. Welsh, who represented New Castle in the Provincial Assembly until 
his death in 1684. Monthly Meetings were held in 1686 and probably pre- 
vious to that time. In 1688, a committee was appointed to select a site for a 
meeting-house and a burying-ground. A lot was purchased and the meeting- 





This 2S 11 dasa! ete AA Wal bead ill pio Gill @ Bt iy Kalu ilcs Ss 165 


house was built in 1705. On July 3. 1720, the meeting-house and land were 
turned over to a board of trustees. In 1750, New Castle united with Wilming- 
ton to form a Monthly Meeting. In 1752, the property was transferred to a 
new set of trustees. On Nov. 13. 1758, New Castle was directed to join with 
Wilmington for worship Meetings. In 1763, all Meetings at New Castle were 
discontinued. After this, the building was used as a school, a white church, 
a colored church and finally as a residence by an old colored man. It was torn 
down in 1885. No headstones of ny kind were approved by the early Friends. 
Some, having been erected in the New Castle burying-ground, the Wilmington 
Monthly Meeting, in 1804, requested the committee in charge of the property 
to use their endeavors to have these stones removed. 

In 1761, the Friends of Delaware adopted promiscuous burials, excepting 
only those who already had burial plots. The meeting-house and burying- 
ground were located at Pine and Railroad Sts., now Fourth and William Sts. 
There is no evidence today of either the meeting-house or the burying-ground. 
Mr. Horace L. Deakyne, who came to New Castle in 1880 described the build- 
ing as follows: “A one-story brick building about 20 ft. square, having a hip 
roof and only one door. It faced Pine now 4th St. and stood about 30 ft. 
back from the street.” 


The Dutch Reformed Church, at New Castle, was founded, in 1657, by 
John Polhemus. A small log church was built and it is believed to have been 
built-on the present site of the Presbyterian Church. Dominie Everardus Welius 
was the first settled minister. He died on Dec. 7, 1659 and was buried in the 
churchyard. The last Dutch minister at New Castle was Petrus Terschmacker, 
who arrived in 1678. In 1689, he left to take over a charge in Schenectady, 
N. Y. and on Feb. 9, 1690 he was killed in an Indian massacre. The church 
at New Castle was kept open for a few years and then abandoned. 


The New Castle Presbyterian Church. The Rev. John Wilson preached - 


in the Court House from 1700 until the first church was built. This church is 
considered by many as a succession of the old Dutch church, their doctrines 
being very similar. On Aug. 15, 1707, a tract of land was purchased and a 
small church was built of brick. It had a high pulpit with a sounding-board 
and the square family pews. More land was purchased in 1712. The first deed 
wassto a board of three men who were to be “the agents for erecting and 
building a Presbyterian Church or house of worship in the said town of New 
Castle.” The second deed describes the land as ‘‘a certain parcel of land *** 
adjoining to the northeast end of the Presbyterian Church or house of wor- 
ship.” This would establish the fact that a church had been built sometime 
between 1707 and 1712. Although the old church extended beyond the 
boundaries of the first tract, the church appears to have been built to its pres- 
ent size at one time without any additions. At that time Second St. had not 
been opened and the entrance to the church faced the river. 

On Nov. 10, 1801, a contract, with Jacob Belvill, was signed for the 
erection of a gallery in the church. The contractor agreed to perform his job 
in a workman-like manner, bring in no bills for extras, collect from the sub- 
scribers the money with which to pay himself and if any surplus be collected, 
to return it to the church. The contract price was $340.00. In April, 1802, 
the trustees set the rate of rentals on the 19 new pews at $5.00 and on 8 pews 
at $4.00 per year. The contractor :ppears to have had difficulty collecting from 
the subscribers as on Oct. 17, 180+. it was reported that he had received only 
$211.00. On Apr. 28, 1809, the trustees agreed to pay him the balance due or 


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166 THE CHURCHES .QE VDEL AWARE 





$71.47 plus $2.50 for glazing windows. On June 19, 1811, the trustees decided 
to install a new “ruff’’ on the church and to make other small repairs. 

On July 25, 1818, the trustees decided to enclose the burial-ground by 
erecting a brick wall in the front and board fences on the dividing lines. Also, 
that the church be thoroughly repaired, new single seats replacing the pews, 
new flooring, the pulpit to be remodeled and made more convenient, that the 
“clark’s’” desk be finished with railing and balustrade and so arranged as to 
be removable at times of Communion, Venetian blinds for the windows, doors 
to be altered so as to open and shut more quietly and the building to be 
painted within and without. 

This work was fully completed and on Mar. 26, 1819, at a meeting of 
the subscribers and the congregation it was decided “that the right of priority 
of choice seats be-determined by drawing lots, each person to enjoy the right 
of choice in the order of the number he may draw beginning with number 
one for the first choice **** The numbers were then prepared by the chair- 
man and put into a hat and all were invited to draw. The drawing being fin. 


ished, the seats were accordingly chosen and distributed and the meeting 


dissolved.” 


On Oct. 9, 1833, Lewis Curlet, a plasterer, was paid for applying to the © 


front of the building, 130 sq. yds. of plaster laid out in stonework and 340 
sq. yds. of plain work. On Mar. 14, 1834, a bill from Thomas Turner included 


new frames, sashes and shutters for the windows and one door, and two 


windows of six lights each in the gallery. This would indicate that the present 
circle-head windows date from that time. A rather startling item contained in 
that bill is a charge of $1.50 for six spit-boxes. On Dec. 4, 1848, a committee 
was appointed to ascertain and report the extent of repairs necessary. It is 
probable that this was the inception of the idea to build a new church. On 
Apr. 1, 1850, a committee was appointed to secure subscriptions toward build- 
ing a new church and another committee was appointed to select a plan for a 
building subject to the approval of the congregation. 

On Mar. 15, 1831, a committee was appointed to procure plans and esti- 
mates for the erection of a session-house, also to receive subscriptions toward 
paying for the same. The session-house was duly built, as on July 23, 1832, the 
minutes report that “at a meeting of the congregation of the New Castle 
Presbyterian Church at the session-house, etc.” An interesting fact is recorded 
in the minutes of Apr. 20, 1840, “**** a letter from the Penn Fire Company 


contains congratulations on the narrow escape of the church and session-room — 


from destruction by fire ****.” Final reference to the session-room or session- 
house was made on Dec. 4, 1848. It cannot be determined whether this was a 
separate building or joined to the old church. It undoubtedly extended so far 
over that it was necessary to remove it before starting the construction of a 
new church building. © | 

On May 10, 1854, in the old church, the Rev. John B. Spotswood, D.D., 
the pastor, delivered an address on the history of the New Castle Presbyterian 
Church, This history was published, in 1859, and is widely quoted as well as 
having become a collector’s item. 

The new church was dedicated on Thurs., May 11, 1854, at the 11 a. m. 
service. The morning service was conducted by the Rev. Dr. Plumer, and the 
Rev. Dr. Leyburn preached in the evening, Services were continued during 
Friday, Saturday and Sunday. 

Two graves in the front of the church contain the remains of the Rev. 
John Thompson who died on Apr. 9, 1795, aged 27 years and 9 months, and 
members of his family. They were moved from a private burial plot by an 








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IMMANUEL P. E. CHURCH, NEw CASTLE 
(Page 162) 


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New CASTLE PRES. CHURCH 
(Page 164) 








168 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


Act of the General Assembly in 1913. The Honorables Richard S. Rodney, 
James G. Shaw and Chauncey P. Holcomb were appointed to oversee this work. 


The oldest legible tombstone is over the grave of John Kirkpatrick, who 
died on Feb. 8, 1744. 


On Nov. 20, 1946, by a vote of 3 to 1 the congregation agreed to proceed 
with the project of restoring the old church to the same condition it was in 
at the time it was built in 1707. After this is completed, then the removal of 
the brownstone church will be considered. 


At a meeting of the Board of Trustees held on Feb. 27, 1800, the follow- 
ing is an excerpt from a resolution that was adopted. “Whereas, it is found 
from experience that Burying-Grounds in the improved parts of towns are 
very injurious to the health of the inhabitants and otherwise inconvenient 
**&*”’ This resolution was followed by another that appointed a committee 
of three to make inquiry for a lot of one-quarter acre adjoining the town 
where a burial-ground could be established. A gift of one-half acre of land 
was made by John Stockton. On Oct. 26, 1832, the trustees purchased from 
Margaret Sexton, for $90.00, the balance of the land which comprises the 
cemetery as it now stands. One peculiarity of the deed from Mrs. Sexton is 
that it recites that the trustees release all right, title, interest and claim to a 
road through the Sexton land. The cemetery, therefore, was not accessible ex- 
cept through private property. At that time, however, the New Castle and 
Frenchtown Railroad owned a right-of-way adjoining the cemetery. The trus- 
tees asked permission to use this right-of-way. A resolution was passed by the 
Railroad Co. informing the trustees “that the Railroad Co. cannot permit 
wheel carriages to go upon the railroad property but that for the accommo- 
dation of funerals to the said Burying-Ground the Company will furnish cars 
and convey them to the grounds without charge—provided that the time 
fixed for funerals shall not interfere with the regular travel and transportation 
on the road.” The Railroad Co. evidently regretted this agreement as some- . 
time later they agreed to provide and maintain a suitable carriage-road to the 
cemetery. The subject of this road was the cause of discussion and disptte 
from 1832 until 1891. The road now in use is the old abandoned right-of-way 
of the Railroad Co. ) 


The receiving vault was built in 1866 and on Dec. 31, 1867, it was form- 
ally donated to the trustees by Mrs. Annie Couper Kerr. In 1886, the ceme- 
tery was enclosed and the burial lots were graded and surveyed. The original 
half-acre can be distinguished by the irregular lots all facing eastward. | 


The custom of facing burials in some definite direction dates far back in 
history. Facing graves toward the east was practised by the Western Church 
of the Middle Ages. It is the accepted tradition that, among the Christian 
peoples, this is done in order that the departed will be facing east where 
Ghrist will first appear at the time of His second coming to the earth. In 
burial lots where this is not possible there is no choice between north and 
south. The Mohammedans bury their dead facing toward Mecca. In New 
South Wales they bury facing the sunrise, the Solomon Islanders bury facing 
inland and some ancients buried their dead facing the direction from which 
their ancestors came. Incidentally, the word cemetery is derived from the Latin 
word “caemeteria’”’ meaning “resting place.” 


At the present time, the cemetery is being administered in a business-like 
way and it has become an interesting and beautiful spot. Among the prom- 
inent Delawareans buried here is former Governor Charles Thomas. 





as a gulch Cag Mee iw haar rw Contd Gap © pt Cia Ai! a 169 


Nazareth Methodist Church (M.E.) at New Castle. Captain Webb, a pen- 
sioned British officer, preached Methodism in New Castle about 1769. He 
preached in his uniform, his sword upon the pulpit and with a patch over his 
blind eye. Although the Court House was used for balls and all forms of 
amusements, its use was denied the Methodists. Robert Furness, who conducted 
a public-house, joined the Methodists and opened his tavern for the meetings. 
By this move he lost a great deal of his custom. 

Francis Asbury preached there on Aug. 10, 1772 and noted that: “he had 
preached to a few, met much opposition and that the Methodists had done no 
good in New Castle.” 

A Society was formed but it did not prosper as sentiment in New Castle 
was very unfavorable to the Methodists. A second attempt was made but it 
was 1820 before the present congregation was established. A plot of land was 
purchased on Sept. 28, 1820, from Richard Sexton, for $150.00. A small 
church was completed and dedicated in 1821. More land was purchased on 
Jan. 24, 1834, from Thomas Challenger. The church was made a station 
in 1837. 

The Rev. Andrew Manship, who was pastor of Nazareth Church in 1849, 
gave three reasons for the weakness of the Methodist church in New Castle 
at that time. “The Episcopal and Presbyterian churches were so much older 
that their antiquity gives them strength; that there was a greater amount of 
aristocracy in New Castle than in any other town on the Peninsula and that 
our church is not so well suited to the aristocracy as some others and that the 
location of the Methodist Church was inconvenient, being far from the center 
of the town.” 

In 1863, the main building of the present church was built, largely through 
the liberality of Thomas Tasker of the Tasker Iron Works. The corner-stone 
was laid on Tues., Aug. 4, 1863, by Bishop Levi Scott. During the construction 
work meetings were held in the Presbyterian Church and in a tent beside the 
new church. These were the first tent meetings ever held in New Castle. It 
was arranged to hold the dedication services on Thurs., May 19, 1864, with 
Bishop Janes, Bishop Simpson and the Rev. J. McKendree Perly, ‘officiating. 

The Sunday School building was added in 1876. The 100th Anniversary 
of the church was celebrated on Oct. 23, 1921. Among the gifts dedicated on 
that day were a baptismal font in memory of the children of Wm. Leach, a 
pulpit stand in memory of the Rev. James M. Wise, a pulpit chair in memory of 
Miss Anna Sherwood, a communion table in memory of Mrs. Edward Chal- 
lenger and the pipe-organ which was a gift of the Dorcas Society. The dedi- 
cation was in charge of Dist. Supt. Robert Watt, assisted by the Revs. J. R. 
Bicking, R. Irving Watkins and E. L. Hubbard. 

New cathedral chimes, a gift of the Four Square Guild, were dedicated on 
May 13, 1945, by the Rev. Geo. H. Murphy. 

There is a large enclosed graveyard beside the church, the tombstones dat- 
ing back to the 1840's. , | 


The First Baptist Church at New Castle. A Bible School was organized, 
in the Dalby home, on Jan. 16, 1876. The church was organized and the name 
“The First Baptist Church of New Castle’? was chosen on Sept. 30, 1876. On 
Aug. 21, 1877, the meetings were transferred to the jury-room in the Court 
House where the meetings were held until the church was built. The first trus- 
tees were elected on Jan. 3, 1877. The church was incorporated on Aug. 
27, 1877. 

The church site, on Union St. between Delaware and Harmony Sts., was 


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170 LHE CHURCH ES WOR ED BL AW ARE 


purchased on Dec. 10, 1877 from Wm. Herbert and more land was secured on 
Sept. 29, 1879 from Joseph I. Taggart. The present brick church was com- 
pleted and was dedicated on Dec. 19, 1879. The first business meeting of the 
church was held on Oct. 31, 1879. The church had a belfry and stained glass 
windows, these were removed at a later date. The water was supplied by a well 
in the cellar. This was replaced later by running water and the gas lighting was 
replaced by electricity. The first pastor, the Rev. Mr. MacMackin, lived in 
Salem, N. J., and came across the river in a fishing boat to attend the meet- 
ings. There is one member still living who attended the Bible School in the 
Court House. 


St. Peter’s R. C. Church at New Castle. Roman Catholic services were 
held in New Castle as early as 1804. A church was organized and trustees were 
elected. On Apr. 15, 1806, the trustees purchased a church site at Union and 
Harmony Sts., from Samuel Rowan for $350.00. In 1807, an effort was made 
to build a church but it was several years before it was completed. The corner- 
stone was laid in 1808 by the Rev. Patrick Kenney. On Feb. 3, 1808 an Act was 
passed by the General Assembly authorizing a lottery to be held to raise not 
more than $2000.00 to be used in completing the church. It is believed that 
this plan was not carried out. | 

The church appears to have had financial difficulties and on Feb. 8, 1820, 


the State Legislature passed an Act to take care of the claims against the 


church through the office of the Chancellor. In carrying out this provision 
the property was sold at a public sale held on May 26, 1821. The church 
trustees bought it in for $230.00. 

The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Thurs., May 5, 1870, 
by Bishop Thomas A. Becker, assisted by Father Taylor. The members met 
in the old church and then proceeded to the new church in a downpour of 
rain. Assisting in the ceremonies were Fathers Hagan, Dailey, Fallon and 
Kelley. The church was completed and was consecrated on May 27, 1876. 

A new bell was consecrated on the afternoon of Sept. 27, 1896, by Bishop 
Alfred A. Curtis, assisted by the Rev. Father John D. Sheehan. This bell was 
presented as a memorial to John F. Brady and was named “John” by the 
Bishop. A belfry was nearing completion. ; 

_ _After extensive rebuilding, the church was consecrated on Nov. 26, 1911, 
by Bishop John J. Monaghan at the morning service. High Mass was cele- 
brated by Monsignor John A. Lyons. The dedicatory sermon was delivered by 
the Rev. Father Charles Lyons. In the afternoon a large parade was held by 
the Hibernian Knights and the school children. 


A large cemetery adjoins the church. The oldest tombstone that the writer 
could find is dated Feb. 27, 1823. 


The Episcopal Chapel at Shawtown. In 1867, a lot was donated by James 
M. Johns at 9th and Clayton Sts., upon which the erection of a chapel was 
started. It was finished on Oct. 5, 1869. Sunday School services were held here 
until 1918. The chapel was torn down, in 1923, and the land was sold. 


The New Castle M. P. Church was organized on Aug. 18, 1893, at which 
time the Rev. L. F. Warner, of Dover, preached. They were incorporated on 
Mar. 14, 1894. No church was ever built. 

Mt. Salem M. E. Church, colored, of New Castle was built of frame in 
1857. The present brick church was built in 1878 and was dedicated on Dec. 





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NAZARETH METHODIST CHURCH, NEW CASTLE 


(Page 169) 





LEBANON METHODIST CHURCH, RED LION 


(Page 172) 





TH CHUOR G Ae ae DELAWARE 


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15, 1878. Additional land was purchased on Dec. 2, 1879. There is a grave- 
yard beside the church. 


Union A. M. E. Church of New Castle was organized in 1818. A por- 
tion of the present church site was purchased on Mar. 28, 1818 from Alex. 
Duncan. A frame church was then built. More land was purchased on Mar. 
10, 1859. In 1863, a brick church was built. Additional land was purchased 
on Oct. 1, 1888. The church was rebuilt in 1888 and in 1927. The name 
“Bethany” was used for a number of years but it has been discarded. 


The Christian Alliance have a small chapel in Dobbinsville. It was built 
in 1928. The chapel was dedicated on Apr. 22, 1928, at 2:30 o'clock, by the 
Rev. G. Vernor Brown, assisted by W. W. Henry. 


The Presbyterian Chapel at Dobbinsville. The ground was broken for 
this chapel on Sat., May 3, 1879. Mr. Dobbin donated the land and most of 
the material. The chapel was completed and Sunday School, with occasional 
preaching, was held until 1895. It was then conducted intermittently or as an 
undenominational Sunday School until 1912. In 1913, the chapel was sold, 
moved to Baldton and converted into a dwelling. 


Dobbinsville M. E. Sunday School was established in 1879. In 1942, the 
Methodists again started a Sunday School in Dobbinsville. 


Red Lion Run M. E. Church. On Aug. 5, 1819, Sarah Weir sold to a board 
of trustees, for $19.90, a plot of land upon which to build a church. This site 
was located on the St. Georges and New Castle Road near Red Lion Run. The 


trustees were Purnel Beach, Geo. Smith; John Lumb, Mahlon Foster, Azariah 
Foster, Henry Batten and Arthur Bailey. : 


Bethel Baptist Church was located just west of Hare’s Corner. It was 
organized as a mission of Welsh Tract Church in 1786. On Feb. 8, 1788, a half 
acre of land was purchased from Ebenezer and Andrew Morton upon which a 
log church was built and a graveyard was laid out. In 1839, it was constituted 
a separate charge. Four acres of land were purchased on Dec. 24, 1849 from 
Mary McCullough. The life of this church is uncertain but no mention is 
‘made of it in the minutes of the Delaware Association after 1871. The old 
church foundation stones at each corner is all that can be found today. The 
graveyard has one section set aside where the bodies originally buried in the 
Wilmington Baptist graveyard, 1008 King St., were reinterred, when the City 
and County Building was erected. The oldest legible tombstone in this group 
is that of Abigail Ainger, wife of the Rev. Thomas Ainger, who died on Feb. 
23, 1793. The graveyard is kept in reasonably good condition. The oldest 
legible tombstone that the writer could find is that of Francis Lowen Cooch | 

who died on Aug. 27, 1791. 


Lebanon Methodist Church (M.E.) is located at Red Lion. In 1819, Mss. 
William Silver donated one acre of land, just south of Red Lion, upon which 
to build a church and to maintain a graveyard. The church was built and used 
until 1853. The present site was purchased on Apr. 23, 1853, from John D. 
Turner for $100.00. The erection of a brick church on the new site was started 
immediately. The corner-stone was laid on June 29, 1853, by the Revs. D. W. 
Bartine, D.D., and Andrew Manship. The church was completed and was dedi- 
cated on Sun., Dec. 18, 1853, at the morning service, by Bishop Levi Scott, as- 





DB te CASTE Onl N ES 1 ke 


sisted by the Rev. Mr. Ryan. The Suilding was renovated after which a re- 
Opening service was held on Nov. 4, 1866. by the Rev. Joseph E. Smith. It 
was remodeled in 1885. On Dec. 26, 1885, the church was seriously damaged 
by fire after which repairs were made. On Sept. 9. 1939, additional land was 
donated to the church by Wm. F. Silvers and Sarah E. Walton. 

A large social-hall was built beside the church in 1940. The church was 
seriously damaged by fire on Jan. 30, 1944. After being repaired, a reopening 
service was held on Sun., July 9, 1944, by the Rev. D. J. Moore, the pastor. A 
stained glass window, in honor of Wm. F. Silvers, who had served as Supt. 
of the Sunday School for more than 50 years, was dedicated. 

The old church site is still used as a graveyard. The oldest tombstone is 
that of R. Smith, who died on Nov. 28, 1821. 


Pigeon Run Presbyterian Church was located one mile n. e. of Red Lion. 
It took its name from the small stream beside the site. This church was found- 
ed, in 1727, as a chapel-of-ease for the members of New Castle Presbyterian 
Church. The church was burned, in 1760, and it was not rebuilt. By an Act 
of the General Assembly, the trustees of the Presbyterian Graveyard at Pigeon 
Run were incorporated on Feb. 1, 1849. The saplings and trees are gradually 
taking possession of the graveyard where interments have been made until 
quite recently. The oldest tombstone is dated 1738. The Rev. Samuel Eakin, 
A.M., former pastor of Pencader Church, who died in 1873, is buried beneath 
a flat slab. 


The Chapel of St. Catherine of Siena (R.C.) was located at St. James’ 
Protectory for Boys at Reybold. After having purchased the Clark farm at 
Reybold, St. James’ Protectory was moved from Wilmington to its new home 
on Aug. 8, 1888, by Bishop Alfred A. Curtis. } 

Bishop John J. Monaghan who succeeded Bishop Curtis on May 9, 1897, 
broke ground at Reybold, in May 1899, for additions that would enlarge the 
capacity of the home and afford greater conveniences. 

On one of Bishop Monaghan’s visits to Rome, he met the Andrews family 
of Baltimore. One of them, Miss Catherine Andrews became dangerously ill 
while in Rome. Bishop Monaghan was called to administer the last rites of the 


Church to her and, later, to preside at her funeral. In gratitude for his kind-_ 


ness, Miss Elizabeth Andrews offered to build a memorial chapel wherever the 
Bishop would select a site. Bishop Monaghan decided to build it at St. James’ 
Protectory. It was dedicated on Apr. 30, 1902, in memory of Catherine An- 
drews, as the Chapel of St. Catherine of Siena. 

When the Protectory was closed, in Jan. 1941, the chapel was dismantled 
and torn down. The altar, pews and other equipment were then used by St. 
Matthew’s Church, at Woodcrest, in their temporary quarters. The altar is now 
in use at Christ Our King Church, in Wilmington. 


Garrison P. E. Chapel, Fort Delaware. This chapel was erected by the 
troops of the Engineer's Corps under the direction of Chaplains E. J. Way 
and Wm. H. Paddock. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 12, 1863, by Bishop 
Alfred Lee. The consecration service was conducted by Bishop Lee on Sun., 
June 23, 1867. This chapel was last mentioned in the Diocesan Journal in 1869. 


Christ P. E. Church at Delaware City was organized in 1848. The meet- 
ings were held in the schoolhouse. On Feb. 16, 1849, a tract of land was 
granted, by John Ashurst, for a church site. The erection of a church was 


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started and the corner-stone was laid by the Rev. T. F. Billop. The work laid 
dormant for two years and was then resumed. 

The first service in the unfinished building was held on Sun., Feb. 23, 
1851. The church was consecrated, by Bishop Alfred Lee, on Dec. 13, 1857. 
A melodeon was installed in April, 1859. The rectory was built in 1869. On 
Dec. 23, 1893, a marble altar and a silver chalice were consecrated by Bishop 
Leighton Coleman. After renovations the church was reopened and the new 
patish-house was dedicated at a service of benediction, conducted by Bishop 
Coleman, on June 23, 1895. In 1897-98, a Bishop’s chair was installed and the 
parish-house was enlarged. 

There are at least two graves on the lawn of Christ Church. The tomb- 
stones have been laid flat. The one that can be read is over the grave of Floriede 
Ubil, who died on Mar. 15, 1870. 


The Delaware City Presbyterian Church. The first Presbyterian meetings, 
in Delaware City, were held in private homes and in the schoolhouse. On Nov. 
17, 1835, Manuel Eyre donated land on the n. e. cor. of 2nd and Jefferson Sts., 
upon which to build a church and to maintain a graveyard. In 1835, a one-story 
brick church was erected. On May 11, 1846, the property was deeded to the 
trustees of the Delaware City Church. Previous to that time, the title had been 
held by the St. George’s Presbyterian Church. On Sept. 4, 1846, the church 
was organized as a separate charge. | 

During the period covering 1858, the Del. City Academy was conducted in 
the church with the Rev. George F. Wiswell of Central Church, Wilmington, 
as principal. 

A frame building had been erected for Sunday School purposes. In 1872, 
the church was enlarged and remodeled. The manse was built in 1886. 


On Sun., Dec. 2, 1945, an American flag in memory of Mrs. Elizabeth 
Winchester and a church flag, a gift of the board of deacons, were received 
by the Rev. Dr. A. H. Kleffman, on behalf of the church. | 


A cormer-stone laying service was conducted on Sun., Sept. 8, 1946, by 
the Rev. D. Linton Doherty, the pastor, assisted by the Rev. Gordon M: Ruff, 
Moderator of the New Castle Presbytery. The stone stood on a platform during 
the ceremonies and was placed in the wall at a later date. 


There is a graveyard beside the church. The oldest tombstone is that of 
Wm. Carson who died on Aug. 21, 1838. 


From 1852 until 1876, there was a situation in Delaware City without 
parallel in Delaware. In the block bounded by Jefferson, Second, Madison and 
William Sts., there were the Presbyterian Church, the Methodist Church and 
the Roman Catholic Church. Each of these churches had its own graveyard and 
the three properties covered the entire block. 


Ebenezer Methodist Church (M.E.) at Delaware City. The first Methodist 
meetings were held in private homes in 1827. In 1830, a union Sunday School, 
in conjunction with the Presbyterians, was held in the schoolhouse. In 1833, 
services were held monthly, first in the schoolhouse and then in private homes. 
A revival was held, in 1834, and the class thus formed, started to build a 
church in the fall. The church site at the n. w. cor. of William and Jefferson 
Sts. was donated by Manuel Eyre to the trustees on Dec. 22, 1835. The church 
was dedicated in 1836 and named the ‘Delaware City M. E. Church.” On Jan. 
19, 1852, additional land on William St. was purchased from John Ashhurst. 
A graveyard was laid out beside the church and it is still maintained as the 





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176 THES CH UR GCRES#R OPE DELAWARE 


Methodist Cemetery. The oldest tombstone is that of Ann Elizabeth Tibbels 
who died on Jan. 11, 1841. 

On Nov. 24, 1865, a lot on Clinton St. was purchased from David and Jos. 
H. Ware. The erection of a new church, on Clinton St., was started in August, 
1876. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 2, 1877, by Bishop Levi Scott and 
the Revs. W. W. Taylor and B. F. Price, the pastor. The church was completed 
and was dedicated on Oct. 13, 1878, by the Revs. R. L. Dashiell, Mr. Williams, 
Mr. Montgomery and B. F. Price, the pastor. 

In 1883, a bell was placed on the building. Sunday School was held in the 
old church until 1886, when it was torn down and the material used in the 
erection of a social-hall beside the church. A new organ and steam-heat were 
installed in 1904. The parsonage, a gift from Mrs. Julia H. Brewer, was built 
in 1917. The church was renovated, including hardwood floors, in 1925. The 
name ‘‘Ebenezer”” was adopted on Jan. 20, 1928. A new organ was presented 
by the Ladies Aid Society in 1930. On Mar. 8, 1942, altar memorials, including 
a Bible, a Cross, communion table scarf and a Bible marker were dedicated. ° 

On Sat., Apr. 20, 1946, during a high wind, the church roof was ignited by 
sparks from a trash fire several blocks distant. The fire spread rapidly and the 
entire building was gutted. Only a piano and a few benches were saved. 


St. Paul’s R. C. Church, at Delaware City, was organized at meetings held 
in private homes prior to 1852. The erection of the first church at the s. w. 
cor. of William and Madison Sts., was started in 1852 and completed in 1853. 
A graveyard was laid out and is still well maintained. The oldest tombstone is 
over the grave of Joseph O’Brien who died on Jan. 29, 1854. A new cemetery 
located on the road to St. Georges was opened in 1938. The church was in- 
corporated on June 28, 1872 and again on Sept. 5, 1883. 

A new church site at Washington and Henry Sts., was purchased on Jan. 
3, 1903, from Martha Price. \ 

The corner-stone of the present church was laid on May 22, 1904, at 5 
o'clock, by Bishop John J. Monaghan. Led by a brass band, a procession formed 
at the old church and marched to the new site. Bishop Monaghan and his as- 
sistants were in the line of march. They proceeded around the site and then 
the stone, of Brandywine granite, was laid and blessed by the Bishop. He was 
assisted by Fathers Hugo Paff, Kelley, Scott, Glancy, Brady and McSweeney. 
The sermon was.preached by Father Wm. J. Bermingham. 

The dedication service was held on Nov. 6, 1904, at 10:30 o'clock. The 
ceremony was conducted by Bishop John J. Monaghan, assisted by the Very 
Revs. J. A. Lyons and L. A. Delury and the Revs. Jacquier and McSweeney. A 
procession was formed which marched around the outside: of the church as 
the Bishop sprinkled holy water and blessed the walls. They then entered the 
church where the Bishop again blessed the walls. High Mass was celebrated 
_ by Father Lyons and the sermon was preached by Father Delury. Bishop Mon- 
aghan then gave a congratulatory talk. A group of boys, from St. James Pro- 
tectory, made their first appearance as a choir. 

A church bell, in memory of Mrs. Catherine C. Dolan, was blessed on 
May 9, 1920, by Bishop John J. Monaghan assisted by Fathers T. F. Waldron 
and James M. Grant. The main altar is a memorial to Father Edward L. Brady. 

On Feb. 23, 1933, the brick schoolhouse at 4th and Clinton Sts. 
was purchased from the State Board of Education. It was remodeled for use 
as a parish-house. With the entry of the United States into World War II, 
the building was turned over to the United Service Organization to be used 
in catering to the men in our armed forces. 


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There are two colored churches in Delaware City. Mt. Salem A. U. M. E. 
was organized in 1868 and the present church was built in 1931. The corner- 
stone was laid on Feb. 21, 1932. The site for St. Peter’s M. E. Church was 
bought from James B. Henry on June 11, 1872, the deed stating that the church 
had been built. It was rebuilt in 1922. 


Bethel A. M. E. Church a: Polktown. This congregation purchased a prop- 
erty from John T. Viney on Apr. 5, 1883. Polktown is situated south of Dela- 
ware City opposite the entrance to Fort Du Pont. 


Port Penn Presbyterian Church was organized at a meeting held on Nov. 
16, 1833. On Feb. 28, 1834, Mrs. Margaret Darrach donated to John M. 
Woods, John Cannon and John Price, trustees, a lot on the corner of Market 


and Stewart Sts., as a church site. A frame building was erected in 1834. After. 


securing 12 perches more land from Mrs. Darrach on Mar. 17, 1856, the corner- 
stone of the present brick church was laid on Tues., Aug. 19, 1856. The first 
services in the new church were held on May 17, 1857. Upon her death, Mrs. 
Darrach devised to the church a house and additional land next to the church 
property. 

More land was purchased on Apr. 25, 1871, from Edwin A. Smith. The 
church minute-book containing a record of every meeting was well cared for 
by the late Wm. McMullen, an elder of the church. When the new church was 
built, in 1856, the old church was sold to a colored congregation who moved 
it to a site two and one-quarter miles west of Port Penn. 


Port Penn M. E. Church was the outgrowth of revival meetings held in 
the schoolhouse in the 1840's. A church was organized and a church site was 
purchased on the east side of Stewart St., from Joseph Cleaver, on Nov. 20, 
1843. A frame building was erected. After major repairs a reopening service 


was held on Oct. 20, 1867, by the Revs. M. D. Kurtz and Elon J. Way, the © 


pastor. In 1881, lack of interest caused the church to be closed but it was re- 
opened in 1887. | 

The church was rebuilt in 1891. The corner-stone was laid of July 12, 
1891, at 2:30 P. M. Those taking part included the Revs. Frederick McKinsey, 
J. S. Willis, Isaac Jewell and T. O. Ayers. The dedication service was held on 
Oct. 11, 1891, with the Rev. T. E. Terry in attendance. The church was exten- 
sively repaired in 1914. It ceased to function in 1920. It was sold to a colored 
congregation who have occupied it since that time. 


St. Daniel’s A. M. E. Church. This congregation purchased, on May 22, 
1906, from Wm. Oakes, a property in Port Penn on the street leading to Dela- 
ware City, near Market St. When the M. E. Church became defunct in 1920, 
they secured possession of this church which they still occupy. The old church 
is now occupied as a dwelling. 


Zion A. M. E. Church was located two and one-quarter miles west of Port 
Penn. The building is the old Port Penn Presbyterian Church which they 
bought in 1856. It was used until more recent times when the congregation 
merged with St. Daniel’s Church in Port Penn. On Oct. 15, 1941, Geo. H. 
Johnson donated more land to the church. A cemetery surrounds the old church 
which is almost a complete wreck. 


Asbury M. E. Church was located three and one-quarter miles south of 
St. Georges. This church was built about 1815. On Jan. 25, 1830, the property 


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178 TEC HG RG EO gree) eh Led WACK 


was transferred to a new board of trustees. The church was abandoned in the 
1850's. The old graveyard remains, with its two sections, one for white and 
one for colored persons. The oldest tombstone in the white cemetery is over 
the grave of Ziporah Reed who died on Aug. 22, 1817. 


George’s Creek Friend’s Meeting-House. Hickory Grove Cemetery, three 
miles s. e. of St. Georges on the road to Port Penn, was the site of this meet- 
ing-house. For many years previous to 1703 the Friends of this section held 
Meetings in private homes. On Nov. 13, 1703, ten acres of land were war- 
ranted for the use of the Friends. A meeting-house was built and a burying- 
ground was laid out. The Meeting had representatives at Duck Creek Monthly 
Meeting in 1706. In 1772, the Preparative Meeting was discontinued. On June 
20, 1783, they received permission from Duck Creek Meeting to move to Cant- 
well’s Bridge, now Odessa, where the Appoquinimink Meeting House had 
been built. The oldest tombstone the writer could find is that of James 
Mansson, who died on Dec. 10, 1776. In this inscription the old style letter 
Ss is used. 


St. George’s Methodist Church (M.E.), at St. Georges, was erected in 
1852. The corner-stone was laid on Tues., June 22, 1852, by the Revs. Anthony 
Atwood and Andrew Manship. The church was finished in the winter of 
1852-53. A great deal of the work was done literally by the Rev. John B. 
Dennison. The dedication services were held on Feb. 20, 1853, and were in 
charge of Bishop Waugh, who was assisted by the Rev, Andrew Manship. 
Additional land was purchased from John P. Hudson on July 9, 1880. Im- 
provements were made in 1883. The church was incorporated on May 12, 1884. 
After major improvements a reopening service was held on Sept. 13, 1896, by 
the Revs. Ezra Tinker and Julius Dodd. The church was remodeled in 1911. 
A new pipe organ was installed in 1943. 


. St. Georges Presbyterian Church was founded in 1698. Meetings were held 
in a log building. The Rev. Henry Hook was installed as the first pastor in 


(1722. “On the 23rd day of April in the 15th year of George II, King of Great 


Britain, etc., and in the year of our Lord 1742,” Magdalene Cox deeded 97 
perches of land on the King’s Road, for 1 shilling, as a church site. On Sept. 
6, 1790, Elizabeth Dushane transferred to the trustees, for the nominal sum 
of 5 shillings, 1 silver tankard and 1 silver pint. 


This church was located one mile west of St. Georges on what is now the 
toad to Kirkwood, where St. George's Cemetery is now located. Presumably it 
was of log or frame construction. The altar was toward the west and there were 
two side aisles. At the head of the southerly aisle there were two interments 
marked with flat slabs. One of these is the oldest inscribed tomb in the ceme- 
tery. It is the grave of Peter Bayard Rodgers, who died on Mar. 15, 1739 at 
the age of 4 years, 3 mos. and 22 days. He was the son of the Rev. John 
Rodgers and his wife Elizabeth. Alongside is the grave of the mother, Elizabeth. 

At the foot of the northerly aisle is the tomb of Dr. David Thompson, 
who died on Feb. 22, 1795. On the site of the altar is the grave of the Rev. 
J. C. How, who served this church and the church in the town of St. Georges 
from 1830 until his death on Aug. 13, 1855. The layout of this church is the 
conclusion reached by Tyson F. Sartin, who looks after the cemetery, and it 
appears quite logical to the writer. 


South of and close to the grave of Mr. How is the grave of the Hon. 





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BETHESDA METHODIST CHURCH, MIDDLETOWN 
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ST. ANNE’S P. E. CHURCH, S. OF MIDDLETOWN 
(Page 185) 








180 HBG AOR GE Snowe 6 1A ae 


Anthony Higgins, LL.D., who was prominent in the public life of Delaware. 
Mr. Higgins died on June 26, 1912, and it is.claimed that his funeral was the 
first all-automobile funeral held in Delaware. 

In 1840, a lot in St. Georges was secured and the present brick church 
was started. It was completed and dedicated on July 27, 1845. 

The 200th Anniversary of the church was celebrated on May 29, 1898. 
Among those taking part were the Revs. W. H. Stone, O. A. Gillingham, L. A. 
Oates, D. J. Beale, H. Rumer, J. H. Moore, J. L. Vallandingham and Anthony 
Higgins, Esq. 

After extensive rebuilding the church was reopened on Oct. 9, 1904. The 
Rev. R. A. Davidson, D.D., preached the reopening sermon in the morning. 
Ten beautiful memorial windows were dedicated by the pastor, the Rev. J. R. 
Milligan. At 2:30 P. M., an historical service was held at which time Anthony 
Higgins, Esq., delivered the address. The evening sermon was preached by the 
Rev. Dr. Henry Rumer, 

There is a gallery in the rear of the church. Two marble tablets on the 
front wall of the auditorium honor the Rev. John Rodgers, D.D., who served 
the church from 1749 to 1763 and the Rev. James Coles How who served from 
1830 to 1855. 


St. Georges P. E. Church was organized prior to 1707, the congregation 
being Welsh. In 1829, when the canal was dug, the cemetery was still there 
but there was no evidence of the church. 


St. James’ A. M. E. Church at St. Georges was built in 1887. 


_ Kirkwood Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1898, S. O. Gibbons, a local- 
preacher, held revival services at Kirkwood and was successful in gaining con- 
verts. On Feb. 2, 1899, R. T. Cann donated land upon which a church was 
built. The corner-stone was laid on May 28, 1899, by the Rev. I. L. Wood. 
The church was dedicated on Sept. 3, 1899, by the Rev. Dr. James Crowe. 
Music was furnished by the P.R.R. Y.M.C.A. choir of Wilmington. ' 


St. Paul’s M. E. Church, colored, at Kirkwood, was founded in 1858. 


They were incorporated on July 15, 1889. : 


Boulden’s Chapel was located within sight of Summit Bridge on a dirt 
road leading to Lorewood Grove. The correct name of this chapel was “Chrystal 
Run Meeting-House.” It was built, in 1822, by Benjamin Boulden, to be used 
for church and school purposes. It was used as an undenominational church. 
Upon his death, Mr. Boulden willed the chapel to Welsh Tract Baptist Church. 
The will was defective, for some reason, so the chapel became the property of 
Mr. Boulden’s sister, Abagail Davis of Dover. It was Mrs. Davis’ desire to 


. carry out her brother’s wishes. Apparently, Welsh Tract Church did not want 


the chapel so Mrs. Davis deeded the property to the Second Baptist Church of 
Wilmington on Aug. 3, 1837. Mrs. Davis reserved for herself and her heirs 
the right to be buried on the property. 


Occasional Baptist services were held here. Summit Bridge M. E. Church 
was organized and met here for a number of years. The school end of the 
building was used for years after the church end had been abandoned. The 
building was destroyed by fire. The body of Mr. Boulden was interred in a 
vault beneath the church. After the fire the body of Mr. Boulden was reinterred 
in Welsh Tract Baptist graveyard. , 





lege Crete Pol Ge On INP Ye 181 


Summit Bridge Methodist Church (M.E.). The Methodists in the Summit 
Bridge section began to hold services in Boulden’s Chapel during the 1860's. 
On June 9, 1870, they purchased a church site of one-half an acre from James 
Nicholson. They agreed to build and maintain a fence around the lot. When 
Boulden’s Chapel became much in need of repairs the Methodists decided to 
proceed with the erection of a church. The corner-stone was laid on Aug. 18, 
1876 by Bishop Levi Scott. The church was incorporated on Mar. 15, 1877. In 
1878, Bishop Scott presided at the dedication ceremonies. 


On July 24, 1913, the church was struck by lightning and burned. A new 
building was started immediately and it was dedicated on Jan. 18, 1914. The 


service was conducted by Dist. Supt. E. L. Hoffecker, assisted by the Revs. ~ 


W. L. S. Murray, E. H. Collins and G. W. Dawson. Reversing the usual pro- 
cedure, the corner-stone was laid on July 26, 1914, at 2:30 P. M., by Dist. Supt. 
E. L. Hoffecker, assisted by the Revs. H. T. Quigg and Asbury Burke. 


Summit Bridge A. U. Church. This church, on Nov. 9, 1859, purchased 
one-quarter of an acre of land from Samuel Hubert for $93.00. On Aug. 23, 
1867, they purchased, from Thomas W. McCracken, one acre of land for 
$125.00. 


Mt. Pisgah U. A. M. E. Church is located at Buck Bridge. The Union 
Church of Welsh Tract was founded at an early date and a church was built. On 
Feb. 25, 1868, they were incorporated and the name was changed to the ‘Union 
African Church of Welsh Tract.” They rebuilt their church in 1870 and in 
1914. On Dec. 27, 1933, they changed their name to “Mt. Pisgah.” The pres- 
ent church was built in 1937, when the old site was taken over in widening 
the Del. and Ches. Canal. There is a graveyard to the rear of the church. 


Forest 2nd Presbyterian Church was located at Armstrong’s Corner. The 
site can be distinguished by a small grove of trees and a short strip of picket 
fence. On Apr. 23, 1871, a group from Forest Presbyterian Church, at Middle- 
town, organized a Sunday School here. On July 22, Benjamin Asmstrong 
donated the land upon which the chapel was built. The corner-stone was laid 
on Aug. 24 and it was dedicated on Sept. 17, 1871. On May 30, 1877, a church 
was organized and named “Forest 2nd.” In April, 1886, it was abolished as a 
separate church and conducted as a mission school. The chapel was closed in 
1915. Shortly after this the Christian Scientists held meetings here for about 
one year. In 1935, the building collapsed and the lumber was used for farm 
buildings, closeby. 


Ringgold A. M. E. Church at Armstrong’s Corner was built in 1912. 


St. Joseph’s A. U. M. P. Church. This church purchased a site from Har- 
riott Houston, for $40.00, in 1899. It was located on a road leading from Mt. 


Pleasant to Odessa. 


Grace Orthodox Presbyterian Church at Middletown. On Jan. 30, 1938, a 
group from Forest Church held a meeting in the Everett Theatre. Grace Church 
was duly organized on Feb. 2, 1938, and it was incorporated on June 9, 1938. 
Ground was broken for the present church on Easter Sunday, Apr. 17, 1938. 
The pastor laid the corner-stone on July 24, 1938. On the corner-stone is in- 
scribed ‘By Grace Are Ye Saved.” The church was completed and was dedi- 
cated on Oct. 6, 1938. This was followed by a full week of services. 


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182 PAE) OC AUR Gee aE 4 lee Aad 


St. Anne’s P. E. Church at Middletown. A Sunday School was opened in 
Middletown in 1866. This was continued and in 1871 the erection of a church 
was started. On July 15, 1871, Wm. Green sold to the congregation, for 
$1,208.00, the land upon which the church is built. At that time Old St. Anne’s 
was badly in need of repairs and it was considered more convenient for the 
members to have a church in town. The corner-stone was laid on Aug. 5, 1871, 
by the Rev. Dr. John C. McCabe, the rector, assisted by the Revs. George A. 
Latimer and T. Gardiner Littell. The consecration ceremonies were held on 
Apr. 4, 1872, by Bishop Alfred Lee who was assisted by Bishop H. C. Lay, D.D. 
On May 2, 1882, the church was damaged by fire and many prized relics 
were lost. 

Rebuilding was started immediately and the church was opened for 
services on Dec. 25, 1882. The erection of the rectory was started in Decem- 
ber, 1883. The church was incorporated on May 24, 1884. The tower was 
completed and a bell was installed in June, 1889. During the following year a 
new pulpit was presented by the Young Ladies’ Guild as a memorial to Sewell 
Green, In 1892, a new altar was consecrated. Beginning in 1890 and continuing 
for about 15 years this church conducted missions at Odessa, Fieldsboro, 
Townsend and Middle Neck. On Jan. 1, 1903, pew rents were abolished. On 
Easter Sunday, Apr. 12, 1914, Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman consecrated a brass 
eagle lectern in memory of Natalie G. Blatchford. A desk and a brass altar 
book-stand were also consecrated. During 1924-25 three memorial windows, a 
Bishop’s chair and a priest’s chair were installed. | 


Forest Presbyterian Church at Middletown. On June 6, 1750, Robert 
Alexander granted, to a board of trustees, a tract of land upon which to build - 
a church. This land is included in the present Forest Cemetery. The church 
stood on the s. e. corner of the plot. The church was incorporated on Jan. 1, 
1789. On Dec. 18, 1789, Slayter Bouchell and Thos. Witherspoon deeded to 
the trustees one acre of land on Mill Branch of Drawyer’s Creek. In return, 
they were granted church pew No. 3, valued at five pounds. This church was 
closed about 1830 and having fallen into decay it was sold and moved away 
in 1840. 

On Sept. 25, 1849, Robert A. Cochran sold to “the trustees of Forest and 
Middletown Presbyterian Church, about to be revived,” the church site on the 
south side of Main St. The present brick church was then built. The corner- 
stone was laid on Thurs., May 9, 1850. The dedication service was held on 
Oct. 26, 1851, at 11 A. M. by the Rev. Isaac W. K. Handy, the pastor. All-day 
services were conducted by the Revs. Thomas Brainard, D.D., John Patton and 
the pastor. Rainy weather kept the attendance down. | 

On Mar. 2, 1878, a two-acre addition to the cemetery was purchased from 


Nehemiah Burris. The parsonage lot was purchased on May 16, 1863 from 


2 


R. A. Cochran. 

On the vestibule walls there are three marble tablets. The first is inscribed 
‘Founded 1750 Rebuilt 1850,” the second contains a list of the trustees of 
1850 and the third lists the ministers who served the church from 1851 
until 1920. 

An addition was built in 1882. Major improvements were made in 1899, 
after which a reopening service was held on Oct. 1, 1899, by the Revs. F. H. 
Moore and J. L. Vallandingham. 

In front of the church and close to the wall there are four gfaves covered 
with flat slabs. These are members of the Peterson family, whose private burial 
plot was on the site when the church was built. One is dated 1741, 





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ST. ANNE’S P. E. CHURCH, S. OF MIDDLETOWN | 
(Page 185) 





OLp DRAWYER’S PRES. CHURCH, NR. ODESSA 
(Page 185) 


184 TUB NC HIU-R G EGP Sue) Fay De bg as 
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In 1906, the tower clock was presented by Mrs. Frances C. Comegys as a 
memorial to her parents. Former Governor John P. Cochran is buried in 


Forest Cemetery. 


Bethesda Methodist Church (M.E.) of Middletown, lovingly called “Old 
Bethesda,” was formally organized on Dec. 13, 1821. A church site was pur- 
chased from John Hays, for $50.00, on Sept. 14, 1822. A small church was 
then built. The church was rebuilt in 1849. The parsonage, adjoining the 
church was built in 1859. Additional land was purchased on May 29, 1860 and 
on Sept. 5, 1864 from Edward Bradley and Wm. G. Whitely. Improvements 
were made in 1879. The church was remodeled and redecorated in 1910 and 
extensively improved in 1940. A graveyard adjoins the church. The oldest 
legible tombstone is that of John Merritt who died on Mar. 25, 1825. 


St. Joseph’s Church, R. C., at Middletown. In 1879, the Rev. Charles H. 
Heichemere, S.J., the pastor of old Bohemia Church in Maryland, began to 
celebrate Mass in the auditorium of the Old Town Hall in Middletown. He 
would drive over on alternate Sundays bringing his altar boy with him. At 
that time, there were only about fifteen Roman Catholics in that neighborhood. 
Fr. Heichemere was succeeded by the Rev. John B. Gaffney, S.J., and, in 1882, 
he began urging that a church be built in Middletown. The site of St. Joseph's 
Church was purchased by means of a public subscription. 

The contract for building the church was awarded to Stevens, Miller and 
Co., on Oct. 19, 1883. The corner-stone was laid on Sun., Nov. 18, 1883, by 
the Rev. Father Murphey assisted by the Rev. John B. Gaffney. At 10 o’clock, 
a Mass was celebrated in the Town Hall, after which the congregation marched 
to the church site. Here the corner-stone was laid and blessed and the 750 
lb. bell was also blessed. In the evening Father Murphey delivered a lecture 
in the Town Hall. The church was incorporated on Feb. 3, 1884. 

The church was dedicated on Oct. 5, 1884, at the morning service, by 
Bishop Thomas A. Becker. Bishop Becker celebrated Mass previous to the 
dedication ceremonies. He was assisted by Fathers Bradford, Keiley, Hayes and 
Gaffney. St. Peter’s choir, of Wilmington, assisted with the music. In the eve- 
ning Father Keiley delivered a lecture. The site of the rectory was donated by 
Mrs. Sarah Lockwood. 
~ Old Bohemia Church near Warwick, Md., mothered not only St. Joseph's 

- Church but all of the Catholic churches in Delaware and Pennsylvania. St. 
Francis Xavier's Church, better known as Old Bohemia Church was founded 
by the Jesuit Fathers in 1704. It is the oldest Catholic church on the Eastern 
Shore. There was a college at Old Bohemia which was attended by Charles 
Carroll of Carrollton, one of the Signers, his cousin, John Carroll, the first 
Bishop of America, and others, who became prominent in the. life of the 
Colonies. The College was founded, in 1745, by the Rev. Thomas Poulton, 
S.J., and it was the forerunner of Georgetown University. It was continued 
until 1790, when the present Georgetown University was founded in Wash- 

tington, D. C. The Jesuit Fathers and the Sulpician Fathers conducted Old 
Bohemia until 1899, when secular priests were placed in charge. It is served 
today by the Rev. John H. Walsh who also looks after the Middletown and 
Chesapeake City Parishes. 


The Home Missionary Church at Middletown was organized in the 
Academy in 1946. The present church was built and was dedicated on Sat., 
Aug. 31, 1946 by the Rev. W. F. Hopkins, the pastor, 





INGE Van Ge A-S-T 1 BGO. UNG EY 185 


The Jehovah’s Witnesses were organized in Middletown in the spring 
of 1936. They meet in a private home on Sunday evenings. 


Methodist Episcopal Church, colored. On Dec. 15, 1869, Samuel Dale 
sold to the trustees of this congregation a church site on the east side of New 
St., containing 3700 sq. ft. Dale’s M. E. Church, colored, purchased 6000 sq. ft. 
of land from Z. A. Pool on Aug. 27, 1886. The present church on Lake St. 
was built in 1894. Trinity A. M. E. Church was built in 1884. It was dedicated 
on Oct. 18, 1885, by Bishop Cane and the Rev. Charles Ross. Mt. Calvary 
Baptist Church, colored, is located on the easterly edge of the town. 


Old St. Anne’s P. E. Church is located one mile south of Middletown. It is 
believed to have been organized before 1704. On Sept. 1, 1704, a grant of ten 
acres on the Queen’s Road below Appoquinimink Creek, was made, upon which 
to build a chapel of the Church of England. The church was built in 1705. On 
June 25, 1765, the Rev. Philip Reading reported that land had been given and 
a subscription was being taken to build a large church. 

The present church was built in 1768, and the original altar and box- 
pews with gates are still in use. The ivy was brought from England by Bishop 


Doane and was planted by him. Among the church’s cherished possessions is a 


covering for the communion table presented to the church by Queen Anne and 
having her initials “A.A.” embroidered in silk upon it. A silver communion 
set was presented, in 1759, by Mrs. Rebecca Dyre. The old altar is a fine 
example of Colonial workmanship. “Old St. Anne’s Oak,” a tree standing in 
the churchyard, is estimated to be more than three hundred years old. 


On June 18, 1922, during the celebration of the 217th Anniversary, a 
bronze tablet in memory of Richard Lockwood, vestryman from 1820 to 1875, 
was dedicated by Bishop Philip Cook. He was assisted by the Rev. Percy L. 
Donaghay, the rector. 

The ornamental brick wall surrounding the property has been built, be- 
ginning in 1914, by different persons chiefly as memorials. Philip Cook, Fourth 
Bishop of Delaware, who died on Mar. 25, 1938, is buried in the graveyard. 
One of the oldest inscriptions that the writer could find is on the tomb of the 
Rev. Philip Reading, :close to the church. It states that he died on Oct. 29, 
1778, aged 58. He was the rector of the church during the unhappy days of 
the American Revolution. Annual services are held on the third Sunday 
in June. 


Old Drawyer’s Presbyterian Church is located one mile north of Odessa. 
From meetings started in 1700, this congregation was organized in 1708, at 
which time the Rev. John Wilson was in charge of Drawyer’s, White Clay 
and the New Castle churches. The site was obtained from John Peterson, on 
May 10, 1711, and the church was built of logs. It was known as the “Church 
of Apoquinimy.” In 1768, Dr. Thomas Read, the great-great-grandfather of the 
Rev. Elliot Field, D.D., of New Castle, became the first settled pastor at Old 
Drawyer’s. In 1769, the log church being in bad repair, a building committee 
was appointed and, in 1773, the present church was built. The bricks were 
made a short distance from the church site. In 1811, a new roof was built and, 
in 1833, the pulpit and seats were remodeled. The name was changed to the 
“First Presbyterian Church in St. George's Hundred.” The church has the old 
family box-pews, in white trimmed with mahogany, the gallery extends around 
three sides, above the high pulpit is a beautiful domed sounding board topped 
with a gold eagle. Two sets of pulpit stairs curve around the precentor’s desk 


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enclosed with a railing. There are a number of marble memorial tablets upon 
the walls. 

Among the most famous of the early members was Thomas McKean, a 
Signer of the Declaration of Independence and of the Articles of Confedera- 
tion. Dr. Read, pastor from 1768 to 1797, and Elder John Crawford were 
commissioners to the Synod that organized the Presbyterian General Assembly 
and to the first Assembly in 1789, when Dr. Read was appointed to the Com- 
mittee on Bills and Overtures. 


Dr. Read, whose missionary journeys embraced a circuit of some forty 
miles, was a chief actor in one of the thrilling episodes of the Revolution. On 
Aug. 22, 1777, the American Army under General Washington, near Chadd’s 
Ford, Pa., was menaced by a superior British force. Washington, with his raw 
troops, did not dare risk a pitched battle. Retreat along the main road was 
equally dangerous, with the trained British Army at his heels. At this juncture, 
Colonel Duff entered the council room and exclaimed: “I know the man who 
can extricate us.” Washington replied, “Mount and bring him here without 
a moment’s delay.” At midnight, Dr. Read was roused from bed and in five 
minutes was under whip and spur for Washington's camp. Through his inti- 
mate knowledge of the countryside, Dr. Read was able to map out the cross 
and by-roads and under his guidance Washington effected a safe retreat to the 
Brandywine. 


Regular services were discontinued in 1858 when New Drawyer’s Church 
was built at Odessa. The first annual services were held, in 1896, by the Friends 
of Old Drawyer’s. These services are held on the first Sunday in June. The 
ivy-covered church and the large enclosed graveyard are kept in immaculate 
condition. The walk leading to the church is flanked by pink and white dog- 
wood trees. The oldest tombstone the writer could find is that of Joseph Hill 
who died on Dec. 7, 1762. 


Appoquinimink Friend’s Meeting-House is located in Odessa. It is a small 
‘brick building about twenty feet square and with only one doorway instead © 
of the usual two. It faces north instead of south as do most Friend’s Meeting- 
Houses. Apparently, the building originally had a door and two windows 
facing south but these have been bricked up. Over the door is a marble tablet 
inscribed: "Erected and presented by David Wilson 1785.” Permission to build 
this meeting-house was granted by Duck Creek Meeting. On June 20, 1783, 
the building being completed permission to hold meetings there was granted. 
On Sept. 2, 1800, for the sum of five shillings, David Wilson conveyed the 
site, containing 143 perches of land, to John Hirons, Joab Alston, Pennel Corbit 
_and Thomas Starr, “members of Appoquinimink Meeting of the Society of 
Friends or the people called Quakers.” The deed recites that the meeting- 
house had already been built. In 1830, the Preparative Meeting united with 
Duck Creek Meeting. All meetings were abandoned in 1881. The building 
and the surrounding burying-ground are well kept. Several fighting Quakers 
are buried here and their graves are decorated with the insignia of the Grand 
ihe of the Republic. The oldest tombstone is that of Wm. Liston, who 
ted in 1788. 


A steep stairway leads to the second floor which was evidently used as 
a school-room. This meeting-house was used as a station on the Underground 
Railway, previous to the Civil War, where slaves would be hidden, fed and 
aan needed clothing before being sent to the next station on their way to 
reedom. 





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188 HE CH Ue COGS eOeP De Fe Lf eAglWV Aree 


Drawyer’s Presbyterian Church, it Odessa, was built in 1858, and was 
dedicated on May 9, 1861. In 1886, extensive renovations were made. 


St. Paul’s Methodist Church (M.E.) at Odessa. In 1830, at a revival 
meeting, in Fieldsboro, several young men from Odessa were converted. They 
secured the use of the schoolhouse and the Rev. Richard Greenbank, of the 
Smyrna circuit, began to hold services in 1831. They adopted the name “Mt. 
Zion Meeting-House.”” They were incorporated on June 25, 1832 as the “‘Cant- 
well’s Bridge M. E. Church,” Cantwell’s Bridge being the name of Odessa 
at that time. 

These meetings were continued for two years, when Joseph C. Griffith 
donated the land upon which to build a church. An old brick house near 
Fieldsboro was bought and a burned-out brick house near Odessa was donated 
and the congregation proceeded to tear them down and clean the bricks. With 
these bricks a fair-sized church was built in 1833 and the walls were white- 
washed. It was called the “Brick-bat Church.” The corner-stone of the present 
church was laid on Aug. 27, 1851, at 10:30 A. M., by the Rev. Mr. Hodgson 
and the Rev. J. R. Anderson, the pastor. It was dedicated on Oct. 24, 1852, by 
Bishop Levi Scott, assisted by the Revs. Andrew Manship and J. Aspril, the 
pastor. The church was repaired in 1877 and improved in 1880. The semi- 
centennial of the church was celebrated on Jan. 18, 1883. Services were con- 
ducted by the Revs. J. S. Cook, B. F. Price and J. S. Willis. At a reopening, 
after repairs, on Nov. 18, 1901, a sketch of the history of the church and the 
town was‘delivered by Chief Justice Charles B. Lore. This address was later 
printed in pamphlet form. Improvements to the church were made in 1939. 
There is a large graveyard beside the church. The oldest tombstone the writer 
could find is on the grave of Rachel Hays who died on Sept. 21, 1838. 


Zoar M. E. Church, colored, at Odessa. The present site of this church 
was purchased from Daniel Stevens on Nov. 2, 1880, for $500.00. The church 
was built in 1881. It was dedicated on June 11, 1882, by Bishop E. G. Andrews. 


Hopkins’ Landing A. M. E. Church. On Nov. 30, 1824, the trustees‘ pur- 
chased a half-acre of land from Wm. Polk for $10.00. It was located on a new 
road leading from Odessa to Hopkins’ Landing where they proposed to erect 
a church. | 


Immanuel Methodist Church (M.E.) at Townsend was organized on June 

13, 1871. Services had been held for several years in the schoolhouse. On July 
5, 1871, they purchased land from Samuel B. Ginn upon which a frame church 
was erected. It was dedicated on Aug. 20, 1871, by the Revs. J. F. Clymer, 
Vaughn Smith and W. C. Prettyman. On Sept. 2, 1881, land was purchased 
from James T. Taylor, about one mile s. w. of the town, where a cemetery was 
established. | ; 
i The church was improved in 1878, at which time the Delaware Railroad 
presented a bell to the church. This bell had been used for years in New Castle 
to announce to the people the incoming and outgoing trains. Additional land 
was purchased on Mar. 6, 1890 and on Sept. 21, 1891, from John Townsend 
and Jesse J. Taylor. 

The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Sept. 10, 1902. It 
was dedicated on May 3, 1903, by the Rev. S. B. McBurney assisted by the 
Rev. J. H. Beauchamp, the pastor. The old church was converted into two 
homes which stand at the southern edge of the town. A new bell was the 
gift of the Sunday School class of Miss Ethelwyn J. Maloney. Improvements 





Nhe cocoa arg WEN ae hu brs eimnaeas Wed W dat Wied ind bh 189 


were made in 1934. The name of this chutch was spelled “Emanuel” until 
more recent times when the present spelling appears to have been adopted. 


Nazareth M. P. Church of Townsend. At a meeting held on Mar. 10, 1860, 
in Mt. Olivet M. P. Church at Warwick, Md., Nazareth Church was incor- 
porated and trustees were elected. They selected as the seal of their Corpora- 
tion the American half-dollar. The trustees were Alfred D. Caulk, Richard A. 
Frazier, Stephen B. Lofland, E. B. Caulk, Wm. Jones, B. F. Shawn, Arthur 
Johns, Isaac Walker and the Rev. Daniel F. Ewell. Mr. Ewell had organized 
a number of churches but the effort to build a church at Townsend appears 
to have failed. 


St. Mary’s P. E. Chapel at Townsend was organized, in 1900, as a chapel- 
of-ease for St. Anne’s Church at Middletown. On May 9, 1900, Rebecca C. 
Rose donated the land for a church site. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 
13, 1900, by Bishop Leighton Coleman. The first service in the completed 
chapel was held on Ascension Day, 1901. The consecration service was con- 
ducted by Bishop Coleman on June 20, 1901. During 1910-11 summer services, 
only, were held. The chapel was frescoed and repaired in 1915-16 and, in 
1921-22, a bell was presented and installed. The last service of any kind, a 
funeral service, was held in June, 1928. In 1940, the chapel was sold and 
converted into a dwelling. 


Haven M. E. Church, colored, at Townsend. On Dec. 19, 1879, Archibald 
Finley donated a lot, 50 ft. by 150 ft., on the easterly side of South St., to a 
board of trustees consisting of three members each from Lee’s Chapel, Ebenezer 
Church and Scott’s Chapel. A small church was built. In 1889, the new church 
was built on the opposite side of the street and the original site was used for 
a parsonage. The church was rebuilt in 1922. 


Bethany Independent Methodist Church was located three miles west of 
Townsend. It was organized in February, 1883. On Nov. 11, 1885, the church 
was incorporated with James T. Webb, J. E. Hallman, J. W. Voshell, J. W. 
Brown, W. H. Moore, Stokley Daniels and David Johnson as trustees. They 
held their services in Van Dyke’s School. On Nov. 25, 1885, they purchased 
from Columbus Watkins, for $100.00, 12,500 sq. ft. of land between Townsend 
and Dexter’s Corner for a church site. A church was then built. Mr. Webb was 
the moving spirit in this congregation. The church ceased to function in 1888 
and the building was sold to the Ebenezer M. E. Church, colored, on Oct. 
30, 1889. . 


Ebenezer M. E. Church, colored. On Feb. 23, 1867, Forrest M. E. Chappel, 
colored, purchased as a church site, 96 sq. perches of land from Richard Loat- 
man, for $24.00. It was located on the north side of the road leading from 
the Levels to the Sassafras and Smyrna Road. The church was completed in 
1873. They were incorporated on Oct. 2, 1889. On Oct. 30, 1889, they pur- 
chased the Bethany Independent Methodist property for $300.00. The church 
was burned early in 1913. The congregation experienced great difficulty in 
raising funds for a new building but, through the generosity of State Senator 
Edward Hart, a new church was completed in July, 1913. In the meantime the 
name was changed from ‘‘Forrest” to ‘‘Ebenezer.’’ The church is located three 
miles s. w. of Townsend and is still active. 


Mt. Zion A. M. E. Church is located at New Discovery, one and one-half 
miles south of Townsend. 


PER Et RRMA AON ONS OS ES: Ree Tr eee RMN ItRe ele 


_ are held on the second Sunday in September. 





190 THE (COHUR CUES, SON? TDSELLAAMVAAPREE 


Lee’s M. E. Chapel, white, was organized and incorporated on Sept. 2, 
1824. They met in a place known as the “whitehouse.”’ 


Lee’s M. E. Chapel, colored, is located at Pine Tree. The land was se- 
cured on June 1, 1907, from Martin B. Burris. The church was completed and 
dedicated in 1907. 


White’s M. E. Church, located between Townsend and Pine Tree was 
the first Methodist church to be built in Appoquinimink Hundred. It was 
succeeded by Dickinson’s Chapel, now Union Church. 


Union Methodist Church (M.E.) is located five miles below Odessa. On 
July 17, 1789, Joseph Dickinson donated to a board of trustees, a tract of land 
upon which Union Church was built. This church, built of logs, was completed 
in 1792 and was known as “Dickinson’s Chapel.” It was rebuilt in 1798. In 
1805, the trustees reported that they had a frame church. The corner-stone 
of the present brick building was laid in 1847 and the dedication service was 
held on Dec. 23, 1847. The bricks were burned close by on the church prop- 
erty. During the building of the church, the congregation met in Lee’s Chapel. 
Alexander McClermont donated land to the church on Apr. 5, 1850. 

Extensive repairs were made in 1877 and a reopening service was con- 


_ ducted by Bishop Simpson on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 29, 1877. On the fol- 


lowing Sunday, services were conducted by Bishop Levi Scott and the Revs. 
J. B. Merrit, Charles Hill and James Carroll, the pastor. 

Bishop Levi Scott, a native of this section, who died on July 13, 1882, is 
buried in the churchyard near the entrance. The inscription on his monument 
is “His record is his monument.” There is a large well-kept graveyard. The 
oldest tombstone the writer could find is that of Sarah Fields who died on 
Mar. 27, 1799. Regular services have been discontinued but annual services 


- 


Scott’s Methodist Church (M.E.) at Blackbird. This church was the out- 
growth of a Sunday School started by Mrs. Lottie T. Blockson in 1886.,The 
church was organized and incorporated on May 9, 1898. On Oct. 22, 1898, 
the church site, containing 9000 sq. ft. was purchased from Theodore Fergu- 
son. The church was built in 1899. It was dedicated on Sun., Sept. 17, 1899. 
Those taking part in the services were the Revs. L. E. Barrett, D.D., Alfred 
T. Scott, Dr. I. L. Wood, Wm. Fairies, G. P. Jones and J. B. Coverdale. 


Blackbird Presbyterian Church was located three miles n. e. of Walker's 
School and then to the left about five hundred yards to a point close to Black- 
bird Creek. It faced a road that at that time followed the course of the creek. 
It was built previous to 1788, as one of the tombstones records the death of 
Rachael Haughey on Mar. 10, 1788. By 1809, the church had become dilapi- 
dated. The graveyard, at least, was used in 1853 as another tombstone records 
the death of Isaac Gibbons in 1853. The site is in a dense forest and no evi- 
dence of the church remains. A portion of the stone wall surrounding the 
graveyard is still standing. 


Scott M. E. Chapel, colored, was located near Taylor's Bridge on the road 
to Flemming’s Landing. The trustees purchased the church site from Isaac 
Staats on June 3, 1864 for $10.00. The church was built and it was dedicated 
at 10 A. M. on July 21, 1867, by Bishop Levi Scott. It was incorporated on 
Sept. 26, 1903. Unused for several years the building was torn down in 1944, 
There are a few graves close to the road. 





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By eereromeacsmenmemtcige 


NTR TRORTE E 


UNION METHODIST CHURCH, NR. BLACKBIRD 
(Page 190) 


FRIENDSHIP METHODIST CHURCH, S. E. OF SMYRNA 
(Page 192 











192 PAEIUE VCURLUSRICKIIES OSE HOE Td PCA Te 


Salem M. P. Church was located four miles south of Blackbird on a stone 
road. The site, consisting of one-half of an acre, was donated to a board of 
trustees by Wm. Temple on Nov. 6, 1844. The deed mentions that the church 
had been recently built. It was called “Delaware” at the time the first pastor 
was installed. In 1845, the name was changed to “Smyrna.” The name ‘‘Salem’”’ 
was adopted in 1850. In 1858, it was called “Warwick and Salem” but returned 
to the name “Salem” in 1860. 

In 1857, the building was repaired. The reopening services were held on 
May 10, but being unable to raise sufficient funds to pay for the repairs, the 
church went into another closed period. In 1858, the Rev. D. F. Ewell was 
assigned to the charge. Through his efforts the debt was paid and the building 
was rededicated. 

The church originally had only a center aisle and in the early days the men 
sat north of the aisle and the women south of it. On Oct. 27, 1886, the property 
was transferred by Samuel MacClary to James Brockson, Charles Numbers, 
A. W. Webster, J. T. Webster and R. Blockson, trustees. About 1900, the 
single aisle was replaced with two side aisles. The church was incorporated on 
Feb. 22, 1912. | 

With many “ups and downs” the church disappeared from the Conference 
Reports in 1930. A closing service was held in 1932 which the congregation 
believed would be only a temporary closing, but it was the last service held at 
Salem. A Sunday School was conducted until 1933 when it was discontinued. 
Some of the pews and the stove were given to the Oak Hill Community. From 
that time the building deteriorated and, by 1941, only a shell remained. | 

The building was sold in 1944 and it was torn down in August. The sal- 
vaged lumber was used in building a bungalow. There is a graveyard, the old- 
est tombstone being that of John W. Thomas, who died on Aug. 15, 1862. 


Massey A. U. M. E. Church, located on the Greenspring Road, was built 
in 1885. 


Dulaney’s Methodist Church (M.E.) is located seven miles west of Clay- 
ton. The first Methodist meetings in this section were held at a place called 
the “Limestone.” In 1842, it was decided to build a church at which time 
Grafton L. Delaney donated land to a board of trustees upon which a log 
church was built. In 1891, a new church was built across the road from the 
former site, where the graveyard is now maintained. The oldest inscribed tomb- 
stone is dated 1862. | 


Friendship Methodist Church (M.E.) is located five miles north and east 

of Smyrna. On Apr. 20, 1782, Robert Appleton conveyed one acre of land to a 

board of trustees upon which to build a preaching-house for the use of the 

Methodist preachers. A chapel, of cedar logs, was built and it was used until 

, 1866. This chapel was situated on the lower end of the plot. Additional land 
"was purchased, from Susan Cruson, on Nov. 14, 1861. A new frame church 
was then built on higher ground. The corner-stone was laid during the week 

of June 18, 1866, by Bishop Levi Scott. The Revs. Wm. Urie, W. E. England 

and S. L. Gracey also took part. The church was to have a gallery and a recess 

pulpit. The dedication was held on Jan. 16, 1867, with Bishops Scott and 

Ames taking part. It was renovated in 1889. There is a large graveyard en- 

closed with an iron fence. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find is 

that of John Conner, who died on Feb. 14, 1801. It is located near the site of 

the first log chapel. 





THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


PART III 
KENT COUNTY 


Severson M. E. Church is located six miles east of Smyrna. On May 13, 
1783, James Severson donated the land upon which to build a church and to 
maintain a graveyard. The church was built in 1783, named “Severson,” and 
it was one of the first frame church buildings in Kent County. For a time it 
was called “Carrollton” but after being rebuilt, in 1874, the name ‘‘Severson”’ 
was restored at the dedication service held on Sept. 27, 1874, at the evening 
service, by the Revs. George Hughes and William B. Gregg, the pastor. The 
sermon was delivered by the Rev. G. D. Watson. A pulpit Bible was presented 
by Mrs. Rachel J. Truax and a communion service was the gift of Emma R. 
Stevenson, Mary A. Severson and M. Emily Truax. 

In 1895, Presley Ford donated a house and lot for the use of the sexton. 
During the year 1900, the church was repaired and remodeled. At times inter- 
est lagged but in 1914, new life developed in the services. In 1921, the church 
ceased to function and it soon deteriorated into a sad state of neglect. At the 
1941 Methodist Conference it was decided to sell the church. The building was 
sold in the fall of 1942. The lumber was salvaged and used to erect a dwelling 
on the north-bound lane of the State Highway just north of Duck Creek. 

The graveyard is in deplorable condition, with many of the tombstones 
knocked ‘‘galley west.” It certainly needs to be given attention by some re- 
sponsible person. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find is that of 
Jane Palmatary who died on Dec. 24, 1815. It had been tumbled over with the 
inscription side down. 


Smyrna Landing M. E. Church was organized in 1860. On Apr. 9, 1860, 
the trustees of the church purchased a lot of land from Thomas Chase for 
$60.00 and proceeded to build the church. The first service was held on Sun., 
Sept. 23, 1860, at which time a sermon was preached by the Rev. C. Hill. It 
was dedicated on Aug. 25, 1861, by the Rev. William H. Brisbane. About 
1928, all services were abandoned. The property was sold, in 1933, and con- 
verted into a dwelling. | 


Duck Creek Friend’s Meeting-House was located at Duck Creek, just 
north of Smyrna. The meeting-house site is located about three hundred yards 
west of the crossroads at Duck Creek on the old road to Clayton. This was the 
first religious denomination to hold services in that Hundred. The earliest 
oficial meeting was held on Oct. 19, 1705, when a Monthly Meeting was 
held. A small meeting-house was built, of frame construction, and a burying- 
ground was laid out. | 

When the meeting-house was built it was mistakenly extended partly on 
the adjoining property. To adjust this, a deed was drawn up on Aug. 17, 1767, 
by which, for five shillings, Thomas Woodward donated the necessary land 
which was described as “lot No. 23 in the Village of Salisbury” also known 
as “Duck Creek.” 

On Oct. 5, 1801, the Meeting purchased, for 60 pounds, 80 perches of land 
from Rob’t. Holliday, described as being in Duck Creek Village. 








194 RAE CHURCHES MOE EEE AU ARE 


When this building fell into decay, they decided to build a new meeting- 
house in the town of Duck Creek Crossroads, now Smyrna. This meeting- 
house was built, on the n. e. cor. of Commerce and East Streets. It was a brick 
building, one and one-half stories high; having two doors and four windows 
in the front and one door in the end. It was abandoned as a place of worship 
in 1853. The building was then used as a schoolhouse. It was used as a bar- 
racks by the Union Army during the Civil War. When Smyrna Seminary was 
established, in 1868, they took over the building. It was destroyed by fire in 
the spring of 1876. 


In 1790, Duck Creek and Motherkill were joined with Eastern Shore 
Meetings to form the Southern Quarterly Meeting. In 1830, Duck Creek and 
Motherkill united with Camden Preparative Meeting. The Preparative Meeting 
was laid down in 1852 and the members joined Little Creek Meeting. A few 
Indulged Meetings were held, after which it was closed entirely. 


The old burying-ground beside the first meeting-house can still be seen 
and it does not receive much attention, which is quite unusual among the 
Friends. The oldest inscribed tombstone is that of Ebenezer Blackiston, who 
died on Dee. 11, 1829. 


On May 17, 1891, the Friends of Smyrna held a meeting in the Town Hall 
at 4 P. M. Jonathan E. Rhoads and Joseph S. Elkinton supervised the meeting. 


St. Peter’s P. E. Church at Smyrna. Near Duck Creek, on the old King’s 
Highway, ‘north of Smyrna, Thomas Green donated one acre of land, on May 
17, 1740, upon which to build a church, and to maintain a graveyard. It was 
here that the first St. Peter's P. E. Church was built. The chapel becoming 
dilapidated, a stone church was built in 1762-64. The Opening service was 
held on Trinity Sunday, 1764. This church was used until 1827, when a new 
church was built on the present site in Smyrna. 


The consecration services were held on Mon., June 9, 1828, with the Rt. 

Rev. Henry U. Onderdonk in charge. He was assisted by the Rev. Messrs. 
Higbee, Presstman, Mead and Robinson, the rector. This plot of land ‘was 
donated by John Cummins for the sum of $1.00. The old church was sold and 
the stone was used to build a wall around the cemetery plot of the Cummins’ 
family. Within this plot, Sarah, the wife of former Governor John Clark, is 
buried. She died on Dec. 12, 1790. Former Governor William Temple is also 
buried here in an unmarked grave. The oldest tombstone is in this plot, over 
the grave of Francis Cwmmins, who died on Nov. 11, 1784, 
In 1857, the church was remodeled and greatly enlarged. While the work 
was in progress the congregation met in the Presbyterian church. The church 
was incorporated on Sept. 27, 1858. The restored church was consecrated on 
May 6, 1859. The first service was held on Wed. eve., May 4, by the Rev. 
Samuel C. Brinckle. The services on Thurs. were conducted by the Revs. M. B. 
Smith and M. Wright. The church was consecrated by Bishop Alfred Lee, at 
the morning service, on Fri., May 6. The sentence of consecration was read 
by the Rev. Dr. Grammer. The Rev. Dr. Sparrow preached in the evening. 
Bishop Lee preached on Sat. and on Sun. both Bishop Lee and Dr. Sparrow 
preached. 

The Sunday School building was a gift of Mrs. Susan H. Fisler. The ground 
was broken and blessed on June 24, 1872, The corner-stone was laid on Wed., 
Aug. 21, 1872, by Bishop Alfred Lee assisted by the Rev. Joshua Morsell, D.D., 
the rector. During a gale on Sept. 17, 1876, the church spire was blown down. 
It was rebuilt in 1880, 





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(Page 197) 


(Page 194) 








196 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


The rectory was built in 1884 on land donated by Mrs. Susan H. Fisler, 
on June 9, 1883. In 1885, the church was greatly improved. 

The chancel window was a gift of the Rev. A. G. Cummins. A new organ 
was also installed. In 1890-91, a silver communion service was presented as a 
memorial. During the years 1896-98, six memorial windows and a brass altar 
cross were unveiled. Major improvements were made in 1902 including a 
cloister connecting the chapel and the church. 

The restored church was reopened on Thurs., Apr. 3, 1902, by Bishop 
Leighton Coleman. The Bishop conducted a service of benediction at which 
time he blessed the new altar. Assisting in the services were Archdeacon 
George C. Hall and the Revs. C. Dexter Weeden, M. L. Poffenberger, W. J. 
Wilkie, W. J. Hamilton, W. H. Groff and G. Valerie Gilreath, the rector. 

On May 12, 1907, Bishop Coleman blessed a peal of four bells in memory 
of the Rev. Alex. G. Cummins which had been presented by Morris L. Clothier 
of Philadelphia. In 1908, a pulpit, in memory of Bishop Coleman was installed. 
On Dec. 8, 1912, Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman dedicated a new organ. The 
church was redecorated in 1924-25. 


The Presbyterian Church at Smyrna. At the southern edge of Smyrna, 
close to the Municipal Bathing Beach is an old cemetery on what is known as 
“Holy Hill.” This was the site of the Duck Creek Presbyterian Church, pre- 
sumably built in 1733. 

On Feb. 11, 1748, Thomas James, for five shillings, donated to Jacob 
Allee, Wm. Cahoon and Wm. White, trustees, 42 perches of land on Holy Hill 
for the use of the Presbyterians. There is no mention in the deed of a church © 
having been built. ; 

Upon the death of the Rev. John Miller, in 1791, the congregation 
dwindled and it was 1818 before the church was repaired and interest -re- 
kindled. In 1846, a church building on Mt. Vernon Street, was purchased from 
the Methodist Protestants. The old church on Holy Hill was abandoned al- 
though the graveyard is still well maintained. The oldest tombstone that the 
writer could find is over the grave of Jacob Peterson who died on Nov.*11, 
1782. Former Governor John Clark, who died on Aug. 14, 1821, is buried 
here under a flat slab. A new church bell was first used on July 28, 1854. 

The present site on Commerce St. was purchased on Feb. 22, 1883, from 
Geo. C. Simpson and J. S. Huffington. The corner-stone of the present church 
was laid on Tues., June 26, 1883. It was dedicated on Apr. 6, 1884, by Dr. 
Mutchmore, the Rev. C. Collins and the Rev. J. T. Umstead, the pastor. A 
new “Delaware State’ organ, manufactured in Wilmington, was used for the 
first time. The pastor offered a dedicatory prayer previous to the sermon by 
Dr. Mutchmore. There were many gifts including one from the Ladies’ Mite 
Society and from one of the boys’ Sunday School classes. 

Built of serpentine stone, so popular at that time, it is one of Smyrna’s 
kand-marks. On Mar. 1, 1896, a lot of land was purchased upon which the 
present manse was built in 1897. 


St. Polycarp’s R. C. Church at Smyrna. About 1863, the Roman Catholics 
of Smyrna began holding meetings in private homes under the leadership of 
Father Dailey of New Castle. At that time there were about six families at- 
tending the meetings. 

On Wed., Oct. 21, 1868, Father Dailey organized a Sunday School in 
Odd Fellow’s Hall. On Oct. 31, 1868, a lot between Railroad Ave. and Metho- 
dist St., was purchased for $400.00. An effort to purchase the Presbyterian 





KeeEeN lr G-O-U-N-E-¥- 197 


Church was unsuccessful. Later, a hall in Spruance City was secured, fitted up 
as a chapel and meetings were held once a month. In 1881, the Odd Fellow’s 
Hall was secured for the services. In 1883, Bishop Thomas A. Becker pur- 
chased the old Presbyterian frame church, during the rectorship of Father 
George S. Bradford, who was also rector of Holy Cross Church at Dover. The 
dedication service was held on Sun., June 10, 1883. The service was con- 
ducted by Bishop Becker assisted by Father Bradford. High Mass was cele- 
brated by the Rev. B. J. Keiley. A concert was given in the evening by St. 
Peter's choir of Wilmington. The church was named “‘St. Polycarps” in honor 
of a bishop of Smyrna, Asia, who was martyred in the second century. The 
stations of the cross were erected and blessed on Wed., Mar. 1, 1893, by the 
Rev. E. J. Mealey. 

Until 1911, the rector of Holy Cross Church came to Smyrna twice a 
month and offered Mass. Then, the burden became too great for the Dover 
priest so one of the Salesian Fathers of Wilmington came by train and held 
setvices twice a month. When this arrangement weakened, arrangements were 
made for a priest from St. Joseph’s Industrial School at Clayton to offer 
Mass on the first and third Sundays of the month. 

Early in 1918, Bishop John J. Monaghan decided to sell St. Polycarp’s 
Church to the Centennial M. E. Church, colored, and to build a new church 
at Clayton. A site was purchased but owing to war-time conditions the erection 
of a church was postponed. Bishop Monaghan decreed that St. Joseph’s Chapel 
at the Industrial School should become the Parish Church. 


Smyrna M. P. Church. A church site at the cor. of East and Methodist 
Sts. was purchased on Mar. 18, 1845, from Samuel M. Fisler and a substantial 
frame church was built. The church became defunct and was sold to the 
Presbyterians in 1846. This church has had one of the most varied existences 
of any church in Delaware. It has been consecrated to the service of the 
Methodist Protestants, the Presbyterians, the Roman Catholics and the Metho- 
dist Episcopalians. er 

A second congregation of Methodist Protestants was organized in 1923. 
They were incorporated on July 3, 1923. During that month a church site at 
Frazier and Union Sts. was purchased from Rowland Ford. A frame church 
was then built. They struggled along with a heavy debt until 1930 after which 
the building was sold. Later, members of the Pilgrim Holiness Church held 
a revival here but there were not enough converts to organize a church. © 


Asbury Methodist Church (M.E.) at Smyrna. In 1780, the Rev. Francis 
Asbury preached in an orchard between Duck Creek Crossroads and Duck 
Creek Village. The first Methodist services in Smyrna were held in the home . 
of James L. Stevenson by the Rev. Philip Cox. In 1786, a frame church was 
built. The land was donated by Allen McLane. It was located on Church St., 
north of Mt. Vernon St., and was named “Asbury M. E. Church.” 

Francis Asbury preached here on Nov. 29, 1789, on Sept. 13, 1790, and 
on May 25, 1801. He attended Conference here on Sept. 11,1792, and again 
on Oct. 10, 1797, when yellow fever was raging in Philadelphia and the Con- 
ference was transferred to Duck Creek. The church was enlarged in 1819 and 
in 1823, Benjamin Coombs deeded more land for cemetery purposes. 

On June 24, 1843, the congregation purchased from Samuel M. Fisler, for 
$300.00, 62 perches of land on the n. w. side of Methodist St., now Mt. Vernon 
St. The erection of a brick church was started. The corner-stone was laid on 
May 28, 1844. This building was used until 1869. On Dec. 11, 1869, the 





198 THE) CU RO OE SO hee Dik Lal Aa OE 


church was seriously damaged by fire. ‘The services of a little fire-engine, be- 
ionging to the town, proved invaluable on this occasion as the fire could not 
be reached by water thrown from buckets.” Both the Presbyterians and the 
Episcopalians offered the use of their churches for worship. The Methodists 
met in the Presbyterian Church while a new brick church was being erected. 

The corner-stone of a new church was relaid on Oct. 7, 1871. It was 
opened with a service on Feb. 4, 1872, conducted by the Revs. R. L. Dashiell 
and A. Rittenhouse. It was dedicated on Nov. 24, 1872, by Bishop Foster. 
During the 1870's the Methodists could be baptized by immersion if they so 
desired. On Mon., Sept. 10, 1877, a class was baptized in the Hoffecker mill- 
pond, south of Smyrna. 

In 1889, major improvements were made including an organ gallery, 
library room, new pipe organ, rolled cathedral glass windows, altar enlarged, 
new carpet and hard oil finish on the woodwork. On Apr. 27, 1890, the church 
was reopened, with the Rev. George E. Reed, President of Dickinson College 
preaching both morning and evening sermons. In 1934, further improvements 
were made. 

The Willard Wright Memorial organ and the Deagan chimes were dedi- 
cated on Sun., Mar. 16, 1947, by Bishop Chas. W. Flint and the Rev. R. E. 
Green, the pastor. The organ was a bequest from Willard Wright and the 
chimes were a gift from Dr. and Mrs. C. J. Prickett in memory of the Revs. 
R. K. Stephenson and J. W. Colona, former pastors. The old graveyard, on 
Church St., is still used for interments. 

The first Methodist camp-meeting in Kent County was held in a grove 
three miles below Smyrna, on the road to Dover, in 1805. 


Jerman’s M. E. Chapel at Smyrna. In the 1880's, one of the problems of 
sincere religious workers was to induce the less prosperous members of a 
community to attend church. Perhaps it was pride but these persons seemed 
reluctant to attend church services because they could not afford to dress as 
well as their more prosperous neighbors. In an effort to reach these persons in 
Smyrna, in 1880, Joshua T. Jerman purchased an old store building on Gom- 
merce St., the site of which is now included in the right-of-way of the Du Pont 
Highway. Mr. Jerman had the building converted into a chapel, named it 
“Mission Chapel” and a Sunday School was conducted by Mrs. Jerman, a mem- 
ber of Asbury M. E. Church. ! ) 

On May 1, 1891, the trustees of Asbury Church purchased a lot in Spru- 
ance City and the chapel was moved to the new site, rebuilt, and named 
“Jerman’s Chapel.” In 1902, under the will of Mr. Jerman, the building was 


placed in the hands of three trustees together with a trust fund of $890.00 for 


the maintenance of the building with the provision that the chapel be used for 
Methodist meetings only. A short time later, the trustees, under the will, 
turned the chapel and trust fund over to the trustees of Asbury Church. Sunday 
School has always been held, first under the leadership of Mrs. Jerman and 
then by members of Asbury Church. For a few years it was a preaching station 
on the Smyrna Circuit. In 1914, during the pastorate of the Rev. Milton Mc- 
Cann, the chapel was entirely rebuilt. | 

It was dedicated on May 16, 1915, by the Rev. Warren Brown assisted by 
the Rev. Milton McCann, the pastor. The altar had been built entirely by Mr. 
McCann. The Methodists ceased to hold meetings here in 1936. 


The Wesleyan Methodist Church at Smyrna. This congregation secured 
the use of Jerman’s Chapel and started to hold meetings in 1936. 





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(Page 200) 
(Page 201 


TRINITY P. 








200 PURE Ce OU ROR a eee tA A 


The Church of the Nazarene. This group was incorporated on May 6, 
1935. They secured the use of the former M. P. Church for their services. The 
church and an additional piece of land at Frazier and Union Sts. were pur- 
chased on Aug. 20 and Sept. 8, 1942. 


The Holy Christian Church was organized, in Smyrna, in 1898. A church 
site on the east side of Frazier St. was donated, on Nov. 7, 1898, by Mary 
A. Jorden. No church was ever built. 


Centennial M. E. Church, colored. The first church was built at the cor. 
of North and East Sts. on a lot purchased on Feb. 8, 1876, from May Patter- 
son. The deed specified that there should be no cemetery. The church was 
chartered on Apr. 8, 1878. On May 28, 1919, they purchased the R. C. Church 
building and are still worshipping there. They had been incorporated on Mar. 
24, 1919. 


Bethel A. M. E. Church was founded in 1867 and is still active. The 
corner-stone was laid on Sept. 29, 1867, by the Rev. John A. Brown. It was 
dedicated on Dec. 8, 1872, by the Revs. Mr. Hunter and Mr. Waters. 


St. Paul’s U. A. M. E. Church. The corner-stone for the first building was 
laid on Sept. 9, 1903. The corner-stone for the present building was laid on 
Oct. 26, 1919. 


Little Mt. Olive Holy Church, colored. The corner-stone of this church 
was laid on Mar. 29, 1937. They took title to the former Centennial Church 
_ building on July 31, 1940, and still meet there. 


Trinity P. E. Church at Clayton. In October, 1884, Episcopal services 
were held at Clayton in a rented room. In 1886, the congregation was organ- 
ized as a mission with the Rev. W. B. Gooden as rector. In 1889, a lot was 
secured, and lumber and pews were bought by Isaac Mills and John B. Book. 
The corner-stone of the present church was laid in. November, 1890. The 
church was consecrated on Apr. 10, 1891. It was commonly called the “Rail- 
toad Church” because of the large number of railroad men who were mem- 
bers and who aided in erecting the building. 

A dedication tablet inside the church states: “This chapel owes its exist- 
ence to the untiring efforts of the building committee: George W. Dame, 
rector, Isaac N. Mills, Henry Seiders, John B. Book, March, 1891.” 

In June, 1894, Trinity was made a parish. During that year a marble 
altar was installed and, in 1895, the children donated a brass altar cross. The 
church was improved in 1899, at which time the altar was placed on a raised 
platform. A new organ and an oak pulpit were installed. Altar vases in mem- 
ory of the Rev. E. A. Bradley, of New York, were unveiled on July 30, 1899. 
Tp 1900-01, a silver chalice and paten were presented in memory of Mrs. Susan 
Mills. In April, 1917, Trinity was made a mission under St. Peter’s of Smyrna. 
The church-school was enlarged in 1924-25. 


St. Paul’s Methodist Church (M.E.) at Clayton. A Sunday School was 
organized at Clayton, in April, 1887. This effort was so successful that on 
Dec. 13, 1887, Abel Sevil donated 14,425 sq. ft. of land upon which a church 
was built. It was dedicated on June 10, 1888. The bell which called the con- 
Sregation to the service was presented by Gen. Supt. H. F. Kenney of the 
P. W. & B. R. R. A window was presented by George W. Todd, in memory 








epee Ne te COO INGLY 201 


of his daughter, Hattie Georgiane, the altar rail was the gift of Mrs. J. S. 
Hoffecker, the pulpit was given by Joseph Pyle, the pulpit furniture by W’. A. 
Fairies and Bro., the Bible by Justis and Davidson and the pulpit hymnal by 
J. Miller Thomas. 

The following members of St. Paul’s choir of Wilmington assisted with 
the music: Miss Eva Zebley, Mrs. Aubrey Vandever, Miss Clara Murgatroyd, 
Miss Emma Flinn, Miss Ida Morris, Miss Mame Morrow, L. Atwood Zebley, 
H. Wentworth Zebley, Harvey Hoffecker and Harry J. Guthrie. In this group 
were the father, uncle and aunt of the writer. 

The services were in charge of the pastor, the Rev. E. E. White. The 
Rev. R. H. Adams preached the sermon. The Sunday School gathered in the 
John P. Hudson building on Alley Street, where their meetings had been held. 
At two o'clock, they marched to the new building where exercises were held. 
At 3:40 P. M. the Rev. W. S. Robinson preached and at 7:30 P. M. the sermon 
was delivered by the Rev. R. K. Stevenson. 

After substantial improvements the church was rededicated on Sun. morn- 
ing, Sept. 22, 1940, by Dist. Supt. Walter A. Hearn. He was assisted by the 
Revs. W. H. Baker, Leon W. Ross, C. S. Marshall and J. C. B. Hopkins, the 
pastor. At 7:30 P. M., a pageant of rededication was given by the Junior and 
Senior choirs. 


Ewell’s Methodist Church (M.P.) at Clayton. This church was built 
through the efforts of the Rev. David J. Ewell for whom it was named. The 
dedication services were held on Dec. 30, 1860, by the Revs. T. B. Valiant and 
John Roberts. The work bogged down and the church was closed in 1869. In 
April, 1870, the building was rented by the Methodist Episcopalians and it 


was arranged to have services every two weeks with preaching by the Revs. — 


Mr. Miller and William Urie. Later, these services were abandoned and the 
church was reopened by the Methodist Protestants. It was made a separate 
charge in 1879. , 

The church was rebuilt in 1904. The new bell was placed in position in 
October. The rededication service was conducted on Sun., Nov. 6, 1904, by 
the Rev. T. H. Lewis, D.D., President of Western Maryland College. A new 
organ was unveiled and ten new memorial windows were also dedicated. As- 
sisting in the services were the Revs. F. T. Little, J. L. Estlin, and George R. 
McCready, the pastor. Among the numerous gifts were a baptismal font by 
Mrs. T. J. Middleton, silver collection plates by Mr. Spink of Baltimore and 
the corner-stone by William H. Stevenson. 

On Sun., May 31, 1942, the steeple was seriously damaged by lightning. 
The spire was removed and it was replaced by a low tower. There is a grave- 
yard beside the church. The oldest tombstone is that of William A. Thompson 
who died on July 4, 1863. 

A mural painting entitled, “Christ the Good Shepherd,” executed by 
Miss Caroline M. Smith, of Wilmington, was dedicated on Sun., Apr. 8, 1945. 
It was presented by Mrs. J. Medford Davis in memory of her father, Geo. W. 
Thomas. 


St. Joseph’s R. C. Church at Clayton. In 1895, St. Joseph's Industrial 
School was established, at Clayton, by the Rev. J. A. deRuyter of St. Joseph's 
Church in Wilmington. This school serves as a home and a school for worthy 
colored boys. Father deRuyter did not live to see the Industrial School com- 
pleted, as he died on Aug. 23, 1896. In May, 1895, twenty-five boys were 


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202 PREC AU CHES Oren LAW ALR 


entered in the school. The farm, of 158 acres, was presented by Edwin H. 
Gayley, et al., on Nov. 23, 1895. Seiad 

St. Joseph’s Chapel at the Industrial School was built in 1896. The 
corner-stone of the chapel was blessed by Bishop Alfred A. Curtis. 

The chapel was dedicated on Thurs., June 15, 1897, at 10:30 A. M., by the 
Most Rev. John J. Monaghan assisted by the Revs. L. J. Welbors and D. J. 
Flynn. Pontifical High Mass was celebrated. These ceremonies were followed 
by a dinner, held in the rectory, where speeches were made by Chief Justice 
Charles B. Lore, Judge William C. Spruance, William Michael Byrne and the 
Very Rev. J. R. Slattery, S.S.J. 

Father deRuyter, the founder, had been buried in front of the chapel and 
on dedication day his body was reinterred beneath the altar of the chapel. 

On Nov. 18, 1900, fire destroyed the main building and two of the shops 
of the school. . 

On the morning of Wed., May 15, 1901, four new white marble altars, in 
the chapel, were consecrated by Bishop John J. Monaghan. In the afternoon 
the Bishop blessed the newly installed chapel bell. The sermon was preached 
by the Very Rev. J. R. Slattery, S.S.J. 

Bishop Monaghan designated the chapel to become the parish church in 
1918. St. Polycarp’s Church at Smyrna had been sold and plans to build a 
church at Clayton were. postponed because of the war. 

‘In the meantime a graveyard has been established beside the woods on the 
school farm and Father deRuyter’s body has been reinterred there. A number 
of interments have been made. A large rugged granite cross bearing the in- 
scription I.H.S. occupies a commanding spot in the graveyard. At the entrance 
there is a beautiful shrine of St. Joseph. 


Church of God Mission at Clayton. This mission was opened on the main 
street in 1945. } 

_ Byrd’s A. M. E. Chapel, at Clayton, was founded in 1894. They pur- 
chased the site on July 13, 1894, from W. C. Dickerson. This section was 
known as “Sweeneytown.” On Aug. 28, 1901, with Mt. Friendship Church, 
they purchased five acres of land from John P. Hudson as a camp-meeting 
site. The church was incorporated on June 10, 1918. 


Blackiston Methodist Church (M.E.) is located seven miles west of Clay- 

ton, beyond Blackiston Crossroads. The first church was built, in 1787, on land 
_ donated by Benjamin Blackiston for whom the church was named. The build- 
ing was designed by Bishop Asbury. On May 19, 1810, the Quarterly Confer- 
ence of the church passed the following resolution: ‘That every preacher and 
every Quarterly Meeting Conference be advised to use all of their lawful and 
prudential influence to promote the freedom of slaves. Not to give licenses to 


any preacher or exhorter who holds slaves unless said slaves are emancipated. 


Not to appoint any class leaders who were unfriendly to the freedom of slaves.” 
In 1847, the old church was moved away and a new church was built. In the 
graveyard that surrounds the church the oldest inscribed tombstone is that of 
George W. Stevens who died on Aug. 14, 1846. At the present time an annual 
meeting is held on the second Sunday in September. 


The Church of Love and Charity, colored, was located on the road through 
Mt. Friendship. They purchased the church site from Lydia A. Thome on 
Mir. 22, 1877. 


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204 BRAVES CHOR GHESRMG Fame EL AWARE 





Friendship A. M. E. Church is located two miles n. e. of Kenton. On 
Sept. 30, 1854, the trustees purchased 40 perches of land from Geo. View. 
An additional half-acre was purchased on Dec. 23, 1874 from Robt. Robinson. 
The present church was built in 1886. 

It was incorporated on Apr. 25, 1918. Additional land was purchased 
from Martha Bryan on May 8, 1918. There is a large graveyard. 


Bryn Zion or Duck Creek Primitive Baptist Church is located one mile 
n. e. of Kenton. Several Baptist families settled in this neighborhood in 1733, 
after which time services were held in private homes as a branch of Welsh 
Tract Church. On Nov. 10, 1747, in the 21st year of the reign of King George 
the Second, one-half acre of land was donated by William Griffin to the trus- 
tees of the organization, upon which to build a church but this was not done. 
In the meantime, ‘the Independent Methodists had built a church which was 
called “Mt. Zion,” on the present site of Bryn Zion Church. This organization 
faded away and in 1771, the Baptists purchased the building and rebuilt it of 
brick. On Nov. 24, 1781, it was organized as a separate church. They were 
incorporated on Mar. 22, 1794. On Dec. 3, 1844, former U. S. Senator Presley 
Spruance donated 106 perches of land adjoining the church property. A new 
church was built in 1873. | 

The graveyard beside the church contains many old tombstones the two 
oldest of which are those of Thomas Ringgold, who died on Feb. 21, 1790, 
and Polly Ringgold, who died on Feb. 5, 1792. The meetings of the congre- 
gation, known as “Hardshell” Baptists, were transferred to a private home in 
Kenton in 1940. All meetings were abandoned in 1942. During the afternoon 
of Sept. 27, 1942, the neighborhood was visited by a small hurricane which 
unroofed the church and blew down one side wall and the rear wall. Several 
trees were twisted off and a number of tombstones were toppled over. One 
year later, nothing had been done to remedy the damage. The attitude of the 
small congregation being “that it was the Lord’s doing.” The great-aunt of 
the writer is buried here, as are her husband and son. Her tombstone is in- 
scribed “Elizabeth Zebley wife of Adam Dady, born Oct. 6, 1803, died Oct. 
20, 1895.” . 


Ebenezer A. M. E. Church. Three and one-quarter miles west of Under- 
wood’s Crossroads there was a small village called Blanco. The houses were 
of frame construction and for some reason they were not kept in repair. 
Gradually, one by one, they tumbled down and the only building that has 
survived is Ebenezer Church. This church was organized and trustees were 
elected on July 5, 1849. It is still active. 


Kenton Methodist Church (M.E.) was built in 1818. The land was do- 
nated and the building was erected by Isaac Buckingham, the Rev. John Dur- 
borough and James Scotten. In 1875, the old building and its site were aban- 
.doned and the erection of a new church was started on the present site. The 
‘corner-stone was laid on Oct. 20, 1875, by the Revs. E. Stubbs, J. H. Caldwell 
and Pres. Elder J. Hough. The opening services were held on Nov. 11, 1877. 
The church was dedicated on Sept. 15, 1878, by Bishop Levi Scott, assisted 
by the Rev. T. H. Hayes, the pastor. In 1889, the church was rebuilt. The 
present church was erected in 1925. 

The formal reopening was held on Sun., June 7, 1925. The services were 
in charge of Bishop Hamilton, assisted by the pastor, the Rev. J. E. Parker. 
Music was furnished by the Harrington Choir and the Smyrna Male Quartette. 





Ree BN Dom GOAL NA Tae 205 





St. Paul’s P. E. Church at Kenton. Meetings were started in Kenton, by 
the Rev. Joshua Morsell, of St. Peter’s Church in Smyrna in October, 1867. 
Services were held on alternate Sundays. The church was organized on May 
9, 1869, and the name “St. Paul's’ was adopted. James Williams was elected 
Senior Warden and M. Arnold was elected Junior Warden. Bishop Alfred Lee 
confirmed a class on Sun., May 30, 1869. No church was ever built and the 
effort was abandoned in 1872. 


Mt. Olive A. M. E. Church, built by the Rev. J. M. Holland, is on the 
outskirts of Kenton. 


Lockwood A. M. E. Church is located six miles s. w. of Kenton. The church 
was rebuilt in 1891. They were incorporated on Apr. 3, 1918. Additional 
land was purchased, on May 10, 1918, from Jacob Mensky and on Dec. 14, 
1923, from the State Board of Education. There is a small graveyard. 


Downs’ Methodist Church (M.P.), located three and one-half miles west 
of Kenton, was built in 1843. The land was donated on Dec. 4, 1842, by 
James M. Downs for whom the chapel was named. The church was rebuilt in 
1880. It was destroyed by fire in August, 1925. The present substantial brick 
church was built in 1927. The corner-stone was laid on the morning of Nov. 
13, 1927, by the Rev. E. C. Makosky. The church was dedicated on the after- 
noon of the same day by the Rev. Samuel Randall assisted by the Rev. J. 
Peyten Adams. 


Bethel Methodist Church (M.E.), located west of the Du Pont Highway 
one-half mile north of Cheswold, was built in 1780. Previous to this time, 
meetings had been held in the home of James Farrow and for seventy years 
the church was known as “Farrow’s Chapel.’ The Quarterly Conference of 
the church determined the length of servitude of any slaves purchased by the 
members of the church. On July 23, 1805, they passed a resolution to oppose 
by precept and example the daily use of spirituous liquors. In 1808, the church 
was reported as out of repair but clear of debt. The first Sunday School was 
organized in 1840. In 1852, the old chapel was sold and moved away to be 
used as a barn. 

Trustees were elected on June 28, 1852. On Aug. 25, 1853, Wm. F. Ves- 
sels, et al., presented one acre of land to the church. The present Bethel 
Church was built, in 1853, of bricks that were made about a half-mile from 
the site. 

The corner-stone was laid on Fri., Sept. 30, 1853, by the Rev. T. C. Mur- 
phey. The church was dedicated on Aug., 6, 1854, by the Rev. Beverly Waugh, 
D.D., Senior Bishop of the M. E. Church. The choir of Asbury Church, at 
Smyrna, rendered the music without instruments as organs had not been in- 
troduced into many Methodist churches at that time. A large graveyard, en- 
closed with an iron fence, adjoins the church. The oldest tombstone that the 
writer could find is over the grave of Sarah Ann H. Register who died on 
Dec. 23, 1839. In 1889, sheds were built for the horses and this was an event 
of much importance. Fifty years later, the sheds and the need for them had 
both passed away. At least two young men went out from Bethel into the 
ministry. Regular services were abandoned in 1921. At the present time an- 
nual services are held on the Sunday before Labor Day. 


Manship A. M. E. Church, located at Bishop’s Corner, was built in 1830 
at which time it was called “Sutton’s Meeting-House.” On Dec. 28, 1844, 





206 PRE CHURCH ESOP LDELAWAKE 


John Miller donated land to the meeting-house. In 1876, a new building was 
erected and the name was changed to “Manship.” On Mar. 1, 1886, one- 
quarter of an acre of land was purchased from James W. Emerson. In 1890, 
the church was again rebuilt. The membership is chiefly, if not entirely, com- 
posed of Moors, who settled in this section many years ago. There is a gtave- 
yard beside the church. 


The Chapel of Holy Faith, P. E., of Cheswold. In 1902, sponsored by 
Trinity Church of Clayton, a room was rented in Cheswold and fitted up as a 
chapel. All of the furnishings were donated by church organizations and in- 
dividuals. Services were started in May, 1902. The effort was not successful 
and was abandoned on Jan. 1, 1903. 


Cheswold Methodist Church (M.E.) was built in 1892. The dedication 
service was held on Sun., Oct. 2, 1892. All-day services were held with the 
Norma Glee Club furnishing the music. Among those taking part were the 
Revs. Alfred Smith, R. K. Stevenson, Dr. S. J. Morris, F. F. Carpenter and 
Mr. Aubrey Vandever. The dedication took place at the evening service. 
The site for the church was given by James S. Moore, the organ was a gift of 
the Ladies’ Aid Society and a pulpit Bible was presented by George W. Childs. 
The church was incorporated on Jan. 9, 1893. On Aug. 2, 1904, they purchased 
a lot on Main St. from Ephraim S. Garrison upon which they built a parsonage. 


Forrest Grove Seventh Day Adventist Church, Moors, is located four 
miles s. w. of Cheswold near Dinah’s Corner. This congregation was organ- 
ized in 1896. Harriet E, Everett donated one-quarter of an acre of land on 
Mar. 6, 1896. The church was incorporated on Mar. 25, 1896. More land 
was purchased from Joseph Seeney on Oct. 4, 1900, and on Sept. 28, 1905, 
Fred H. Seeney donated additional land. As they observed Saturday as their 
Sabbath they would proceed with their usual occupations on Sundays. This 
aroused much resentment in the neighborhood and early in 1897 an organized 
effort was made to break up this desecration of Sunday. On May 26, 1897, two > 
men were arrested for Sabbath breaking. They were fined $4.00 and costs or 
24 hours in jail which they served. 

The first church was built in 1915. This church was burned and the old 
district school was purchased and remodeled for church purposes. It is an 
attractive building, shingle-sheathed and is located in a fine grove of trees. 
In 1941, a day-school was opened in the church for the children of the con- 
&regation. In 1943, a new church was built and the first church is used ex- 
clusively for a day-school. There is a graveyard adjoining the church where 
at least one World War I veteran is buried. | 


Central Methodist Church (M.E.), south of Cheswold and below Moore's 
Crossroads, was built in 1860, by Joseph Moore. The church was dedicated on 
Oct. 18, 1863, by the Revs. Dr. Charles Cooke and Dr. Boone. 

+ The incorporation of the church was recorded on Nov. 28, 1863. On 
Jan. 4, 1864, they purchased from Noble T. Jerman, for $10.00, 77 perches 
of additional land. 

On the night of Oct. 18, 1879, thieves tore out the bricks covering the 
corner-stone and stole the coins, Photographs and lists, leaving only the 
Testament and hymnal. 


Little Union Church, colored, at Du Pont Station, was organized, in 
1850, by the Rev. Silas W. Murray at which time a slab shanty was built. This 
was followed by a log chapel and, in 1883, the present frame church was built. 





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208 PEE CHAWKC AIS Obey Dike AVEATE 


Roby Methodist Church (M.P.), at Leipsic, was organized on June 3, 1865. 
The church site was purchased, on Dec. 4, 1865, from Samuel J. Burton, et al. 
The church was completed and was dedicated on Jan. 28, 1866, by the Rev. D. F. 
_ Ewell, the pastor. After being improved the church was reopened on Sun., 
Nov. 8, 1891. The services were conducted by the Revs. T. J. Smith, H. W. D. 
Johnson, J. M. Yingling and John A. Wright, the pastor. After major renova- 
tions a reopening service was held on Sun., Sept. 26, 1926. It was conducted 
by the Rev. E. C. Makosky, D.D., the newly elected President of the Maryland 
M. P. Conference. There is a graveyard beside the church, the graves dating 
back to 1867. 


Immanuel P. E. Church in Leipsic. Services were started in Leipsic in 
October, 1867, by the Rev. Joshua Morsell of St. Peter’s Church, in Smyrna, 
who preached on alternate Sundays. On May 10, 1869, the church was organ- 
ized and the name “Immanuel” was adopted. Andrew Spear was elected Senior 
Warden and G. W. Spicer was elected Junior Warden. Bishop Alfred Lee 
confirmed a class on Sat., May 29, 1869. No church was ever built. 


Leipsic Methodist Church (M.E.), located at the western edge of the 
town, is believed to have been built in 1837. This church was used until 1892. 
The old building was sold and is in use today as a storage building only a 
short distance away. The old graveyard is still there although neglected. The 
oldest tombstone being dated 1800, indicates that the little graveyard was there 
at the beginning of the century whether or not the church had been built at 
that time. 

On the tombstone of John S. Paris who died in 1856, at the age of 18 
years, is the following inscription: 

“‘Passerby as you are now so once was I 
As I am now so you must be 
= Prepare for death and follow me.” 

A number of years ago a rather sacrilegious wag from Smyrna created a 
scandal by adding in blue pencil the following: 

“To follow you I am not content : 
For I don’t know which way you went.” 


Land on the corner of 2nd and Walnut Sts. was purchased on June 10, 
1886, from Jos. E. Palmer. On Jan. 29, 1891, Wilson L. Cannon donated addi- 
tional land for a new church at the present site. The present building was 
completed and was dedicated on Sun., May 29, 1892. Among those taking 
part in the services were the Revs. J. D. C. Hanna, T. E. Terry and S. R. 
Maxwell. The Norma Glee Club furnished the music. In 1919, a number of 
improvements were made to the building. | | 


Muddy Branch M. E. Church, located two miles south of Leipsic, was 
established in 1800. In 1837, the church was abandoned, the members attend- 
ing the Leipsic church. The old graveyard with a number of fine tombstones — 


can still be seen although the trees and brambles are gradually taking pos- 
session of the plot. 


Grime’s Chapel, colored, is located on a dirt road two miles s. w. of 
Leipsic. On Apr. 2, 1858, the church site of one acre was donated by F. B. 
Harper. The church has been closed since 1925. 


Gum Swamp Church, colored, is located one mile north of Little Creek. 
It has been closed for a number of years, 





Vesa atl BERANE lt Osi Mal as liad fe 209 





Raymond’s M. E. Chapel is located, on Raymond’s Neck, about six miles 
s. e. of Smyrna. The first church was built between the years 1787 and 1791 
upon land donated by James Snow. The present church was built in 1827, by 
Shorters and Farrel, contractors. The bricks were made closeby and the mem- 
bers of the church assisted with the work. In 1877, the church was improved. 
The old high pulpit was removed and a recess pulpit was built, a new roof 
was built and new pews and furniture were installed. A reopening service was 
held on Sun., July 15, 1877, by the Revs. I. T. Cooper and T. E. Terry. 

Extensive improvements were made in 1906. On May 13, 1914, the 
church was seriously damaged when a brush fire got beyond control. It was 
rebuilt in 1915, the old walls being used. By this time the church was not 
prospering and services were abandoned in 1920. 


Hartly Methodist Church (M-E.) was founded in 1840 and was called 
“Hawkins M. E. Church.” The first church was used until Sept. 18, 1886, when 
a new church a short distance to the east, was dedicated. The site had been 
purchased from Walter A. Clark on June 12, 1885. The first church building 
was converted to other uses. 

In 1926, scores of mysterious fires broke out, in the dead of night, in the 
various homes and buildings in Hartly and its immediate vicinity. By the time 
ten properties had been destroyed the people had become thoroughly alarmed. 
There was no fire company at Hartly although one was organized and equipped 
a short time later as a direct result of this episode. The nearest fire companies 
were located at Dover, Clayton and Smyrna. The situation became so critical 
that these fire companies-.took tums staying on guard at Hartly each night. 
The state detectives and state police were called in and it reached a point 
where everyone left their homes fully illuminated each night. 7 

Early on Mon., Apr. 19, the sheathing of the Methodist Church was torn 
off near the altar, the spot was saturated. with oil and set afire. This fire was 
discovered and extinguished with only $200.00 damage. But on Wed., Apr. 
28, at 3:30 A. M., the firebug made a complete job of the church. The Dover 
Fire Company was on guard that night but, when discovered, the flames had 
made good headway. The other two companies were sent for but the church 
was completely destroyed. This made the eleventh victim of the firebug. 

The burnings continued for several months and although several arrests, 
On suspicion, were made, the firebug was never caught. 

The church was incorporated on Oct. 27, 1927. Land was donated on 
Dec. 22, 1927, by Geo. P. Grotten. 

The erection of the present brick church was started and in the meantime 
the congregation met in the schoolhouse. The new church was completed and 
the opening service was held on Sun., Apr. 21, 1928, with the pastor, the Rev. 
Joseph Vaughn, in charge. ; 

There is a large cemetery beside the church. The oldest tombstone is that 
of Jonathan Stant who died on May 26, 1857. 


St. Martin’s P. E. Church at Hartly. A Sunday School was started in 1906, 
by Dr. Ada MacAlpine. Meetings were held in the loft of a blacksmith shop, 
no other meeting-place being available. The church was organized in October, 
1908, and it was recognized by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman on May 6, 1910. 
On Oct. 3,1912, three-quarters of an acre of land was donated by John Ashton, 
et al., as a church site. Being forced to move, the services were transferred to a 
rented room in a dwelling on Jan. 1, 1913. 

The church was built in 1914 and it was dedicated by Bishop Kinsman 





4 


210 YB we G8 TIN OF w ET EES COC SN BY ONT ON eRe ND Be AY BAT ER) “ABo5 Ve 


on Sat., Oct. 3, 1914. Archdeacon Benjamin F. Thompson, B.D., of Christ 
Church in Dover was the leader in this effort. Most of the carpenter work 
was done by the men of the congregation led by Percy Gardner, Senior Warden. 
Most of the furnishings were presented by the Woman’s Auxiliary of the 
Diocese. The church-yard was consecrated on Nov. 1, 1918, by Bishop Kinsman. 

There are two graves in the churchyard close to the chapel. One is that 
of the founder of St. Martin’s, Dr. Ada MacAlpine, who died on June 4, 1944, 
and the other is that of Dr. Wm. MacAlpine who died in 1926. 


St. John’s Mt. Sinai Holy Church, colored, is located two miles n. w. of 
Hartly. This was the Gibb’s A. M. E. Church which was built in July, 1906. 
On Oct. 14, 1937, they turned the property over to St. John’s Church. 


Asbury Methodist Church (M.E.), near Pearson’s Corner, was built in 
1829 and was called “McElwee’s Chapel,” for the minister in charge at that 
time. In 1867, the present church was built and it was dedicated on Nov. 3, 
1867, by the Revs. Andrew Manship, A. D. Davis and J. Downham. After ex- 
tensive renovations, a rededication service was held on Sun., Nov. 8, 1942. 
There is a graveyard beside the church, the tombstones dating back to 1842. 


Bethesda M. P. Church, located about two miles s. w. of Pearson’s Corner, 
was built in 1864, on land donated by Mrs. Annie J. Cox, on July 11, 1864. The 
dedication service was arranged for Sun., Dec. 17, 1865, with the Rev. Daniel 
F, Ewell in charge. The present church was built in 1883. It was arranged to 
have the church dedicated on Oct. 28, 1883, by the Rev. C. T. Cochel. Regular 
services were abandoned in 1929 and only annual meetings are now held. The 
Grange now meets here by permission of the trustees and stewards of the 
church. There are a few graves beside the church. : 


Halltown M. E. South, Church was organized, in the schoolhouse, in 1868. 
On Mar. 5, 1870, a church site was donated by John W. Downes. The site is 
marked by a small graveyard. The oldest tombstone is that of Mary Patrick, 
who died on Mar. 20, 1887. The name of Halltown was later changed to 
Marydel. : 7 


_ Christ P. E. Church, St. Jones’ P. E. Church at Dover. In 1704, Col. Robert 
French donated to the Church of England a glebe of 110 acres, located about 
two miles south of Dover, on the Bay Road and on the east side of St. Jones’ 
Creek. A log church was built at this site and given the name, “St. Jones’ 
Church.”” The Rev. Thomas Crawford, a missionary of the Church of England, 


arrived in Philadelphia on Aug. 27, 1705, on his way to Dover to take charge 


of Kent County. After his arrival he was very much dissatisfied, claiming that 
everyone in the neighborhood was sickly. He became sick with “the ague, 
dropsie and short windiness.” His chief opposition, he said, was from “‘itiner- 
ant Presbyterian preachers and a heathenish people called Quakers.” He or- 
ganized a Society for the Reformation of Manners and with the help of Cap- 
tain Rodney, a Justice of the Peace, he claimed to have almost completely sup- 
pressed swearing and drunkenness. On Aug. 30, 1708, Mr. Crawford reported 
that the church was nearly finished, all glazed and almost full of pews. He 
returned to England in 1711, 

In 1722, the congregation asked for another pastor, the church having 
been destitute since 1711. In 1733, the Rev. George Frazer began a subscrip- 
tion to build a new brick church in Dover. The building was started, in 1734, 





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(Page 214) 








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and the walls were completed in November of that year. On Oct. 27, 1740, the 
church was reported as finished. ) 

On May 10, 1760, the Rev. Charles Inglis reported that the church had 
been reconditioned after laying in a shocking condition. Also, that it was now 
furnished and ornamented with a bell, pulpit cloth, etc. In 1767, for the first 
time, the church was mentioned as “Christ Church,” until this time and it was 
still called “St. Jones’ Church.’ During the Revolution the church was much 
abused but in 1785, it was restored to use. For many years the congregation 
was apathetic and only scattered services were held. In 1841, when Bishop Lee 
visited Dover, he preached in the Court House. In 1850, the church was recon- 
ditioned and reopened. In 1859, efforts to renovate the church were resumed. 
The glebe was sold and the proceeds were used to repair and restore the 
church. At this time, the present entrance was built. The square pews, the 
brick floor and the high pulpit with the clerk’s desk gradually disappeared. 

The church was reopened on Jan. 15, 1860. The consecration service was 
held on Ascension Day, May 17, 1860, by Bishop Alfred Lee, assisted by the 
Revs. J. B. Clemson, R. J. Keeling, B. Franklin and M. B. Smith, the rector. 
After renovations, including a new memorial window, the church was re- 
opened on Aug. 9, 1868. On Oct. 1, 1869, pew rents were abolished and all 
pews became free for the use of anyone. 

The present rectory was purchased on Dec. 18, 1879, for $2500.00. It 
was the former home of Charles Kimmey. 

The chancel was added in 1887. The large memorial window, in the 
chancel, ‘was unveiled on Sept. 5, 1888, as a memorial to Lucinda Ball Bradford. 

During the 1880's, the women of Christ Church would accept seasonal 
employment with the Richardson and Robbins Company, to make money to 
be applied to the church work. . . 

In 1890-91, a new altar was installed as a memorial to Mrs. Lucinda B. 
Bradford. In 1894-95, a brass pulpit and a brass eagle lectern were installed in 
memory of the Rev. L. W. Gibson. | 

On Oct. 2, 1896, Dr. Henry Ridgely sold 63.4 perches of land to Christ 
Church to be used in enlarging the church-yard. The parish-house was* built 
in 1898. It included a library and Sunday School rooms. In 1905-06, a window 
in memory of Dr. Henry Ridgely was unveiled. A new organ was installed in 
1906-7. In 1910-11, two lots were purchased at the corner of Bradford and 
Division Streets. It was proposed to use these lots as a site for a new parish- 
house and Sunday School, This plan was not carried out and the lots were 
sold the following year. ; 

Under the leadership of Archdeacon Benjamin F. Thompson, B.D., the 
church was enlarged, improved and redecorated in 1913. Bishop Frederick J. 
Kinsman conducted a service of benediction on ‘Delaware Day,” Dec. 7, 1913. 
In 1916, a new entrance and wall were built. The new porch was dedicated 
by Bishop Kinsman on Nov. 26, 1916. The oratory in the rectory was dedicated 
on Dec. 31, 1916, by Bishop Kinsman. More land was purchased from Bessie 
F. Davis on Mar. 7, 1917. 

On Nov. 2, 1918, Bishop Kinsman consecrated the church-yard and dedi- 
cated the wall and gateway in memory of Ann Ridgely du Pont and Amelia 
Elizabeth du Pont. A memorial window, provided by the will of former U. S. 
Senator Willard Saulsbury, in memory of his parents, Willard and Annie Pon- 
der Saulsbury, was unveiled in 1929. 

On Apr. 21, 1944, a lot with a 75 ft. frontage on State St. was secured 
from Eleanor A. Reed making possible the present entrance from State St. 


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The parish-house was seriously damaged by fire on Dec. 14, 1946 at which 
time an adjoining factory was gutzed by fire. 

A new Moller organ, in memory of Henry Ridgely, was dedicated at an 
organ recital given on Mon., Jan. 27, 1947. 

In 1885, a group of members of the Dover Bar formed the Rodney Club 
pledged to raise sufhcient funds to have the body of Caesar Rodney removed 
from his home place and reinterred in Christ church-yard. Because of a strong 
local sentiment against disturbing the bones of the dead, the reinterment took 
place at midnight in the year 1887. A heavy granite curb encloses the burial 
plot in the center of which is an imposing memorial. The name, Caesar Rod- 
ney, is the only inscription, which, in view of his fame is quite sufficient. 
Through the interest of the Rocney Club, the General Assembly passed a 
Joint Resolution on Feb. 20, 1889, providing for the erection of this monument. 

Another former Governor, James Sykes, is buried in the Sykes plot in an 
unmarked grave. There are numerous graves dating back to the middle of the 
18th century. One of the oldest tombstones is over the grave of Captain Benson 
and is dated 1748. 


The First Baptist Church of Dover. Sometime after 1832 the Rev. John 
P. Thompson was sent as a Baptist missionary to the section including Dover. 
He was succeeded, in 1847, by the Rev. John P. Walter. In 1850, a lot on the 
south side of Dover Green was purchased by Jonathan Stites and George Parris 
who headed a subscription list to build a Baptist church. The corner-stone was 
laid on Sept. 8, 1850. The basement was dedicated on Jan. 25, 1852. The 
upper part of the church building was dedicated in January, 1853. The title 
to the one-acre church site was presented to the church by Mr. Stites and Mr. 
Parris on May 18, 1853. A new organ was installed on Apr. 11, 1868. 

In May, 1870, the Baptists announced that an effort would be made to 
secure a church bell. An Episcopal clergyman suggested, publicly, that per- 
haps they should get a diving bell. The Baptists apparently did not resent the 
suggestion but simply announced that a diving bell would not do. 

In May, 1877, the church was enlarged and beautified. The gallery was 
removed and two small side galleries were built. The baptistry was placed 
under the pulpit. In May, 1886, the benches were replaced with chairs, a new 
walnut desk and a new pipe-orgam were installed. An infant Sunday School 
room was built at the rear. 

In 1891, it was planned to build a new church. On Aug. 12, 1891, the 
corner-stone was removed from the old church. Some of the articles found in 
the stone had rotted away, others were found to be in good shape, including a 
silk book-marker and an 1838 five cent piece. It was planned to place these in 
the corner-stone of the new church. 

A lot on the corner of Bradford and Division Sts. was purchased, from 
John A. Hartnett, on July 10, 1891. 

The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Sun., July 3, 1892, at 
six o'clock, by the Rev. E. B. Palmer, D.D., assisted by other clergymen. The 
Norma Glee Club furnished music for the occasion. A temporary floor had been 
laid to accommodate those attending. 

The opening service was held on Jan. 22, 1893. Among those taking part 
were the Revs. Dr. Wayland, O. G. Buddington, John Miller and Maurice P. 
Fikes, the pastor. 

On May 18, 1897, Mr. Harry A. Richardson offered to contribute $9400.00 
with which to liquidate the entire indebtedness of the church. This offer was 
accepted with appropriate resolutions of thanks, 


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214 THE CHURC AE AgOe? DBILAWAIRIE 





The church was dedicated on Sun., June 20, 1897, under the direction of 
the Rev. J. C. Pierce, the pastor. Among those taking part were the Revs. C. E. 
Hastings, J. B. Turner, Alfred Smith and S. S. Woodward. The match was 
applied to the mortgage by George Barker and Mrs. Eliza Walker, charter 
members. The prayer of dedication was offered by the Rev. F. G. Merrill and 
the benediction was pronounced by the Rev. T. C. Young. 

More land facing Division St. was purchased on Sept. 14, 1901, from 
Nannie B. Van Dyke. The parsonage, on State St., was purchased on Jan. 
30, 1914. 

An addition, to be used as a Sunday School and social-center, was dedi- 
cated on Dec. 14, 1924, by the Rev. Dr. Charles A. Walker. 


Wesley Methodist Church (M.E.), of Dover, was organized on Sept. 13, 


1778. Freeborn Garrettson, the missionary, had preached from the steps of the’ 


old Academy on the day before. He was subjected to indignities as were so 
many of the early Methodist preachers. Preaching was also held at Mr. Hil- 
liard’s home above Dover, at Gum Swamp and at Little Creek. The first church 
was built at North and Queen Streets, Richard Bassett, afterwards Governor of 
Delaware, contributing one-half of the cost of the building. Vincent Loocker- 
man had donated the land for that purpose to a board of trustees, on June 1, 
1782. Incorporated in 1799, the church was given the name “Wesley.” 
Francis Asbury preached in the new chapel on Oct. 2, 1784. On May 25, 


1801, he preached in the Court House while Bishop Whatcoat preached in | 


the chapel. 

Bishop Whatcoat died on July 5, 1806, at the home of Richard Bassett in 
Dover. He was buried beneath the altar of the church. When the old church 
_ Was removed a stone monument was erected over Bishop Whatcoat’s grave, 
the entire plot being used as a cemtery. The oldest tombstone that the writer 
could find is over the grave of Elizabeth Chandler who died on Dec. 1, 1807. 
Among the prominent men buried here are former Governors Cornelius P. 
Comegys and Gove Saulsbury. - __ | 

In 1850, a new church was built on State Street, salvaged bricks from*the 
old church being used in the new building. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 
23, 1850. The church was dedicated on Feb. 9, 1851, by the Rev. Charles I. 


Thompson. The brick dwelling adjoining the church was purchased for a par-- 


sonage on Jan. 6, 1851, from James L. Smith. 

A reopening service was held on July 17, 1859, after extensive improve- 
ments not the least of which was the installation of gas lighting. Two. new 
harmoniums, one in the church and the other in the Sunday School room were 
used for the first time on June 3, 1866. On Oct. 22, 1869, Wesley Church 
purchased five acres of land beside the lake upon which to establish a cemetery. 

The corner-stone of an addition was laid on Fri., July 22, 1870, by Pres. 
Elder T. J. Thompson, assisted by the Revs. James H. Lightbourne and Henry 
putton. The church was rededicated on Jan. 8, 1871. The Rev. Dr. D. W. 
Bartine preached in the morning, the Rev. Wm, Corbett in the afternoon and 
the Rev. J. S. Willis in the evening. The new organ was first used at a musical 
entertainment on Fri., May 12, 1871.. The church was enlarged in 1884. An 
addition was erected in 1892. 

In 1897, the entire church was rebuilt, only the side walls being used. 
The organ, which was retained, was equipped with a water motor. Six new 
memorial windows were installed. The rededication service was held on Feb. 
20, 1898. Among those assisting vere the Revs. S. F. Beiler, T. E. Terry, 
W. L. S. Murray and Alfred Smith, the pastor. The church was dedicated by 





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(Page 218) 


(Page 217) 








216 TRE CHURGHES@GE VD ELAWAICE 


Pres. Elder R. H. Adams. In 1903, the church was beautified after which it 
was reopened on Wed., Sept. 9, 1903, by the Rev. L. E. Barrett, the pastor. 

In 1907, Andrew Carnegie contributed $1500.00 toward a second organ 
which was installed. An addition was built in 1924 and in 1938 a new par- 
sonage was completed. 

The Sunday School was started in 1830 by Mrs. Ann Clark Sipple. On 
Sept. 27, 1800, Berroni Harris, a trustee, was ordered to free a girl slave whom 
he owned and, in 1803, the Quarterly Conference ordered another member to 
free several slaves. It was 1866 before music was approvd and an organ in- 
stalled. It was 1912 before church suppers were approved. 


The Holt Chapel in Wesley Junior College. The organ was dedicated on 
Mon., Aug. 17, 1942. Those taking part included the Revs. Dr. Walter A. 
Hearn, M. W. Marine, Earl J. Cummings, Ralph C. Jones and L. E. Windsor. 
An organ recital was given by Lester S. Bucher. The chapel furnishings and 
the organ were gifts of Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Holt of Federalsburg, Md., for 
whom the chapel was named. 


The People’s Christian Congregational Church of Dover. The Rev. Dr. 
A. W. Lightbourne was pastor of Wesley Methodist Church, in Dover, when 
the validity of his credentials was questioned by the Conference, meeting in 
Asbury Church at Wilmington, in 1908. After a trial Dr. Lightbourne was 
acquitted. In 1909, at the Conference in Milford charges were again brought 
against Dr, Lightbourne relative to his credentials. Dr. Lightbourne refused 
to stand trial a second time. As a result, Dr. Lightbourne with about 250 
members who sympathized with him withdrew from Wesley Church. On Apr. 
4, 1909, they started to hold Sunday meetings in the Opera House. 

The church was duly organized and the name ‘‘People’s’’ selected at a 
meeting held at the pastor’s home on Fri., May 28, 1909. A court action to 
_ decide just who owned the Wesley Church property was decided in favor of 

_ the minority who had remained at Wesley. The project of building a church 
was immediately undertaken and, in July, a lot was purchased on s. Bradford 
St., near Reed St. és 

On Aug. 29, a one-day rally was held at the Camden camp-grounds with 
hacks to transport those attending, to the grounds. It was an eminent success. 
In the meantime People’s Church became identified with the Southern Chris- 
tian Conference. 

The corner-stone of the new church was laid on Oct. 31, 1909, at 3 o'clock. 
The congregation met at the Opera House and marched in a body to the new 
site. The ceremonies were conducted by Dr. Lightbourne. Thomas J. Stevenson 
read a sketch of the history of the church which was enclosed in the stone. 

The church was dedicated on Sun., June 5, 1910, by the Rev. W. W. 


Staley, assisted by Dr. Lightbourne. Gifts of ornaments and furnishings were _ 


presented by Mr. and Mrs. Walter Morris, Mrs. John B. Hutton, the W. T. 
Smithers’ class, the Usher’s Union, the Lend-a-Hand Society, Miss Lizzie Clark 
and Miss Mary. Godwin. ; ) | | 

The dedication service took place in the evening and as they were com- 
pleted at 11 o’clock, Miss Clara Heverin and Harry Raymond, with their at- 
tendants, proceeded to the altar and were married. This was something unique 
in dedication day ceremonies. 

A window in memory of Catherine Benson was unveiled on Mar. 5, 1916. 
The property adjoining the church on the corner was purchased and plans were 
prepared for rebuilding the church and adding a parish-house. 





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DEEN TIC O NETS ZU, 


The corner-stone was laid on Thurs., Apr. 17, 1924, by the Rev. Dr. Roy 
Helfenstein. The first service in the new building was held in the parish-house 
on June 8, 1924. The dedication service was held on Oct. 5, 1924. It was in 
charge of the Rev. W. H. Denison, J. O. Atkinson and L. E. Smith. 

Mr. Eldridge Johnson, a former Dover boy, contributed $100,000.00, the 
tubular chimes, the Westminster clock and the memorial tower. The building 
has modern departmental Sunday School rooms, a chapel, a gymnasium, two 
bowling alleys, banquet room, reception room, church parlor and kitchen. The 
tower is surmounted by an electrically lighted cross. 


The Church of the Holy Cross (R.C.) at Dover. In 1751, Hugh Neill, a 
missionary, reported to the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel that 
Masses were being offered in Dover, once each month, by priests who came 
over from Maryland. In December, 1868, a Sunday School was organized in 
the Sons of. Temperance Hall. On May 8, 1870, Father Edward J. Taylor cele- 
brated Mass in the Academy building. It was planned to hold one service 
each month. 

One acre of land on Clara St. was purchased on Nov. 10, 1870, as a 
cemetery site. The church site on Bradford St. was purchased from Joseph 
McDaniel, et al., on Jan. 5, 1871. 

The erection of the present church was started in 1870. The corner-stone 
was laid on Wed., Nov. 9, 1870, at 2 P. M., by the Most Rev. Thomas A. 
Becker, Bishop of Wilmington. A procession formed at the pastor’s residence 
on New St. and marched to the church site. The Bishop then blessed the stone. 
He was assisted by the Revs. G. Villiger, F. Blake, M. X. Fallon, J. A. Lyons 
and Edward J. Taylor, the pastor. The Bishop then delivered an address in 
which he mentioned the fact that Dover was the only capital city in the United 
States without a Catholic Church. Those present then proceeded to the new 
Catholic cemetery which was consecrated by the Bishop. He then recited the 
prayers for the dead beside the grave of George Griffon, who had been buried 
on Oct. 3, 1870. Many persons, prominent in Delaware, including Governor 
Gove Saulsbury, were present. p 

A new rectory, beside the church, was also being built. The church was 
dedicated on Wed., May 14, 1873. The church was blessed by the Rev. G. 
Sorentine, assisted by Father McCaffery. Mass was celebrated by the Rev. 
Michael Curran, assisted by the Revs. M. X. Fallon and George J. Kelley. 
The high altar was a gift of the Sisters of Notre Dame, Rittenhouse Square, 
Philadelphia. There were numerous gifts from other churches. 

The new organ was unveiled at a concert given on the evening of Tues., 
May 13, 1873. The church bell was installed and ready for use on July 2, 
1881. In 1888, an altar was presented by Samuel J. Everett and the stations 
of the cross were presented as a memorial to Mrs. B. J. Burns, by her husband. 

The church was consecrated on Sun. morning, Apr. 8, 1888, with a large 
congregation, from all denominations, present. The church was blessed by the 
Most Rev. Alfred A. Curtis. Mass was celebrated by the Rev. George S. 
Bradford. Bishop Curtis delivered a lecture at the evening service. 

Bishop Curtis transferred the properties to Holy Cross Church on 
Feb. 7, 1896. 

During 1911, the interior of the church was rebuilt and beautified. The 
improvements were consecrated on Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 30, 1911, by 
Bishop John J. Monaghan, assisted by the Rev. James C. Comiskey, the pastor. 
Three services were held. The Rev. T. F. Waldron celebrated the first Mass. 


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218 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


A talk was given by the Rev. J. J. Harney. At the afternoon service the Bishop 
conferred the Apostolic blessing on those present. ; ’ 

A new Moller pipe-organ was blessed at the morning service on Sun., 
Dec. 13, 1925, by the pastor, the Rev. Joseph A. Lee, D.D. A concert was 
given in the evening with Firmen Swinnen at the console. On Apr. 14, 1926, 
John E. Behen donated more land for the cemetery. 


The Presbyterian Church of Dover. The site of the old Presbyterian 
Church and cemetery is on what was known in the early days of Dover as 
“Meeting-House Square.” As early as 1711, the Presbyterians were holding 
meetings in private homes in Dover. A log church was built, presumbly, in 
1714. The exact date cannot be determined but an English missionary reported 
its existence on Aug. 27, 1717. On May 12, 1743, a new deed to the property 
was given to a board of trustees by the Town Commissioners. On Aug. 16, 
1790, the corner-stone of the brick church was laid. This church was com- 
pleted and occupied. 

The difficulty of securing qualified ministers plus the inroads made by 
the Methodists resulted in the church becoming practically defunct for about 
twenty years. In 1818, an effort was made to resuscitate the church but it does 
not appear to have been very successful. On May 15, 1825, the church was 
reopened and occupied. 


The Convention which framed the 1831 Constitution of Delaware held 
its meetings in this church. About this time the absence of a congregation led 
the State Legislature to appoint a committee to look after the property. In 
October, 1835, the church was reorganized and for the next nine years inter- 
mittent services were held. 


On Feb. 22, 1841, an Act of Incorporation was passed by the General 
Assembly. Three trustees were specified as ‘Trustees of the Pres. Meeting- 
House and Graveyard in the town of Dover.’ On June 24, 1844, a regular 
pastor was installed. A new bell was installed and first used on Apr. 10, 1870. 
The property was enclosed with an iron fence in November, 1874. 


The brick chapel which stands at the corner of Bank Lane was built in 
1880. This chapel was built and furnished by George V. Massey, Esq. It was 
dedicated on June 27, 1880, by the Rev. C. Huntington. Addresses were made 
by E. S. Reynolds and F. A. Williams. A new organ was opened on July 
16, 1882. 


In 1887, major repairs were made to the church. Among the prominent 
Delawareans buried in the graveyard are former Governor Jacob Stout, former 
Governor Charles Polk, Thomas M. Clayton and Captain John Haslett. The 
oldest tombstone is that of Rebecca Kelley who died on Sept. 25, 1773. In 
1941, the tower was removed from the church. 


The present church on State Street, was built in memory of the Rev. 
Thomas G. Murphey, pastor of the church from 1844 to 1861. The church 
geceived title to the site on Sept. 19, 1922. The church was started in 1923 
and was dedicated on Easter Sun., Apr. 20, 1924, by the Rev. J. Ross Stevenson, 
Pres. of Princeton Seminary assisted by the Rev. G. A. Burslem. This church 
was the gift of the Rev. Mr. Murphey’s son, Sanford S. Murphey who also 
built and endowed the Elizabeth W. Murphey School, in Dover, in memo 
of his mother. The manse adjoining the church was purchased on Apr. 24, 1926. 

A Resolution was passed at the 1947 session of the State Legislature au- 
thorizing the Archives Dep’t. to accept the old Pres. Church building on 
Governor's Ave. as a gift from the N. C. Presbytery. It was proposed to con- 





St. JoHN’s Evan. LutH. CHURCH, Dover 
(Page 220) 


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WHATCOAT METHODIST CHURCH, CAMDEN 
(Page 224) 





220 DED CH: ORG HE See Orr ee EIA WARE 


vert the building into a State Museum. As the State provided no money for 
this work it became necessary to solicit private funds to carry out the project. 


Grace Methodist Church (M.P.) at Dover. This church was organized 
in 1890 and met. in the schoolhouse which they purchased on Apr. 13, 1893. 
The last service was held in the schoolhouse on July 9, 1893. The building 
was then torn down to make way for a new church building. A tent was erected 
on the lawn and services were held here during the summer. In the fall they 
secured the use of the Pres. Chapel for their meetings. 

The corner-stone of the new church was laid on Sun., Sept. 3, 1893, at 
3 P. M. In addition to the pastor, the Rev. L. F. Warner, those taking part 
included the Revs. W. L. S$. Murray, J. H. Gohegan, M. P. Fikes and W. P. 
Taylor. The last meeting in the Pres. Chapel was held on Dec. 10, 1893. The 
new church was opened on Sun., Dec. 17, 1893, by the Rev. L. F. Warner, the 
pastor, assisted by the Revs. David Greenfield and J. F. Sheridan. Additional 
land was purchased on Aug. 27, 1921. The church was rebuilt in 1955: 


Jewish Congregation at Dover. During 1939, a number of Sunday meet- 
ings were held in the Capitol Theatre for the purpose of establishing in Dover, 
a Jewish Congregation for Central and Lower Delaware. They were incor- 
porated on Feb. 1, 1939. The only Synagogues in Delaware are all located in 
Wilmington. For some reason the Dover effort was abandoned. 


The Seventh Day Adventist Church was Organized, at Dover, on Nov. 
24, 1917. Meetings were held in the New Century Club. The church was built 
during the years 1931 and ’32. The dedication services were held in De- 
cember, 1932. 


St. Luke’s Christian Church was organized, in 1917, by Dr. R. S. Stephens. 
It was incorporated on Oct. 30, 1917. On Mar. 31, 1920, they purchased the 
old shirt factory at Governor's Ave. and North St. and fitted it up for church 
purposes. The name “St. Luke’s” was adopted on Apr. 28, 1920. The corner- 
stone was laid on May 16, 1920. The church was closed in 1931 and the prop- 
erty was turned over to the People’s Church on Apr. 27, 1931. 


St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church, at Dover, was organized, in 
1924, in the New Century Club. The church site on Lotus St. was purchased 
_ on Mar. 5, 1924. The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Oct. 19, 
1924, by the Rev. C. T. Ohlinger. The dedication service was held on Apr. 
26, 1925. The service at 10:30 A. M. was conducted in the German language. 
The dedicatory sermon was preached by the Rev. H. H. Brauns of Phila. A 
service, in English, at 2 P. M., was conducted by the Revs. L. Geiger and 
E. Totzke. : 


The M. E. Tabernacle of Dover was located on New Street. It was dedi- 
cated on June 18, 1876, by the Rev. J. H. Caldwell. This was an effort by 
the Methodists to reach a group of people who ordinarily did not attend 
any church. 


St. Paul’s Methodist Church (M.E.) and Armory M. E. Church at Dover. 
In the 1880's, in an effort to reach a new group, a band of Methodists began 
holding meetings in the old Armory on Loockerman Street. They named their 
group the Armory M. E. Chapel. On Mar. 24, 1887, E. M. Stevenson donated 





TSENG O-U NATH 221 


a plot of land at Governor’s Avenue, and Mary St., to the trustees of Wesley 
M. E. Church upon which to build a chapel. 

The corner-stone was laid on Sun., July 3, 1887. The chapel was dedi- 
cated on Oct. 2, 1887, at which time the name ‘Avenue M. E. Chapel” was 
selected. Services were held here for a few years. On May 14, 1892, the present 
church site on Division St. was purchased by the Second M. E. Church. 

On Nov. 12, 1892, the chapel was sold to the Second M. E. Church who 
moved it to the present site on Division St. Armory had been incorporated on 
Sept. 12, 1892. Dedication services were held on Dec. 25, 1892. Title to the 
site was acquired on Feb. 1, 1893. The church was improved in 1902. The 
name “St. Paul's’ was adopted on Feb. 20, 1922. 


The Dover Mission M. E. Sunday School was organized on Nov. 15, 
1868, and a full complement of officers and workers was selected. This was 
another effort to reach persons who attended no church. 


The Pilgrim Holiness Church, at Dover, was organized in 1914. They 
met in the Hinkle Building, the Wise Building, St. Luke’s Christian Church 
and in the Presbyterian Chapel. It was while meeting in the latter place that 
they began building the present church at New and Reed Sts. The corner- 
stone was laid in 1924. They were incorporated on Aug. 27, 1924. The site 
was acquired on Mar. 18, 1924. More land was purchased on Aug. 7, 1925. 


The Gospel Hall. On Apr. 14, 1940, the Rev. Edward Richmond of the 
Plymouth Brethren started to hold services in the Burton Building. The first 
meeting was attended by one child and its grandmother. In the meantime Mr. 
Richmond has built up a good congregation. In the spring of 1944, Mr. Rich- 
mond started the erection of a church building on Forest Ave. The work 
was done by Mr. Richmond, personally, aided by members of his congregration. 

The church was completed and the opening services were held on Apr. 
22, 1945. 


There are at least eight colored churches in Dover as follows:* Calvary 
Baptist Church was built in 1886 and dedicated on July 29, 1887; the Union 
Baptist Church laid the corner-stone of a new building and upon its comple- 
tion they vacated the old church on Bank Lane where they had met for many 
years; Mt. Zion A. M. E. Church which was dedicated on Nov. 15, 1874. 
Solid Rock Baptist Church, Seventh Day Adventists, Welcome Tabernacle and 
Mt. Sinai Holy Church all have their own buildings. The Church of the Living 
God meets on the first floor of a lodge hall. 


Whatcoat M. E. Church, colored, was built on the s. w. cor. of the present 
Methodist Cemetery. It was dedicated, in 1854, by Andrew Manship. The 
church was incorporated on Mar. 3, 1870. In 1871-72, a new church was 
built on the same site. The corner-stone was laid on Sun., Oct. 22, 1871, at 
2 P. M., by Pres. Elder H. Smith assisted by the Revs. L. Y. Cox, W. J. Parker 
and Solomon Cooper, the pastor. The church was dedicated on June 23, 1872, 
by the Revs. J. B. Mann, J. B. Merritt and S. Cooper, the pastor. The old 
building was moved to North Street, and converted into a parsonage. The 
church was improved and rededicated in 1935. 


Carlisle M. E. Church, colored, is located four miles west of Dover. On 
Jan. 18, 1849, Casper Carlisle donated 40 perches of land to the trustees as a 
church site. It was described as being situated in the forest of Dover Hundred 





222 Tere Con U URC Oe ae od od 





on the road from Dover to Davis’ Corner. The church was rebuilt in 1879. 
It has been closed for several years. 


Little Creek Friend's Meeting-House. On Sept. 12, 1771, Eleazer Badger 
deeded land to Samuel Hanson and Henry Cowgill, trustees, upon which a 
meeting-house was erected. Previous to this time the Friends in this neighbor- 
hood had attended Duck Creek Meeting. More land was purchased on June 
15, 1785, from Wm. Grav. On May 6, 1802, Jabez Jenkins sold 157 sq. perches 
of land to Daniel Clayton, Jonathan Cowgill and Samuel Price, trustees of the 
Meeting, upon which a new meeting-house was built of brick and the original 
meeting-house was abandoned. This site was then used exclusively for a bury- 
ing-ground. It is located four miles east of Dover. The new meeting-house 
was used until 1865 after which services were held only occasionally. In Octo- 
ber, 1887, the meeting-house was sold and it is still doing yeoman service as 
a storage-house for farm products. The old well-kept burying-ground, sur- 
rounded by a stone wall, is still used for interments. The oldest legible tomb- 
stone that the writer could find is near the entrance, over the grave of Coe 
Gordon who died in 1787. 


Little Creek Methodist Church (M_E.). Gum Swamp M. E. Church was 
located one mile north of Little Creek Landing. A school was maintained in 
1832 and both white and colored children attended. In February, 1875, the 
building was moved into Little Creek. It was repaired and reopened for service 
on May 30, 1875, at which time the name “Little Creek’ was adopted. The 
church site was donated by S. M. Collins, et al., on July 14, 1876. The present 
church was completed and opened for service in 1883. It was arranged to hold 
the dedication services on Dec. 6, 1885, with Pres. Elder A. W. Milby, J. S. 
Willis and James Carroll, the pastor, taking part. More land was purchased on 
Nov. 17, 1920, from Wm. H. Short. 


Old Order Amish. There are four Congregations of Old Order Amish 
close to Dover. They are divided into east, south, north and middle distficts, 
each district comprising about 28 families. They meet on alternate Sundays, 
two districts on one Sunday and the other two districts on the following Sun- 
day. They maintain no church-houses, but hold their services in different 
members’ homes. For this reason they 2re sometimes referred to as “House 
Amish” as distinguished from the “Church Amish’? who maintain meeting- 
houses. | 


Camden Camp. On the easterly side of the highway between Dover and 
Camden, beside Isaac’s Branch, is located the “Camden Union Camp-ground.” 
The camp was incorporated in 1859 and again in 1879. The usual camp- 
meeting activities were held each summer by the Methodists. The meetings 
were discontinued in 1914. The camp-ground was sold to the Pilgrim Holiness 
on Jan. 4, 1927, and they have been conducting camp-meetings here since 
that time. 


The Colored People’s M. E. Church is located, on a dirt road, a short 
distance south of the Camden camp-grounds, at Brinckle Hill. This church 
was organized in 1879 and met in private homes. The church site, of one- 
quarter of an acre, was purchased from James Till on Nov. 4, 1879. The 
church was built in 1883. At the present time services are held twice a month. 











St. PAUL’s P. E. CHURCH, CAMDEN 
(Page 224) 


CAMDEN FRIENDS’ MEETING-HOUSE 
(Page 224) 








224 THEY CHURCHES TOP DELAWARE 





Whatcoat Methodist Church (M.E.) located at Camden was organized in 
1791, at which time Daniel Lowber gave them the use of one-half an acre of 
land upon which to build a church. Mr. Lowber formally deeded the land to 
“the people called Methodists” on July 27, 1796. This half-acre is included in 
the old graveyard in the southern part of the town. On this land, a small 
chapel was built. There was a gallery for the colored people who worshipped 
with, and received the sacraments of the church from the white ministers. 
On Apr. 24, 1813, an additional half-acre was deeded to the trustees, to enlarge 
the graveyard, by Benj. Brady, et al. Francis Asbury spoke in the chapel on 
Apr. 12, 1815. 

This chapel was used until 1857, when the present commodious brick 
church was built. The site had been purchased on July 5, 1856, from Thos. 
Mifflin. The church was dedicated on July 26, 1857. The services were con- 
_ ducted by the Revs. Wesley Kenney, W. H. Brisbane and R. W. Todd, the 
pastor. On Oct. 24, 1857, the old chapel, benches and fixtures were sold at a 
public sale. Two years later, during a severe storm, the north end of the new 
church was partly blown down. The damage was repaired and the church was 
rededicated during January, 1860. 

After major improvements, the church was rededicated on Sun., Nov. 12, 
1865, by the Rev. Andrew Manship assisted by the Rev. Mr. Hammersley, the 
pastor. After being renovated, the church was reopened on Sun., Oct. 27, 1867, 
by the Rev. Mr. Schreck. Early in 1869, a parsonage and a new organ were 
purchased. 

The church was incorporated on May 16, 1923. The parsonage, on Main 
St., was purchased, from Mary E. Graham, on May 23, 1923. During 1940, 
extensive improvements were made to the interior of the church. 

At least a portion of the old church, built more than a century ago, is now 
a dwelling occupied by colored persons. In the old graveyard at the southern 
end of the town, the oldest tombstone that the writer could find is over the 
gtave of Robert McClyment who died on Mar. 24, 1814. Formerly there were 
a number of oaken grave markers but these have all disappeared. 


St. Paul’s P. E. Chapel in Camden. The effort to organize this church was 
started on Trinity Sunday, June 7, 1868. The meetings were held in Sarde’s 
Hall. It was organized as a mission of Christ Church, in Dover, on July 17, 
1868. A church site was secured in 1890 and the chapel was built in 1891. 

In 1895-96 a window in memory of the Rev. Lewis W. Gibson was un- 
veiled. A new organ was installed in 1906-07. Three memorial windows were 
unveiled in 1907-08 and additional land was purchased. In 1908-09 chandeliers 
and chancel lights were presented by Mrs. Caulk of Milford. The church was 
renovated and the parish-house was built in 1913. On Dec. 7, 1913, the church 
was consecrated and the parish-house was dedicated by Bishop Frederick J. 
Kinsman. A new pulpit was installed and it was blessed by Bishop Kinsman 
on Dec. 13, 1914. In 1922-23, a chancel window in memory of Mrs. Julia 
Lord was unveiled. A credence shelf was installed in 1927. 

Beginning in 1890 services were conducted in Wyoming for a short time. 


Camden Friend’s Meeting-House was the last Meeting to be organized in 
Kent County but, in the meantime, it has absorbed all of the other Meetings 
in the County. In 1805, the present meeting-house was built for religious and 
school purposes. The deed for the land was executed by Jonathan and Patience 
Hunn on July 6, 1806, and the plot was described as being located on the road 
leading from the village to the poor-house. This Meeting was an offspring 


a 


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RENT Tr Cre IN pre 225 


of Motherkill Meeting. A few of the school desks and benches can still be seen 
in the school-room on the second floor. This school was discontinued in 1875. 

The Meeting was incorporated on Feb. 13, 1888. This meeting-house is 
unique in several of its features. The style of architecture is different from the 
usual Friend’s Meeting-House, having no porches, a single double-door and a 
gambrel roof with dormer windows, Then, to top it off, the meeting- 
house faces north instead of south. The great majority of meeting-houses, 
for some undetermined reason, were built facing the south. The old horse- 
sheds have been removed. John Hunn, Governor of Delaware, 1901-05, is 
buried in the adjoining burying-ground. The use of foot-stones is noticeable. 
The oldest tombstone is that of Jonathan H. Jenkins who died on Aug. 11, 
1837. A memorial to Warner Mifflin stands in the burying-ground. This stone 
was originally set up in Motherkill burying-ground where Mr. Mifflin is 
buried in an unmarked grave. When Motherkill burying-ground became ex- 
tremely neglected the stone was moved to its present location in 1937. 

The meeting-house is equipped with candles in wall-sconces but it is 
doubtful if they are ever used as the Friends seldom hold meetings at night. 


Camden Baptist Church. In October, 1869, the Baptists in the neighbor- 
hood of Camden purchased Wyoming College, which included a chapel. This 
chapel was dedicated on Sun., Dec. 5, 1869, by the Rev. Dr. Jay T. Backus 
and the Rev. H. G. Weston of Crozer Seminary.:This was used as their meeting 
place. On Dec. 15, 1880, they were incorporated as the Wyoming Baptist 
Church. On Dec. 28, 1880, they purchased, from George Parris, a plot of land 
in Camden upon which a church was built. It was dedicated on Sept. 4, 1881, 
by the Revs. Mr. Heath and James Hope. The last service was held here on 
July 14, 1912, and today the building is occupied as a beauty parlor and 
apartments. 


St. John’s Reformed Church, at Wyoming, was organized on July 18, 
1869, in the Good Templar’s Hall. Meetings were held in the schoolhouse 
and in Ellison’s Hall. Ground was broken for a church on May 11,.1872. The 
corner-stone was laid on June 9, 1872, by the Rev. Dr. E. V. Gearhart. Josiah 
Besemer and Milo H. Grop donated the church site on Layton Ave., at Broad 
St., on Feb. 18, 1874. The church was dedicated on Apr. 19, 1874, by Dr. 
Gearhart. It was incorporated on Feb. 6, 1877. In 1922, the building was sold, 
moved to the main street and converted into a double dwelling. 


St. Paul’s Christian Church, at Wyoming, was organized in 1913. The 
church was incorporated on June 11, 1913. On June 12, 1913, they purchased 
a building at Mechanic and Walnut Sts. from John T. Marker. It was remodeled 
for church purposes. After a few years’ activity the effort was abandoned. 
The building is now occupied by the Knights of the Golden Eagle. 


A Church of God in Christ, colored, is located at Camden. 


Wyoming Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1856, when the Delaware Rail- 
road was built about one mile west of Camden, the station at that point was 
named ‘Camden Station.” In 1865, a town was laid out and given the name 
“Wyoming.” Later in that year, John T. Jakes started a subscription for the 
purpose of erecting a building to be used for Sunday School meetings. A plank 
chapel was built but before it was dedicated it was taken over by the Methodist 
Episcopal Conference. Named the “Wyoming M. E. Church,” the dedication 








226 TOE GH UR: GE Sk eR eAMVAARReE 


was arranged to be held on Nov. 12, 1865, with the Revs. A. Manship, J. ip 
Pearce, Mr. Colclazer and A. D. Davis taking part. 

On Jan. 20, 1881, John T. Jakes donated a church site at the cor. of Layton 
Ave. and College St. More land was purchased on July 8, 1881, from Sarah 
A. Williams. The ground was broken for the present church on Mon., July 4, 
1881. The corner-stone was laid on July 31, 1881, by the Revs. A. W. Light- 
bourne, J. S. Willis, J. H. Caldwell and J. N. Pilchard, the pastor. The church 
was incorporated on May 8, 1883. It was dedicated in September, 1883. After 
having been entirely redecorated a reopening service was held on Oct. 7, 
1888. The building was improved in 1902 and a reopening was held on Sept. 
14, 1902. On Dec. 29, 1912, the church was rededicated after extensive 
improvements. 


Zion A. M. E. Church was organized in Wyoming in 1845 and a church 
was built. Additional land was purchased on Sept. 12, 1848, from Geo. Jones 
and on Apr. 9, 1863, from John Jones. A second church was built in 1889. On 
On Oct. 6, 1898, while a service was in progress, Sam Jones jumped up and 
declared, “I am the Lord and all who don’t believe it are liars.’”’ Then the 
trouble started. Ike Fulman drew his pistol and shot into the ceiling first and 
then sent a bullet crashing into Chas. Waters’ breast. A general melee followed 
after which Jones and Fulman fled to Hazlettville and then on into Maryland. 

On Aug. 15, 1923, one-quarter of an acre of land was purchased from 
Wm. Gaynes. : 


Union Methodist Church (M.E.) is located four miles west of Wyoming. 
The first camp-meeting in this section was held, in 1805, near the site of this 
church. The first church was probably built previous to, or at about this time. 
This building was used until 1859 when it was moved away to be used as a 
barn. A new frame church was completed and was dedicated on Dec. 25, 1859, 
by the Revs. Dr. Cooke and John B. Mann. In the graveyard the first inter- 
ment was John Seward who died on Feb. 23, 1847. Extensive improvements 
were made in 1894. Pennell Emerson donated additional land on May 20, 1931. 
In 1933, the minister appointed by the Conference was refused by the congre- 
gation and the church was closed. It was opened as a Sunday School in 1935 
which is still continued with occasional preaching. 


Thomas’ Methodist Chapel (M.E.) is located four miles west of Hazlett- 
ville. One-half acre of land was donated by Hennelope Freeman-Mrs. Owen 
Irons to the Rev. Wm. Thomas to be used as a site for a church by “the people 
called Methodists to preach and expound God’s Holy Word.” A log chapel 
was built and a graveyard was laid out. On Dec. 24, 1779, Mr. Thomas trans- 
ferred the property to a board of trustees. It was known locally for many 
years as the “Log Chapel” and as “Forest Chapel” although its official name 
was ‘Thomas’ M. E. Chapel” in honor of the Rev. William Thomas. On May 
13, 1781, Harry, a negro, preached upon the subject, ‘The barren fig tree” and 
from the mention made by Bishop Asbury “that the circumstance was entirely 
new and that the white people looked on with attention,” it is believed to have 
been the first instance of a negro preaching to white people on the Peninsula. 
Harry was Bishop Asbury’s servant and accompanied him on his travels. 

The log chapel was moved away, in 1798, and a frame chapel was erected. 
This chapel was dedicated by Freeborn Garrettson. The present brick chapel 
was built in 1825. It was dedicated by the Rev. Solomon Higgins. In 1877, 
the chapel was rebuilt in modern style. The walls were raised three feet, the 





METHODIST CHAPEL 


THOMAS’ 


(Page 226) 


ROR RARE te 


ARAN 
Wan 


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2 ak 


yf 


METHObpIST CHURC 


St. JONES’ 


(Page 229) 





228 TRAE SC HU RGH ES O Fen BIW AUAA RE 


gallery was removed and a recess pulpit was built. It was dedicated on Nov. Poa 
1877, by Pres. Elder Charles Hill and the Rev. J. H. Caldwell. 

Services are held every other Sunday afternoon. In the rear gable, the 
date 1825, in large figures, is laid out with black header bricks. The grave- 
yatd beside the chapel is well maintained. The oldest tombstone that the writer 


could find is that of the Rev. John Connelley who died on Dec. 21, 1845. 


Parker's Methodist Church, colored, is located two miles s. w. of West- 
ville. This church was founded in 1877. 25 perches of land were donated on 
Jan. 9, 1878, by Joshua Parker, as a church site. There is a graveyard. 


Star Hill M. E. Church, colored, is located at Star Hill, east of Camden. 
The first building was erected in 1866. The present church was built in 1905. 

Additional land had been purchased from F. W. J. Heinemann on 
Feb. 16, 1903. 


Star Hill Unity Holiness Church, colored, is located at Star Hill. This 
building was originally the home of the Lutheran Church at Rising Sun. In 
1931, the building was moved to its present location. The church site had been 
donated by Albert M. Palmer on Oct. 13, 1930. 


Rising Sun M. E. Church was organized in 1888, and meetings were held 
in a local hall. The interest was not sustained and the effort failed in about 
three years. 


St. Paul’s Evangelical Lutheran Church at Rising Sun. This congregation 
was formed in 1900, and met over the blacksmith shop at the five corners. On 
Jan. 13, 1903, a building committee was elected.’ The church was incorporated 
on Feb. 16, 1903. A plot of land was purchased from Robert Richardson, on 
Mar. 3, 1903, and the building was started. The corner-stone was laid on Mar. 
29, 1903. The opening service was held on May 24, 1903. The church was 
given the name “St. Paul’s” and was dedicated on Aug. 2, 1903, by the Revs. 
E. L. S. Tressel and W. Zimmerman. Sometime between Mar. 12, 1911 and 
1916 this congregation was dissolved. Mission services were held from 1916 
until 1924 when the church was Closed, the congregation transferring to the 
Dover church. The building was sold, in 1931, to a congregation of colored 
Holiness who moved it to Star Hill. bi 


Lebanon Methodist Church (M.E.) at Lebanon, was built in 1858. The 
church site had been purchased from John Sapp on Oct. 19, 1857. The church 
was incorporated on Apr. 2, 1874. On Mar. 12, 1922, the church was de- 
stroyed by a fire that originated next door in the home of Captain Walker. A 
new church was built and it was dedicated in 1925. The church was closed in 
1939. Since that time occasional services have been held by students of the 
Wesley Junior College. 


: Lebanon P. E. Mission was founded by the Rev. Benjamin F. Thompson, 
B.D., of Dover, in January, 1931. The early meetings were held in a private 
home. The Methodist church was closed at that time and Father Thompson 
was given the use of it for his services. In February, 1933, a class was ready 
for confirmation and this was done by Bishop Philip Cook in St. Paul’s 
Church at Camden. At this time the Methodists decided to reopen their 
church. This depleted the mission to some extent. One of the members vol- 
unteered to transport the members, by bus, to attend the services at St. Paul’s 
Church in Camden, after which the mission at Lebanon was closed, 





nee: 





Km INe Toes Oo UGN Ea 229. 


St. Jones’ Methodist Church (M.E.) located two miles south of Little 
Creek was founded in 1802, when a frame church was built. A Sunday School 
was organized in 1845. A new building was erected and it was dedicated on 
Jan. 29, 1871. 

The services were in charge of the Rev. E. Stubbs, assisted by the Rev. J. 
Owen Sypherd, the pastor. Because of inclement weather, only a small con- 
gregation was present, yet they cleared the church of debt and also raised 
money to insure the building. It was decided to plant a tree in front of the 
church to be known as the ‘‘Postles’ Tree.” This was in honor of Thomas 
Postles, chairman of the building committee. 

The 100th Anniversary was celebrated on Oct. 12, 1902, with the Rev. 
L. W. Layfield in charge. 

The church was closed in July, 1944, and by the end of 1945 only a shell 
remained. On two occasions during its last 20 years this church was ravished 
by thieves. The last time, after the 1944 closing, the thieves took everything 
that was not nailed down including the three pulpit chairs and the pulpit Bible. 
In the adjoining graveyard there are only a few inscribed. tombstones. The 
oldest is that of Parigan Mansfield, who died on Dec. 18, 1814. 


John Wesley Church, colored, is located two miles south of St. Jones’ 
Church. There is a small graveyard. 


Bethel Christian Church, at Kitt’s Hummock, was organized by Dr. R. S. 
Stephens. The church site was donated, on July 23, 1915, by Timothy E. Town- 
send and a galvanized iron building was erected. A larger frame church was 
built sometime later. It became defunct in 1935. The building was sold, re- 
moved to the north shore and remodeled for a cottage. 


Banning’s M. E. Chapel was located four miles below Cooper’s Corner 
where cement steps lead up to the old graveyard. This chapel was the result 
of preaching by Freeborn Garrettson at the home of Caleb Boyer’s father in 
1778. Francis Asbury preached at Boyer’s on Nov. 24, 1780. On Sept. 20, 
1842, Richard A. Cooper donated an additional acre of land upon which to 
build a new church. This building was erected, with the Rev. Wm. Connelly 
doing most of the work. In the 1850's, it was decided to build two churches 
closer to the homes of the congregation. One group built Beth Berei Church 
at Magnolia in 1856 and another group built Lebanon Church in 1858. Ban- 
ing’s Chapel was then abandoned. The large graveyard contains graves dating 
back to 1846. No burials have been made in recent times and the graveyard 
receives but little attention. 


Motherkill Friend’s Meeting-House and burying-ground were located on 
the northern edge of Magnolia beside Beaver Dam Branch. On May 12, 1760, 
Wm. Jackson donated one acre of land for the above purpose. The meeting- 
house was burned shortly after being built and a new building was erected. 
In 1790, Motherkill and Duck Creek were united with Eastern Shore Meetings 
to form the Southern Quarterly Meeting. In 1805, Motherkill Meeting fath- 
ered the Camden Meeting. In 1828, they united with Duck Creek as a Monthly 
Meeting. In 1830, Motherkill and Duck Creek united with Camden Preparative 
Meeting. The brick meeting-house was used for occasional meetings until 1844 
when it was sold to Henry MclIlvain. 

The old burying-ground is still there and is known locally as the ‘Quaker 
graveyard.” Small care is given to this plot in recent times and as a result 
trees and brush have taken almost complete possession of the site. There are 


OO A RAO eat Bisat ok Oe Bite cteti atria A ek Aeuby ovale 4. 





230 Tit Ee CUO" OCG ee Ca a WA eee 





many field stones marking graves and only the Luff’s and the Sipple’s have in- 
scribed tombstones. The oldest of these is over the grave of Dr. Nathaniel 
Luff who died Jan. 21, 1806, at the age of fifty years. He was a surgeon in 
Washington's Army and crossed the Delaware with him at Trenton. Dr. Luff’s 
recorded experiences on his first day's attendance at a school in Dover are 
quoted by almost every Delaware historian. 


Magnolia Methodist Church (M.E.) is a daughter of Banning’s Chapel. 
On Oct. 12, 1853, Geo. S. May sold 2.42 acres of land, beside Beaver Branch, 
to a board of trustees. Here a church was built and it was dedicated on Nov. 
30, 1856, by the Rev. Dr. Durbin and the Rev. Andrew Manship. The name 
“Beth Beret’ meaning “house of my creation” was adopted. The church was 
incorporated on Feb. 22, 1861, and on Sept. 9, 1861, the property was trans- 
ferred to the new trustees. The parsonage, adjoining the church was built in 
1887. After major improvements, a reopening service was held on Sept. 20, 
1891. It was conducted by the Revs. J. S. Willis, E. L. Hubbard and L. Lay- 
field, the pastor. 

During 1941, the church was entirely renovated at a cost of $1500.00. A 
reopening service was held on Nov. 23, 1941. On the morning of Dec. 7, 
1941, while the sexton was preparing for services a fire was discovered around 
the chimney. Despite the efforts of firemen from Magnolia and three neigh- 
boring towns, the building was gutted. 

Under the leadership of the Rev. Walter L. Beckwith the erection of a 
new church was started immediately. The opening services was held on Apr. 
18, 1943. With all bills paid, this beautiful brick church was dedicated on 
Apr. 25, 1943, by Dist. Supt. Dr. Walter A. Hearn. The church was incor- 
porated as Magnolia Methodist Church on Feb. 1, 1943. 

Due to war-time restrictions there was a delay in securing the pews. After 
being installed, the pews together with the song books and hymnals were 
dedicated on Sun., Feb. 13, 1944, by the Rev. H. Norman Nicklas, the pastor. 
_ At the same service, the corner-stone, a gift of Mr. William V. Sipple, of 

Milford, was dedicated and placed in position. The sermon was preached by 
the Rev. John M. Kelso of Wesley Junior College of Dover. 


Magnolia Baptist Church was located on Walnut Street, in Magnolia. 
The corner-stone was laid on Apr. 3, 1872. The church was incorporated 
on April 30, 1873. The church site was donated by Edmund Stout on Oct. 17, 
1873. The church was dedicated on Feb. 15, 1874, by the Rev. S. M. Harris. 
This church had an active existence for a few years but it was burned, in 1889, 
and not replaced. 


Murderkill Presbyterian Church was located one and one-half miles west 
of Magnolia on the road to Canterbury. The site is about four hundred yards 
north of the road and to the east of Double Run where a millpond furnished 
power to operate a lumber mill and later a grist mill. The millpond, known 
as “Burke Pond’ has been washed out and the mill torn down. This church 
was established previous to 1738 and it was the first Presbyterian Church in 
Kent County. It was abandoned and a new church was built three miles south 
of Canterbury in 1762. The old graveyard still remains but the encroaching 
wilderness has almost claimed it for its own. The oldest inscribed stone to be 
found marks the graves of George Craige and his wife Isabella who died in 
1738 and 1753, respectively. An old underground vault is located here with 


09 00 
shige wo 





OLIA METHODIST CHURCH 


MaGN 
(Page 230) 





MAGNOLIA METHODIST CHURCH 


(Page 230) 








232 IEE CH URC H ES ono es AWARE 


the entrance open and subject to the elements. The local name for this spot 
is ‘‘vault woods.” 


Mt. Olive A. M. E. Church, east of Little Heaven, was rebuilt in 1906. 
The land had been purchased on Oct. 26, 1904, from Wm. Abrams. 


Saxton’s Methodist Church (M.E.), located one and one-half miles west 
of Bower’s Beach, was built on land donated by John Saxton, on Jan. 23, 1881. 
The chapel was dedicated on Dec. 8, 1879. In 1893, the chapel was moved to 
its present site at Bower's Beach. The opening service was held on Sun., Dec. 
3, 1893. It was conducted by the Revs. W. L. S. Murray, Robert Watt and 
S. R. Maxwell. This site was purchased from Elizabeth Minner on June 
20, 1894. 


Barratt’s Methodist Chapel (M.E.) is located one mile north of Frederica. 
It is known as the “cradle of Methodism.” The land on which the chapel and 
the large graveyard are situated, was conveyed by Philip Barratt on Aug. 17, 
1780, to a Methodist board of trustees for the nominal consideration of five 
shillings. The interest in Methodism in that locality was started by Freeborn 
Garrettson, a Methodist missionary, who preached in private homes in 1778. 
Among those converted were Philip Barratt and Waitman Sipple. They formed 
a Methodist Society and in March, 1780, they took the initiative and startea 
building the brick chapel on Barratt’s land. It was finished and occupied be- 
fore the end of the year. It was here on Nov. 14, 1784, that Bishop Thomas 
Coke first met Francis Asbury and the spot is marked with a brass star inlaid 
in the floor. It was here that the Holy Sacrament was first administered 
regularly. 


On Dec. 24, 1784, at Baltimore, Asbury and Coke were elected the first _ 


"Superintendents of the church in America. In spite of John Wesley’s earnest 
opposition both Asbury and Coke immediately assumed the title of Bishop. 
Asbury preached here for the last time on Apr. 14, 1815. | 

The old-fashioned high pulpit has been removed but the pulpit-bench, 
upon which Coke and Asbury sat, is still Preserved and in use on the present 
‘pulpit. For the first sixty years the interior was roughly finished, the only 
flooring being the ground itself. At regular intervals a half brick was left out 
of the outside walls, a feature that arouses the curiosity of many persons. It 
appears that in those days the scaffolding used in erecting brick buildings was 
placed on the outside of the buildings. These Openings, half-brick deep, are 
where the scaffolding rested on the walls and they were not filled in when 
the scaffolding was removed. ) 

Barratt’s Chapel is owned and supervised by a self-perpetuating board 
of nine trustees. Under the deed of trust negroes were allowed to hold meet- 
ings on designated mid-week evenings using the gallery for these meetings. 
It was stipulated that they must not become boisterous and that at least three 
of the trustees must be present. The white mulberry tree in front of the chapel 
is believed to be older than the chapel itself. In 1932, termites did consider- 
able damage to the building. The damage was repaired, the woodwork was 
treated and it receives semi-annual inspection and care. 

Among the noted persons buried in the 8taveyard are former Governors 
George Truitt and John W. Hall. Gov. Truitt was originally buried on his 
farm south of Canterbury. Added to the inscription on the flat slab over Gov. 
Truitts vault is the following: “By Resolution of the General Assembly of 
Delaware the remains of Gov. Truitt and family were reinterred and these 
three stones removed to this place—March A. D. 1903. The oldest tombstone 


-?> 


acs te tan a pc a bu 8 250 





that the writer could find is over the grave of Susanna Shockley who died on 
May 7, 1795. 


Trinity Methodist Church (M.E.) at Frederica. As early as 1778, Metho- 
dist meetings were held, in private homes, in Frederica. An undenominational 
church was built in 1800. The land was donated by Benjamin Dill and the 
framework by Benjamin Smith. It was located on the main street and is still in 
use as the first floor of Harry F. Mitten’s undertaking establishment and furni- 
ture store. This church was taken over by the Methodists and dedicated on 
Mar. 12, 1812, by the Rev. Zedakiah Davis. 

On Apr. 23, 1836, Robert I. Lowber sold to a board of trustees 6180 sq. 
ft. of land for $28.37. This was to be the site for a new Methodist meeting- 
house to be named the “Christian Tabernacle.” This plot was directly across the 
street from the first church. The new church was completed and was dedi- 
cated by the Rev. Thomas J. Quigley. It was a much larger building and was 
two stories high. 

The present brick church was built in 1856. It was dedicated in the spring 
of 1858 by the Rev. J. B. Merritt. The second church was then used as a 
schoolhouse and a Town Hall. When the present school was built the first 
floor of the old building was converted into a store. After the present Com- 
munity Hall was built, the old building was torn down in 1936. 

The present church has a spire that can be seen for miles around. The 
original spire collapsed in a windstorm in October, 1878, and was replaced in 
1880. ‘In 1891, a memorial window, in the pulpit recess, was presented by 
Sarah H. Lister in memory of her daughter. 

Mrs. Lister, on July 1, 1921, presented to the church, town properties 
that had been owned by her father, former Governor John Wood Hall. These 
properties form a part of the permanent investments of the church. 

After extensive improvements, reopening exercises were held on Jan. 15, 
1905. The services were in charge of Bishop Earle Cranston, assisted by the 
Rev. Wm. Cashmore. A new organ was installed in 1924. 

On the front wall of the church auditorium there is a white marble tablet 
with a black border erected in memory of former Governor John W. Hall, 
who was an active member of Trinity Church. 


Frederica M. P. Church was built, in 1891, on the western edge of the 
town. It was planned to lay the corner-stone on July 4, 1891, with a band in 
attendance and fire-works in the evening. The dedication was arranged for 
Sun., Nov. 22, 1891, with the Rev. F. T. Little in charge. The last minister 
served during the year 1910 after which the church was closed. It was later 
sold to a colored congregation who moved it to a new location. 


Frederica Christian Church. A congregation of the Christian Church was 
formed, in 1912, through the efforts of Dr. Lightbourne of Dover. They never 
had a church building but held their meetings in the Town Hall. During 
1915-16, they were served by a local-preacher from Dover. Never very strong, 
the congregation soon disbanded. 


Frederica Baptist Church. The Rev. Mr. Sanderling, a blacksmith on the 
side, held Baptist meetings in the M. P. Church in the early 1900's. He secured 
a few converts and some of the oldtimers recall with evident relish at least 
one baptism in the Murderkill River. The effort was soon abandoned. 


Hubert A. M. E. Church, at Frederica. The first church was built in 1906. 
In 1911, the M. P. Church was purchased and moved to the present site. It was 


2a DAE CHOU RCA ESS. bevel) Eel, AW A-Ree 





rebuilt in 1923. They were incorporated on Jan. 1, 1923. Land was purchased 
from Maurice A. Hartnett on Apr. 30, 1923. 


Big Union A. M. E. Church is located two miles west of Frederica. The 
church was incorporated on Apr. 21, 1886. The church site was purchased on 
May 20, 1886, from James Pennewell. 


Law’s M. E. Chapel is located four miles s. w. of Frederica on the road to 
Harrington. From 1778 until 1802 preaching was held in the home of Mr. 
Cardeen. Joshua Laws was one of the active members and when, in 1802, it 
was decided to build a chapel he proposed to donate one-quarter acre of land 
for that purpose. He transferred the land to Marcy Smithers and on Apr. 17, 
1802, Mr. Smithers deeded the land, for the nominal sum of $5.00, to a board 
of trustees known as the “Methodist Society,” Mr. Laws being one of the 
members. The church was built and named in honor of Mr. Laws. 

The deed stipulated that the building was to be used as a schoolhouse 
and as a preaching-house, the preaching to conform to the teachings of John 
and Charles Wesley. If any conflict arose between its use for school purposes 
and for preaching, the church services took precedence. The Board of Trustees 
is self-perpetuating and in 1812, two of the members having died and one 
having withdrawn from the church, the survivors elected three new members. 
This procedure has continued to the present time. In 1856, the first building 
was torn down and the present chapel was built. It was dedicated on Aug. 5, 
of that year. 

Additional land was purchased on May 4, 1878, from Jos. O. McColley 
and on Dec. 13, 1929, from the State Board of Education. 

Law’s Chapel has had several closed periods and the last attempt to open 
it was abandoned as hopeless in 1932. Under the direction of Thomas Cham- 
bers, one of the present trustees, a home-coming was held on May 4, 1941, © Laon 
and it was most successful in bringing out a large crowd of worshippers. © 
Among the interesting relics in the possession of Mr. Chambers are the old 
minute books dating back to 1802, an old communion service and the pulpit — 
Bible, purchased when the present chapel was built. os 





John Wesley A. M. E. Church and graveyard are located on the road to 
. Thompsonville. The site was donated on Sept. 25, 1847, by Thos. Mason with 
the provision that a church would be erected. tein 
Additional land was purchased on Nov. 6, 1897, from Paris T. Carlisle. uae 
A social-hall was built in 1944. . 


Wesley Methodist Church (M.E.) sometimes called ‘Milford Neck 
Church” is located at Thompsonville. The first church was built, in 1790, on 
land donated by Col. and Mrs. John Wood to a board of trustees composed of 
Nathaniel Luff, Isaac Jester, J. Hendrickson, Thos. Sipple, J. Taylor, Thos. 
Smith, James Bell and J. Parsons. This church was not large but it included 
end and side galleries. It was named “Sardis’’ for one of the seven churches 
built by the Apostle Paul in Asia. The city of Sardis was noted for its beauty 
and wealth and it was the home of Croesus renowned for his ziches. During 
the winter of 1840, a larger church was built on land deeded by Lewis Pass- 

| More, sixty yards to the east of the old church. This new church was built of 
| lumber that had washed ashore on the beach of the Delaware River, possibly 
| three miles away. It was larger than the first church; contained three galleries 
and had a high pulpit from which the preacher could see and be seen by every- 
| one present. It was dedicated in June, 1843, by the Rev. Henry White of the 








FREDERICA 


NR. 


’ 


S METHODIST CHAPEL 


(Page 232) 


I 


7 we 


BARRA 





TRINITY METHODIST CHURCH, FREDERICA 
(Page 233) 


236 THE CHURCHES {OF (DELAWARE 


Dover District, a descendant of Judge Thomas White, who sheltered Asbury 
from the authorities in the early days of Methodism. This church was lighted 
by candles at the evening services. 

This building was remodeled in 1873, 18 feet were added to its length, 
the galleries were removed and a second story was added. It was dedicated b 
the Rev. James Mann, on Sept. 6, 1874. The first organ was installed during 
the pastorate of the Rev. R. K. Stevenson and Mrs. Stevenson was the first or. 
ganist. During the pastorate of the Rev. C. B. Kitchen, a bible platform was 
built in front of the pulpit. 

The church was incorporated on July 29, 1921. On June 25, 1925, Mrs. 
Sarah H. Lister presented $1000.00 to the church as a memorial to her son, 
Charles C. Lister. On Nov. 26, 1928, Mrs. Lister donated additional land to 
the church. 

In 1933, an addition was built, including a kitchen and a motor room. 
Electric lighting was installed at this time. 

Across South Bowers Road from the church there is a large granite monu- 
ment erected by Sarah Hall Lister in 1909. It honors the memory of Col. John 
Wood—Patriot and Philanthropist—who died on Sept. 14, 1818, and his wife, 
Mary Hall Wood who died on Dec. 23, 1831. 


On the back of the monument is this inscription: 
“Near this spot on land donated 
By Col. Wood stood the first 
M. E. Church of Milford Neck built 
* in 1790 largely by his generosity.” 

On Aug. 10, 1943, a violent windstorm visited this section. Three large 
trees were uprooted and blown over on the roof of the one-story kitchen at 
the rear of the church, practically demolishing it. It was rebuilt immediately. 

Originally, there was a fork in the road at the church and in the Y thus ~ 
formed there was a small graveyard. None of the gtaves had inscribed tomb- 
stones and when the road was improved, the Y was removed and all trace of 
the graveyard disappeared. 


Woodside Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1886, an interdenominational 
Sunday School was started in Woodside. It was very successful and the present 
church site was purchased on June 19, 1889, from Ezekiel Cowgill. In 1889, 
the corner-stone of the present Methodist Church was laid and the building 
was completed. The dedication, by the Rev. J. S. Willis was planned for June 
22, 1890. More land was donated by W. S. Barger. The first bell was installed _ 
in 1896 and was replaced by the present bell in 1920. 

After having been completely renovated, the church was reopened on the 
evening of Nov. 4, 1945. The services were in charge of the Rev. Dr. Thos. 
C. Mulligan, Dist. Supt., and the Rev. W. O. Hackett, the pastor. 

To quote a prominent member of that community, its motto is, ‘Don’t 
tread on me” and applies socially, politically and religiously which signifies 


“that the people of that neighborhood are very independent. Probably because 


of this attitude, the church was closed for two periods of a few years each. 
This was the result of the inability to make satisfactory arrangements with the 
other churches on that circuit as to the time services would be held at Woodside. 

Quoting again, the people of Woodside say that so long as a single brick 
remains of old Barratt’s Chapel the spirit of Methodist will not die in that 
section. This spirit has led to the reopening of Woodside Church for the 
third time and the congregation is struggling along buoyed up by the follow- 
ing thought: 


Ae be Weigel aad a ew Loe 237 


“A rocky path one often goes 
But even then, perhaps a rose 
Lies right ahead—one never knows.” 


St. John’s A. U. M. P. Church is located in Woodside. The church site 
was purchased from James H. Jones on Nov. 26, 1909. It was stipulated that 
there should be no graveyard. 


Willow Grove M. E. Church. At Willow Grove a Methodist Society was 
organized at an early date and meetings were held in private homes. On Aug. 
2, 1824, Thomas Jackson, for the sum of six cents, conveyed, to a board of 
trustees, a plot of land upon which Willow Grove Church was built. The 
church was incorporated on May 29, 1844. In 1850, more land was purchased 
and a new church was built. 

Ground was broken for the present church in April, 1882, and the build- 
ing was completed in 1883. It was built by Thomas Gooden who contributed 
all of the material and supervised the construction, all at his own expense. Mr. 
Gooden stipulated that the church must never be sold and that in the event 
the Methodists ceased to use it, the church should be open to any white Chris- 
tian congregation who wished to use it. The property belongs to the com- 
munity. It ceased to function as a Methodist Church in 1912. A short time 
later a Baptist Missionary started a series of meetings in the schoolhouse. 
After he had gathered a congregation together, he was given the use of the 
church. Interest in this effort fell off after the missionary was replaced by 
another pastor. In the meantime, the church has been used by the Pilgrim 
_ Holiness, the Nazarenes and other denominations with many closed periods. 
The building has been kept in reasonably good repair through the interest of 


John T. Dodd and the neighbors. At the present time services are being held. 


by the Church of God, Reformation. The old church, built in 1850, was moved 
into the village, in 1883, where it was used as Frasher’s store. 


Willow Grove Church of God, Reformation. This congregation started 
to use the community-owned Methodist Church on Oct. 26, 1941. It was then 
that their first service was held here. They have preaching three times 
each week. 


St. Paul’s A. M. E. Church is located on the outskirts of Willow Grove. 
The church site was donated on May 2, 1921, by Mary M. Stansberry. The 
erection of the church had been recently completed. 


Cow Marsh Primitive Baptist Church. Near Mount Moriah, which is two 
miles east of Sandtown, the Baptist Church was organized on July 18, 1781. 
For ten years previous to this time meetings had been held in the neighbor- 
hood. The effort to build a church was postponed from time to time. On Sept. 
7, 1793, Job Meredith conveyed two acres of land to Joseph Flood upon which 
a church was built. On June 4, 1796, Joseph Flood conveyed the property to 
the trustees of the “Baptist Church at Mount Moriah.”’ In 1872, a new and 
larger church was built. It was opened on Dec. 29, 1872, by Elder W. L. Pur- 
rington. An additional acre of land was donated on Apr. 24, 1926, by John 
G. Meredith. The congregation is of the “old line or hardshell” denomination 
and regular services are conducted by an elder of that branch. There is a 
gtaveyard beside the church, the graves dating back to 1835. 


Mt. Olive Methodist Church (M. P.) is located one and three-quarters 
miles east of Sandtown. The land upon which the church and graveyard are 


ail ee a ee eee ts 


re, eee 


ak WAM od RON Ne Gee nr ne 





238 IOHLE ©. CHUCK, CULES SOF a) EDA WAAL 


situated was donated by Thomas Dougherty. The first building was erected in 
1845. The present church was built in 1871 and was dedicated on Jan. 14, 
1872, by the Rev. James Nichols. It was extensively remodeled in 1900. 

In 1932, the pastor having died, the church was closed. In 1939, the Rev. 
Carvel Tribbett was invited to preach, but difficulties arose and he left in 
1940, to found Hughes’ Chapel of Pilgrim Holiness about two miles away. 
The church was reopened by the Methodists on June 21, 1942, with bi-weekly 
meetings in charge of the pastor of Trinity Church in Harrington. There is a 
large graveyard across the road from the church, the graves dating back to 1852, 


Hughes’ Holiness Chapel, located four and one-half miles beyond Hol- 
landsville, was built in 1940. It is a frame building in a lovely grove and was 
originally built so that the sides could be thrown open in the summertime 
converting it into a tabernacle. The building will seat two hundred persons 
and all of the labor was performed by the members of the congregation. 
Charles Hughes, for whom the chapel is named, contributed the land and most 
of the timber. A tabernacle was built beside the chapel in 1945, 

The Rev. Carvel Tribbett was the founder and his meetings, twice a week, 
are attended by large crowds, some persons coming many: miles to attend. 
Three-quarters of a mile west of the chapel an original Mason and Dixon 
stone can be seen, close to the road. 


Magee’s M. E. Chapel, Viola Methodist Church (M. E.). Magee’s Chapel, 
located at Magee’s Crossroads, two miles west of Viola was founded by the 
Rev. J. N. Magee. In 1857, he built a frame tabernacle which was dedicated 
by the Rev. J. S. Willis. In 1858, a substantial frame church was built. It 
was dedicated on Dec. 26, 1858, by the Rev. C. Hill and the Rev. J. S. Willis. 
This chapel was in use 25 years when it was decided that a church in Viola 
would be more convenient for the congregation. | 

A meeting was held in Viola on Sept. 9, 1883, at which time the M. E. 
Sunday School of Viola was organized. On Oct. 18, the M. E. Church of Viola ' 
was organized and trustees were elected. The first meeting of the trustees was — 


held on Nov. 19, at which time officers were elected, one committee was ap-2 


pointed to look around for a church site and another committee was appointed 
to secure subscriptions for building a church. On June 18, 1884, a committee 
was appointed to investigate the advisability of moving Magee’s Chapel into — 
Viola or of selling the chapel to best advantage. It was decided to tear down _ 
the chapel and to use the lumber in building the Viola church. On Oct. 6, 
1884, Mary A. Monson, of Connecticutt, donated the land for the church site, 
for the nominal sum of $1.00. The deed stipulated that it was subject to ceme- — 
tery rights for certain persons. This burial privilege has never been exercised. 
The church was completed: and was dedicated on Mar. 8, 1885. On July 25, 
1897, the new church bell was used for the first time. A wing was added to the 
building in 1916. ! 


Mt. Plymouth A. U. M. E. Church, built in 1889, is located south of Viola 
on the Plymouth Road. | 


Plymouth Baptist Church, south of Canterbury, was organized on May 
29, 1867 and recognized on Sept. 24, 1867. They secured the use of a church 
that had been built by the Congregationalists who had not prospered. The 
congregation became small and on Mar. 22, 1873, they closed the church and 
transferred their membership to the Magnolia Baptist Church. The church 
building was sold, moved away and used by a canning factory. 





WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH, THOMPSONVILLE 
(Page 234) 


St. STEPHEN’S P. E. CHURCH, HARRINGTON 
(Page 245) 


ner ae 





SS 


240 THE! CHURCH BS! OFM IDET AWARE 


Green’s M. E. Chapel. One mile south of Woodside on the western side 
of the Highway and about one hundred yards distant there is a large clump of 
trees and brush. This was the site of Green’s Chapel, founded as a Methodist 
Meeting on May 16, 1781. At that time Christopher Green conveyed one 
acre of land upon which to build a chapel. Francis Asbury preached here on 
Tues., Mar. 20, 1810. This chapel was in active service until 1856, at which 
time the congregation decided it would be more convenient to build a church 
at Canterbury. 


Bethesda Methodist Church (M. EF.) at Canterbury. Jonathan W. Gilder- 
sleve donated three-quarters of an acre of land at Canterbury upon which to 
build a church. The incorporation of the church was recorded on June 4, 1856. 
The building of Bethesda Church was begun on July 21, 1856, and was com- 
pleted on Sat., Oct. 25, 1856. The dedication services were held on Oct. 26, 
1856, the Rev. John D. Onins of Philadelphia being in charge. The church 
was extensively repaired after which it was reopened on Sun., Jan. 1, 1871. 
The church stands as originally built. The church was incorporated on June 
25, 1922. After major improvements a reopening service was held on Sun., 
Sept. 25, 1925, by the Rev. Earl S. Hoxter, the pastor. There is a small gtave- 
yard to the rear of the church. | 


When the highway is converted into a dual road, some time in the near 
future, the State Highway mepe proposes to move the church building to the 
south and beside the graveyard. 


Canterbury Presbyterian Church was built, three miles south of Canter- 
bury, in 1762. It was abandoned in 1860 and there is nothing to mark the 
site. The building was converted into a farm building and is still in use on the 
McGinnis farm. : | 


Purnell’s M. E. Chapel was located about one-half mile east of the pres- 
ent town of Felton. It was the predecessor of Felton Methodist Church. A 
Methodist Society was formed at Andrew Purdin’s in 1779. Francis Asbury 
was a frequent visitor at Purdin’s. He preached there on Aug. 10, 1779, and 
on Mar. 27, 1780. He delivered a lecture there on Nov. 8, 1780, at which 
time 700 Ibs. of pork were subscribed towatd completing Barratt’s Chapel and 
he administered the sacrament there on Oct. 3, 1785. 5 


A chapel was built on land provided by Major James Purnell, for whom 
the chapel was named. At that time, this neighborhood was tough, to say the 
least. Certain elements were given to heavy drinking and gambling. There was 
a half-mile race track closeby which was constantly in use. Francis Asbury 
called the section the ‘Devils’ Synagogue,” why synagogue, is impossible to 
determine. The race track habitues, when Opportunity afforded, would sneak 
Asbury’s riding horse to the track and give him a workout. One afternoon as 
Asbury was riding past the entrance to the track, his horse dashed in and 
Started racing against time around the track. In spite of Mr. Asbury’s frantic 
yells of “Whoa, Sparks, Whoa, Whoa,” the horse continued until he had 
passed the finish line. Needless to say, this incident was most embarrassing 
to the preacher and caused great glee among the neighborhood hooligans. Mr. 
Asbury mentions this incident in his Journal on Jan. 22, 1781. 


Purnell’s Chapel was enlarged in 1842, with the pastor, the Rev. Wm. 


Connelley doing most of the work. The chapel was closed in 1861, when 
Felton Church was built, 


Beil Ton OTN Take 241 


Felton Methodist Church (M. E.) succeeded Purnell’s Chapel which was 
located one-half mile out of town. At the present location, a new church was 
built. It was arranged to have the corner-stone, which is really a gable-stone, 
laid on Tues., June 26, 1860, by the Revs. T. C. Murphy, C. Cook, J. Allen and 
Mr. Smith. The first service was arranged to be held in the basement on Sun., 
Nov. 11, 1860, with the Revs. J. F. Chaplain and John Allen in charge. The 
church was dedicated on Sept. 29, 1861, by the Rev. Dr. Cooke. After im- 
provements, a reopening service was held on Oct. 11, 1874, by the Revs. R. W. 
Todd, the pastor. The church was again improved and a reopening service was 
held on Jan. 8, 1882, by the Revs. J. S. Willis and B. Warren. The church 
was renovated in 1894. A new steeple was built in the fall of 1897 and the 
new bell was installed on Oct. 24, 1897. Improvements were made in 1919. 


Ebenezer Christian Church was organized in 1912 and met in Willis’ 
Chapel, four miles west of Felton. It was served by Dr. R. S. Stephens of 
Dover and disbanded in 1915. 


Felton Presbyterian Church was organized on Nov. 15, 1860. It was closed 
in 1926 and dissolved in 1940. The Felton Avon Club continued to meet here 
until 1939. 


Felton M. P. Church was organized in the K. of P. Hall on Dec. 9, 1877. 
A new church was built in 1879. The corner-stone was laid on July 28, 1879, 
by the Rev. D. Bates. The site, on High St., was donated on Dec. 10, 1880, by 
Job S. Butterworth. 

It was made a separate charge in 1883. In 1907, the church was moved 
to a new site beside the parsonage. The last minister served here in 1929. In 
1931, the church was abandoned and traded to the M. E. Conference. In 1932, 
it was converted into the Felton Community Building. 


The Pilgrim Holiness instituted meetings in Felton in 1936. They meet 
in the Grange Hall. 


St. James A. U. M. P. Church is located at Owl’s Nest, west of Felton. 
The site was purchased on Aug. 20, 1924, from Harry Greenberg. 


Willis’ M. E. Church was located four miles west of Felton. The first 
church was organized in 1858, by the Rev. J. M. Magee, and was named 
“Ebenezer.” In 1880, the building was sold and a new church was erected on 
the same site. It was dedicated on June 12, 1881. The church was incorporated 
on Feb. 20, 1883, as “Ebenezer M. E. Church.” On May 29, 1912, it was in- 
corporated as “Willis M. E. Church,” in honor of the Rev. Jonathan S. Willis. 
It ceased to function about 1930. In 1940, the building was moved to Manship 
Methodist Church to be used as a social-hall. 


Hopkin’s Cemetery is located on the road from Masten’s Corner to Burn- 
ite’s Mill. This land was donated to a board of trustees on May 16, 1898, by 
Mary E. Warner as a cemetery site and as a site for a proposed church. The 
deed requested that special care be given to the graves known as the Hopkin’s 
row and the Wm. M. Warner row. No church was ever built. 


Manship Methodist Church (M. E.) and Black Swamp M. E. Church. 
The exact location of Black Swamp Church was probably near Black Swamp 
schoolhouse, east of Hollandsville. It was built in the early 1800's and was 
active until 1855 at which time Manship M. E. Church was built five miles 


PN RA PoE Baer Creme mes 





242 DAES Gh URS Hie Ss are EYE 74 a4 Rae 


west of Felton, near Hollandsville. Manship Church was dedicated on Dec. 
2, 1855, by the Rev. Andrew Manship, for whom the church was named. He 
was assisted by the Revs. J. B. Merritt and Mr. McClintock. Incidentally, Mr. 
Manship was the author of ‘Thirteen Years in the Itinerancy,” of which at 
least two editions were printed. In 1940, Willis’ Church was moved to Man- 
ship Church and converted into a social-hall. 


St. Paul’s P. E. Church, in Murderkill Hundred, was built of frame in the 
fall of 1761 under the direction of the Rev. Charles Inglis, a Church of Eng- 
land missionary stationed in Kent County. Mr. Inglis conducted a service on 
a week-day, once each month. On Oct. 31, 1765 John R. Reid transferred to 
the Society for the Propagation of the Gospel, 2 acres of land at a cost of 
5 pounds. The deed recites that St. Paul’s Church had already been built and 
that it is located near the Maryland line, on the road from Dover to Chop- 
tank Bridge. 

This church was last mentioned in the report of 1836. It had become 
dilapidated, was blown down in 1836 and all trace of it has disappeared. 


The Melvin Free Gospel Church was located three-quarters of a mile n. w. 
of Hollandsville, near Kemp’s Crossroads, on the road to Edwardsville. This 
frame church was built, in the early 1880's, by Hinson Melvin, on his farm. 
Services were in charge of Noah Walls, preacher and singer. During the serv- 
ices, his daughter, a strapping girl, would take her stand, with a hickory club, 
in the center aisle, to preserve order. Numerous disturbances were created by 
the rowdies of this section, known as “Sockum,” when they would get “liquored 
up. During those days there was usually a case pending in the courts at 
Dover, emanating from these brawls. 

Dissention arose in the congregation which resulted in the building of 
Zion Holiness Church and the abandonment of Melvin’s Church. The site is 
marked by a large mound, close to the road, where Mr. Melvin and his wife 
are buried in unmarked graves. 


Zion Holiness Church was located one and one-half miles n. w. of Hol- 
landsville, just off the road to Edwardsville. This church was built in the late 
1880's by a dissenting group from Melvin Free Gospel Church, led by Noah 
Walls, the preacher. Services were abandoned about 1899 and the building 
was torn down. 


The Seventh Day Adventist Church, near Hollandsville. The first meet- 
ings of this congregation were held in the Zion Holiness Church, in the late 
1880's. On July 31, 1890, one-half an acre of land was purchased from Samuel 
H. Lister as a church site. The church was built and was on the opposite side 
of the road from Zion Holiness Church and some distance down the road 
toward Hughes’ Crossroads. This church was burned about 1901, after which 
the meetings were held in S. H. Lister’s home. These meetings were continued 
until 1913 at which time the church at Whitleysburg was built. 


Walnut Grove Church was located between Zion Hoiiness Church and 
Hughes’ Crossroads, on the farm of Wm. E. Greenlee. It was built, about 
1879, by Mr. Greenlee and services were conducted by visiting ministers. It 
was planned to adopt the M. P. doctrines but the church was never dedicated. 
Services were abandoned in 1881 and the church was moved to a new site on 
the farm where it was used as a farm building. 





HARRINGTON 


TRINITY METHODIST. CHURCH 


(Page 245) 





RINGTON 


HAR 


ASBURY METHODIST CHURCH 
(Page 245) 





244 THE CHURGHES BOD. DELAWAKE 


Cedar Grove M. P. Church is located on a dirt road two and one-half 
miles n. e. of Whitleysburg. It was founded in 1844 when a chapel was built 
and a graveyard was laid out. The membership increased so rapidly that it was 
found necessary, in 1858, to build the present church across the road from the 
graveyard. It was dedicated on Jan. 2, 1859, by the Revs. James Nichols and 
E. Y. Reese. Services were discontinued in 1932. The church was secured by 
the Pilgrim Holiness in 1935 and they are still holding services there. The 
oldest tombstone that the writer could find in the graveyard is that of William 
H. Dill, who died Feb. 7, 1876. 


Cooper’s M. E. Meeting-House. About 1795, John Cooper, a local- 
preacher, built a small chapel at Greenlee’s Crossroads. It was known as 
Cooper's Meeting-House. When Cedar Grove Church was opened, in 1844, 
the meeting-house was closed. 


Whitleysburg Seventh Day Adventist Church was organized and the 
church was built in 1913. The site was purchased on Apr. 7, 1913, from Ella 
Anthony. It was built of cement blocks and the western boundary line of 
Delaware passed directly through the church. It was on a circuit and regular 
services were held by the pastor once each month, on Saturday morning, which 
is their Sabbath. Services were held on the other Sabbaths and they were in 
charge of a local member. | 

In 1944, it was decided to merge with the Farmington congregation and 
to build a new church at Harrington. The last service was held at Whitleys- 
burg on Apr. 29, 1944.. The building and the one-acre site were sold at a 
public sale, held in Longfellow’s store, on Apr. 17, 1944. 


Masten’s Methodist Church (M. E.). located at Masten’s Corner was built 
in 1873 on land purchased from Joseph A. Masten on Dec. 14, 1874. In 1886, 
the church was entirely refurnished and, in 1896, the building was renovated. 


Asbury M. E. Chapel was located about midway between Harrington and 


_ Masten’s Corner. On Apr. 14, 1814, William Masten, 3rd, deeded to a board 


of’ five trustees of the Union Meeting-House a plot of land upon which they 
were to build and maintain a meeting-house and a schoolhouse. These buildings 
were in course of erection at the time the deed was delivered. The trustees 
were a self-perpetuating board with the pastor having a casting vote in case 
of a tie. At a later date the name was changed to “Asbury.” This church was 
last mentioned in the Conference Minutes in 1888. 


Asbury Pilgrim Holiness Church. Early in 1901, Harrington M. E. Church 
sold the old Asbury Church, settlement being made on Nov. 13, 1901. The 
church was repaired, in June, and reopened as Asbury Pilgrim Holiness Church. 
Repairs were again made in 1905. The church became defunct in a few years 
and was sold to David Brown who moved it away and converted it into a 
dwelling. At the present time the dwelling is located on the extension of 


,sugar Stick Lane. 


The schoolhouse was sold and moved into Harrington where it is still 
used as a dwelling. 


Turner’s M. E. Church, colored, was named for a preacher of that name 
who was instrumental in having the church built. It was located s. e. of Felton 
on what is now the Oscar Hill farm. The site was purchased on Oct. 9, 1885, 
from Samuel L. Peck. The church was built by Frank and Joseph Abbott, It 
became defunct and no trace of it remains. 





EN-l--G-0-Uy N-L-Y- 245 


St. Stephen’s P. E. Church in Harrington. In 1868, the Rev. J. Leighton 
McKim, M.A., rector of Christ Church in Milford, began to hold services in 
Harrington on each Sunday afternoon. The foundations for a church building 
were erected on the edge of the town, in 1871, and some lumber was delivered. 
Then a controversy arose over the deed to the site which had been promised 
as a gift. The work stood still for three years. Then the present site was se- 
cured and the building was started with the expectation of having it com- 
pleted by Aug. 1, 1875. The church was built by subscription, a large portion, 
being contributed by Dr. McKim. 

The consecration service was conducted by Bishop Alfred Lee on June 
6, 1876. The church was renovated in 1888. In 1907-08, a sidewalk was laid. 
A new organ and electric lighting were installed in 1922. In 1922-23, a new 
roof was built and an altar, donated by St. John’s Church in Wilmington, was 
installed. In 1925-26, a chancel window in memory of Dr. McKim was pre- 
sented by Nicholas R. Johnson. 

It has always been a Mission never having attained the status of a Parish. 
It is one of the three missions established by the Rev. J. Leighton McKim of 
Christ Church in Milford. The other two being All Saints’ at Rehoboth Beach 
and St. John the Baptist, at Milton. Dr. McKim continued as priest-in-charge 
from the founding until 1880 and from 1894 until 1918. Except for short 
intervals, St. Stephen’s has been served by the clergy of Christ Church. The 
Rev. Joseph S. Hinks assumed charge on May 1, 1930. For years St. Stephen’s 
was known as the “little red church.” It possesses many memorials including 
windows, communion vessels and altar supplies. Services are held regularly 
on the second and fourth Sundays of each month. 


Trinity Methodist Church (M. P.) at Harrington was organized in the 
local schoolhouse in 1880. A frame church was built on the present site of the 
fire-house. This site was purchased on Apr. 23, 1881, from John Clymer. The 
church was dedicated on Aug. 19, 1881, by the Revs. T. H. Lewis, R. S. Rowe 
and John E. Nicholson. The church was incorporated on Oct. 2, 1900. The 
present site was purchased on June 6, 1904, and the brick church was com- 
pleted in that year. Pulpit chairs were presented by Mrs. Tamsie Reese. The 
patsonage, next to the church, was completed in 1917. An individual com- 
munion service was presented by Mr. and Mrs. Wm. J. Potter in memory of 
their daughter Viola, who had been church organist for 14 years. The com- 
munion table was presented in honor of Wm. J. Potter. The pipe-organ was 


installed and first used on Dec. 21, 1924. The Sapp Memorial Building was. 


erected by Mrs. Ora C. Sapp in honor of her husband and children. It includes 
Primary and Beginners Departments, memorial windows, kitchen and heating 
plant. It was opened for use on Sun., Dec. 12, 1926. The name “Trinity,” se- 
lected from a group of ten names after five weeks’ voting, was adopted on 
Mar. 14, 1939. 


Harrington Baptist Church. This church was organized and a church was 
completed and was dedicated on Oct. 13, 1889, by the Rev. Frank Howes. The 
site had been purchased on Mar. 27, 1889, from Henry C. Wolcott. In 1896, 
the congregation from Vernon Baptist Church merged with them. Never very 
strong the church was closed after a few years. In 1907, the building was sold 
to the Pilgrim Holiness congregation. It is the present Nazarene Church. 


Asbury Methodist Church (M.E.) at Harrington. The first Methodist Sun- 
day School in Harrington was started by Dr. F. J. Owens. On Mar. 30, 1858, a 
deed for 28,300 square feet of land was given by Albert Butler, Winthrop E. 


tor, 


Pd WSLS RI Ng tt 








246 DME CH ORC AE eae AW AO 


Faulkner and Francis Tuttle, Jr., to a board of trustees for the use of a M. E. 
Church forever. This was done at the request of Ann Elizabeth Harrington 
who had sold the land to them for its timber. The parsonage was built in 1858, 
but the first church was not built until 1870. It was dedicated on Oct. 23, 1870, 
by the Revs: R. W. Todd and Andrew Manship. During these twelve years the 
members worshipped in the railroad engine-house and in the schoolhouse. The 
church was rededicated on June 1, 1873, by the Revs. R. L. Dashiell and 
J. S. Willis. ! 

In 1890, the church was rebuilt and a rededication service was arranged 
for June 1, 1890. The church was incorporated on July 6, 1914. In 1915, a 
pipe-organ was installed through the help of Andrew Carnegie, the Pittsburgh 
philanthropist. In 1929, when the Rev. Edward H. Collins was pastor, the 
Collins Educational Building was erected for the use of the church-school and 
other church organizations. On May 23, 1939, by popular vote, the name 
“Asbury” was adopted: In April, 1939, the original communion set which had 
been presented to the early church by Ann E. Harrington (Mrs. Nimrod) was 
restored by her great-granddaughter, Miss Ann Messick. Enclosed in a glass 
case, donated by Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo T. Jones, it was placed on the original 
communion table which had been restored. In 1939, the Christ Chapel for 
Youth, in memory of Mrs. Addie Satterfield, was presented by her daughters. 

The newly-rebuilt pipe-organ was dedicated on Sun., Dec. 17, 1944, by 
Dist. Supt, Dr. Walter A. Hearn. 


Harrington Presbyterian Church began with meetings held in the school- 
house in 1871. The church site on the west side of Dorman St., beside the pri- 
vate graveyard of Geo. W. Dorman, was purchased from J. Sharp, et al., on 
June 24, 1872. A church was formally organized on Mon., Dec. 2, 1872. A 
church building was erected in 1873. It was arranged to have the church 
dedicated on Dec. 7, 1873, by the Revs. J. H. Johns, A. A. Dinsmore and J. G. 


_ Hamner. The church ceased to function and the building, on Dorman St. be- 


came dilapidated. It was destroyed by fire in 1924. At this time the bodies 
from the adjoining graveyard were reinterred in Hollywood Cemetery. The 
land was sold and is now the site of a dwelling and the New Century Club. © 


Harrington Pilgrim Holiness and the Church of the Nazarene. In 1902, 
the Apostolic Holiness Union Church held a revival in a hall at Harrington. 
The crowds became so large and so enthusiastic that, fearing for the safety of 
the building, the meetings were transferred to the shirt factory. The church 
was incorporated on June 4, 1902. On Mar. 25, 1903, they purchased from 
the Del. Bap. Union, the Baptist Church on Mechanic St. On Mar. 23, 1906, 
they purchased the parsonage lot from Samuel L. Shaw. The church was dedi- 
cated on May 14, 1907, by the Rev. D. M. Carpenter. Dissention arose in the 
congregation and a bare majority voted to turn the property over to the Pente- 
costal Church of the Nazarene. On June 15, 1910, they purchased a property 
‘on Mechanic St. from Wm. H. Knox for a parsonage, this was sold later. 

The minority withdrew from the church in March, 1909, held meetings in 
Masten’s Hall and organized a Pilgrim Holiness Church. Trustees were elected 
on May 10, 1909. On May 26, 1909, Cyrus N. Grant donated a church site on 
Liberty St. A church was built and it was dedicated on Nov. 28, 1909. Addi- 
tional land was purchased, on Sept. 3, 1937, from Cyrus N. Grant. Mr. Grant 
owned the land on both sides of the church lot. He sold one of these adjoining 
lots to an individual and when it was surveyed it developed that the church 
building encroached on this lot. To correct this, the church bought the adjoin- 





LO: OOO IEOOEED IARI 9) COPE Bee RRR 


veotmbeinn a: 


CHRIST CHAPEL FOR YOUTH, METHODIST, HARRINGTON 


(Page 245) 


WHITE’s METHODIST CHURCH, W. OF HARRINGTON 
(Page 248) 














248 Teo C HOR CE Sa Ores EA WA RE 


ing lot on the other side of the church and had the building moved over the 
required distance. The parsonage lot was purchased from Irma J. Harrington 
on June 1, 1939. The church was incorporated on Sept. 16, 1939. 


Harrington Seventh Day Adventist Church. This congregation was formed 
by the union of the Whitleysburg and Farmington congregations. The church 
site, on Clark St., was purchased on Sept. 10, 1943. The brick church was built 
in 1944. It was dedicated on Sat., May 6, 1944, by Elder G. H. Robbins. 


Metropolitan M. E. Church, colored. This church was Organized in 1873. 
A board of trustees, headed by James Friend, was elected. They purchased a 
church site, consisting of 1614 sq. perches, from Henry C. Wolcott on May 
17, 1873, and a church was built. Land on West St. was purchased on July 
14, 1893, from Mr. Wolcott and the present church was then built. It was 
dedicated on Oct. 8, 1893. The church was rebuilt in 1920. 


St. Paul’s A. M. E. Church was organized in 1894. The church site on 
New St. was purchased on Mar. 12, 1894, from Henry C. Wolcott. The church 
was completed in 1895. On May 16, 1922, additional land was purchased from 
Annie M. Wolcott and the church was rebuilt. 


In the early 1940’s there was a small church on East St. known as the 
Macedonia Baptist Church. It ceased to function after a year of service. 


White’s Methodist Church (M, E.). In the home of Judge Thomas White, 
in Mispillion Hundred, was held the first Annual Conference of the M. E. 
Church in America. At that time they had not entirely separated from the 
Church of England and it was decided at this Conference not to separate. Mr. 
Asbury was very much opposed to separation. The Second Conference was 
held here on April 16, 1781. 

These Conferences must have been local affairs asthe Methodist Episcopal 
Church in America was not organized until 1784. This took place at the so- 
called Christmas Conference held in Baltimore on Dec. 25, 1784. aaa 

The Methodists had been subjected to many outrages and were held in 
utter contempt by the members of the other denominations. In April, 1778, 
Judge White, who was Judge of the Common Pleas Court in Kent County, 
was arrested and placed in jail on charges arising from the fact that he was a 
Methodist. He was confined for five weeks and then acquitted. It was in Judge 
White's home that Mr. Asbury took refuge on Mar. 25, 1778, when the au- 
thorities sought to arrest him on similar charges. 

To understand the charges against Judge White and Bishop Asbury one 
must remember that during those troublous Revolutionary days, the Patriots 
considered anyone who had any favorable English connections to be a Tory 
and therefore an enemy. The Methodist Church was considered a part of the 
Church of England from which they had not yet withdrawn. The Patriots pre- 
sumed that these church leaders favored the British side of the quarrel and for 
that reason accused them of treason. As accusation that was hardly justified 
and never proven. 

Mr. Asbury remained in seclusion at Judge White’s for two years. He 
was able to conduct, clandestinely, some of his many duties. 

Incidentally, even today, the Judge White home would make an ideal 
hideout. Although the house can be seen from the road, one of several long 
lanes must be traversed to reach it. Built of brick and frame with high ceilings 


GIN LeU GEO ye 249 


and numerous fireplaces it has been a fine home in its time but is rather 
dilapidated today. 

Freeborn Garrettson preached two sermons at Judge White's on Sept. 5, 
1778, the first time he preached under a tree and the second time in the house. 
He preached here again on June 28, 1779. He mentioned in his Journal that 
the Nicholites were very active in this section. 

The Nicholites or New Quakers were a recalcitrant group organized by 
Joseph Nichols of western Kent Co., Del., about 1760. They built three 
meeting-houses in Caroline Co., Maryland. By 1803, the meeting-houses and 
the members were taken over by the Friends. 

Meetings were held by the Methodists in Judge White’s home for three 
years. The erection of a chapel on Judge White’s farm was started in 1780. 
Mr. Asbury preached there on Sept. 17, 1780, and his Journal notes: “White's 
Chapel, a miserable place it is, unfinished and one part lying open to the sun. 
A group of mocking young men.” Mr. Asbury preached at White’s on Oct. 6, 
1782, after the chapel was completed and noted that: “it is one of the neatest 
chapels the Methodists have on the whole continent.” 

At a later date, Union M. E. Church was Organized and met in White's 
schoolhouse which was located where White's Chapel now stands. On July 
20, 1841, Wm. Wix donated 50 perches of land at White’s schoolhouse to 
White's Chapel. 

_ The chapel was moved to the new site which is four and one-half miles 
west of Harrington. Union Church merged with them, the old schoolhouse 
being used as a social-hall. Both the church and the school were destroyed by 
fire about 1861. The present church was then built. 

Although the congregation is very small, services are held every other 
Sunday by a regular pastor. After being redecorated and recarpeted the 164th 
Anniversary was held on Feb. 6, 1944. There are a few graves in back of the 
church. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find is that of Sarah Wix, 
who died on Feb. 20, 1844. 


Prospect Methodist Church (M.E.) is located just east of Vernon. On 
Apr. 23, 1835, Jacob Graham, et al., donated 60 perches of land to a board 
of trustees upon which they agreed to build a church. The present church was 

built in 1874 and was dedicated by Bishop Levi Scott. 


Zion Baptist Church at Vernon. The Zion Independent Methodist Church 
was organized at Vernon. In December, 1870, they invited the Rev. O. F. 
Flippo, a Baptist missionary, to preach to them. A revival was held and the 
congregation gradually swung over to the Baptist faith. On Mar. 12, 1871, the 
entire congregation was baptized and a preacher was installed. The church 
was incorporated on July 27, 1871. It was recognized as Zion Baptist Church 
in April, 1871. A new church was built one mile from Vernon on the road to 
Gum Swamp Island. 

The building was dedicated on Nov. 19, 1871, by the Rev. O. F. Flippo 
assisted by the Revs. Isaac Cole, George Bradford and W. H. Spencer. The 
church measured 28 ft. by 36 ft., and was semi-Gothic in style. It was built 
on the land of J. W. Smith. For years the baptisms were held in a nearby 
ditch until a baptismal pool was built in the church. Late in 1896, the con- 
gregation even into Harrington. In February, 1897, the church building was 
sold, moved to Concord, Md., and converted into a dwelling. 


Wesley Methodist Church (M.E.) at Burrsville. Burrsville lays astride the 
Del.-Md. boundary line. Wesley Methodist Church is on the Delaware side, 





250 Toe ey CHUL C EP eerie poke ot We 1 te Fs 


the boundary line crossed the doorstep of the church which was burned in 
1934. The first church was erected in 1834. Thomas Baynard was the builder 
and the building is still in use on the farm of Thomas E. Cahall. 

In 1872, work was started on the second structure. The corner-stone was 
laid on Nov. 7, 1872. It was dedicated in May, 1873, with Bishop Levi Scott 
in charge and the Rev. Andrew Manship preaching the sermon. Henry Thaw- 
ley, for many years Supt. of the Sunday School, was the builder. He also cut 
and hauled the timbers. On Feb. 18, 1934, just after the morning service had 
closed, the building was burned to the ground. Work was started immediately 
to build another church. There was some sentiment that the new building 
should be located in the village but it was decided to retain the old site. Under 
the leadership of the Rev. Leon W. Ross, the church was ready for dedication 
on Dec. 16, 1934, with all of the costs met by cash and subscription. The Rev. 
E. C. Hallman, Dist. Supt., conducted the dedication and preached at the morn- 
ing service. The Rev. Roy T. Thawley, grandson of Henry Thawley, assisted 
at the dedication and preached the afternoon sermon. There is a large ceme- 
tery enclosed with an iron fence. 


Milford Circuit M. E. Church, colored, was located one and one-half miles 
west of Prettyman’s Corner. The church site was donated on May 19, 1894, by 
Samuel A. Tharp, at which time the church had been erected. It became de- 
funct and no evidence of the church remains. 


Houston Methodist Church (M.E.) was built of frame in 1883-84. It was 
dedicated in October, 1884. The church site, on Broad St., was donated on 
May 7, 1886, by David Scott. After major improvements, the church was re- 


dedicated on Sun., Nov. 26, 1893, by the Rev. W. L. S. Murray. In January, 


1899, both the church and the parsonage were destroyed by fire. 


A new church site, on Broad St., was donated on Mar. 6, 1899, by John 
C. Wharton. The corner-stone of the present brick church was laid on July 4, 
1899, by the Rev. G. S. Smith. It was dedicated in October, 1899. .The church 


was incorporated on July 22, 1911. 


A new electric organ was dedicated on Sun., Apr. 27, 1947, by the pastor, 


the Rev. Wm. J. McKee assisted by the Rev. Dr. O. A. Bartley. The Wesley 
Junior College choir sang under the direction of Mrs. Wm. J. Storey. An 
organ recital was given by Mrs. Ethel Johnson. Funds for purchasing the organ 


were raised by Mrs. Estelle Biggs’ class with former State Senator Robt. H. — 


Yerkes as leader. 


Houston Mission M. E. Church, colored, is located on the western edge of 
Houston. The church site was donated on Nov. 1, 1923, by Geo. F. Dunning. 
This church was established, in 1924, when the Williamsville congregation 
secured the old schoolhouse, moved it to Houston and transferred their activi- 
ties to this point. More land was purchased on June 26, 1928. 

Williamsville Methodist Church (M.E.) was the outgrowth of meetings 
held in the schoolhouse previous to 1850. Then, W. T. Griffith donated a 
piece of land upon which a chapel was built and named “Griffith’s Chapel,” 
in honor of the donor. A graveyard is located beside the church, the tomb- 
stones dating back to 1862. In 1884, services were discontinued and the mem- 
bership transferred to Houston Church. The church was reopened in 1897. 
After another closed period it was reopened as a Houston charge. Services 
were discontinued in 1940. The church was reopened on Sun., Mar, 15, 1942, 


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(Page 254 








252 IEC AOR GOH Ee eee. A We ARE 





with Robert Hammond as Supt. of the Sunday School. Preaching is held every 
other Sunday by the pastor of Houston Church. 


Williamsville M. E. Church, colored, was located on the edge of that 
village. The church site was purchased from Sarah, David and Caroline Hitch- 
ens on May 1, 1867. A frame church was built and a graveyard was laid out. 
In 1924, the church was abandoned when the congregation moved to Houston. 
The old building was torn down in 1944. There is a large graveyard. 


Millwood Methodist Church (M.E.) is located three miles north of Mil- 
ford to the west of thé Highway. On Apr. 18, 1882, one-quarter of an acre of 
land was purchased from Elizabeth H. Mitchell upon which to build a church. 
The timber was reserved and there was a reversion clause. The church was 
built by a group of Methodist Protestants who had been meeting in Milford. 
They opened the church in September, 1880. Located close to a tub mill the 
church was commonly called the ‘Tub Mill Church.” In September, 1883, the 
congregation decided to turn the church over to Avenue M. E. Church of Mil- 
ford for administration of the services. It was dedicated by the Rev. J. S. Willis 
and was named “Willis M. E. Chapel’ in his honor. An additional five acres 
was secured from Elizabeth W. Mitchell on Sept. 30, 1897. In 1914, a well- 
equipped social-hall was built beside the church. More land was donated on 
Dec. 30, 1932, by Harry Greenberg. The name “Millwood” was adopted some- 
time previous to 1897. 


Mispillion Baptist Church. Three and one-half miles north of Milford on 
a road to the west at a distance of one-half mile is the site of the first Baptist 
Church in Milford Hundred. It is close to Baptist Branch which undoubtedly | 
took its name from this church. It was organized on May 10, 1783, and after 
meeting in private homes for many years, it was incorporated in 1796. On 
Aug. 15, 1796, David Dewees conveyed to a board of trustees the land upon 


which the church was built and the graveyard was laid out. It was named the | Bi o | 


“Mispillion Baptist Church.” Services were discontinued in 1865. Its name 
disappeared from the minutes of the Delaware Ass’n in 1868. The church has _ 
entirely disappeared but the old graveyard, close to the road and enclosed with 
an iron fence, still remains. The plot has been neglected for several years and 
is badly overgrown with brush and saplings. 


Mushmillion Friends’ Meeting, also known as Mispillion and Milford. 
The Friends of Milford are first mentioned in the records of Duck Creek 
Monthly Meeting on May 19, 1707, at which time meetings were being held 
in private homes. On Sept. 20, 1750, the Monthly Meeting was informed that 
the meetings of Mushmillion Friends had been transferred from the home of 
Matthew Manloes to that of Reineer Williams, it being more convenient. 

A meeting-house was built, in 1760, at Three Runs. On Nov. 13, 1790, 
five acres of land were purchased close to Quaker Branch and a meeting- 
house was erected in 1795 on the King’s Highway with the burying-ground 
on the opposite side of the road. The old meeting-house was then aban- 
doned. The Preparative Meeting was discontinued in 1832 and the mci 
Meeting was discontinued in 1833. The building has entirely disappeared. 
The site is marked by a small clump of trees west of the Highway three- 
quarters of a mile south of the northern entrance to Milford. 


Church Hill Sunday School. During the mid-1800's, when transportation 
was difficult, Sunday Schools were quite often established by Christian people 


ENENVIS  G-OJUE NNT? Ye. 2955 


who realized the real need of religious instruction for the young people of 
these rather isolated districts. The school were usually opened in the district 
schoolhouse and the teachings were of an undenominational character. 


A Sunday School of this type was started in the schoolhouse at Church 
Hill, west of Milford, in 1876. It had a Prosperous existence for many years. 
The last superintendent was Stephen Golan Armour. The school was closed 
in 1897. 


Avenue Methodist Church (M.E.) at Milford. In 1777, Methodist meet- 
ings were held in the home of Reynear Williams by the Rev. John Cooper. 
During the year 1778, Bishop Francis Asbury preached three times at these 
services. On Dec. 3, 1787, a lot of land on North St., in Milford, was donated 
to the Methodist Society by Joseph Oliver, the founder of Milford. On this 
lot, a frame church was built and a graveyard was laid out. This is the present 
Methodist Cemetery where former Governor Peter F. Causey is buried. The 
oldest tombstone that the writer could find is that of Simon Miller who died 
on Sept. 3, 1795. The church stood in about the center of the present cemetery 
and faced west. Before the building was entirely completed a funeral sermon 
was preached in it by the Rev. Wm. Jessup. The first illumination was by 
candles which were replaced later with sperm-oil lamps. In 1789, the church 
was in charge of the Rev. Thomas Jackson and Wm. Radcliff with the Rev. 
Richard Whatcoat as Presiding Elder. In a report to the Conference that year, 
879 white members and 236 colored members were reported in the circuit. 
In 1790, the frame church was fully completed with a gallery for the colored 
members. In 1796, Wm. Colbert, in his diary, stated that the circuit extended 
from Frederica to Georgetown to Lewes and included 32 preaching places. In 
1800, an addition was built to the church and it continued in use for 42 years. 
The Methodist Conference was held here in 1821. On Jan. 5, 1827, a Sunday 
School was organized by Mrs. Samuel Draper. 

In 1842, a brick church was built at 3rd and North Sts. This is the pres- 
ent St. Paul’s M. E. Church, colored. Philadelphia Conference met here on Apr. 
1, 1845. In 1852, the church was made a station although Cedar Neck Church 
continued to be associated with it until 1869. 

In 1871, the brick church was built on Railroad Ave., now Church Ave. 
There was considerable controversy before the final selection of the present 
site. Some members claimed that the site was on the edge of the town, that it 
_was low and marshy and surrounded by stables and pig-pens. They also ac- 
cused those favoring the site of using unfair means to attain their end. Those 
favoring the site claimed that it was central, high ground and perfectly suitable 
as a church site. 

The work of building the new church progressed gradually and by the 
end of 1872 the basement and lecture-room were completed. A farewell mem- 
Orial service was held in the old church on Dec. 29, 1872. The first service in 
the new church was held in the lecture-room on Jan. 5, 1873, a very stormy 
day. The services were in charge of the Revs. Jacob Todd and S. W. Thomas. 
The church bell, a gift of Captain Henry W. Laws, was placed in position on 
Jan. 25, 1873. : 

On Apr. 3, 1874, a group headed by Nathan Pratt purchased the old 
church at 3rd and North Sts. They converted it into a playhouse which they 
named “Music Hall.’’ It was popularly known as the “Opera House.” Musical 
and dramatic productions were booked and appeared there. Two rooms were 
equipped as school-rooms by the Academy and at least one music teacher had 
his studio in the building. 





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254 Dee CH UR CAR aMOR eerie Le oe ALi 


In 1882, Messrs. Isaac Truitt, Alex Pullen and Burr conducted experi- 
ments in conserving fruits in the building. The building was sold to St. Paul’s 
M. E. Church, colored, on Sept. 14, 1889. 

The construction work on the new church on Railroad Ave. was resumed 
in March, 1876. The church was completed and was dedicated on Mar. 3, 
1877. The services were in charge of the Rev. Dr. R. L. Dashiell who preached 
both morning and evening. At this time the name ‘‘Avenue’’ was selected. 

After extensive improvements, a rededication service was held on Dec. 22, 
1889. The morning service was led by the Rev. Dr. George E. Reed, Pres. of 
Dickinson College. The Hon. W. F. Causey led the afternoon exercises and 
the Rev. T. E. Terry preached in the evening. A new organ was installed in 
March, 1901. Methodist Conferences have been held here a number of times. 

The ground was broken for the present stone church on Feb. 12, 1939, 
by Governor Richard C. McMullen. The corner-stone was laid on Mar. 19, 
1939. With the erection of the stone church, the spire on the former brick 
church, one of the most outstanding in Delaware, was removed, much to the 
chagrin of many residents of Milford. The church was incorporated as Avenue 
Methodist Church on Nov. 3, 1939. The new church was dedicated on Dec. 24, 
1939, by Bishop Edwin H. Hughes, assisted by Dist. Supt. Dr. W. A. Hearn 
and the Rev. Frank Herson, the pastor. The organ, a gift of Mrs. George H. 
Hall in memory of her husband, was dedicated at the evening service by Dr. 
Hearn. 

Included in the church establishment are the auditorium, Friendship 
Chapel, vatious Sunday School rooms, dining-room and kitchen. The memorial 
windows were reset in the new church. A window, executed by Tiffany, in 
memory of Wm. F. and Anna P. Causey, was presented by their daughter, 
Mrs. Wm. Aldrich. The brick church will be used as a social-hall and it is pro- 
posed to veneer it with stone to conform to the new church. 


Christ P. E. Church at Milford. The first Episcopalian services in lower 
Kent County are believed to have been held west of Milford, in 1704, by the 
Rev. Thomas Crawford, a missionary of the Church of England. On Feb. 12, 
1755, Joseph and Isaac Mason sold to a board of trustees for thirty shillings, 
an acre of land on the south side of Pemberton’s Savannah: This land was 
located at Church Hill, three miles west of Milford, and was to be used as a 
site for a church of the Church of England. It was officially known as “Christ 
Church of Mispillion.’”” The church was popularly known as “Savannah 
Church” because of the swamp or savannah beside the church. Two wings 
were added to the building in 1761. 

In 1773, the Rev. Sydenham Thorne afrived and took up his residence 
near Church Hill, When Christ Church was built in Milford the little 
church at Church Hill was abandoned as was the little burial-ground beside 
the church. In this graveyard many of the early pioneers of that section were 
buried including Jehu Davis, a former Governor of Delaware. This graveyard 
suffered the fate of many such sacred spots when the interest in those buried 
there had disappeared. Today the bodies of these neglected dead lie beneath 
the concrete highway with nothing to mark the spot. 

One of the few memorials and the last one to survive was over the grave 
of John S. Asparagus who was born in 1781 and who died in 1847. It con- 
sisted of a recumbent slab 4 ft. by 8 ft. and about 4 inches thick. It was first 
broken when an ox-team became unmanageable and trampled over the stone. 
Later, small boys would break off pieces to be used as bases in their ball games. 
Finally, only a small section remained and it was removed to a nearby woods. 





{oe wo Se MORE DY ETB Yeh fst 1c a idem 


In 1777, Parson Thorne, a wealthy man, purchased a farm on the out- 
skirts of the present town of Milford. He erected an imposing brick home 
which is still standing on n. w. Front St. Joseph Olivér owned the adjoining 
farm to the east and at the suggestion of Parson Thorne, Mr. Oliver began 
selling lots for a town site. Nearly all of the deeds given by Mr. Oliver pro- 
vided for a small consideration and an annual ground rent that had to be paid 
promptly on Jan. 1st of each year. He deeded, as a gift, two lots at Third and 
Church Sts., for the use of Christ Church. At a later date more land was pur- 
chased from the Oliver heirs and this land was subject to a ground rent of 
$6.92. This was in effect until 1932, when the ground rent was extinguished 
by the purchase of a release from Mrs. Elizabeth M. L. Nutter the present 
owner of the Oliver ground rents. 

The foundations of Christ Church were laid in 1791. It was built of brick 
burned closeby from clay dug on Mr. Oliver's land. The timbers were cut 
from trees on Parson Thorne’s land and either hewn to size by hand or cut 
to size at his mill. Parson Thorne died on Feb. 13, 1793, at the age of 45 years 
and is buried in the family graveyard, surrounded by a stone wall, on the old 
Thorne property on n.w. Front St. The death of Parson Thorne caused the 
work of building the church to be stopped, with the building in condition to 
use but not fully completed. Mr. Oliver, a member of the vestry, was originally 
buried on his farm but was moved later to a spot close to the rear of the 
church. Over the grave is a well-preserved tombstone stating that Joseph 
Oliver died on Feb. 28, at twenty minutes of seven in the morning in the year 


of our Lord, 1807, aged about 80 years. The oldest tombstone that the writer - 


could find is that of Wm. Sorden, who died on March 8, 1806. 

The church was not completed, as originally designed, until 1835. This 
work was done by Sam. Draper and John Eubanks, carpenters of Milford. 
During the work a piece of lumber was placed against a stove pipe to dry. 
The board became ignited, and started a fire that jumped to the roof and did 
serious damage before it was subdued. The firemen responded with their hand- 
engine and a line was formed to pass leather buckets filled with water from 
the creek to supply the engine. 

The consecration services were held on Jan. 26, 1836, with the Rt. Rev. 
Henry U. Onderdonk, in charge. The certificate of consecration sealed and 
signed by Bishop Onderdonk is framed and hangs in the vestibule of the 
church. The church had galleries on three sides and a high pulpit with a 
sounding board. The work on the building was completed in 1838. During 
1861-64, the Rev. J. Leighton McKim made many improvements including 
enlarging the seating capacity. An organ was presented in 1868. A Bishop's 
chair was a gift from the children of the Sunday School. In 1873, a bell was 
purchased. An iron fence was presented by Manlove R. Carlisle, in 1881. 


On Thanksgiving Day, 1882, shortly after the close of the services, fire 
was discovered, by the rector, in a basement partition. With the help of his 
brother, who was visiting him, the rector extinguished the blaze. In 1890, a 
mission chapel was built on Marshall St., above Front St., in South Milford. 
In the spring of 1892, the chapel was destroyed in a gale and it was not re- 
placed. The church tower was completed in 1893. In 1894-95, electric lighting 
was installed. In 1907-08, windows in memory of John R. Draper and Mary E. 
Torbert were unveiled. In 1910-11, a house was rented for the use of the 
parish societies. In 1913-14, a window in memory of Mrs. Rodney, an eagle 
lectern in memory of Mrs. James M. Hall and altar vases in memory of Mrs. 
E. Lofland were installed. 

In 1914, windows in memory of Mrs. Mary E. Lofland, Wm. and Robert 


SN epee Na. 





256 TREE CG HU RIG Sai 1A WARE 


J. Beswick were unveiled. On Oct. 8, 1915, a house on n. w. Front St. was pur- 
chased for a rectory. On Mar. 25, 1916, Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman con- 
ducted a service of benediction in the rectory. In August, 1915, the church 
was damaged by lightning. In 1925, the land adjoining the church was pur- 
chased. The parish-house and rectory were built in 1926 and the former rec- 
tory was sold. 

On May 23, 1923, and May 23, 1932, ground rents on the property, held 
by Mrs. Elizabeth M. L. Nutter were extinguished. 

The Rev. J. Leighton McKim, for many years rector of Christ Church, 
purchased the “red house” on Second St. for his family. It became known as 
“the old rectory.” Miss Marion McKim, a daughter of Dr. McKim, still occu- 
pies the house. It is one of Milford’s early residences, having been built 
about 1813. Former Governors Wm. Tharp and Wm. Burton are buried in 
the graveyard. 


The First Baptist Church of Milford. The first meeting of the Baptists, in 
Milford, was held in the Methodist Church on June 14, 1873. The church was 
formally organized in 1873 and was recognized on July 10, 1873. The present 
church was completed and the dedication services were held on Thanksgiving 
Day, 1875. The church received title to the site on Dec. 24, 1875, from E. 
Smith, from whom it had been purchased. 

The parsonage lot on Pear St., now Washington St., was purchased from 
James H. Latchem on Dec. 15, 1934. 

On Thanksgiving Day, Nov. 26, 1942, a service was held to which all of 
the Milford churches were invited. The interior of the church had been 
renovated during the previous three months and a rededication service was 
included in the Thanksgiving service. 

After extensive alterations and renovations, the church was rededicated 
on Sun., Apr. 28, 1946. 


The Church of God, at Milford, was organized in 1928 and met on the 
second floor of the William’s Block. Later, they moved to a building at ‘2nd 
and Washington Sts., which they remodeled for church purposes. They were 
incorporated on Apr. 5, 1934. They took title to the church property from 
Eugene P. Smith on Apr. 23, 1934. 


St. John’s R. C. Church at Milford. The first Masses were celebrated, at 
Milford, in the Central Hotel in the 1890's through the courtesy of Frank H. 
Kramlich who conducted the hotel at that time. The first agitation toward the 
erection of a church was started in 1896. On Dec. 8, 1909, the present site 
containing 11,280 sq. ft. of land was purchased from the Grier’s for $350.00. 
The Rev. T. F. Waldron of Holy Cross Church in Dover worked and begged 
to secure funds to erect the present church. The contract to build was awarded 
on Feb. 21, 1910, to Joseph T. Rogers of Milford. 

The dedication services were held on June 26, 1910. Father Waldron 
conducted a regular Mass at 7 o'clock. At 10:45 A. M. the service of dedica- 
tion, by Bishop John J. Monaghan was started. A procession of priests was 
formed and circled the grounds as Bishop Monaghan, in the lead, blessed the 
ground and the four corners of the building while the dedicatory choral was 
being sung. They then proceeded into the sacristy. Bishop Monaghan con- 
ferred the Pontifical Blessing upon those present. The name ‘“‘St. John’s” was 
selected in honor of the Bishop. The dedicatory sermon was delivered by Vicar- 
General John A. Lyons. Solemn High Mass was celebrated by the Rev. James 





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ST. JOHN’s R. C. CHURCH, MILFORD 


(Page 256) 
Topp’s METHODIST CHAPEL, NR. ADAMSVILLE 








258 eS CH OR OPE Sele i, 4A A RE 


L. McSweeney, assisted by Fathers Hanley and Dougherty. The afternoon 
sermon was preached by the Rev. Father Hanley. The choir from Holy Cross 
Church at Dover furnished the music. Between the two services the Bishop, 
the priests and the choir were entertained at dinner in the Central Hotel. 

The church was incorporated on Jan. 7, 1912. On Apr. 26, 1912, Bishop 
Monaghan deeded the property to St. John’s Church. 

On Jan. 7, 1944, Wm. R. Murphy and his sister, Gueneviere O’Brien, 
donated a lot on the north side of Seabury Ave. as a site for the proposed 
new church. 


St. Paul’s M. E. Church, colored, of Milford was organized in 1857. On 
July 13, 1857, they purchased the church site on the s.e. cor. of 4th and 
Gutter Sts.—now West St.—from Mary Shockley. They erected a church and 
laid out a graveyard. The church was incorporated on May 28, 1872. On Sept. 
14, 1889, they purchased the former M. E. Church at 3rd and North Sts. This 
church was remodeled in 1896. It was dedicated on Sept. 19, 1897. 

The old church at 4th and West Sts. was used as a moving picture theatre. 
It was sold to Mt. Enon Baptist Church on May 26, 1922. 


Bethel A. M. E. Church, at Milford, was founded in 1870. A church was 
built on Church St., on the present site of the Elks’ Club. The church was 
moved to the present site on 4th St., in 1892. The parsonage was purchased 
from Emma Deputy on Nov. 26, 1926. The present church, built of cement 
blocks, was. started and for a time during construction, the basement was used 
for services. 

The opening service in the completed church was held on Dec. 12, 1937, 
by the pastor, the Rev. J. W. Whalen. The church was dedicated on Apr. °23) 
1939, by Bishop David H. Sims, assisted by Mr. Whalen. 


The First Seventh Day Adventist Church, colored, of Milford. This 
church was organized in a dwelling at 4th and Church Sts. On Jan. 12, 1942, 
they purchased the church site on West St., from Sylvester Holland. The pres- 
ent church was built during that year. b 

Mt. Enon Baptist Church, colored, of Milford. This congregation pur- 
chased the old St. Paul’s Church at 4th and West Sts., on May 26, 1922. The 


- corner-stone was laid on that day. 


The Church of God Mission, colored, was organized in- Milford a few 
years ago. 


Mt. Sinai Holy Church, colored, has held services in a storeroom, in Mil- 
ford, since March, 1942, 


Salem Methodist Church (M.E.) was built in 1816, n.e. of Farmington, 
én the old King’s Highway, one-quarter of a mile south of the road to Wil- 
liamsville. The land upon which this church was built, was conveyed to the 
trustees, by Thomas Davis, on May 21, 1817. The little graveyard can still be 
seen close to the road, surrounded by an iron fence and with numerous old- 
fashioned and modern tombstones. The oldest tombstone that the writer could 
find is that of George Powell, who died on July 31, 1851. 

On Jan. 12, 1872, Rob’t. J. Hill donated a lot, 66 ft. by 120 ft. in Farm- 
ington and a new church was built. It was dedicated on June 1, 1873, by the 
Revs. R. L. Dashiell and J. S. Willis. The church was incorporated on Jan. 


REGINA en OLIN La 259 





31, 1888. A Sunday School room was added in 1895. The first service in the 
addition, was held on Fri., Jan. 10, 1896. A reopening service was held on 
Sut., jan. 12,.1896. 


This church was of frame construction and was burned on May 27, 1914, 
when a conflagration swept over part of the town. The Delaware Railroad 
donated $2300.00 to the trustees to be used in building a new church. This 
is the present cement-block church and it was dedicated on May 16, 1915. 
Extensive improvements were made in 1940. 


The Mispillion Presbyterian Church was built between 1825 and 1830, on 
the farm of Wm. Powell one mile north of Farmington. In 1866, it was moved 
into Farmington and located across the street from the present Methodist 
Church. During the year 1868-69, the Rev. James M. Williams conducted a 
school here at the instance of some of the local women who wanted their 
children to receive advanced education. Incidentally, Mr. Williams afterwards 
became the first principal of the Wilmington Conference Academy at Dover. 


Church services were held occasionally but the congregation gave up the 
struggle in 1872. The building was sold and moved away to be used as a 
- blacksmith shop. In 1880, with some of the old members as a nucleus, a new 
congregation was formed and a new church was built on another site. They | 
were incorporated on Oct. 19, 1880. The church site was donated on May 
12, 1894, by Annie P. Reynolds. Services were held for a number of years but 
the membership became so small that the church was closed. In April, 1924, 
the building was sold to the Brethren Church. 


The Brethren Church at Farmington. This congregation was organized at 
Greenwood in 1918. In September of that year they purchased the local thea- 
tre from Kate Houseman. Their meetings were held in this theatre and they 
were incorporated on Nov. 23, 1919. 

On Apr. 30, 1924, they purchased the Presbyterian Church at Farmington, 
at a Sheriff’s sale. The building was remodeled and dedicated that year. They 
were incorporated on Oct. 13, 1940. More land was secured on Nov. 15, 1940. 


A Seventh Day Adventist Church was organized at Farmington in 1939. 
The meetings were held in private homes. They merged, in 1944, with Whit- 
leysburg Church to form the new church at Harrington. 


Bethel Methodist Church (M.P.) located at Andrewsville was built in 
1838. In 1871, a new church was built to the rear of the first church. It was 
dedicated on Sun., Jan. 7, 1872. Those taking part were the Revs. L. W. Bates, 
D. J. Murry and T. D. Valiant. The church was entirely remodeled in 1904. 
‘The rededication service was held on Jan. 8, 1905. There is a small burial plot 
to the side of the church, the tombstones dating back to 1854. 


Todd’s Methodist Church (M.E.) is located less than one mile east of 
Adamsville close to the Kent-Sussex line. The chapel grew out of meetings 
held in the home of Levin Todd about 1800. The church was built. in 1808, 
upon land donated by Olive Jump. Additional land was purchased on Jan. 21, 
1858. In 1858, the present church was built of a very distinctive design. It 
was dedicated on May 30, 1858, by the Revs. W. Kenney and Andrew Man- 
ship. There is a graveyard. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find ts 
that of Nicholas O. Smith who died on Mar. 9, 1861. 





260 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


Thawley’s Methodist Church (M.E.) at Hickman. In 1884, land at Noble- 
town, Md., was secured from Zebedial Fountain upon which a chapel was 
erected. It was located close to Liden’s School. It was named Davis’ Chapel in 
honor of the Rev. A. D. Davis. In 1888, the chapel was moved to Hickman 
where it stands on the Delaware side of the street which it faces. 

The name was changed to ‘“Thawley’s” in honor of Henry Thawley of 
Burrsville. The site was purchased from Wm. R. Peters on Mar. 23, 1904. 
The original corner-stone was recovered, in 1919, by the Rev. G. T. Gehman 
and reset in its proper place. In the spring of 1942, the church was repaired 
and renovated. 


A Pilgrim Holiness Church was built in Hickman in 1922. The site had. 
been purchased on Nov. 9, 1921, from Fred T. Peters. There was a keen inter- 
est for a few years but this died out and the building was sold in 1930. It 
was moved to the corner where it has been converted into a store and a garage. 


THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 
PART IV 


EASTERN SUSSEX COUNTY 


The First M. P. Church was organized in Milford in the 1870's. In Sep- 
tember, 1880, they moved to Tub Mill Church which they had helped to build. 
When the congregation surrendered Tub Mill Church in September, 1883, the 
efforts of the Methodist Protestants in Milford were abandoned for many years. 


Calvary Methodist Church (M. P.) at Milford. In 1910, a group of Meth- 
odist Protestants erected a canvas tent ons. e. Front St., in Milford and started 
to hold meetings. The first sermon was preached on Sept. 25, 1910 to a group 
of eight persons. Interest grew and in a short time thirty persons had been 
converted. The congregation was organized on Thurs., Oct. 6, 1910. A frame 
tabernacle was built and furnished in one week at a cost of $800.00. The open- 
ing service was held on Oct. 30, 1910 and the revival was continued. A Sun- 
day School was organized on Nov. 13, 1910 with Wm. H. Richardson as Su- 
perintendent. During that month church officers were elected and the Rev. L. 
A. Bennett of Harrington becamie the pastor on Dec. 1, 1910. The church was 
incorporated on Jan. 16, 1911. 

The Tabernacle was used until May 12, 1912. A building committee was 
appointed on Mar. 11, 1911 and work was started on a large church built of 
cement blocks. The sand used in making the blocks was hauled from Cedar 
Beach and the blocks were made on location. The site was purchased from 
the Nutter Davis estate. 

The church was completed and was dedicated on May 19, 1912. The 
Rev. L. A. Bennett, the pastor, was in charge of the services. The Rev. D. L. 
Greenfield preached in the morning with the Dover Glee Club furnishing the 
music. At 2 P. M., the Sunday School met at the old tabernacle and marched 
to the new building. Here, the exercises were conducted by the Rev. Messrs. 
Holmes, Mowbray, Bunstein, Carroll, Andrews, Savage and Johnson. The 
Dover Glee Club and the Avenue M. E. Church choir furnished the music. 
The evening sermon was preached by the Rev. Dr. J. S. Bower. Music was 
furnished by the local Presbyterian choir. The church bell was a gift of Mrs. 
Geo. Wilson’s Sunday School class. 

The parsonage was purchased on Dec. 28, 1918, from Emma C. Sipple. 
Land adjacent to the church was purchased on Mar. 6, 1931, from Mary L. 
Marshall. : 

The name “Calvary” was adopted in 1939. During that year the church 
had been redecorated. 


The Pilgrim Holiness Church at Milford was organized at tent meetings 
held in South Milford. The organization was effected on Jan. 11, 1922. In the 
meantime, they held their meetings in the old schoolhouse, the Red Men’s 
Hall and the New Century Club. The present church site was purchased on 
Jan. 7, 1927 from Hettie Prettyman. The church was completed and was dedi- 
cated on May 8, 1927. At midnight on May 10, 1942, fire broke out and the 
church was seriously damaged. Repairs were made immediately and the re- 


Ae tat eh 8 5 MAA ONY at EU the conor ltt 9. ee a ee 





262 Dts Be eGiH OR: CH sp Oni, AW A Reds 


opening was celebrated with all-day services on June 28, 1942. The parsonage 
was secured on Aug. 8, 1942. 


The Milford M. E. Chapel. In the early 1880's a Methodist Sunday School 
was conducted in South Milford in the schoolhouse. The chapel was built, in 
1885, through the efforts of Peter F. Causey, John C. Hall and Joshua Spencer. 
The motive behind this effort was to interest the people of South Milford in 
Methodism, many of whom, for one reason or another, could not be induced to 
attend Avenue Church. The corner-stone was laid on Nov. 8, 1885, in a drench- 
ing rain. Taking part were Presiding Elder A. W. Milby, the Revs. J. S. Willis, 
W. S. Robinson and Mr. Peter F. Causey. Owing to the rain the services were 
brief. Services were held regularly until more recent times when the member- 
ship was transferred to Avenue Church. 

The chapel was purchased by Avenue Church on June 28, 1916. The 
chapel was then used as a social-hall until the improvements were made at 
Avenue Church. On Oct. 7, 1938, the building was purchased by Ionie Council 
No. 13, Degree of Pocahontas who remodeled the building into a most at- 
tractive lodge hall. 


The Christian Science Society of Milford was organized on Aug. 27, 1930. 
They hold their meetings in Grange Hall. 


The First Presbyterian Church at Milford. The first Presbyterian Church 
in this neighborhood was the Three Run’s Church. Its site can be seen on the 
King’s Highway where the run crosses the street. This church is believed to 
have been organized about 1700. In 1772, the Lewes Presbytery met here. It 
was a frame building with a brick floor. On Jan. 11, 1819 it was incorporated 
as the ‘‘First Presbyterian Church and Congregation in Milford.” 

Some years later the church ceased functioning because the building had 
fallen into decay. For a time the few members worshipped in’ a building in the 
eastern part of South Milford but finally disbanded. In 1847, there were only 
two members remaining. During that year a Sunday School was started by Miss 
Hester A. McColley, (later Mrs. Wm. Marshall). | 

In 1850, the congregation was resusitated and the present brick church 
was built in Milford. The church site at Front St., and Pearl Alley was pur- 
chased on Apr. 12, 1850, from Rachael B. Draper. The corner-stone was laid 
on July 4, 1850. When completed, there was a tall spire that was outstanding 
in those days. A tower-clock was installed in the frame part of the church 
tower. A newspaper story of that time stated that the clock had been presented 
to the church by the State of Delaware and that there was some criticism of the 
State for its generosity. When the people found out how convenient a town 
clock was, the criticism vanished. 

On Feb. 13, 1835, the State Legislature passed an Act appointing trustees 
and authorizing them to hold a lottery to raise $25,000.00 to be used in build- 
ing a Court House at Georgetown and in dredging Broad Creek. On Feb. 4, 
1851, the Legislature passed an Act directing the above trustees to pay over 
to the trustees of the Milford Presbyterian Church $1500.00 to be used in 
completing the church then under construction. No doubt the critics of the 
tower-clock figured that State money from this appropriation had been used 
in paying for the clock. 

This clock was a single dial movement which was hooked up to operate 
four dials. This placed an unusual strain on the movement with the result 
that the clock was worn out in a few years and it was not replaced. Parts of 
the clock are still strewn about in the belfry. | 








MILFOxD 


CALVARY METHODIST CHURCH 


(Page 261) 


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264 T HIE? GHiU‘/RiG/HiES* Oe Di ANGAKsE 


The land between the church lot and Walnut St., was owned by the estate 
of Joshua S. Layton. A short time after the church was built, in settling Mr. 
Layton’s estate, this plot was purchased by Thomas H. Truitt. He proceeded 
to build ‘a blacksmith shop and other unsightly buildings” which was “annoy- 
ing to the church members” and to many other persons. To overcome this, 
Peter F. Causey dickered with Truitt and finally purchased the lot. He deeded 
the plot in front of the church to the church trustees on Dec. 16, 1854. The 
consideration was at cost or $262.50 and he stipulated that ‘‘no building shall 
be erected in the future.” 

The church was incorporated on Jan. 13, 1858. The 50th Anniversary 
was celebrated on Dec. 25, 1900. Services were conducted for a full week. The 
church was remodeled in September, 1904. The manse, on s. Walnut St., was 
purchased on Sept. 2, 1908. It was sold at a later date. 

There was a small graveyard beside the old Three Run’s church and this 
was used until the 1870's: In 1924, Dr. Frank L. Grier, after securing permission 
of the State Legislature, arranged to have the bodies reinterred in the Odd 
Fellows’ Cemetery. Six were placed in family plots and the remaining five 
were buried in a double lot, purchased by Dr. Grier and turned over to the 
Presbyterian Church of Milford. 

The Sunday School celebrated its 100th Anniversary on Sun., Feb. 23, 
1947. Two of the highlights of the ceremonies were a biographical sketch of 
the founder, Hester McColley Marshall, read by her grandson, Dr. Wm. Marsh- 
all, Jr., and an historical quiz conducted by the Rev. J. M. De Chant, the pastor. 


The First Independent Church of Milford. This church was founded by 
the Rev. C. W. Taylor. The first meeting was held in a private home on Feb. 
8, 1944. In March, the meetings were transferred to the Degree of Pocahontas 
Hall. Mr. Taylor purchased the old Burrs’ M. E. Church at Venton, Md., and 
salvaged the building materials. The erection of a church building was then 
started on Marshall St., in Milford. The site was donated on May 22, 1944, by 
Wm. V. Benson. The ground was broken on May 30, 1944. The corner-stone 
was laid on June 18, 1944, by Mr. Taylor, assisted by the Rev. Elwood Sakers. 
This was the old Burrs’ Church corner-stone and the old inscription, dated 
1893, was not removed but faced toward the interior of the church. 
The pews and altar were purchased from Parker's Chapel, near Salisbury, 
Md., and the large church bell was formely a school bell at Bower’s Beach. 
The opening service was held on Sun., July 30, 1944, with the Rev. Mr. 
Sakers assisting Mr. Taylor. The church lot was dedicated on Sun., Sept. 
24, 1944. The service was conducted by the Rev. R. B. MacCullough, assisted 
by the Revs. W. T. Archer and C. W. Taylor, the pastor. 
The church, free of debt, was dedicated on Sun., July 15, 1945. Those 
taking part included the Revs. R. B. MacCullough, Geo. W. Andrews and 
a W. Taylor, the pastor. 
Y ey 
o <~ “edar Neck Methodist Church (M. E.) is located four miles east of Mil- 
et ford on the road to Fort Saulsbury. The first church was built at an early date. 
~~ A new church was dedicated on Nov. 6, 1859, by the Rev. A. Manship at the 
10 o'clock service. In February, 1875, the building was burned so badly that 
ya mew church was erected during that year and it is still in use. On Feb. 5,. 
21913, Theodore W. Shockley donated land to the church. In 1919, major im- 
J provements were made, including a new roof. There is an enclosed graveyard 
beside the church, the tombstones dating back to Dec. 21, 1875. 





ast ia boll id oa) 8 cl WO lds ek al SP, ares Ce BALE ES Id a 265 


St. Matthews P. E. Church was located about four miles s. e. of Milford 
near Draper's Pond. At the crossroads beyond the mill, on a knoll in a field, 
is the graveyard that marks the site of old St. Matthew's. The first church was 
built in 1707, being the first church of that denomination erected in Sussex 
County. It was a timber building 20 ft. by 30 ft. by 12 ft. high, had a cypress 
‘shingle roof and cypress board sheathing. It contained the usual pulpit, desk, 
communion table and pews. A small gallery was added later. The branch close 
to the church is known as Church Branch. A second church was built in 1768. 
It was 36 ft. by 40 ft. and high enough to have galleries and two tiers of win- 
dows. “A church-house thereon erected’ is mentioned in a survey made by 
Caleb Cirwithin on Apr. 10, 1770. 


The church was incorporated on June 28, 1788 with the following trus- 
tees: Nehemiah Davis, Thos. Evans, Isaac Beauchamp, Geo. Walton, Jacob 
Townsend, Bethuel Wattson and Mark Davis. The church site of more than 
two acres was transferred by David Thornton to the new trustees on Oct. 28, 
1788. The deed states that the church-house is erected and is located near 
Draper's Mill Pond. The consideration was “his pious love for the church, 
etc.,”’ and five shillings. 


After being reconditioned, the church was consecrated on May 29, 1836, 
by Bishop H. U. Onderdonk. Beginning in the winter of 1844-45 services were 
suspended and reopened during the summer with meetings once a month. In 
1851, the church was finally closed. The rector, the Rev. John L. McKim, 
transferred the services to schoolhouses in different locations. Meetings were 
held in a nearby school during 1868-69. 

On Nov. 19, 1860, the land was leased to John Ingram for a term of 33 
years beginning on May 1, 1858, at a rental of $2.00 per year. It was stipulated 
that he could erect nothing on the land but that he could use the old church 
building and that the burying-ground was to be undisturbed and unbroken. 
In 1864, Hiram Barber purchased the building, moved it to Milford and used 
it as a saw-mill until December 12, 1871, when it was burned. The old grave- 
yard, rather poorly.kept, contains old gravestones dated as early as 1773. A few 
oaken grave markers are still standing, badly rotted and with the carved in- 
scriptions indecipherable except for a few letters. 


Cedar Creek M. E. Sunday School. Cedar Creek was formerly a thriving 
village and as late as 1908 there were many children for whom there was no 
provision for religious training. To remedy this situation, Mrs. Wm. T. Sock- 
rider opened a Sunday School in her home in 1908. This effort prospered and 
on Dec. 3, 1913, Geo. W. Clendaniel sold to Hubbard Macklin, Jas. F. Pierce 
and Jos. L. Chipman, trustees, a one-acre site which included a dwelling. This 
house was located nearly opposite to the present store of Hubbard Macklin. 


The trustees altered the first floor to make it suitable for Sunday School pur- 


poses. For about five years this Sunday School was conducted with Mr. Macklin 
as Superintendent. When'the Sunday School was closed the building was used 
as a dwelling and was later torn down. 


Slaughter Neck Methodist Church (M.E.) is located four miles s. e. of 
Milford on the Rehoboth Highway. In 1777, a Methodist Society was formed 
at Cedar Creek in the home of Mr. Shockley by a Presbyterian Minister whose 
initials were ‘J. K.’” This was the seed from which Slaughter Neck Church 
grew. On July 26, 1810, a meeting was held and trustees were elected and in- 
corporated under the name of “Zion Trustees.” On Oct. 7, 1810, Wm. Hick- 





266 THEWOH U ROH ES tO heeD bil WARE 


man, preacher, donated 70 perches of land upon which a meeting-house had 
been built. 

It was called ‘““Hickman’s Meeting-House.” It was a frame structure with 
galleries on three sides. This building was used until 1855. An acre of land, 
near the old site, was purchased from Lemuel Draper and a new frame church 
was built in 1856. 

Mr. Draper died in 1877 and “‘he had failed, during his lifetime,” to trans- 
fer the land to the church trustees. His widow, Hester O. Draper remedied 
this oversight by giving the church a deed on May 1, 1880. In 1888, the church 
was practically rebuilt. More land for the graveyard was purchased on May 1, 
1911, from Amos G. Bennett. In 1918, major improvements were made. The 
present church was built of cement blocks in 1929. 

The corner-stone was laid and the church was dedicated on Nov. 24, 1929. 
The first sermon was preached by the Rev. Otis P. Jefferson, a native of Slaugh- 
ter Neck. The corner-stone was laid at 10 A. M., by Jos. E. Holland, who was 
also a native of Slaughter Neck. The afternon service was led by Dist. Supt. 
W. E. Habbart. The music was furnished by the choir of Bethel Church of 
Lewes. The choir of the First M. P. Church of Milford, under the leadership 
of Wm. H. Richardson, furnished the music at the evening service. The dedi- 
cation service was conducted by the Rev. W. E. Habbart. The memorial win- 
dows from the old church were installed in the new church. The coal-oil lamps, 
the pulpit and the altar rail were also from the old church. 

There.-is a large and prosperous congregation and the large graveyard 
is well laid out and is kept in fine condition. The writer believes that the or- 
iginal meeting-house stood to the left in the rear of the present graveyard. It 
is here that the oldest graves are located. The earliest of the inscribed tomb- 
stones is over the grave‘of Mary W. Hickman, who died on Sept. 9, 1828. 
She was probably a member of the family for whom the first meeting-house 
was named. 


Siloam A. M. E. Church was originally located on the road to Cedar 
Creek Mill a short distance west of the Rehoboth Highway. On Oct. 27, 1827, 
Joseph Young donated 87 perches of land on the west side of Turner’s Branch 
as a church site. A church was built and a graveyard was laid out. The old site 
and graveyard are overgrown with trees and brush and cannot be located from 
the road. 

Two acres of land were purchased at a Sheriff's sale on Apr. 6, 1921. In 
1940, the church was moved a half-mile to the west on higher ground. There 
is a modest social-hall beside the church. 


Wesley M. E. Church, colored, is located within sight of the Rehoboth 
Highway, six and three-quarters miles s. e. of Milford. The first church was 
built in 1853. The half-acre church site was donated by Anthony Shockley on 
Oct. 4, 1856, with the timber reserved. They were incorporated on Mar. 3, 
1888. On Nov. 12, 1895, they. purchased one and one-half acres of land from 
Molton H. Shockley. The present church was built in 1906 and is a well-kept 


building. 


Lincoln Methodist Church (M.E.). In common with the Methodists in 
many communities the members at Lincoln held their early meetings in private 
homes. Later, a newly-built hall was rented for Sunday School services with 
occasional preaching. They were incorporated on Mar. 7, 1867. On May 7, 
1867, Abel S. Small donated a church site on the cor. of 2nd and Baltimore 





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(Page 265) 








268 TRAE GH UR CES O wee LAW ORE 


Ave. In 1869, it was decided to build a church and the corner-stone of the 
church was laid on Oct. 10 of that year. The dedication services were held 
on Dec. 12, 1869. A new church was built in 1885. On Oct. 3, 1885, a half-acre 
of land was purchased from John W. Tharp and on Nov. 16, 1886, three- 
quarters of an acre was purchased from Harry M. Cole. The present church 
was erected in 1908 and it was dedicated on June 6, 1909. 


Lincoln Presbyterian Church was erected in 1869. on land at 2nd and 
Small Ave., purchased from Abel S. Small on Sept. 6, 1869. It was dedicated 
on Jan. 16, 1870, by the Rev. Richard Mallory. This church had a rather dis- 
couraging existence. No church services were held after 1900 although a Sun- 
day School was conducted until 1910, Eventually, the building was sold and, 
in 1919, Frank Clendaniel secured Possession, tore it down, and used the lum- 
ber in erecting a large storage-house. 


Lincoln Baptist Church. In May, 1867, an unsuccessful attempt was made 
to organize a Baptist church at Lincoln. The effort was renewed and on Apr. 
28, 1869, a church was organized. The writer can find no evidence that a church 
was ever built. In 1873, the congregation was merged with the Milford church 
which was in process of organization. 


Mt. Zion M. E. Church, colored, was organized at Lincoln on July 17, 
1887. 


Flea Town M. E. Church was located at Flea Town, on the King’s High- 
way, two miles north of Ellendale. The writer has been unable to get any 
data on this church. It was built at an early date, destroyed by fire, and not 
rebuilt. In those days Flea Town was well known for its popular tavern which 
stood across the road from the church. It was the stopping place for many 
prominent persons on their way down State. 


Ellendale Methodist Church (M.E.) was organized in 1873. On July 16, 
1873, Wm. McCaulley deeded to a board of trustees a tract of land upon which 
to build a church, a school, a parsonage and to maintain a graveyard. The school 
and parsonage were built immediately and church services were held in the 
school. A frame chapel was erected in 1882 and it was dedicated on Dec. 31, 
1882, by the Revs. J. S. Willis and A. W. Lighbourne. After extensive renova- 
tions a reopening service was held on Sept. 10, 1893. It was conducted by the 
Revs. J. S. Willis and C. A. Grise, The chapel was burned on Feb. 11, 1916. 

The church was incorporated on Dec. 2, 1916. Land at Main St., and 
Washington Ave., was purchased on Jan. 18, 1917, from Mary C. Reed. The 
present building, of cement blocks, was started immediately and it was dedi- 
cated on Nov. 24, 1918. The corner-stone was laid at 4 P. M. by the Rev. R. 
K. Stevenson. The dedication service was conducted by Dist. Supt. W. R. Mow- 
bray. The sermon was preached by the Rev. John Krantz. Governor John G. 
Townsend, Jr., and the Rev. T. S. Barratt, the pastor, also took part in the 
services. 

Additional land was donated on Oct. 8, 1928, by Harry W. Jester. The 
heating plant, in memory of Mrs. Sarah E. Whitney, was presented, in 1929, 
by her husband. On July 31, 1937, Ioka Tribe, No. 35, I'mpd O. R. M., donated 
to the church the Red Men’s Cemetery just outside of town. The only re- 
striction was that a member of the Tribe could buy a burial plot at a cost of 
$5.00. There are memorial windows in the front of the auditorium that were 





Emp velere kN S OS SEX VCOUGGNeley. 269 


presented by Ioka Tribe No. 35 of the Red Men and Ellendale Council No. 
32 of the Junior Mechanics, both of which have since become defunct. 


Ellendale Pilgrim Holiness. In 1935 the Pilgrim Holiness started to hold 
services im a one-story frame dance-hall in Ellendale but, in 1936, the effort 


was abandoned. 


Mt. Zion A. M. E. Church at Ellendale was built in 1906. The site had 
been purchased on May 20, 1905, from Nettie C. Warren. 


New Market M. E. Church is located, on a dirt road, one and three-quar- 
ters miles east of Ellendale. This church was formally organized as ‘Wesley 
M. E. Church” at a meeting held in the home of Wm. Morris, near Elias Lof- 
land’s store, on Sept. 8, 1810, when trustees were elected “for the intended 
place of worship.” On Aug. 7, 1811, Elias Lofland donated sixty perches of 
land, on the road to Nathan Reed’s mill as a church site. The church was built 
and a graveyard was laid out. The oldest tombstone is that of the Elias Baker, 
one of the original trustees, who died on Jan. 9, 1821. 

A new church was completed and was dedicated on Sept. 1, 1850. More 
land was secured, on May 5, 1858, from John Warren. The present building 
was erected in 1881. It was repaired and a reopening service was held on Sept. 
30, 1883. More land was secured on June 15, 1904, from Wm. Short. Services 
were discontinued in 1936. The graveyard is enclosed with an iron fence and 
is well maintained. The Woman's Society for Christian Service is still active 
but they meet in the Ellendale Methodist Church. 


Reynolds’ Methodist Church (M.P.) is located, on a dirt road, five miles 
east of Ellendale, near Jensen’s Mill, which was known as Reed’s, Reynolds’ 
and Ponder’s in earlier days. Church trustees were elected on Oct. 14, 1869. 
On Nov. 18, 1869, Geo. Wilson donated 100 perches of land and on Nov. 19, 
1869, James Ponder donated 46 perches as a church site. 

_ The first church was built in 1870 through the efforts of the Rev. J. T. 
Melvin. On Dec. 25, 1870, the dedication was conducted by Mr. Melvin as- 
sisted by the Rev. John Jones. While the dedicatory sermon was being preached, 
fire was discovered between the ceiling and the roof. The congregation escaped 
through the door and windows. There was no means to combat the fire but 
the congregation did save the window sash, the benches, the stoves and the 
lamps. The building was completely destroyed. Although disheartened, Mr. - 
Melvin immediately started on a soliciting campaign to gather funds to erect 
another church. It was completed and dedicated in July, 1872. The church was 
incorporated on Apr. 1, 1897. There is a well-kept graveyard beside the church, 
the tombstones dating back to 1863. 


St. Johns U. A. M. E. Church was located just north of Milton on the 
old dirt road to Waples’ Mill. This congregation was incorporated in October, 
1908. A small church was built and a graveyard was laid out. The older mem- 
bers died off and because of lack of interest, the church was sold, moved some 
distance to the south and converted into a dwelling. The earliest tombstone 
is that of Fannie E. J. Brown who died on Jan. 13, 1913. 


St. John the Baptist P. E. Church in the Wilderness was located about 
two and one-half miles s. w. of Milton beside Long Bridge Branch. The first 
church was built in 1728 under the leadership of the Rev. Wm. Becket, the 





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270 PAB CHORC HE SSO ADE LAW ARE 


Church of England missionary in charge of Sussex County. The church was 
raised on Mar. 27, 1728. The framework was of white oak, the dimensions 
being 20 ft. by 30 ft. by 12 ft. high. The roof was of cypress shingles and the 
sides were sheathed with cypress boards. Missionary Wm. Becket speaks of the 
church as being in the middle of the forest. The writer believes that this ac- 
counts for the belief that there was a Sussex County church named ‘Forest 
Church.” The church was closed about 1800. It was last mentioned in the rec- 
ords in 1799. The building was used as a school for a number of years. There 
is no evidence of the church today. 

The Rev. Cory Chambers reported that he had reorganized the Milton 
congregation in July, 1838. Occasional services were held. On May 20, 1847, 
Bishop Alfred Lee preached at one of these meetings. In 1864, the Rev. if 
Leighton McKim, of Milford, started to hold services in the M. P. church. A 
parish was organized and given the name “St. Mary’s” as this was believed to 
have been the name of the church in the wilderness. It was finally determined, 
in 1875, that “St. John the Baptist’’ was the correct name. 

The present church building was started with the expectation of having 
it completed on Oct. 1, 1875. The consecration service was held on June 5, 
1877, by Bishop Alfred Lee and the Rev. J. Leighton McKim. During his pas- 
torate, Dr. McKim would very often walk to and fro between Milford and 
Milton in the performance of his duties. In 1894-95, a window in memory of 
Harold Hunter was unveiled. 

On-May 7, 1899, Bishop Leighton Coleman presented a fine brass altar 
cross to the church. During 1907-08, a mission was conducted in Ellendale. On 
Mar. 12, 1915, Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman consecrated a Bishop’s chair pre- 
sented by the children of Nehemiah D. and Mary P. Welch. The beautiful 
window behind the altar, erected in 1929, was a bequest of former U. S. Sen- 
ator Willard Saulsbury in memory of his mother, Annie Ponder Saulsbury, 
who was a native of this section. In 1936, extensive remodeling was done in- 
cluding a veneer of brick, making the building much more attractive. Th 
church was consecrated on Jan. 17, 1937, by Bishop Philip Cook. . 

The parish-house was completed and was dedicated by Bishop Arthur R. 
McKinstry, assisted by the Rev. Benjamin F. Thompson, B. D., on Monday 
evening, Oct. 6, 1941. 

On Sun., Dec. 1, 1946, Bishop McKinstry dedicated an American flag 
and a Church flag. They were presented by Mrs. Marcia Winn, in memory of 
her son, Joseph T. Winn, Jr., of the Merchant Marine, who lost his life in 
the North Atlantic and the others who served in the armed forces during 
World War II. 


Goshen Methodist Church (M.E.) at Milton. A Methodist Society was 
organized in Milton previous to 1801. On July 7, 1801, a subscription toward 
building a church was started. The land was donated Jan. 16, 1802, by John T. 
Conwell. It was described as being located at Second and Apple Sts., at the 
Head of Broadkiln known as Federaltown. The church was incorporated on 
Feb. 21, 1807, at a meeting held in the church. It was 1820 before the church 
was entirely completed. It was located beside the present graveyard. In 1838, 
a brick wall was built around the graveyard. On June 18, 1874, a plot of land 
on Federal St., was purchased from Geo. W. S. Nicholson upon which to build 
a new church. After a false start in 1874, a new start was made in 1877. The 
corner-stone was laid on Sun., Oct. 7, 1877, by the Rev. R. W. Todd, the 
pastor. The church was completed in 1878, It was dedicated on Jan. 12, 1879, 
by Bishop Levi Scott. 





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On Dec. 2, 1882, a house and lot at Federal and Coulter Sts., was donated 
to the church by Eliza A. Fisher. Improvements were made in 1898. A new 
organ was unveiled on Tues. evening, Sept. 26, 1911, when a musical program 
was given. It was dedicated on Sun., Oct. 1, 1911, following a sermon by the 
Rev. R. K. Stevenson. The church was incorporated on Jan. 25, 1912. A new 
tower was built in 1919. There is an attractive chapel on the first floor which 
is used as a Sunday School room. 


The Pilgrim Holiness Church at Milton was organized in 1925. The 
church site, on Union St., was purchased on Jan. 26, 1926, from Chas. G. 
Waples. The church was built immediately and it was dedicated on Easter 
Sunday, Apr. 11, 1926. The first meeting was held on Sat., Apr. 3, 1926. All- 
day services were held for a full week. On Sun. afternoon, Apr. 4, the Dover 
String Band furnished the music. The dedication service was held on Easter 
Sunday afternoon. 


The Presbyterian Church at Milton was built in 1834 upon land purchased 
from Thara Messick, on Aug. 3, 1833. The church had been incorporated on 
July 4, 1833 at a meeting held in the Cool Spring Pres. Meeting-House. In 
1865, the congregation was dissolved. In the adjoining cemetery the oldest 
inscribed tombstone is dated 1844. For many years the old cypress-shingled 
building was used as a school and later as a colored church. At the present 
time it is occupied by a colored lodge. 


Grace Methodist Church (M.P.) at Milton. The Rev. Thomas A. Moore, 
a supernumerary of the Maryland M. P. Conference, was visiting his friend 
Joseph Betts, a tailor, in Milton. Coming in contact with numerous friends of 
the Conference, Mr. Moore conceived the idea that an M. P. Church should 
be built there. The first meetings were held in the M. E. Church. On Oct. 22, 
1857, Wm. A. Hazzard conveyed to a board of trustees a lot of land upon 


which a church building was started immediately. 


On Sept. 23, 1880, they purchased a house and lot on Broad St., from 
Mary I. Smithers. The church was incorporated on Apr. 1, 1897. Additional 
land was purchased on June 12, 1903, from Elizabeth A. Conwell. In the mean- 
time the church had been enlarged and improved. A service of dedication was 
held in the spring of 1906. Land was donated to the church on Nov. 20, 1911, 
by James C. Palmer. The parsonage was purchased, on July 5, 1915, from 
Annie L. Culver. Land adjacent to the church was purchased, on Oct. 2, 1925, 
from Josiah Brittingham. In 1940, the name “Grace” was adopted. The social- 
hall, beside the church, was enlarged by using the lumber salvaged from Wei- 
gand’s Chapel when it was torn down, in 1940. 

Over the entrance to the church there is a stained glass window which 
contains the emblem of the Jr. O. U. A. M. This window was presented by 


Enterprise Council of the Jr. O. U. A. M. 


Union M. E. Church, colored, of Milton. When the Presbyterian Church 
became defunct the church was purchased by the Milton School Commissioners 
and used as a public school. On Sept. 17, 1892, the property was purchased by 
Union Church and reconverted for church purposes. In the meantime the 
church became defunct and the property was sold to a negro lodge. 


There are three colored churches in Milton. Mt. Zion Holy Church was 
organized in 1940. The First Congregational Church was built in 1927. The 





Eo an INS OOS SEDO € OLN FY 273 


church site had been donated by John Clark, Jr., on Nov. 24, 1926. They were 
incorporated on June 2, 1927. Bethel A. M. E. Church was first located on the 
Broadkiln Beach Road, a short distance east of the negro school, This half- 
acre site was donated, on Oct. 22, 1827, by David Hazzard, to a board of trus- 
tees headed by Major Millman. A church was built and the present graveyard 
was laid out. | 

The present site of Bethel Church was purchased on Sept. 8, 1896, from 
Francis A. Stephenson and a new church was built. They were incorporated 
on Mar. 8, 1897. This church was destroyed by fire and the present church was 
built in 1920. 


Zion Methodist Church (M.E.) is located two and one-half miles east 
of Milton on the road to Broadkiln Beach. Old Zion Church was built in 1818, 
on 3600 sq. ft. of land donated on Mar. 11, 1818, by Aletta Clark, to a board 
of trustees. It was located a short distance east of the present church and on 
the opposite side of the road. The church was enlarged in 1843. There was no 
gtaveyard at that time as all burials were made in family plots located on the 
farms. The present church was built in 1873 and an attractive graveyard was 
laid out. This acre of land was donated by Hevaloe Morris on Apr. 19, 1873. 
The church was dedicated on Jan. 25, 1874 and it was incorporated on June 
7, 1874. The old church was destroyed by fire on Wed., Apr. 25, 1877. On 
Oct. 9, 1899, the Rev. E. C. Atkins donated 84 perches of land to the church. 

A corner-stone, bearing the dates 1818 and 1874, was laid in August, 
1938. The only repairs to'the building were made in 1941, when a new roof 
was installed and the church was painted inside and out. A service of dedica- 
tion was held on May 11, 1941. 

On the afternoon of Oct. 10, 1943, the church was destroyed by fire. 
The congregation immediately cleared up the site and started an intensive cam- 
paign to raise funds to build a new church. 

A brick church was completed and the opening service was held on Sun. 
afternoon, Oct. 7, 1945, with the Rev. Dr. T. C. Mulligan, Dist. Supt., as the 
speaker. A series of evening services were held during the following two weeks. 
- The church is most attractive and well furnished. The rose window in the 
sanctuary is in honor of the Rev. F. H. Truitt, the pastor. There are eight 
stained-glass memorial windows. 

The church was dedicated on Sun. afternoon, Nov. 18, 1945. Bishop 
Chas. W. Flint was in charge of the service. He was assisted by the Rev. Dr. 
T. C. Mulligan, Dist. Supt., and the Rev. Mr. Truitt, the pastor. | 

In the graveyard, the oldest tombstone is over the grave of P. Manuel 
Russell who died on Sept. 18, 1812. This, as well as several others, is a reinter- 
ment from a family plot near Drawbridge. : 

To the right of the church entrance is a monument erected to the mem- 
ory of Helmanius Frederic Wiltbank. It is inscribed as follows: “Emigrated 
from Sweden in a Dutch ship which was wrecked in the mouth of the Dela- 
ware Bay. He was saved by swimming and landed on Cape Henlopen about 
1650, died 1695, leaving three sons, Cornelius, John and Abraham.” Mr. Wilt- 
bank lived near Lewes and was a very large landowner. He took a prominent 
part in civic affairs as have many of his numerous descendants. He was or- 
iginally buried on his home farm but his body was moved to Zion graveyard 
shortly after the new church was built in 1874. Also buried in this plot is David 
W. Wiltbank, a veteran of the war of 1812, who died on May 16, 1865. 


Conway’s M. E. Chapel. In 1885, Wm. N. Conway, usually called ‘‘Nat,” 





274 THEV CR OR OCHS POR VDE Lat Wii Ree 


built a chapel upon his own land two miles south of Milton. It was affiliated 
with the Independent Methodists. In 1886, dissention arose in the congrega- 
tion and part of them withdrew, to build Weigand’s Chapel. In 1886, Mr. 
Conway, an elder in the Independent Methodist Conference, applied for ad- 
mission into the M. E. Conference and was accepted. His little chapel was then 
dedicated to the M. E. service. At the end of one year the chapel was still ac- 
tive but weak. It was eventually sold and converted into a dwelling. 


Weigand’s M. P. Chapel was located in Cave Neck two miles south of 
Milton on the road to Lewis. It was built in 1887, on a half-acre of land do- 
nated by Frank Blocksom on Sept. 23, 1887. The church was incorporated on 
Apr. 1, 1897. Land was donated to the church on Sept. 2, 1913, by Silas H. 
Dodd. The church prospered so long as the original members lived. The con- 
gregation gradually became smaller and in 1930, they ceased to function. The 
benches were sold in 1933 for $20.00. In 1940, the chapel was torn down and 
the lumber was used in enlarging the social-hall of Grace Church at Milton. . 
The graveyard at Weigand’s is kept in excellent condition. 


White’s Methodist Chapel (M.E.) is located on the Rehoboth Highway 
two and one-quarter miles above Nassau. The organization was tentatively 
called the “Coolspring M. E. Meeting-House” in 1838. Trustees were elected 
and incorporated on Jan. 31, 1839, ‘to build White's Chapel.” The church site 
was donated by Samuel Paynter on Sept. 5, 1839. The church was built during 
that year. It was named for the Rev. Henry White, a Presiding Elder. The 
early meetings had been held in the schoolhouse. Additional land was pur- 
chased on Jan. 12, 1872, from Alfred C. Warrington. In 1872, a new church 
was erected. The dedication was arranged for Oct. 27, 1872. 

The parsonage lot was donated by the Hon. Edward Wootten on Apr. 24, 
1880. A half-acre of land was donated on Sept. 19, 1893, by Eliza A. Fisher. 
In 1901, the building was remodeled. Land was purchased from Mary R. Mar- 
vel on Feb. 9, 1903. In 1919, the church was destroyed by fire. A new church 
was completed and was dedicated on Dec. 4, 1921, by Dist. Supt. W. R. Mow- 
bray. There is a large graveyard, the tombstones. dating back to 1852. 


Burton’s A. M. E. Church, west of Overbrook, was built in 1870. The 
church site, of ten perches, was donated, on Mar. 19, 1870, by George Burton. 
It was described as being on the road to the Oyster Rocks in Broadkill River. 
Additional land was secured, on Apr. 10, 1903, from Myrus R. Fisher. The 
church was rebuilt in 1912. An additional quarter-acre of land was donated, 
on Sept. 22, 1942, by James H. Burton. 


Cool Spring Friends’ Meeting-House was located near the Rehoboth High- 
way, beside Red Mill Pond. The Monthly Meeting of the Friends at Duck 
Creek gave consent for a place of worship to be settled at Cool Spring. The 
earliest meeting-house was built in 1742. At that time Cool Spring Creek was 
navigable beyond this point. The meeting-house was a frame building with 
a burying-ground beside it. The Preparative Meeting was discontinued in 1809 
and the Established Meeting was laid down in 1817. The building was aban- 
doned and in 1839, Samuel Paynter purchased the property with the burying 
ground exempt. The oldest date on a tombstone is 1840. The plot is looked 
after by the owners of the farm upon which it is located. 





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(Page 270) 


GRACE METHODIST CHURCH 








276 POH ECW UCR CG HES MeO yo Ff I® AU" gi 


Wesley M. E. Church, colored, at Belltown was built in 1873. A new 
church of cement blocks, was built in 1908. They purchased land on Dec. 8, 
1909 from Hiram R. Burton. 

A new church was built facing the Georgetown-Lewes Road and the 
first service was conducted by the pastor, the Rev. C. W. Bagwell on June 14, 
1946. The corner-stone, bearing the dates, 1873-1908-1946, was laid by the 
Rev. Mr. Bagwell on July 26, 1946. 


Israel M. E. Church, colored, south of Belltown, was burned in 1853 and 
rebuilt. An additional half-acre was purchased, on Feb. 24, 1915, from Matilda 
W. Harmon. The present church was built in 1916. 


Lewes Mennonite Church. Oar June 6, 1662, Peter Cornelius Plockhoy, 
a Mennonite, of Zierik Zee, Holland, entered into an agreement with the 
Burgomasters of Amsterdam to take a group of 25 Mennonite families to the 
South or Delaware River where he had received permission from the United 
Netherlands to establish a colony. The settlement was made upon the same 
site that DeVries had selected for his ill-fated colony. The Plockhoy colony 
was a community affair, each person to work six hours a day for the benefit 
of the community fund. These profits were placed in a strong-box having three 
locks, each officer of the colony having a key to one lock. Children were re- 
quired to attend school one-half of each day and to work at some trade the 
other half of the day. They accepted the Bible in its literal meaning without 
any human formulas of religion. No member of the colony was to be a lord 
and they were not allowed to become servants although servants could be em- 
ployed from outside the colony. Members were free to withdraw, when they 
would receive their share of the profits. Members were permitted to marry 
in the community or outside. Undoubtedly Plockhoy built a church which was 
probably also used as a school. This colony lasted for two years. Sir. Robert 
Carr, Governor of New York, reported to the British Ministers, in 1664, that 
he had “destroyed the quaking colony of Plockhoy to a nail.” Nothing more 
is known about this colony except that thirty years later Plockhoy, now Blind, 
and his wife appeared in Germantown, Pa., where they were taken care of by 
the Mennonites. 


St. Peter’s P. E. Church at Lewes. In 1681, the people of Lewes fenced 
in four acres of land and laid out a &taveyard. They petitioned Gov. Sir Ed- 
mond Andros for a grant of this land for the use of the Church of England. 
This land was granted to them on Apr. 25, 1689. As has happened in a num- 
ber of other places, the citizens assumed that this land was for general use and 
acted on that belief. The Levy Court built a Court House upon the church land 
and church services were held in the Court House for several years. 

In 1707, the people petitioned the Church of England to send them a 
«minister. The Rev. Wm. Black, a missionary, arrived on July 26, 1708 and 
stayed until August, 1709. He seemed to think that only a native could stand 
the terrible climate..- 

On Aug. 7, 1716, Samuel Rowland donated one acre of land, near Lewes 
and fronting on the River of Lewes, now the canal. The deed called for an 
annual rental of one grain of Indian corn and stipulated that a church of the 
Church of England would be erected on the site. 

The Rev. George Ross arrived on Aug. 5, 1717 and preached in the Court 
House on the 6th, 7th and 9th. The Rev. Wm. Becket arrived on 79) a i We ge 





fe i V4 aks wai a ea DR YAY Bali GE 0 17 ge) Sy SO 277 


and the building of a church was immediately planned. The frame of the 
church was raised on Oct. 6, 1721. He reported on May 19, 1724 that the church 
was nearly finished. It had been placed in use early that year, In 1727, the dis- 
pute between Wm. Penn and Lord Baltimore as to the ownership of the three 
counties comprising Delaware was still unsettled. Mr. Becket believed that the 
decision would be against both of the claimants and that the land would re- 
vert to the Crown. So he suggested to the Church authorities that they petition 
the King to grant the three counties to the Church as a glebe—a glebe that 
would have supported many churches in fine style. 

On Oct. 11, 1728, Mr. Becket described the church at Lewes as follows: 
“40 ft. by 24 ft. by 15 ft. high, the frame of wood, roof of cypress shingles 
and the walls of cypress boards. The floor was laid, the walls wainscotted 
with cypress as high as the tops of the pews; the pulpit, desk, communion 
table and rail handsomely built of black walnut and the pews made of pine 
plank.” In 1741, the inside was wainscotted in a “plain decent manner’ and 
the roof was arched. 

_ The Court House at Georgetown, the new County seat, being nearly com- 
pleted, the Commissioners advertised the Court House at Lewes for sale. It 
was purchased on Oct. 18, 1791, by Thomas MclIlvain, carpenter, for 85 pounds. 
He sold the building to a group of Lewes citizens on Feb. 6, 1793. This group 
presented the building to St. Peter's Church on May 6, 1797. The vestry rented 
the building to various parties at a yearly rental of from 25 to 30 pounds. 

On April 11, 1795, the pew rents were raised 33 1/3%. In June, 1808, 
a new church was raised. It was the same size as the old church but was set 
30 or 40 ft. south and west of the old site. The Rev. James Wiltbank held the 
first service in the new church on Aug. 28, 1808. The building was completed 
and the workman discharged on Sept. 15, 1808. 

In 1854, the old church with its high pulpit was moved over to a corner 
of the lot and the erection of the present church was started on the old site. 
- The corner-stone was laid on May 27, 1854, by Bishop Alfred Lee. The church 
was completed and the opening service,was held in November, 1857. The 
dedication services lasted for a full week with the consecration taking place 
at 10 A. M. on Thurs., Aug. 12, 1858, with Bishop Lee in charge. He was as- 
sisted by the Rev. Messrs. Martin, Colton, Franklin, Slack, Wright, McKim 
and McIlvaine. | 

The old church was fitted up to be used as a school and for week-day 
‘services. A colored Sunday School was opened on May 9, 1858. In 1870, the 
church was improved, the tower and spire being added. The second building 
still stands on a dairy farm near Five Points doing valiant service as a farm 
building. Additional land was purchased on Apr. 18, 1887, from Wm. P. Orr. 


In 1890-91, the church was redecorated and a pipe-organ was installed. A 
new altar and reredos were installed in 1892. On Aug. 24, 1896, a new altar rail 
was presented in memory of Dr. Harbeson Hickman. During the summer of 
1913, the church was renovated after which Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman con- 
ducted a service of benediction for a restored church on Sept. 1, 1913. 

On Dec. 14, 1913, Bishop Kinsman dedicated 3 windows and also a tab- 
let placed in the church by the Judiciary of Delaware in memory of the first 
Chief Justice of Delaware, Ryves Holt, who was a warden of St. Peter’s and 
who is buried in the graveyard. 

In the graveyard surrounding the church many early famous Sussex 
Countians are buried. Four former Governors of Delaware: Daniel Rodney, 
Caleb Rodney, Samuel Paynter and Joseph Maull are buried here. 





278 ED ss AON Ole MORE SQLCOD kL EK OG) TEM OLIN Se Saal PSE: 


Over near the south wall is the famous Feb. 30th tombstone, over the 
grave of Elizabeth H. Cullen. The present Gregorian calendar was laid out by 
Pope Gregory VIII, in 1582. It was not adopted by the English Colonies until 
1752, and a great many of the colonists opposed the change. These persons 
continued to use the Julian calendar in which February had thirty days in 
leap years. The family of Elizabeth Cullen appear to have been numbered 
among these “‘diehards” and they insisted on marking her tombstone “Born 
Feb. 30th, 1760.” Close to the front of the church is the grave of Captain 
Henry McCracken, a Delaware river pilot, who requested that his anchor be 
buried with him. One of the flukes of the anchor can be seen protruding from 
the grave. The oldest tombstone, close to the side of the church, is over the 
grave of Margaret Huling who died on Feb. 16, 1707. So far as the writer can 
determine this is the oldest inscribed tombstone in Delaware. 


Lewes Friends’ Meeting. The Friends held meetings in Lewes as early as 
1692. In June, 1712, a regular Weekly Meeting was established in the home of 
Cornelius Wiltbank. It was attached to the Duck Creek Meeting. On Feb. 1, 
1742, Christopher Topham donated six acres of land to the Society of Friends. 
It was located at the corner of Helmanius Wiltbank’s land, beside the mill 
pond. The meetings were discontinued about 1800, the members attaching 
themselves to the Cool Spring Meeting. 

On Oct. 28, 1813, Jane Cord, nee Jane Miers, donated to Ezekiel Hunn, 
Warren Mifflin, Daniel Neall and Joseph G. Rowland, trustees of the Mother- 
kill Friends’ Monthly Meeting, one acre of land on South St. This was a por- 
tion of a four-acre plot of which the Friends’ burial ground was a part. 

At the Motherkill Monthly Meeting held on Oct. 12, 1818, a committee 
reported that “this acre of high ground had been surveyed and laid out some- 
time since back by Rhodes Shankland ***** and the lot now rented to Wm. 
Coleman on written contract for seven years at the rent of two dollars per year 
and the said Coleman being also bound to keep the fence around the same in 
good repair for the said period.” On July 9, 1838, it was reported “one acre 
of land at Lewes in Sussex County, we have no knowledge as to its situation.” 
The word “situation” probably meant “condition.” 

The graveyard has been unused since 1840. An effort is now being made 
to give proper attention to the section known as Quakertown. The pillory and 
whipping-post were located here. Only one house of old Quakertown is stand- 
ing today. | 


Lewes Presbyterian Church. Presbyterian preaching was started in Lewes 
about 1691 and in 1692 it was reported that there was a small congregation. 
On May 9, 1707, Thomas Fenwick donated to the Presbyterians 100 sq. ft. of 
land upon which to build a meeting-house, a schoolhouse and to maintain a 
burial place. A frame church was built during that year. For some undetermined 
teason, Mr. Fenwick gave them another deed to the same tract on May 9, 1715. 
It was described as being in Lewestown between the County Road and the 
road to the Samuel Davis plantation. The first church building lasted only 
twenty years. 

The erection of a brick church was started in 1727 and, in common with 
the churches of that day, no heat was provided. Repairs were made in 1759 
and in 1818. This church was used until 1832 but it stood until November, 
1871 when it was sold and demolished. A new church, in course of erection 
for several years, was dedicated in 1832. In 1869, it was remodeled. In 1886, 





ail |. 





. MILTON 


NR 


ZION METHODIST CHURCH 


(Page 273) 





St. PETER’s P. E. CHURCH, LEWES 


(Page 276) 





280 Po EC A UCR AE Sai he DE Lot Wed 


a steeple was built and a bell and a Pipe-organ were installed. The church was 
thoroughly modernized in 1887. Land adjoining the church lot was purchased 
on July 3, 1895, from David L. Mustard. The church was incorporated on 
Aug. 14, 1895. 

In the rear of the church auditorium there is a white marble tablet erected 
in memory of the Rev. John Mitchelmore who perished in the burning of the 
steamship Wm. Penn on Mar. 4, 1834. He had been the pastor from 1827 un- 
til his death. There is also a Photograph of the little brick church built in 
1727-28. 

Among the prominent Delawareans buried in the gtaveyard are former 
Governors Col. David Hall, a Revolutionary hero, and Ebe W. Tunnell. The 
oldest legible tombstone that the writer could find is that of Comfort Edgell 
who died on May 11, 1760. 


Bethel Methodist Church (M.E.) and Ebenezer M. E. Church. Ebenezer 
M. E. Church was located on the western outskirts of Lewes where the grave- 
yard can still be seen. The M. E. Church in Lewes and Rehoboth Hundred 
was Organized and met in the new house belonging to Rhoades Shankland. 
They were incorporated at a meeting held on Mon., Mar. 31, 1788 at 4 P. M. 
On May 7, 1788, Rhoades Shankland deeded, for seven shillings, 70 perches 
of land to the church trustees headed by Jno. Wiltbank. The plot was located 
“on the n. w. side of South St., in Lewestown near the s. w. end thereof where 
the main branch of Canary Creek crosses the street.” It was on this site that 
Ebenezer Church was built of frame. 


Bethel M. E. Church was built, about 1790, at Third and Market Sts. 
Francis Asbury noted in his Journal on Oct. 23, 1790, ‘““We have a chapel at 
Lewistown.” This probably referred to Bethel Church although he may have - 
meant Ebenezer. Services were held alternately at the two churches until Eben- 
ezer was abandoned and the entire site was then used as a graveyard. The old- 
est tombstone is a recumbent slab over the grave of Mary Shankland who died 
on Feb. 6, 1803. 


In 1828, Bethel Church was moved to Mulberry and Church Sts., and 
repaired. The church was incorporated on Oct. 2, 1834. Land was purchased 
from Henry Wolfe on June 25, 1870. 


The corner-stone of a new church was laid on Aug. 29, 1870 and the 
basement was dedicated on Aug. 18, 1872, by the Revs. T. J. Thompson, Wm. 
E. England, Samuel Pancoast and W. M. Warner, the pastor. The church was 
completed and was dedicated on Mar. 1, 1874, by Bishop Levi Scott assisted 


by the Rev. Wm. M. Warner, the pastor. 


"of the present stone church was laid in 1910. The church was completed and 
the dedication service was held on May 21, 1911. The services were opened 
with a love feast conducted by the Rev. R. K. Stevenson. The dedicatory ser- 
mon was preached by the Rev. Dr. John Krantz. In the afternoon the Sunday 
School members gathered at the old church and then marched to the new 
building with the orchestra furnishing music. They then circled the building 
three times singing “Onward Christian Soldiers,” after which their regular 
exercises were held, The evenihg sermon was preached by Mr. Stevenson and 





LAT RUBEN SOUS Si Xv G ONG UNE TRY: 281 


short talks were given by former pastors who were present. The celebration 
was continued, with various services, for a full week. The old church was sold 
and is now used as a garment factory. It was damaged by lightning in June, 
1917. 

Bethel Church maintains a large cemetery on Savannah Road. 


The First M. P. Church at Lewes was organized in 1842 and was dis- 
banded in 1854. 


Groome Memorial Methodist Church (M.P.) at Lewes was Organized in 
1906. Meetings were held in private homes and halls until a rough tabernacle 
was built. The corner-stone of the present church was laid in 1907. The church 
was remodeled in 1934. 


The Full Gospel Mission Pentecostal Assembly was organized, about 1920, 
and have held their meetings in various halls in Lewes. 


St. Georges A. M. E. Church at Lewes is located on Park Ave. On Feb. 
23, 1861, Peter Lewes donated land on Pilot Town Bank Road as a church site. 
A church was built and a graveyard was established. This graveyard is still in 
use. Land on Ship Carpenter St., was donated to the church by Hannah Bur- 
ton on Oct. 6, 1881. The deed stipulated that they should continue the pres- 
ent building or erect a new church and school. A new church was built in 1883. 

The cemetery property was transferred to a new set of trustees on May 13, 
1891. The description stated that the property was located between the Row- 
land graveyard and another burial plot belonging to the Society of the Sons and 
Daughters of Harrison Smith, of Lewes. 

The church was rebuilt in 1891. They were incorporated on June 19, 1899. 
On Sept. 23, 1922, Isaac Burton donated additional land on Park Ave., for- 
merly Ship Carpenter St. The church was rebuilt in 1930. 


St. Paul’s M. E. Church, colored, at Lewes is located on 4th St. The 
church site was purchased on Nov. 28, 1882, from Louisa R. Maull. The church 
was built during that year. Land was purchased from Chauncey P. Holcomb 
on Oct. 13, 1896. The church was remodeled in 1930. 


New Ebenezer Methodist Church (M.E.) is located two miles north of 
Midway. This church was organized, at the home of John P. Salmons, on 
Oct. 1, 1856, at which time trustees were elected. On July 7, 1857, Abba Wolfe 
donated 110 perches of land as a church site. The church was completed and 
was dedicated on Jan. 4, 1858. It was renovated in 1886, 1901 and 1920. More 
land for the graveyard was donated on Mar. 12, 1917, by Wm. A. Blizzard. 

The church ceased to function on Mar. 18, 1934. An annual meeting is 
now held on a Sunday early in October. There is an enclosed graveyard. The 
earliest tombstone is that of Temperance J. Records, who died on Feb. 25, 
1832, evidently a reinterment. 


Rehoboth Presbyterian Church is located east of Midway. The church 
was erected, of frame construction, in 1855. It became a separate charge on 
May 17, 1876. At the present time it is attached to the Lewes Presbyterian 
Church. In 1926, the church was entirely rebuilt. The length was increased 
to include the entrance and two small Sunday School rooms. The old gallery 
was removed and a recess was added to the pulpit. The six windows were en- 
larged and in each a memorial window of artistic glass was installed. Electric 





282 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


lighting was installed and the entire structure was veneered with brick. The 
one-acre school lot adjoining the church was secured on July 11, 1938. There 
is a large, well-kept graveyard. The two oldest tombstones are those of Cath- 
erine Thompson who died on Oct. 15, 1817 and Wm. Thompson who died 
on July 11, 1826. 

When this graveyard was laid out there was a section for the burial of 
colored persons. When Burton's Chapel, colored, in Rehoboth, laid out a 
graveyard in 1881, by mutual consent, the bodies in the colored section of the 
Rehoboth Pres. graveyard were reinterred in the Burton Chapel graveyard. 


Scotts M. E. Chapel and Epworth Methodist Church (M.E.) at Rehoboth 
Beach. As is known to most persons, the central part of Rehoboth Beach was 
purchased by the Methodists, laid out in home sites and sold to establish a 
summer resort surrounded with religious activities. The Rehoboth Beach As- 
sociation was incorporated on Mar. 15, 1871 and a large tract of land was pur- 
chased in 1872. On Jan. 27, 1873, the name was changed to ‘Rehoboth Beach 
Camp-Meeting Association of the M. E. Church.” Camp-Meeting grounds were 
laid out in a grove and annual meetings were started. In February, 1879, the 
name was changed to ‘Rehoboth Beach Association,” In 1881, the camp-meet- 
ings were discontinued. 

In the spring of 1873, Scott’s M. E. Chapel was built on Baltimore Ave., 
under the direction of James E. Hooper. It was dedicated by and named for 
Bishop Levi Scott. The chapel was designed and built for the use of any de- 
nomination that desired to use it. The chapel was incorporated on Sept. 5, 
1892. On Sept. 2, 1897, Epworth M. E. Church was organized and trustees 
were elected. A church building was completed, in 1898, at the corner of Lake 
and Rehoboth Aves. It was dedicated on Aug. 14, 1898. On Mar. 29, 1909, it 
was decided to build a parsonage. The church was incorporated on Feb. 10, 
1910. ; : 

Scotts Chapel was gutted by fire on Feb. 22, 1913, after which it was 
decided to merge with Epworth Church. Additional land on Baltimore Ave., 
was purchased on Aug. 12, 1913, from Harry. A. Roe. A new church was‘ built 
on the site of Scott’s Chapel, in 1914, and named Epworth M. E. Church. The 
first anniversary of the dedication services was held in August, 1915. An ad- 
dition to be used for Sunday School purposes was built in the spring of 1942. 
It was dedicated on Oct. 17, 1943, by Dist. Supt. Walter A. Hearn. 

After renovations, a reopening service was held on Sun., Nov. 19, 1944, 
by the pastor, the Rev. David W. Baker. The speakers were Bishop Charles 
W. Flint and the Rev. Dr. O. A. Bartley. 

On Sun., Nov. 26, 1944, the new chancel furniture and numerous other 
church effects were separately dedicated in memory or in honor of members 
and friends of the church, by the Rev. David W. Baker. 


. All Saint’s P. E. Church at Rehoboth Beach was built in 1893. During the 
“summer of 1892, Episcopal services were held on the porch of the Hotel Hen- 
lopen. On July 11, 1892, Bishop Coleman conducted a morning service, an 
evening service and Sunday School in the afternoon. On Dec. 29, 1892, Bishop 
Leighton Coleman, who was confined to a dark room because of illness, dic- 
tated a letter in which he directed the Rev. J. Leighton McKim of Milford to 
take charge of the erection of a new church at “Cape Henlopen City,” now 
Rehoboth Beach. Mr. McKim personally drew the plans for the church and 
supervised its construction. He would ride the train from Milford to Lewes, 





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(Page 281) 
EpwortH METHODIST CHURCH 











284 DOH ES CH UR CoH ESO Ee Bin Aa Wor ies 


then walk to and from Rehoboth. He estimated that he walked 900 miles while 
supervising the erection of the church. The site was secured from John W. 
Causey on Mar. 27, 1893. The corner-stone was laid and the opening service 
was held on Sun., July 9, 1893, by Bishop Coleman. The date of the conse- 
cration is unknown. 

During 1911-12, services were held during the entire year for the first time. 
In 1912-13 a clergy-house was secured for the use of visiting clergymen. 

On Jan. 30, 1938, the church was damaged by fire. It was rebuilt and 
improved, after which it was reopened on Whitsunday, 1938. The consecration 
services were held on Aug. 21, 1938, by the Rt. Rev. Francis M. Taitt, assisted 
by the Very Rev. Hiram R. Bennett. Miss Mary Littell presented a communion 
service in memory of her brother, Dr. John S. Littell, former rector. 

On Sun., May 23, 1943, at a very early hour, the church was again seri- 
ously damaged by fire. Valuable church hangings and vestments, acquired in 
Belgium and England, were destroyed. A valuable communion service, donated 
in memory of Dr. John S. Littell, was saved. Churches and other organizations 
offered the use of their auditoriums for services and the offer of the Veteran 
Employees Assn., Del. Division, P. R. R., was accepted. Services were held 
here during the time required to rebuild the church. 

The architect in charge of rebuilding the church was Wm. Heyl Thomp- 
son, of Phila., a son of the Rev. Benj. F. Thompson, B. D., of Dover. The in- 


_ terior of the church is practically the same as before the fire, being an adaption 


of St. Alban’s Church in England. The biggest change in the exterior is the 
slender spire surmounted by a six foot cross. This replaces the belfry which 
was burned. 
In rebuilding the church a small chapel was added. It was named “‘All 
Soul’s Chapel.” The chapel and a memorial window in the foyer were erected in 
memory of Mrs. Edwin Stalfort by her relatives. The altar in the chapel is a 
memorial to the parishioners of All Saint’s Church who served in the Armed 


_ Services during World War II. There is a seating capacity of about twelve 


persons. The altar is of limestone construction. The floor is of tile which are 
replicas of ancient floor pieces found in English, French and Spanish cathe- 
drals and monasteries. The stained glass window behind the altar pictures 
uy on the Cross and the two side windows depict the six parables of the 
Lord. 

The opening was set for Nov. 2, 1943, at which time the rector celebrated 
a requiem Mass with special prayers for those honored by the memorial altar. 
The church and chapel were consecrated on Jan. 16, 1944, by Bishop Arthur . 


_R. McKinstry, assisted by the Rev. N. W. Rightmyer, the rector. 


A window in memory of Frederick S$. Homan, presented by his children, 
was dedicated on Sun., Oct. 29, 1944, by the rector. A new parish-house was 
built during 1946. It was used for the first time on Jan. 9, 1947. 


St. Agnes-by-the-Sea R. C. Church at Rehoboth Beach. The Roman Catho- 
lic Order of St. Francis de Assisi was established in the United States in the 
year 1855, with Sister Agnes as Mother Superior. On the 50th Anniversary 
of the Order, in 1905, the Most Rev. Bishop Monaghan, of the diocese of 
Wilmington, presented to the Order a cottage at Rehoboth Beach, where the 
sisters could spend a vacation each year. 


In connection with the cottage, a small chapel was established for religious 
worship. As the community grew, the chapel soon proved too small to ac- 
commodate the worshippers who wished to attend Mass. A frame church was 





dE 4 bas Sy Sn <a gas gt & bas wa Co aren ls © al & eG ses) nh 285 


then built and named “St. Agnes-by-the-Sea,” in honor of the patron saint 
of the first Mother Superior. 

The dedication was arranged to be held on Thurs., Aug. 9, 1906, by the 
Most Rev. John J. Monaghan. He was assisted by Fathers Wm. J. Bermingham, 
T. F. Waldron and the Rev. Father Felix. 

It was announced on May 9, 1946 that the church had been sold. At the 
same time the Franciscan Nuns’ Summer Home was also purchased by Mrs. 
Margaret Broeders who planned to convert the property for hotel purposes. 


St. Edmond’s R. C. Church at Rehoboth Beach. Built of stone, the erec- 
tion of this church was started in 1939. The corner-stone was laid on July 7, 
1939. The church took title to the site on Dec. 15, 1939. The first service was 
conducted by Bishop Edmond J. FitzMaurice on Sun. May 12, 1940, when he 
celebrated the Feast of Pentecost. 

The church was dedicated on Sept. 1, 1940. The service was conducted by 
the Most Rev. Edmond J. FitzMaurice, Bishop of Wilmington. He was assisted 
by Fathers Eugene J. McCarthy, F. J. Hensil, A. Fosick, and C. J. McGinley. 
The sermon was delivered by the Rev. Dr. Joseph A. Lee. The church was 
named in honor of Bishop FitzMaurice. The visitors were entertained at lunch 
at the Hotel Henlopen. 


Westminster Presbyterian Church at Rehoboth Beach. On Easter Sunday, 
1931, the Presbyterians began to hold meetings in Horn’s Theatre. These 
meetings were continued there and in the Belhaven Hotel until a store-room 
in the Carmine Building was rented. A church was organized and incorporated 
on Nov. 1, 1931. The corner-stone of the present brick church was laid on the 
morning of Sun. July 10, 1932, by Elder A. Victor Hughes. It was dedicated 
during the afternoon of the same day by the Rev. John Humphrey. 


Mt. Pleasant M. E. Church, colored, at Rehoboth Beach. On Apr. 1, 1881, 
Elijah Burton donated one acre of land for a church site and a graveyard. It 
was located on the old Rehoboth-Lewes Road. A church was built and it was 
named “Burton Chapel.” At a later date the bodies from the colored section 
of the Rehoboth Presbyterian Church graveyard at Midway were reinterred in 
the Burton Chapel graveyard. This graveyard is to the north of the cut-off 
road entering Rehoboth Beach. 

On Aug. 22, 1884, Elijah Burton donated the present one-acre church 
site and the church was moved to the new location. The old site was then used 
exclusively as a graveyard. They were incorporated on Jan. 23, 1899, at which 
_time the name “Mt. Pleasant” was adopted. The church was enlarged in 1946. 


Cool Spring Presbyterian Church was organized in the early 1700's. It is 
known to have been in existence on Oct. 11, 1728, at which time the Rev. Wm. 
Becket reported to the Church of England that there were Presbyterian 
churches at Lewes and Cool Spring. In 1734, the Cool Spring and Lewes 
churches were joined as one parish with one minister. A new church was built 
in 1735. This church was painted red, had two front.doors and a gallery. A 
painting of this church hangs on the front wall of the present church. It was 
executed by the late R. B. Hopkins, M.D. of Milton. On Aug. 22, 1737, the 
proprietaries of Pennsylvania issued a warrant that four acres of a plot of ten 
acres should be granted to the members of the congregation. The survey was 
made on Sept. 29, 1737, by W. Shankland. 

The.circuit was incorporated on Sept. 1, 1787, as the “United Presbyter- 
ian Congregation of Lewes, Cool Spring and Indian River.” The present build- 





286 AE. GHUR GR ESHMGEABDEL AWARE 


ing is the third to be erected on this site and it was dedicated on Jan. 14, 1855. 
At a funeral, late in 1904, difficulty was encountered in getting the casket 
through the narrow door and Dr. James A. Hopkins, who was present, prom- 
ised that this would never happen again. He had the two narrow doors re- 
placed with the present wide door and the two side aisles replaced with a cen- 
ter aisle. On the front wall, inside of the church, there is a marble tablet erected 
in honor of “the Rev. Cornelius H. Mustard, late pastor of Cool Spring, Mil- 
ton, Blackwater and Oceian View, died Jan. 26, 1870, in the 66th year of his 
age. There is a large graveyard enclosed with a wall. There are quite a num- 
ber of tombstones dating back to the middle of the 18th century. The earliest 
which the writer could find was over the grave of Elizabeth Martin, who died 
on Sept. 16, 1741. 

In recent years one of the good friends and benefactors of Cool Spring 
Church has been Dr. David M. Hitch of Philadelphia. He had the social-hall 
built a short distance from the church on the Georgetown-Lewes Highway. 
It is complete with an auditorium seating 500 persons, stage, rest room, dress- 
ing room, dining room and kitchen. This site was formerly known as the 
“Sunken Gardens,” and was donated by Lolitie M. Smith and John F. Perry 
on Nov. 20, 1928 and May 11, 1929. The dedication services were held on 
Aug. 1, 1929. Dr. Hitch presented the keys of the building to the trustees and 
the Rev. Thomas Parker McKee, the pastor, responded. Addresses were made 
by Col. Robert G. Houston, at that time, a member of Congress and by James 
M. Tunnell, later, U. S. Senator, both of whom were elders of the Presbyterian 
Church of Georgetown. | i 


Beaver Dam Methodist Church (M.P.) is located at Harbeson. The first 
church was built in 1820 upon part of the present graveyard. It was a small 
one-story building and faced the Georgetown Road. Beaver Dam was the name 
of the village at that time. A new church was built in 1874 on the graveyard lot 
but it faced the Milton Road. The old church is believed to have been moved 
into Cave Neck for the use of another congregation. The second church was re- 
modeled in 1885. They were incorporated on Feb. 3, 1885 and one acre of land 
was purchased on June 18, 1885. On July 16, 1888, an acre of land was dohated 
by Harbeson Hickman. The church was incorporated on Apr. 1, 1897. More 
land was purchased from Edgar R. Sipple on Aug. 5, 1897. | 

In 1927, the church was moved across the road to its present site and an 
addition for Sunday School purposes was built. On Nov. 8, 1937, the old 
school property was purchased at a public sale. There is a large walled-in 
cemetery across the road from the church, the tombstones dating back to 1855. 


The Reformer’s Church at Beaver Dam. There was a church located at 
Beaver Dam during the period including 1850 which was known locally as - 
The Reformer’s Church. The writer believes that this was the Beaver Dam 
M. P. group but has been unable to verify this. 


Sand Hill Methodist Church (M.E.) is located three and one-half miles 
n. e. of Georgetown on the road to Milton. The one-acre church site was do- 
nated on Mar. 25, 1859, by Dr. Wm. Marshall. The frame of the church was 
raised on July 2, 1859. It was dedicated on Sun., Nov. 20, 1859 and called 
“Reed's Chapel” in honor of the pastor of that circuit. Fifty-two perches of 
land were donated on Jan. 28, 1860, by James Reed. The building was repaired 
extensively in 1885 and in 1940. There is a well-kept graveyard, the tomb- 
stones dating back to 1857. Until more recent times a camp-meeting was con- 
ducted in the grove close to thé church. 





ALL Saints’ P. E. CHURCH, REHOBOTH BEACH 
(Page 282) 


Sapmrsimensns Be ‘pia 


St. EDMOND’s R. C. CHURCH, REHOBOTH BEACH 
(Page 285) 











288 J RNs OSI LEE OI @ BR BEM SK esd ONS SN LOD 8s BIND Be UAL! Or LS 60 5 





Redden M. E. Chapel. When Redden was a thriving village a group met 
in McColley’s Chapel, on Jan. 13, 1894, elected trustees and were incorporated 
as “Redden M. E. Chapel.” On Mar. 12, 1894, James A. Evans donated land 
on the south side of the main street as a church site. The chapel was then built 
and dedicated. In the meantime, three disastrous fires have almost wiped out 
the village. Services were abandoned in 1918 and the building finally fell down 
in ruins. A grove of trees and thick brush are all that remain to mark its for- 
mer site. At the 1941 Methodist Conference it was decided to sell the site. 


Faith M. P. Church, located on the old King’s Highway, one and three- 
quarters miles above Redden, was built in 1898. The church was incorporated 
on Feb. 28, 1900. The one-acre church site was donated on Apr. 11, 1901, by 
John H. S. Ewell. The church ceased to function in 1930 and stood idle until 
1935. It was then rented to a Holiness group who purchased the building in 
1938. It is now known as the “Faith Bible Holiness Undenominational 
Church.” After extensive repairs, including a new shingle roof, the church 
was rededicated on May 21, 1944, by the pastor, the Rev. Robert Nailor. There 
is a graveyard to the rear of the church, the tombstones dating back to 1899. 


Grace Methodist Church (M.P.) at Georgetown was the outgrowth of a 
big revival held in the summer and fall of 1891 at the corner of Race and 
Edward Sts. A tabernacle was erected and many conversions resulted. The Rev. 
Louis A. Bennett had been assigned to the pastorate of the rural churches Heb- 
ron and Providence with instructions to establish a church at Georgetown. He 
arrived on the afternoon of Apr. 24, 1891 after a three days’ drive by horse 
and carriage from real et Md. Diligent inquiry within a few days dis- 
closed that the two rural churches had less than a dozen members and that, in 

Georgetown there were but two persons who were affiliated with that denom- 
ination. 

A survey was made which disclosed that some dissention had taken place 
in Wesley M. E. Church and it took but little persuasion to get.some of them 
to break away. While the tabernacle meetings were in progress plans were 
made to rent a hall when cold weather should arrive. This hall was located at 
Cedar St., and Railroad Ave., and was owned by George Christopher Calhoun 
who conducted a store on the first floor. The church was incorporated on June 
27, 1891. Several months.later it was decided to build a church. 

A site was purchased on the n. w. cor. of Market and King Sts., from 
Geo. W. Bennum, on Nov. 6, 1891. A frame church was built and given the 
name “The First M. P. Church of Georgetown.” The doors were thrown open 
to the public for the first time on Sun., Apr. 10, 1892. The dedication services 
were held on Tues., July 4, 1899. They were conducted by the Revs. L. A. 
Bennett, D. W. Austine and D. W. Hodges. 

During the spring of 1905 a lot was purchased on the s. e. cor. of Market 
and King Sts., diagonally -across from where the church stood. The frame 
church was moved under the direction of the pastor, the Rev. Howard O. Keen 

«and it was slightly remodeled. On Sun. morning, Nov. 21, 1909, while the 
‘congregation was at prayer, fire, from a defective chimney, broke out and the 
church was destroyed. The second church, built of brick, on the present site 
was finished in the late spring of 1910. It was dedicated on Sun., July 7, 1918, 
during the ceperts of the Rev. John T. Bailey. This church was burned be- 
tween 3 and 4 o'clock on Sun. morning, Feb. 20, 1927, as a result of a severe 
electrical storm which caused electric light wires to ignite it. 

The third church, built of brick, was started on Mar. 28, 1927. The corner- 
stone was laid on Oct. 27, 1927, by the Rev. M. E. Hungerford, the pastor. 





E SIME RIN SU S'S‘E Xt SCYOLUING BY 289 


Among the articles placed in the corner-stone was a history of the church 
written by Oscar S. Wilson, the Associated Press representative in George- 
town. The church was opened for the first time on June 10, 1928. The dedica- 
tion service was held on Nov. 28, 1943. It was conducted by Dist. Supt. W. A. 
Hearn, assisted by the Revs. R. W. Sapp, J. Earle Cummings, M. E. Hunger- 
ford and Wm. P. Kesmodel, the pastor. 

A new electric pipe-organ, with chimes was dedicated on Sun. Sept. 22, 
1946, by the Rev. Wm. P. Kesmodel, the pastor. The sermon was delivered 
by the Rev. Dr. T. C. Mulligan, Dist. Supt. The chimes were a memorial to 
Harold West, Arnold L. Roach, Harry E. Hill and Harold Scott who had lost 
their lives in World War II. 


St. Paul’s P. E. Church at Georgetown was founded in 1794. It was in- 
corporated on June 21, 1794. Services were held in the Court House prior to 
the erection of the first church. On Mar. 8, 1797, the Commissioners for laying 
out the town of Georgetown donated lots No. 102 and No. 103 at Front and 
Pine Sts., as a church site, the consideration being one cent. The trustees sold 
this land on Mar. 6, 1805 to Wm. Russell for $14.00. 

On July 23, 1803, four lots at Pine St., and North Lane, were purchased 
from the estate of Geo. Hazzard, for $28.50. This is part of the present site. 
The erection of a frame church was started. On Jan. 15, 1805, the Legislature 
provided that a lottery could be held to raise $1500.00 for the purpose of com- 
pleting the church and enclosing the graveyard. The church was dedicated on 
St. Paul’s Day, 1806, by the rector, the Rev. Hamilton Bell, who is buried be- 
side old Christ Church, east of Laurel. On Feb. 8, 1827, another lottery was 
authorized but it was not held. The frame church had galleries on three sides, 
a high pulpit with a sounding board and a clerk’s desk in front of the pulpit. 
The frame church was removed and a brick church was built in 1843-44. It 
was consecrated on Nov. 19, 1844, by Bishop Alfred Lee. 

Early in 1856, during a heavy storm, the roof was blown off and the 
church was seriously damaged. Rebuilding was started immediately and the 
reopening service was held on Jan. 11, 1857. 

In June, 1865, a new altar and a beautiful lectern were installed. The old 

lectern was placed outside of the chancel to serve as a pulpit. The church was 
rebuilt in 1881. The plans were drawn by McKim, Meade and White of New 
York. This firm was organized on June 21, 1880, and planned a number of 
famous churches. Stanford White was a member of this firm and Mr. McKim 
was.a cousin of the Rev. J. Leighton McKim. The reopening service was held 
on Oct. 13, 1881. A frame chapel was built to be used for Sunday School 
activities. : 
On Easter Sunday, 1882, a baptismal font was consecrated. It was a gift 
of former rector, John Linn McKim and friends. The interior of the church 
was beautified and a pipe-organ was installed in 1886. In 1891, a lot was pre- 
sented to the church. A credence shelf, in memory of Judge John H. Paynter 
was received in 1894-95. ) ust 

On Nov. 6, 1895 Mrs. Elizabeth W. Williams of Middletown presented 
a farm as a glebe. This 150-acre farm was located at Green Branch on the 
Georgetown-Laurel Road. A new bell was presented on Jan. 25, 1897, by 
Captain John S. Atkins. Land on Pine St. was purchased from Hettie A. S. 
Kollock on June 14, 1897. During that year the parish-house was moved to 
make room for a rectory. The rectory was completed and a service of bene- 
diction was conducted by Bishop Leighton Coleman on Dec. 10, 1897. 

In July, 1901, a silver paten, in memory of Miss Martha W. Fooks was 
presented. A tablet, in memory of the Rev. Benj. J. Douglass, former rector, 





290 THE CHURCHE SR OF? DE CAVA 


was unveiled by Bishop Coleman on Apr. 12, 1902. A brass altar desk in mem- 
ory of Charles C. Stockley, former Governor of Delaware, was blessed on Apr. 
20, 1902. A water-motor was attached to the organ in 1911-12. A new organ 
was dedicated by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman, on Oct. 17, 1915. Brass candle- 
sticks were presented by Henry M. Denning. A tablet in memory of Lieut. 
Lawrence Taylor was dedicated, by Bishop Kinsman, on Mar. 26, 1919. 

The present | dd cai te was completed in 1941, but no dedication was 
held. The outstanding memorial window behind the altar was provided by the 
will of former U. S. Senator Willard Saulsbury as a memorial to his sister, 
Miss Margaret Saulsbury. New reredos were included in the memorial. The 
window is called the ‘““Te Deum” window. The dedication service was con- 
ducted by Bishop Philip Cook on Feb. 9, 1930. He was assisted by the Revs. 
Samuel Van Loan and Martin Bram. Among those present were Judge Hugh 
M. Morris and Judge Victor B. Wooley, executors of the Saulsbury estate. 

Among the prominent Delawareans buried in the church yard is former 
Governor Charles C. Stockley. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find 
is on the grave of James Anderson, who died on Jan. 3, 1810. 


Wesley Methodist Church (M.E.) at Georgetown. In 1791, the General 
Assembly of Delaware passed an Act providing that a Court House be built 
at the most central point in Sussex County. The present site of Georgetown 
was selected and a town was laid out, to become the county seat. In 1792, a 
plot of land was deeded to the Methodists as a site for a chapel. This would 
indicate that there was a Methodist Society in that neighborhood previous to 
that time. Francis Asbury wrote in his journal that on Sept. 24, 1779, he went 
from Lewes.to the home of Abraham Harris, in Georgetown, where he and 
the Rev. Mr. Allfree preached to a gathering of neighbors. This is the first 
authentic record of the entrance of Methodism into Georgetown. 

A lot, 60 ft. by 120 ft., on Pine St., was donated on Nov. 7, 1805, for the 
sum of twenty-five cents, by John Russell. Wesley M. E. Chapel was built of 
brick in 1806. The chapel was incorporated on Apr. 10, 1807. About 1825 the 
building was damaged by fire but was reconditioned for use. Additional land 
was secured from G. A. Ewing on Feb. 24, 1842. 


A curious tradition, apparently well attested, connected with the burning 
of Wesley Chapel is to the effect that a big revival was in progress. Three 
young men attended the meetings and one night, for some rudeness, were 
ejected from the church. They were heard to remark that no meetings would 
ever again be held in that church. That night the church was burned. The 
young men were arrested on suspicion. In protesting their innocence, the first 
one said he hoped he might die if he did it, the second said he hoped he 
might never speak another word distinctly if he did it and the third said he 
hoped he might become as crooked as a rainbow if he did it. A short time 
later the first one was found dead in bed, the second became so paralyzed as 
ato become almost speechless while the third grew almost double from rheuma- 
tism. This story has been told repeatedly by the old people of Georgetown 
and has always been accepted as true. 

On Jan. 22, 1844, the church trustees ‘resolved that it was expedient to 
raise means to erect a new church,” but nothing was done at this time. On 
Jan. 24, 1859, the trustees met to vote where the new church should be located. 
The vote decided in favor of the “Chase lot,’ Charles Tunnell, Thomas W. Hat- 
field and David Dodd voting for it. Mr. Hatfield transferred the site to the 
church on July 9, 1859. They were named the building committee and pro- 
ceeded to start the erection of a two-story frame church on Race St. They suc- 





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WESTMINSTER PRES. CHURCH, REHOBOTH 
(Page 285) 


GRACE METHODIST CHURCH, GEORGETOWN 
(Page 288) 








292 eH EB) CLA UTR Re Ger in BL A WOALR 





ceeded in getting the building under roof when work was suspended and 
another debt struggle ensued. The building was completed in 1866, when it 
was dedicated by Bishop Simpson. At a meeting of the trustees held on Aug. 
14, 1866, it was decided to sell the old brick church and it was purchased by 
Thomas Sipple, for $35.05. At this time a fence was erected enclosing the 
graveyard on Pine St. The oldest tombstone that the writer could find is over 
the grave of Eliza Coston who died on Oct. 16, 1817. 

Additional land on Race St. was donated on Feb. 16, 1878, by Chas. H. 
Richards. The second church was remodeled in 1882. The present brick church 
was built during 1896-97. More land on Race St. was purchased on Sept. 7, 
1896, from Charlotte McFee. The ground was broken on Thurs., Sept. 10, 
1896, on the 117th Anniversary of Asbury’s first preaching in Georgetown. 
The corner-stone was laid on Tues., Oct. 27, 1896, by the Revs. J. D. C. Hanna 
and T. E. Martindale. 

The dedication services were held on Mar. 7, 1897, when the Rev. 
Charles A. Grise was pastor. The congregation met at the old church at 9 
A. M., and marched in a body to the new building where all of the services 
were held. Bishop Cyrus D. Foss preached in the morning, Bishop J. M. Walden 
in the afternoon and the Rev. Robert Watt in the evening. Ten new memorial 
windows were also dedicated. On Mar. 13, 1912, land on Laurel St. was pur- 
chased from Chas. W. Cullen. 

In 1929, the Willie M. Jones Memorial Community Hall, of frame con- 
struction, was built on the church property. The 150th Anniversary of the 
coming of Methodism to Georgetown, was celebrated with services beginning 
on Sun., Oct. 26, 1929, and lasting for a full week. 

The carillonic bells and tower system were dedicated on Sun., June 2, 
1946 at services conducted by the Rev. Omar E. Jones, D.D., the pastor. The 
Presentation speech was delivered by the Hon. Harold W. T. Purnell. They 
were accepted on behalf of the church by Frank M. Jones, Esq., and on behalf 
of the service men by T. Stuart Russell. They were dedicated to the men who 
served in the armed forces during World War II, of whom Eben A. Townsend 
III lost his life in action on Mar. 24, 1945. ‘ 


The Presbyterian Church of Georgetown was organized on Jan. 27, 1860. 
Elisha Cullen was elected ruling elder and served until his death on Feb. 8, 
1862. The first meetings were held in the Court House. The church was in. 
corporated on Jan. 21, 1871. The church site was donated on Oct. 13, 1871, by 
Edward Wootten. It was stipulated that there should be no graveyard. On 
Oct. 6, 1871, the contract for building a frame church at the present location 
was awarded to’Hiram T. Downing and Peter Pepper of Georgetown. The 
church was dedicated on Dec. 15, 1872, by the Rev. Mr. Patton assisted by the 
Rev. Messrs. Hammer and Adams. Additional land was donated on Dec. 6, 
1925, by Harold B. Scarborough. . 

The work of rebuilding the church was started during the week of Apr. 
9, 1934. The building was raised and a basement was built. This is used as a 
» Sunday School room and a social-hall. A new roof was built at this time. Dur- 
ing the progress of the work the congregation met in the Grange Hall. An 
electric organ was installed in February, 1942. 


The Wesleyan Methodist Church at Georgetown. The first meetings of 
this congregation were held in a frame building near the High School and 
later in the Wagamon Building. The church was organized on the evening of 
Aug. 31, 1940, by the Rev. J. E. Martin, Pres. of the Middle Atlantic Confer- 
ence. The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Nov. 10, 1940, by 





| rhs AN QD aK. S00 a Diva od IRR WN HO Rot Crt od UGLY IA A 293 


the Rev. J. E. Martin. He was assisted by the Revs. Robert Linthicum, Raymond 
Taylor and Virgil Peters, the pastor. The title to the church site was secured 
from Edward B. Rust on Jan. 13, 1943. The dedication service was held on 
Jan. 30, 1944, by the Rev. J. E. Martin, assisted by the Rev. Zenas B. Bean, 
the pastor. 


The colored people of Georgetown maintain three churches. Prospect 
A. M. E. Church was built in 1866 and rebuilt in 1907. St. James’ M. E. Church 
was built in 1840. On Jan.13, 1840, they purchased the “‘schoolhouse old field” 
from Wm. E. Harris for the church site. The church was remodeled in 1867. 
The First Mt. Zion Baptist Church purchased one acre of land on Mar. 22, 
1921, from Chas. A. Wing in the section known as “Campbell Town.” 


Bethesda Methodist Church (M.E.) was originally located at a spot ad- 
joining the northern end of Delaware Colony, south of Georgetown. Joshua 
Morris, who owned the Morris or Dodd Mill, on June 28, 1831, purchased the 
Morris or Anderson Mill which included a saw-mill, a grist-mill, a dwelling 
and ten acres of land. In February, 1832, Joshua Morris donated a half-acre 
of land on Mill Road upon which a Methodist Church was to be built. Bethesda 
Church was built during that year. 

The erection of a new church was started in June, 1859. It was dedicated 
on Nov. 13, 1859, by Dr. Cook and the Rev. Mr. Willey. One hundred 
perches of land were purchased on Apr. 14, 1883 from Benton W. Thompson. 

The site is marked by the old graveyard, badly overgrown with brush, in 
which the oldest legible tombstone is that of Wm. B. Timmons who died on 
Feb. 5, 1867. 

In 1895, the church was moved to a new site at Stockley and rebuilt. This 
new site was secured from N. W. Prettyman on Jan. 25, 1896. The Benton 
Thompson tract was sold to Wm. L. McIlvaine on Jan. 14, 1896, for $16.00. 
There is a graveyard beside the church, the dates on the tombs beginning 
about 1900. 


Grace Methodist Church (M.E.) at Millsboro. When settleménts were 
made at the head of the Indian River, the village east of the river was called 
Rock Hole and the village west of the river was called Washington. When a 
postoffice was established at Rock Hole, it was given the name Millsboro. 
Gradually, this name was also adopted by the village of Washington. 

In 1827, a Methodist Society was formed at Washington and on Feb. 16, 
1828, a church site was purchased from Wm. Jefferson for $21.00. A church 
was then built and named the “Washington M. E. Church.” 

A new church was built and it was dedicated on Aug. 18, 1874 by the 
Rev. Anthony Atwood. On Sept. 20, 1894, they were incorporated as “Grace 
M. E. Church.” In 1896, the building was sold to the Baptists, who moved it 
to Washington St. Additional land was purchased on Apr. 27 and Nov. 11, 
1896, from Mary B. Salmons. The frame of a larger church was raised on Sept. 
18, 1896. The dedication service was held on the evening of Apr. 11, 1897, 
by the Rev. T. E. Terry assisted by Pres. Elder Avery and the Revs. T. E. 
Martindale and J. D. C. Hanna. 

On Aug. 12, 1905, the building was destroyed by fire. The present struc- 
ture was completed and was dedicated on Dec. 16, 1906. The parsonage lot on 
State St. was purchased, on May 26, 1924, from Edwin C. Ryan. A property on 
Morris Ave. was purchased, on Dec. 18, 1928, from the State B. of E. This ts 
the proposed site for a new church which it is planned to build. 

The church was remodeled in 1933 and an oil-heating system was installed 








294 THE GHUR@HES@OLSDE LAW ARE 





in 1939. In the graveyard to the rear of the church, the earliest tombstone is 
dated Mar. 20, 1857, over the grave of Mary E. Johnson. 


Millsboro M. P. Church was built in 1865. The name was changed to 
‘Lower Sussex’’ in 1869 and again changed to “Sussex” in 1871. The Rev. I. T. 
Adkins served as pastor in 1869-70. The church was located at the edge of the 
town on the road to Lewes. It was improved in 1896. The church was destroyed 
by fire a short time later and not rebuilt. 


St. Mark’s P. E. Church, at Millsboro, was founded by the Rev. John A. 
Childs at meetings held in the schoolhouse. The erection of a church building 
was started in 1847. In 1848, the church was being used although not entirely 
completed. The church was formally organized in October, 1848. The church 
site had been donated by M. S. Burton. The consecration service was conducted, 
by Bishop Alfred Lee, on Oct. 26, 1849. 

In 1870, the church was torn down and the erection of a new church was 
started. It was several years before it was entirely completed. In 1880, the gal- 
lery was removed and the steeple was built. A consecration service was held on 
May 6, 1884. Additional land was purchased in 1885. A new altar and reredos 
were erected, in 1895-96, in memory of Thomas Burton. The church was placed 
on a brick foundation, in 1896-97 as a gift of J. R. Godwin. New pews were 
installed in 1900-01 and a new fence was built in 1902-03. 

A spire was built in 1915 and it was dedicated, on Oct. 17, 1915, by Bishop 
Frederick J. Kinsman. On June 14, 1924, the “mansion house of the Rev. 
Lewis W. Wells,” to be used as a rectory, was presented, by Eugene F. and 
Frank L. Wells, in memory of the Rev. and Mrs. Lewis W. Wells. A brass tab- 
let was erected in recognition of this gift. In 1941, a new Organ was installed. 
There is a graveyard beside the church, the oldest tombstone being that of 
Susan Watson, who died on Dec. 19, 1848. 


Millsboro Baptist Church was built at a very early date. It was located 
close to Indian River about opposite Lingo’s Garage. After being unused _ for 
_ Many years and only a ghost of its former self, it was demolished in a wind- 

storm on Feb. 14, 1860. iieeey 

In 1896, the Baptists of Millsboro purchased the old Methodist Church 
and moved it to Washington St. It was formally opened on July 12, 1896. At 
the end of four years the church was sold and converted into two apartments. 
It was later destroyed by fire. | 


Indian River Presbyterian Church also known as “Saw-Mill Church” was _ 
located two miles north of Millsboro, near the head of Indian River. It was 
built sometime between 1730 and 1750. 

On Feb. 4, 1786, Levi Collins sold to John Aydelott and Thos. Harney, 
Sr., for one pound, seven: shillings, one acre of land “being part of the tract 
upon which the Meeting-House now stands.” The circuit was incorporated on 
Sept. 1, 1787, as the “United Presbyterian Congregations of Lewes, Cool 
Spring and Indian River.” A second church was-erected in 1794. With the 
passing years the congregation grew smaller and it was closed in 1863 and 
never reopened. 

The interior of the church was beautifully finished with wide panel work 
of the heart of pine and the outside was sheathed with cypress shingles. Within 
the memory of living men the fine woodwork of the church was carried away 
a piece at a time until there is no evidence of the church remaining. There is a 
small graveyard deep in the woods where saplings and brush have grown up 





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WESLEY METHODIST CHURCH, GEORGETOWN 
(Page 290) 


St. PAUL’s P. E. CHURCH, GEORGETOWN 


(Page 289) 








296 Tate Glo UR GH EN Neaiie eo 1) 4 Ie A" Rake 


all over the place. There is one group of graves surrounded by a brick wall 
that was originally three or four feet high but which has crumbled down so 
that one can now step over it. In this plot is the grave of Simon Kollock, Es- 
quire. Mr. Kollock was buried in 1817 at the age of eighty years. It is very 
evident that Mr. Kollock was a man of consequence as his tombstone states 
that he was an elder of the church for forty years which is mute evidence that 
the church was built before 1777. His tombstone also states that he served his 
State in its Judicial, Legislative and Military Departments. Referring to the 
State Archives, we find that he was the Speaker of the Delaware House of 
Representatives in 1782 and that he was Lieut. Col. of the 6th Regiment of 
the Delaware Militia which was a part of the Revolutionary Army. 

It is a pity that someone does not take enough interest to keep these 
graves and their surroundings in good shape as it would cost but little. It 
seems a shame that the grave of a former Speaker of the House and Revolu- 
tionary Officer should be enveloped in a deep forest, unknown and unseen 
except by an occasional gunner. 


The First Seventh Day Adventist Church, colored, of Millsboro, is located 
four and one-half miles east and north of Millsboro. Seven acres of land were 
purchased on Feb. 12, 1924, from Able Ableman. The church was incorporated 
on Sept. 19, 1925. Additional land was purchased from Burton C. Street on 
June 10, 1927. The church was built in 1933, previous to which time meetings 
had been held in private homes. There is a graveyard beside the church. 


Zoar Methodist Church (M.E.) is located at Zoar, four miles north of 
Millsboro. Tradition says that it was founded in the late 1700's and that a log 
church was built.. Both Bishop Coke and Bishop Asbury are believed to have 

preached in this church. 
| On Apr. 22, 1802, Robert Lacey donated one and one-quarter acres of 
land on the east side of the road from his house. The church trustees were 
Wm. B. Ennis, Isaac Atkins, John Morris, Levin Records, Thos. Grice, Bagwell 
Baker, Jos. Morris, Wm. Harris and Wm. Lacey. A cypress-shingle church was 
built. The church was incorporated on Nov. 5, 1810. i 

Another church of similar construction was started in 1894. The corner- 
stone was laid on Dec. 2, 1894, by the Revs. G. L. Hardesty and C. A. Grise. 
This building was burned in 1910. The present building, of cement blocks, 
was started immediately with the Rev. James L. Derrickson, the pastor, doing 
most of the carpenter work. This building was dedicated on Feb. 19, 1911. In 
1805, when camp-meetings were being established, one was built in the grove 
beside the church. The camp was closed in 1919, yet two of the frame cottages 
are still standing. 

There was a small burying-ground to the rear of the church in early 
days but all evidence of it has been gone for more than fifty years. - 


St. John’s Methodist Church (M.E.) is located four and one-half miles 
‘ east of Georgetown. Meetings were first held in private homes and later in 
the Springfield schoolhouse near Springfield Crossroads. They were incor- 
porated on July 3, 1852, as the “Trustees of Johnson’s Society.” They were 
also known as ‘St. John’s M. E. Chapel.’ The one-acre church site was pur- 
chased on July 27, 1852, from James E. Blizzard. The church was built in 
1853. Land was donated on Dec. 19, 1874, by Peter Rust and more land was 
purchased on Aug. 12, 1894, from Chas. H. Joseph. The church was rebuilt 
in 1907. An attractive graveyard is laid out beside the church, the tombstones 
dating back to 1857. 


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Indian Mission Methodist Church (M.P.). Previous to 1880 the Nanti- 
coke Indians worshipped at Harmony Church, pronounced with the accent on 
“mo.” A new preacher was assigned to Harmony Church in the late 1870’s. 
He was of the evangelical type and advocated that the Indians and negroes 
should mingle in every way, including their religious devotions. Part of the 
congregation was willing to do this but another group was bitterly opposed 
to it. The opponents withdrew from the church, in 1881, and built Johnson's 
Chapel, located less than a mile east of Holleyville. The one-acre church site 
was donated on Mar. 27, 1884, by Jesse E. Joseph. The chapel was incorporated 
on May 23, 1915. 

In 1921, a mew church was built and named “Indian Mission M. P. 
Church.” The old chapel was moved to a farm about one-half mile south’ 
where it is used as a farm building. Indian Mission Church with its well-kept 
graveyard would be a credit to any race and here the Nanticoke Indians hold 
their religious services and their community activities. The tombstones in the 
graveyard date back to that of Ann W. Johnson who died on Oct. 7, 1885. 


St. Georges P. E. Chapel, known locally as ‘The Brick Chapel,” is lo- 
cated one and one-half miles n. e. of Indian Mission Church. On May 8, 1706, 
Roger Corbett donated one acre of land upon which to build “a religious 
place of worship.” It was located in Angola Neck on the south side of Love 
Branch. It was subject to a yearly rental of one grain of Indian corn, if de- 
manded. A log church was built that year. 

The Rev. Wm. Becket reported that the first church was finished in De- 
cember, 1719. The frame was of oak, 20 ft. by 25 ft. by 12 ft. high. The 
walls and roof were covered with red oak boards. There was a gallery. In 
1725, the length of the building was increased by 15 ft. This church was 
destroyed by fire in 1792. In 1794, the present church was built of bricks 
burned near the church site. After ninety years service, the walls became 
cracked so that it was necessary to remodel the building in 1883. The height 
of the building was cut down, part of the galleries were removed and the 
entire style of architecture was charged. ‘ 

In 1884, the wall in front of the church was replaced with an iron fence. 
In 1889-90, a new organ was presented by the Guild. In 1911, a new bell was 
presented and new chancel furniture was installed. The tower and porch were 
added in 1916. On June 25, 1916, these improvements and the bell were dedi- 
cated by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman. The church was renovated during the 
summer of 1927. There is a large graveyard in which many prominent Sussex 
Countians are buried. There is a broken tombstone leaning against the front 
wall of the church. It is inscribed to the memory of Thomas Pretyman who 
died on Jan. 3, 1765. This is the oldest inscribed tombstone in the graveyard. 
Mr. Pretyman’s grave is beneath the present church building. 

In recent years the celebration of Rogation Rites has been resumed at 
St. George's Church. Rogation Days in the Episcopal Calendar are the Mon- 
day, Tuesday and Wednesday preceding Ascension Day. This observance, 
started in the fifth century in old England, consists of prayers of intercession 
for a good harvest of the crops being planted. There is a tree at St. George’s 
planted in memory of Bishop Philip Cook. - 


Unity Methodist Church (M.E.). On Sept. 22, 1810, Arthur Milby deeded 
to a board of trustees the land upon which Unity Church is built, at Fair- 
mount. The first church was erected in 1810 and it was rebuilt in 1842. The 
present church was built in 1887. A homecoming service is held each year in 


the fall. 


298 THE GHURGHES(ORVDE LAW ARE 


Conley Methodist Chapel (M.E.) is located one and one-quarter miles 
n. e. of Angola. This church was organized in the Angola schoolhouse and 
was first known as “Angola M. E. Chapel.” They were incorporated on Feb. 
9, 1838, as “Connelly’s M. E. Chapel’ while still meeting in the school. In 
the meantime the name has been shortened to “‘Conley's.” On Feb. 9, 1838, 
Dagsworthy Derrickson donated to the following trustees, D. W. Brierton, 
Arthur Milby, Wm. S. Hazzard, David Hazzard and Wm. S. Vessels, 674 
sq. perches of land as a church site. It was described as being near the road 
to Angola Neck. 

The first church was built in 1838, through the efforts of the Rev. Mr. 
Connelly, a carpenter by trade, for whom it was named. 


The present building was erected in 1876. It was thoroughly renovated in 
1901. More land was purchased on Sept. 3, 1912, from Dagsworthy D. Burton. 
In September, 1944, the building was sheathed with white asbestos shingles 
and the interior was completely renovated. There is a large graveyard enclosed 
with a low wall. The earliest tombstone is over the grave of Mrs. Hannah 
Lynch, who died on Apr. 3, 1862. 


Trinity P. E. Chapel was located on the Long Neck Road south of the. 
Millsboro-Lewes Road. The first services were started in a nearby schoolhouse, 
in 1845. In 1846, the Chapel of the Comforter was built on this site under the 
leadership of the Rev. John A. Childs. The half-acre church site was donated 
by James T. Bayliss, on Feb. 6, 1847, at which time the chapel was under 
construction. : . 


It was a chapel-of-ease attached to St. George’s Church and was conse- 
crated on May 25, 1847, by Bishop Alfred Lee. In 1870, the church was en- 
larged, a recess chancel and a vestry-room being built. At that time the name 
“Trinity” was adopted. The building was improved in 1881 and again in 1890. 

In 1891, a bell was secured and a Bishop’s chair and a priest’s chair were 
installed. New windows were installed in 1904. The steeple was wrecked in a 
wind-storm late in 1916. The last services were held here in 1918. The building 
gradually disintegrated and by 1940 it was flat upon the ground. The all- 
devouring forest swallowed it up and not an echo lingers to whisper of its 
former glory. In the meantime the wood-lot, in which it stood, has been cut 
over and no vestige of the chapel remains. _ . 


Central M. E. Church is located in Long Neck about two miles n. e. of 
Harmon’s School. It was founded in 1867 and the present building was erected 
in 1887. This church was never very strong and in 1937 it was closed forever. 
At the 1941 Methodist Conference it was decided to sell the property. 





supe s M. E. Church, colored, is located about two and one-half 
miles s. w. of Fairmount. The present church was built in 1895. There is a 
small graveyard, and across the road from the church is their bush-meeting 
ground. 








Harmony M. E. Church, colored. This church was organized in 1818. A 
half-acre church site was purchased on Mar. 20, 1819, from Eli Norwood. A 
' church was built and it was located about two and one-half miles west of 
| Friendship Church. They were incorporated on Apr. 21, 1875, while the Rev. 
| T.H. Johnson was pastor. A new church was built in 1891. A half-acre of land 
| for the burial-ground was purchased on June 4, 1915, from Wm. T. Hurdle. 
They also maintained a bush-meeting ground. 


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ST. MaRK’s P 
(Page 294) 
St. GEoRGE’S P. E. CHAPEL 


(Page 297) 








300 LH Eo CHURCH ESS OFS DECAW AR E 


In 1940, the construction of a new church was started, one mile west of 
Harmon's School. The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 13, 1942. The church was 
completed and the opening service was held on Apr. 18, 1943. 

The old church was sold to Wm. D. Burton who moved it away to convert 
it into a dwelling. The large well-kept graveyard was then enclosed with a 
cement-block wall. 

In September, 1945, Mr. Burton moved the old church to the Rehoboth 
Road between Westcoat’s Corner and Midway, to be converted into a dwelling. 


Bethel Methodist Church (M.E.) of Dagsboro was built and dedicated in 
1882. It was located beside the present site of Christ Methodist Church, the 
land having been donated on Aug. 30, 1881 by William Bright of Wilmington 
who owned large tracts of land at Dagsboro. The church was incorporated on 
Dec. 17, 1894. In 1906, the congregation decided to erect a new church and 
selected the site where Bethel Church now stands. They were again incor- 
porated on June 17, 1906 and purchased land at Clayton and Hazzard Sts. on 
Oct. 2, 1906 from John A. Lingo. Part of the congregation wanted to retain 
the old site so they withdrew and joined Vine’s Neck M. P. Church. It was 
then decided to move Vine’s Neck Church to the site presented by Mr. Bright. 
This was done and the two churches stood side-by-side during the building of 
the new Bethel Church. There was considerable friction between the two con- 
gregations during this time. When the new Bethel Church was completed the 
old church was sold, moved away and converted into a livery stable and an ice 
manufacturing plant. These were later burned down. The new Bethel Church 
was dedicated on Sun., Nov. 3, 1906. It was rebuilt in 1925. 


Christ Methodist Church (M.P.) of Dagsboro was organized in 1890. The 
first church was built in Vine’s Neck about one and one-half miles outside of 
Dagsboro and called ‘Vine’s Neck M. P. Church.” They were incorporated on 
Nov. 1, 1898. In 1906, the building was moved to its present location in Dags- 
boro. It was rebuilt, in 1907, and named “Dagsboro M. P. Church.” The site 
was donated on Feb. 6, 1907, by Geo. W. Bright of Wilmington. The name 
“Christ” was adopted in 1940. | ss 


The Church of the Nazarene, at Dagsbéro, was organized on July 30, 1939 
at a tent-meeting in charge of the Rev. W. T. Archer. He was assisted by Mr. 
and Mrs. L. W. Conaway, evangelists. The church was built and it was dedi- 
cated on Nov. 26, 1939. The service was in charge of the Rev. Dr. D. E. Higgs, 
Dist. Supt. He was assisted by the Revs. V. A. Miller, L. W. Savage, Maude A. 
Stuneck and W. T. Archer, the pastor. 


Prince George’s P. E. Chapel, at Dagsboro. There is a tradition that this 
chapel was established in 1706, when a log chapel was built, and that this was 


_teplaced with a frame building in 1738. The chapel was named in honor of . 


the infant Prince George of England who was born in 1738 and who later be> 
Came King George the Third. 

The Church of England was established in the province of Maryland by 
an Act passed by the Assembly on June 2, 1692. This Act provided for the 
method of organization, for the support of the establishment and for the erec. 
tion of churches as well as chapels-of-ease in the respective parishes. 

Previous to the settlement of the boundary dispute between Delaware and 
Maryland, in 1767,\a large section of southeastern Delaware was claimed as a 
part of Maryland and hence in Worcester Parish. On July 8, 1755, the Mary- 
land Assembly passed an Act empowering the vestry of Worcester Parish to 








E-A- Soler Tie ReN +S SoS EX GOL UNG EGY. 301 


purchase two acres of land on the east side of Pepper's Branch near the main 
road and to erect a chapel thereon. The vestry had agreed, on June 9, 1755, to 
erect a chapel here and on July 19, 1755, they purchased two acres of land, at 
Blackfoot Town—now Dagsboro—from Walter Evans. 

On Aug. 12, 1755, James Johnson agreed to build the chapel for 39,200 
pounds of tobacco. On Dec. 2, 1755, Captain Derrickson was directed to buy 
plank to finish the chapel. On Dec. 6, 1756, there was an agreement with Dan- 
iel Hull to lay gallery floors, build wainscoating, two pairs of stairs, a pew for 
strangers and a table, for 20 pounds. On Apr. 14, 1757, the vestry assigned the 
pews and on June 30, 1757, the chapel was completed and was accepted by 
the vestry. 

The church lot is mentioned in a deed from Walter Evans to John Dag- 
worthy, executed in October, 1763. 


About 1780, the chapel was enlarged when a transcept and small sanc- 
tuary were built on the west end. General John Dagworthy was instrumental in 
having this work done. The General and his wife were later buried beneath 
the transcept. At a later date their bodies were reinterred in the graveyard. A 
communion plate inscribed ‘Prince George’s Chapel, Worcester Parish’’ is said 
to have been presented to the chapel by Queen Anne of England. 


The church was inc erated on, June 26, 1790. It was a chapel-of-ease 
for St. Martin's Church®be ow Se byville and the records mention on July 9, 
1791, that the two churches had the same rector. On July 22, 1791, the pay of 
the sexton was set at 7 shillings, 6 pence per year. By the year 1804, Prince 
George's was on a circuit with St. Paul’s Church of Georgetown and Christ 
Church of Broad Creek. On Mar. 15, 1806, John S. Waples was engaged to 
make repairs to the church on a day-work basis. This work was completed at a 
cost of $370.48. A sale of pews to help finance the repairs was held on Aug. 
23, 1806 at which time $80.25 was realized with some pews remaining to be 
sold later. 


The early church records contain a list of the baptisms and lists of the 
communicants starting on June 27, 1790. 


By 1850, the chapel was quite dilapidated, the transcept being entirely 
rotted away. At this time services were discontinued. Beginning in 1865 serv- 
ices were conducted intermittently in the Dagsboro schoolhouse for six years 
or more. 


On Nov. 12, 1893, Bishop Leighton Coleman conducted a reopening 
service. He was assisted by the Rev. L. W. Wells. The chapel had been reno- 
vated. At léast a portion of the interior is still preserved in its original state, 
In 1901-02, the property was fenced in. Repairs were made in 1903. In 1912 and 
1913 annual services were held by the Bishop. There were no services from 
1916 to 1926. 7 


The chapel was repaired in 1928, after which the building was consecrated 
on June 30, 1929, by Bishop Philip Cook. In the old section of the graveyard, 
the oldest tombstone is over the grave of Wm. Hill Wells, Esq., former U. S. 
Senator, who died on Mar. 12, 1829. The building and its surroundings are kept 
in beautiful condition. A low ornamental brick wall, facing the road, was built" 
in 1940. Only annual services are now held in the fall at about harvest time. 

In 1908, a monument in memory of Gen. Dagworthy, was erected in the 
graveyard by the State of Delaware. The presentation was made on May 30, 
1908, by Chief Justice Charles B. Lore and it was received by Gov. Preston Lea. 
In spite of inclement weather large delegations from all parts of the State, 
were present. 


ut) 


fot 


302 TORCE SCHAUER CAH EES ROR. LDDs EL tA AAR 


Lawsonia A. M. E. Zion Church was located in Piney Neck. The church 
site was donated, on Feb. 10, 1896, by Thomas B. Riggin. It has since become 
defunct. 


Antioch A. M. E. Church is located one-half mile north of Frankford. It 
was established in 1856 when the old church of the Antioch Methodist, white 
congregation, was purchased and occupied. They took title to the property on 
Aug. 4, 1857, upon payment of $70.00. On Feb. 28, 1890, one acre of land, 
forming the present church site, was purchased from Millard F. Murray and a 
new church was built. The old church was sold and moved to a site on the 
Highway below Frankford where it is now used as a dwelling. There is a large 
campmeeting ground beside the church where enthusiastic annual meetings 
are held. Electric lighting has replaced the old fire-stands. On Sun. morning, 
Aug. 15, 1943, fire of undetermined origin broke out in one of the cottages. 
Whipped by a high wind, the fire spread to other cottages and to the church. 
In spite of the efforts of six fire companies the church and ten cottages were 
completely destroyed. 

A_new building was erected and was occupied in the early summer of 
1946. The corner-stone was laid on July 26, 1946 by the Rev. G. M. Purnell, 
the pastor. The church was dedicated in the fall of 1946. 

Frankford Presbyterian Church was organized in 1875, when meetings 
were held in the schoolhouse. Land on Reed St. was purchased on Mar. 18, 
1880, from John T. Reed. The church was built in 1880. It was arranged to 
hold the dedication services on Oct. 30, 1881. The church was incorporated on 
Sept. 11, 1894. Land on Thatcher St. was purchased on Mar. 23, 1904, from 
Mary A. Long. - 


Frankford Methodist Church (M.E.) was originally located in a woods 
about one-quarter mile n. e. of the John M. Clayton School on land now owned ; 
by Everett Long. | j 

This site was purchased on Apr. 10, 1819, from Joshua Robinson at a cost 
of $14.3714. The trustees were Arthur Williams, David Hazzard, Stephen Ellis, 
John Hazzard and Percy Pool. The lot measured 78 sq. poles and was part of a 
large tract known as “Security.” The trustees agreed to erect an M. E. church 


immediately which they did. This church was known as “Old Zion” and as : a 


“Antioch.” The church was incorporated as “Antioch” on Mar. 4, 1820. The © | 
road upon which the church faced took the name of Antioch Road. 
When it was decided to build a new church in Frankford, the old church 


~ property was sold to a negro congregation who took the name “Antioch 


a 


A. M. E. Church.” 

The church site, in Frankford, was purchased on Nov. 20, 1852, from 
Jonathan Carey. The corner-stone of the new church was laid on Aug. 28, 1853. 
When the new church was completed, it was named the “Frankford M. E. 
Church.” In 1880, extensive repairs were made and the spire was added. Addi- 
tional land was purchased on June 27, 1881, from Jos. S.. Carey. Repairs were 
made in 1901, and, in 1916, an ell containing a Sunday School room was added. 
There is a graveyard beside the church. The earliest legible tombstone inscrip- 
tion is dated 1868. 


The Church of God at Frankford was organized in May, 1940 and they 
meet in Odd Fellows’ Hall. 


Grace P. E. Chapel, at Baltimore Mills, was located three-quarters of a 
mile north of Omar close to Lamb's Woods. This chapel was built to take the 





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PRINCE GEORGE 


(Page 300) 





304 Te BO GOA OK CSAS Sa Ore Eek i oe Ea 


place of Prince George’s Chapel which had been closed for several years. Meet- 
ings in the schoolhouse, at Baltimore Mills, were started in 1850. The erection 
of a church was started and at a meeting in the nearly completed church the 
parish was organized on May 19, 1852. The church site, of three-quarters of an 
acre, was secured from Wm. Fosque on May 19, 1853. The church was conse- 
crated on May 20, 1853. 

The interior was renovated in 1883. The membership dwindled and the 
church was closed in 1886. By 1894, the church had been seriously damaged by 
vandals. The pews were moved to St. George’s Church and the sale of the build- 
ing was arranged. It was moved away to become a farm building. The site is 
overgrown today but the writer did find two graves with tombstones. They were 
inscribed William Fosque, who died on Mar. 23, 1869 and Janet Jacobs, his 
wife, who died on Oct. 16, 1884. 


Lamb’s Camp. A successful Methodist camp-meeting was held for many 
years in Lamb’s Woods just below Grace P. E. Chapel. About 1921, some of 
the leaders decided to enclose the grounds with a wire fence and to charge ad- 
mission. The fence was cut in protest and this marked the end of that camp. 

Omar M. E. Church was built in 1900 on land donated in January, 1901, 
by Chas. E. West. It was dedicated on Feb. 3, 1901, by the Rev. Vaughn S. 
Collins assisted by the Rev. M. D. Nutter, the pastor. It was closed about 1931 
and was sold to Louis F. Daisey. For a year it was rented to the Grange after 
which it was used as a storage house. In March, 1945, it was rented to Christ's 
Sanctified Holy Church who are still meeting there. 


v © F l 6 . 2 
Daier ort Biatewines Presbyterian Church atone qe ite west of Clarksville 


w 


cane \near the head of Blackwater Creek. There were Presbyterian services held in 


crowd this neighborhood alas to 1967. This church was organized in 1697. This 


Ve . sion of Blackwater Church in 1667. seb Oe was recognized by the synod 
: s YP ° 


ya! until 1921. These meetings were usually for the purpose of granting letters 


P 
p 


on 
0 Everyone buried in the graveyard, that surrounds the church, is related to Sena- 


fact is corroborated by the recdrds of Prince George's P. E. Chapel at Dags- 


piel boro. These records show that Wm. Tunnell resigned from the vestry and from 


e 


his membership in that church in 1967. He became a member of the first ses- 


in 1690. Scharf Hist OLD Hd. -3 


oat be frre. Che: 
t +%. Services were held at Blackwater for many years on alternate Sundays, the bu’ 


v pastor being shared originally with Old Buckingham Church at Berlin, Md., 7b 3 


and ultimately with the Frankford Church which was an offspring of Black- 
water Church. Tce ee 

The church ceased to function regularly in 1856, when the members of 
Blackwater founded the church at Ocean View)’ Occasional meetings were held 


releasing members to other and more active churches. The final touch came at 
the meeting of the Presbytery in October, 1921, at which time the church or- 
ganization was abolished, the Presbytery taking over the physical assets and the 
Frankford Church was appointed as trustees to manage these assets. Charles 
Tennent who became the first pastor of Blackwater was the son of Wm. Ten- 
nent, the founder of the old Log College, later known as the College of New 
Jersey and finally as Princeton University. 

The Tunnell family has always been closely identified with Blackwater 
Church. Wm. Tunnell, a member of the first session, was a direct ancestor of 
former U. S. Senator Jas M. Tunnell and during the entire life of the church 
the Tunnell family was always represented among the elders of the church. 


tor Tunnell by blood, marriage or adoption. Since 1927 a Tunnell family re- 


fF e-em, union has been held each year on the Saturday and Sunday following the 


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Eee INES US) UC aden 305 


Homecoming which is held at Ocean View on a Wednesday in August. One 
of the features of the reunion is a Sunday afternoon service at Blackwater 
Church. The collections which are taken at that service, insofar as they exceed 
the fee paid to the minister, are placed in a special fund to be used for the pur- 
pose of constructing a brick wall around the graveyard. Begun in 1939, the wall 
in front of the church and a portion of one side wall have been completed. 
The tombstones in the graveyard date back to 1850. 

There is an annual service held by the people interested in Blackwater 
Church. It is held in the fall on a date set by the session of Frankford Presby- 
terian Church. 

More land was donated to the church on Nov. 19, 1931, by Ebe T. Murray. 


St. George’s Methodist Church (M.E.) at Clarksville. The first church was 
built on a road, now abandoned, about one mile north of the present church. 
When it was decided to build a new church on the present site, the old church, 
built of hand-hewn timbers, was torn down and used in building a barn on the 
farm of Wm. Steele. The old church benches were used in the new church for 
several years. When the new church was built, most of the bodies were removed 
from the old to the new graveyard. Today, surrounded by trees, only two in- 
scribed tombstones can be found. They mark the graves of John E. Lathbury 
who died on Oct. 21, 1881 and Mary A. Lathbury, who died on Aug. 15, 1876. 

Trustees were elected on Jan. 10, 1879. The present church site was pur- 
chased on Feb. 18, 1880, from John Steele. The church was built and it was 
dedicated in the spring of 1880. The parsonage site at Clayton and Waples Sts., 


in Dagsboro, was purchased on Feb. 3, 1914, from Virginia M. McCabe. The. 


present church was rebuilt in 1928 and greatly improved in 1937. The large 
graveyard is located on both sides of the road. The oldest tombstone the writer 
could find is dated 1853. 


Wesley M. E. Church, colored, is located on the edge of Clarksville. The 
church site was purchased off Dec. 18, 1873, from Miers B. Steel. More land 
was secured on Dec. 1, 1926, from Quimby Walker and on Apr. 6, 1938, from 
John G. Walter. A camp-ground is maintained with services late in July. This 
was the last camp in Delaware to use the old wooden fire-stands for lighting 
purposes. They were replaced with electricity in 1943. 


Millville M. P. Church. This church was incorporated on Aug. 10, 1897. . 


The corner-stone was laid on Sept. 21, 1897. It was dedicated on Feb. 13, 1898. 
There were three services which were conducted by the Revs. F. T. Little, J. L. 
Straughn and J. McLean Brown. The church ceased to function in 1910. It is 
now used as a social-hall by the M. E. Church, having been purchased by the 
Gleaner’s Club on Oct. 29, 1938. 


The Church of Christ, Disciples, of Millville. This congregation was in- 
corporated on Mar. 27, 1922. They purchased the old M. P. Church on Apr. 
26, 1922. The church became defunct and sold the property on Oct. 29, 1938. 


Millville Methodist Church (M.E.) was built in 1907. The old Dist. No. 
180 school lot was purchased on Aug. 3, 1907. The Gleaner’s Club purchased 
the old M. P. Church on Oct. 29, 1938 and it is used as a social-hall. 


Ocean View Presbyterian Church was founded, in 1856, by a group of 
members from Blackwater Church. The use of an acre and one-half of land was 
given by John Hall. The corner-stone was laid on July 5, 1856, and the church 


* ot 
Cha eel ‘ 


- 





306 Mab UR Chae 1) AW. AOR 


was opened for services in the fall of that year. The corner-stone of the present 
church was laid on July 2, 1907, and the dedication service was held on Dec. 1, 
1907. The title to the site was deeded to the church by Mr. Hall's daughter, 
Elizabeth A. Evans, on Aug. 14, 1909. There is a large, well-kept graveyard. 
The oldest legible tombstone is that of Mary P. Hall who died on Oct. 3, 1838. 
This is probably a reinterment. 


The Christian Church, Disciples of Christ at Ocean View. This congrega- 
tion was organized in 1880, when a church was built at Bayard. Trustees were 
elected on Oct. 20, 1881. The first church was burned; a second church was 
built and it was also burned. A church site in Ocean View was purchased on 
Apr. 22, 1899, from James M. Evans. It was stipulated that there should be no 
cemetery. The present church at Ocean View was built in 1901 and rebuilt in 
1940. Their ritual includes baptism by immersion which leads many persons 
to refer to them as Baptists. 


Mariner’s Bethel Methodist Church (M.E.) was organized in 1859 and a 
frame church was built. It was incorporated on Feb. 14, 1878 and again on May 
3, 1894. Four acres of land were purchased on June 16, 1894, from Elisha Evans. 
The corner-stone of the present church was laid on July 14, 1898 and the 
building was completed in 1899. It was rebuilt in 1904. Additional land was 
purchased on May 8, 1906, from Mary H. Townsend. On July 21, 1930, Geo. 
W. Mitchell donated a small strip of land to the church. 

There is a large graveyard to the rear of the church, the tombstones dat- 
ing back -to 1862. During the night of Sun., July 19, 1942, the steeple was 
struck by lightning, ripping off shingles and doing considerable damage. Some- 
time later, the spire was removed. 


St. Martin’s P. E. Church at Bethany Beach. Although meetings have been 
held in Bethany Beach by the Episcopalians since 1914, a church was not built 
until 1940. The erection of St. Martin’s Church was begun in May, 1940. The 
first service and the dedication were held on Sun., Aug. 4, 1940. 

The Christian Church, Disciples of Christ Tabernacle at Bethany Beach. 

About 1900, a group of members presented to the church, sixteen acres of land 

at Bethany Beach. The tabernacle, which was then built, is of similar design 

to the study of Alexander Campbell, one of the founders of the church. For 

a number of years Chatauquas were held here. At the present time the taber- 

nacle is used during July and August to accommodate various group confer- 

ences from the Capital Area of the church, which includes the church at Ocean 

View and fifty-one other churches. More land was donated on April 30, 1923 

by Hiram J. Penrod. A large two-story building was: erected near the taber- 
i n wacle, in 1939, to be used as a dormitory and dining-hall. 


“fie 
Res Zion Methodist Church (M.E.) at Roxana. The first church was built in 


39 and was named “Sound M. E. Church.” It was known to Many persons 








as “Centerville Church,” that being the name of Roxana until 1872 gc pres- . 8 
ent site, measuring 40 sq. poles was secured on ay 21, > from,Nathaniel Capt. | 
W. Evans. At that time the trustees ef ound Church were Isaac C@ West, 
Wm. Ro Tibbs, Zadoch P. Collier and Kt W. Evans. 
A second church was built and if was dédicated on May 2, 1858, by the 
Revs. Robt. L. Dashiell and Alfred A. Cookman. The present church was built 
in 1874. The corner-stone was laid on Tues., Apr. 21, 1874, by the Revs. T. O. 
Ayers and J. A. Arters, the pastor. It was arranged to dédicate the church on 


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FRANKFORD METHODIST CHURCH 
(Page 302) 


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BLACKWATER PRES. CHURCH, NR. CLARKSVILLE 
(Page 304) 





308 torrie Con OO RiGee le Soe tsa eh, Ae 


July 26, 1874, with the Revs. J. B. Mann and Wm. F. Talbot in charge. The 


name ‘‘Zion’’ was chosen to distinguish it from Union Sound Church east of 
Williamsville. The church was rebuilt in 1921. The schoolhouse, a short dis- 
tance south of the church was purchased from the State B. of E. on Nov. 22, 
1935. It was rebuilt for use as a church-house and was opened on July 1, Pa 
Additional land for the cemetery was purchased on April 8, 1942, from Wilmer 
S. Evans. Ft aww (ida, , nob et 19 63, 


Roxana Pilgrim Holiness Church was organized after two series of tent- 
meetings in a nearby grove. The church was built, in 1928, on a plot of land 
donated, on Nov. 24, 1928, by J. Frank Lynch, for that purpose only. In 1941, 
when the road in front of the church was widened, the State allowed them 
damages and moved the church across the road to a new site purchased on 
May 26, 1941, from Chas. E. Richards. A new wing, containing a Sunday 
School room and a new tower were added to the church. The Lynch land was 
returned to him on Aug. 5, 1941. The church was incorporated on June 30, 
1942. A new parsonage was built in 1942. 


Christ’s Sanctified Holy Church. This-church was incorporated on Aug. 
1, 1896, with Chas. H. Lynch, Wm. S. Hickman, Joshua J. Stephens, Abisha D. 
Cooper and Chas. F. Hudson as trustees. They held their meetings in different 
member's homes for nine years. On Mar. 17, 1905, Orlando B. Lynch donated 
a church site on his farm at Long’s Ridge. A frame church was then built and 
occupied. In 1944, the members decided to seek a new site for their activities. 
The church and lot then came into the possession of Dory Evans who rented 
the building out as a warehouse. 

Christ's Church then held their meetings in a former schoolhouse at Bay- 
ard for about eight months. Late in March, 1945, they rented the former Omar 
M. E. Church from Louis F. Daisey and they are still meeting there. 


Salem Methodist Church (M.E.) at Selbyville. A Methodist Society was 
organized, in 1789, in the home of David James Murray, on his farm, one and 
one-half miles n. e. of Selbyville. This was the birthplace, at a later date, of 
the Rev. W. L. S. Murray, D.D., prominent in Methodism. The farm is now 
owned and operated by Joshua L. Murray. s 

In the spring of 1790, a basket-meeting was held in the grove at Sandy 
Branch, opposite, the present Red Men’s Cemetery, at which time 28 persons 
were convened) sehbe: Sieiee and Hagcchoal was then built ‘in the 
grove. The inside was unfinished, had a fireplace for heat, used light-wood for 
illumination at night services and the benches were made of slab wood with 
holes bored in them for inserting legs. The church was incorporated on Feb. 


28, 1833. Fifty-two poles of land, were donated on Nov. 2, 1833, by Milburn , 


Murrayf@ his wife Rebecca in censideratice” ofSj,0o te cach of them deeded 


the Solem Mecting Hease te them usith the prevision thet It cculd also be used 


& Scheel hewThe second church was built in 1849 near Sandy Branch on the land of 


Zeno Long. He deeded the site for the church to the trustees on May 3, 1849. 
Tallow candles were used and some of the old ladies would light their pipes 
from the candles for a “drag” on the way home. There was a gallery for the 
negroes who would nearly raise the roof with their shouting. In the mean- 
time, the town of Selbyville had sprung up a |, 19 1883, a third church was 
built in town. The old church was sold to ME fo who used it as a barn. It 
was in use until about 1935 when it was burned. ¢&, Gunti's ) 


In the new church chandeliers holding oil lamps were used. Land was 
purchased, on May 5, 1886, from Wm. R. McCabe and on June 19, 1895, from 


as 


(7 ERAN SEITE RONG S"UCS SUBLMA UCSOUUINGT Yi 309 
\e i¢ 

Wm. S. McCabe. In 191, this building was moved to the opposite end of the 
lot and\tised as a school for the younger grades. Title to the half-acre former 
public school plot adjoining the church property was secured on Feb. 5, 1915. 
The old church which had been moved to this plot was dest gyed by fire in 
October, 1922X The present stone church was built in file! te was dedicated 
by Bishop Hamilton and Dr. Krantz on Sun., July 14, 1912. A new parsonage 
was completed at the same time. A reopening service was held in 1934. Fou 


bth Cort 


\ 


ST 


young men have gone out from Salem to become ministers. Rav: Geog A. Campbei/, 


“Rev . Wi Las: iat » Rev. Joshua Melkbe ) Rev. WS. Matthews, Howard 


elbyville M. P. Church was the outgrowth of tent-meetings started in the 
fall of 1909. A church site was purchased on Mar. 10, 1910, from Jacob M. 
Holloway. Meetings were continued in the tent until 1911 when a large 
church was built on Duke St. This church was destroyed by fire on Sun. eve- 
ning, Jan. 28, 1923 and it was not replaced. 


Selbyville P. E. Mission. In June, 1946, a group of Episcopalians in Selby- 
ville started to hold regular meetings in Pomeroy’s Log Cabin with the inten- 
tion of establishing an Episcopal Mission and building a house of worship. 


_ Zoar M. E. Church, colored, is located on the outskirts of Selbyville, on 
the road to Roxana. This church was organized in 1883. They purchased a one- 
acre church site on May 13, 1884, from James R. Bishop. This church was lo- 
cated on the Selbyville-Head of Sound Road and was named Long’s A. M. E. 
Chapel. “to Fenuich Rd, 

The present one-acre site was purchased, on Oct. 24, 1924, from Philip 
C. Showell and the church was moved across the fields to the new site. The 
name “‘Zoar’’ was then adopted. On Oct. 5, 1929, the Balto. Trust Co. donated 
a strip of land 25 ft. wide as an outlet for the property. 





Calvary Holy Church, colored, hold their meetings in an old schoolhouse 
about two miles east of Selbyville. 


Williamsville M. P. Church was organized in 1905 and a church was built 


on the edge of the town. This church was destroyed by fire in August, 1910. A 
new church was built on the same site. It was closed in 1913. The building 
was sold to the Mechanic’s who moved it into the center of the town where it 
was put in use as Mechanic's Hall. In 1945, the building was converted into a 
dwelling. ae 


A Church of the Sanctified was built in Williamsville in the fall of 1892. 
It was located where Lynch’s Hatchery now stands. The building was destroyed 
by fire on July 10, 1894 and was not rebuilt. 


Sound Methodist Church (M.E.) is located a short distance east of Wil- 
liamsville. The first church was built in 1784 and was located at Johnson's Cor- 
ner where the Johnson family graveyard is located. The first church was built 
through the efforts of Freeborn Garrettson, the horseback-riding early mis- 
sionary of Methodism. | | 

Mr. Garrettson preached here for the first time on Apr. 3, 1779. He 
preached again on June 2, 1779 and he mentioned in his Journal that the Bap- 
tists were very active in this section, head of the Sound, 

The church site was donated, for 20 shillings, on Apr. 29, 1784 by John 
Robinson to Solomon Evans, Arthur Williams, Andrew Williams, Wm. Powell 
and Ezekiel Williams of Sussex County and James Law, John Aydelott, John 
Dier and John Coe of Worcester County, Maryland, trustees. The site “stood 


Wa rréa - 


310 TALE "CyVH UTR AC HOES OWS LES. oA ACR 


at the head of a small gulley making into the Branch called and known by 
the name of Indian Town Branch” and comprised “one acre more or less.” 

The deed specified “that a preaching-house or chapel for the use of the 
Methodists or those of the Clergy of the Church of England that are friendly 
thereto.” It also specified that any vacancies in the board of trustees should be 
filled by the surviving trustees and that their number should be kept up to nine 
trustees forever. The deed was witnessed by Rackiffe Conner, Robert Wild- 
goose and Thomas McGee. It was acknowledged in Common Pleas Court on 
May 5, 1790, at which time Nathaniel Mitchell was the Prothonotary. 

This church had two doors, one for the men and one for the women who 
were seated on opposite sides of the center aisle. At the end of the services the 
minister would dismiss the congregation. Only the professed Christians would 
remain in the church, then the doors would be closed and a class-meeting would 
be held. 

Francis Asbury attended a Quarterly Meeting at Sound on Oct. 23, 1787. 
He preached there on Oct. 26, 1790. In his Journal he mentions Bro. Williams. 
Services were held without interruption until 1806 when they were discon- 
tinued for one year. Trustees were elected on Sept. 28, 1807 and the name 
Williams’ M. E. Chapel, Head of Sound” was adopted. After this, the build- 
ing was repaired and services were resumed. In 1829, the church was rebuilt. 

A new church was built on the present site, -adjoining Dist. School No. 
30, in 1870. The quarter-acre site was donated, on Jan. 16, 1871, by Charles 
Collins to James Brasure, Jacob H. Brasure, Ed. W..McCabe, John R. Macolum 
and James L. Brasure, trustees. The deed mentions that the meeting-house had 
been erected and that it was called “Union Sound M. E. Church.” It also de- 
scribes the site as being on the road to Finicar’s Island, which probably was 
Fenwick Island, misspelled. 

On Sept. 2, 1911, the school plot, adjoining the church was purchased 
from the Commissioners of School Dist. No. 30. On Feb. 5, 1924, James M. 
Gray donated one acre of land for cemetery purposes only. This plot is located 
on a dirt road a half-mile east of the church and includes the Gray family 
graveyard. Up to the present time it has not been utilized as the church grave- 
yard, most of the interments being made at the Roxana Church cemetery. 

The church was destroyed by fire on Dec. 11, 1937. An altar rail around 
which Freeborn Garrettson had conducted revivals was burned. During the - 
construction of a new church services were held in the Red Men’s Hall. 

The church was Hedictked on Sept. 4, 1938, with the pastor, the Rev. John 
E. Jones, in charge. At the morning service the collection of money to pay all © 
of the bills incurred was in charge of U. S. Senator John G. Townsend, Jr., 
and needless to say it was successful. The sermon was preached by Dist. Supt. 
Dr. John J. Bunting. In the afternoon the Rev. Otis P. Jefferson preached 
and Governor Richard C. McMullen made an address. The evening sermon 
was delivered by the Rev. John Graham, a former pastor. 

+ Early in 1947, the congregation secured the old White Oak schoolhouse 
and moved it to a site close to the church. It was then remodeled for use as a 
church-house. : ; 

In the grove beside the church a camp-meeting was held each year, until 
1927, when it was discontinued. 

a\ members 

Sound Baptist Church was organized on Aug. 12, 1779, at the Head of 
Sound. During the first thirteen years of its existence, six young men were 


schooled for the ministry. No church was ever built and the congregation Ay 

3 5 ie: went out of existence. Qnd (4 Dh. Chirncl iy Bw. | 
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THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 
PART V 


WESTERN SUSSEX COUNTY 


Central M. P. Church was located on the Shawnee Road three miles s. w. 
of Milford. It was founded by the Rev. John Lee Straughn of the Harrington 
M. P. Church. The land was donated on May 1, 1894 by Orren Fenner and a 
tabernacle was built. After building up a good membership a church was built 
in 1895, the lumber from the tabernacle being used in the construction. After 
thirty years, interest lagged, and the church ceased to function. The building 
was sold, in 1938, and torn down. 


Lebanon M. E. Church is located at Staytonville. This village was called 
Tea Town until Feb. 26, 1851, when the name was changed to Staytonville by 
an Act of the General Assembly. A one-acre church site was donated on Mar. 
26, 1840, by John W. Stayton. The Tea Town M. E. Church was incorporated 
by the General Assembly on Feb. 19, 1841, with Pemberton Clifton, James 
Stayton, Wm. H. Stayton and Burton Prettyman as trustees. It is natural to 
Presume that a church was built previous to this time. The present church was 
built in 1873 on land donated on May 4, 1873. The church was greatly im- 
proved in 1895. During the past 20 years the church has had a rather check- 
ered career. During the 1930's, it was operated as an undenominational church. 
In October, 1940, Mrs. Paul F. Barkley started holding regular meetings. These 
services were discontinued on Jan. 1, 1942. There is a graveyard to the rear 
of the church. The two oldest tombstones are over the graves of Susan Hayes, 
who died on July 26, 1805 and James B. Stayton, who died on June 15, 1807. 
The Church-House of the Conservative Amish-Mennonites is located one- 
half mile n. e. of St. Johnstown on the Shawnee Road. A short distance away 
is the day-school for their children. This Congregation was organized in 1916 
and met in the Carlisle School. The meetings were later transferred to the barn 
of Nevin V. Bender. On Oct. 22, 1918, during the influenza epidemic, two 
girls, Sarah Schrock and Lizzie Bawel passed away. The Congregation’s need 
for a burial-ground was thus made apparent. The present site was imme- 
diately purchased from Noah L. Swartzentruber and the two interments were 
made. The deed was executed on Apr. 7, 1920. As the Congregation grew it 
was decided to proceed with the building of a church-house. The church-house 
was completed and was dedicated on July 4) 1920. In the front part of the 
building there is a small room equipped ‘as a nursery. It includes a crib and 
‘tiny bunks built in a tier against one partition. The ministers, who receive no 
pay, are chosen by lot from a group selected as eligible for the post. This Con- 
gregation has a Bishop and a minister. The number of ministers varies from 
two to four for each Congregation. They are disciples of Menno Simons, a 
religious reformer, who lived in the Netherlands from 1492 to 1561. He 
sought to imitate the humility and nobility of Christ. His followers took the 
name of Mennonites about 1536. The movement spread over Central Europe 
but they were persecuted because of their refusal to perform army service. 
They were then welcomed into Russia by Catherine II but toward the end of 
the Nineteenth Century they.were ordered to do army service or leave the 


AY AL sat ASTIN IRE ne RENE. Nts AA I sushnascn oe ee Hs 











a 


314 PoE CHU RCH BE Sego Far E LA WAR ie 


country. Difference of opinion has resulted in the formation of several sects. 
They are noted for their industry, thrift and avoidance of publicity. 

The men of this congregation wear straight-front coats, no ties, black 
shoes and stockings while the wearing of beards is optional. They do not ap- 
prove of radios or of any instrumental! music, either in their churches or their 
homes. They have a fire-aid system under which a fire-loss is replaced by assess- 
ments upon the members. 

A new church-house, built of brick, was started early in 1947. It is to 
the left and rear of the present frame building. 


Pergamos P. E. Chapel was located on the present farm of Wm. H. Car- 
lisle, on the Shawnee Road, about a quarter-mile above St. Johnstown. The 
chapel was built of brick during 1782-83. In 1786, Wm. Laws deeded three- 
quarters of an acre of land upon which the church stood for the use of the 
Episcopal Church. The deed stipulated that the land was to revert in the event 
that the church was closed. On Sept. 3, 1810 the church was incorporated. The 
building was one-story, 25 ft. by 30 ft. with a high ceiling. A few years later 
services were discontinued. Today the site is part of a cultivated field with 
nothing to mark the location of the old chapel. 


Macedonia A. M. E. Church of St. Johnstown. This church was located 
on Shawnee Road, just north of St. Johnstown, and adjoined the lands of Wm. 
J. Carlisle and J. D. Knowles. The congregation purchased 84 perches of land, 
on Jan. 1, 1894, from Warren B. Fowler. A church was built and a graveyard 
was laid out. This graveyard is still in use. 

This congregation became established in Greenwood in 1902 at which 
time the Macedonia church building was moved to the new site where it is 
used as a social-hall. 


St. Johnstown Methodist Church (M.E.) is located one mile east of Green- i uo 
wood on the old King’s Highway. A village named St. Johnstown was located 


at this point and is mentioned in the records as early as 1776. Situated on the © 


route of the stage-coach lines, there were two inns, several stores and numerous — iy ; 
homes. When the Delaware Railroad was built, in 1856, the town of Green- 
wood was laid out and St. Johnstown declined into a ghost town. Only two — 


houses are there today and one of these is reputed to have been used by Patty — 
Cannon in her slave-stealing and slave-selling trade. 

St. Johnstown Church was the outgrowth of meetings held in the woods | 
near this spot, by an old local-preacher named John Marim. Meetings were 
held in the home of Wm. Laws under the inspiring preaching of Francis As- 
bury in 1779. A one-acre church site was secured from Wm. Laws, on Feb. 24, 
1786, “where a preaching-house now stands.” Francis Asbury mentions St. 
Johnstown and Mr. Laws in his journal of Mar. 17, 1780 and again on April 
13, 1815. The church was incorporated on Mar. 5, 1822. The property was 
deeded to the new trustees on Mar. 15, 1822. 

A new building was completed and was dedicated on Sept. 29, 1872, by 
the Revs. Jacob Todd and L. C. Matlack.- Extengive improvements were made 
in 1895. Sixty perches of land were purchased on Mar. 6, 1909, from Jas. H. 
Davis. The church was incorporated on Mar. 31, 1934. Two acres were added 
to the graveyard in 1934. A dedication service was held on Sat., Sept. 8, 1934, 
at which time Judge Earle D, Willey was the speaker. The church was refur. 
nished in. 1938. There is a well-kept Bravevird eRPiactd with an iron fence. 
The oldest tombstone is dated 1855. 


AVS, 


ST. JOHNSTOWN METHODIST CHURCH 


(Page 314) 


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TRESSLER MENNONITE CONG 
(Page 316) 











316 TARE CH OR OOH SROReOE DAW ut hee 





Tressler Mennonite Congregation holds its meetings at Owens, four miles 
east of Greenwood, in a former district school-house. This Congregation was 
organized in April, 1935. In the meantime Wm. Tressler of Greenwood had 
purchased the old school at Owens. Mr. Tressler died in December, 1934 and 
when the Congregation was organized, his heirs presented the building to the 
Congregation who have renovated the building and adapted it for their uses. 
The basic discipline of the Mennonites and the Amish is essentially the same, 
the chief difference being in reference to dress and worldly affairs. This Con- 
gregation is less strict in this regard than the Amish-Mennonites on the 
Shawnee Road. They send their children to the public schools. 


Oakley Methodist Church (M.P.), at Oakley, was founded in 1898. On 
Aug. 30, 1898, Joshua Hemmonds donated one-sixth of an acre of land as a 
church site. The church was built in 1900. They were incorporated on Mar. 
31, 1902. More land was donated on Oct. 8, 1926, by John L. Banning. In 
1931, the church was closed with the building sadly in need of repairs. In 
1937, Virgil C. Littleton, a local-preacher of Georgetown, secured permission 
from the M. P. Conference to reopen the church. After personal calls on many 
families in the neighborhood, Mr. Littleton reopened the church on Jan. 2, 
1938. Stressing Sunday School activities in order to attract the young people 
Mr. Littleton was having good success. In 1939, a violent windstorm tore one 
side of the church loose from the building. In the meantime repairs were 
made. Because of the large number of young men serving in the armed forces, 
the church was closed in 1943 and the Sunday School was closed in 1944. 


There is a well-kept graveyard, with modern tombstones, beside the 
church. The oldest tombstone is that of Jeremiah Webb who died on July 
26, 1853. This is probably a reinterment. 


Union Methodist Church (M.E.) is located one mile east of Oakley, then — 
two and one-half miles north on a dirt road. There is a small graveyard and ~ 
the entire site is surrounded by a grove of trees. The oldest tombstone in the 
graveyard is dated Feb. 26, 1874. This congregation was organized and a — 
church, named “Smith’s Chapel,” was built in 1821. It was named for David — 
Smith who donated the site on June-29, 1821. The corner-stone of the present _ 
church was laid on Dec. 14, 1873. The dedication services were held on May . 
3, 1874, when the. name “Union” was adopted. For fifty years it was an active 
influence on the people of that neighborhood. In the meantime, the early 
members died off, a new elemént began to buy the farms and the young peo- - 
ple, if interested at all, attended the town churches: A prominent member of 
Union Church advanced this theory to the writer—‘that the passing of the 
country schools heralded the downfall of the small country churches. The 
children, taken by bus to the town schools, educated by town teachers became 
town-minded and wanted to go to town for everything. The result was that 
athe attitude of the children influenced the parents in this respect—a little child 
‘shall lead them.” | 

Previous to this, the little schools would have their activities, many of 
which would be staged in the small churches because of the music available. 
Thus the parents would be drawn to the church and a general interest in the 
church would be maintained. Union Church was improved in 1902. With only 
a few families interested in the church, not enough to finance its operation, 
the church was closed in 1939. The church was reopened on Mar. 21, 1943, 
with preaching every second Sunday and Sunday School on the alternate 
Sundays. 


Wad FERN OSU S'SEXS CO EN Tov eh iyi 


Greenwood Methodist Church (M.E.). In 1880, the residents of Green- 
wood who were members of St. Johnstown Church became dissatisfied with 
having to walk a mile to attend services. A movement to erect a chapel in 
Greenwood was successfully completed. The site was purchased on Nov. 17, 
1880, from Simeon Pennewill. The church was dedicated on June 28, 1880, 
by the Rev. R. W. Todd. 7 
| The corner-stone of the present church was laid on June 13, 1901. It is 

also known as the “Church of the Good Shepherd.” On Sun., July 4, 1943, the 
airplane spotters of this district were honored with a special service, the first 
such service on record. The church was incorporated on Nov. 26, 1889, Nov. 
3, 1902 and on June 8, 1922. 

A new electric organ and memorial plaque were dedicated on Sun., Apr. 
7, 1946 by the Rev. Dr. T. C. Mulligan, Dist Supt. Melvin L. Brobst was the 
guest organist. A tower music system was dedicated on Sun., Mar. 2, 1947 by 
the Rev. James O'Neil, the pastor. He was assisted by the Revs. S. Bradley and 
R. C. Graham with Mrs. J. Anthony at the organ. 


Grace Methodist Church (M.P.) at Greenwood was founded im 1880. The 
church site was donated by Simeon Pennewill on Aug. 7, 1880. The corner- 
stone of a church building was laid on July 25, 1880. It was dedicated 
on Aug.. 8, 1880, by the Revs. J. M. McFadden, J. E. Nicholson and 
Thomas Moore. The church was incorporated on Oct. 4, 1902. The present 
church was erected in 1903 and was dedicated in October of that year. On Dec. 
2, 1903, at 12:20 P. M., there was a rear end collision between two freight 
trains at Greenwood. The wreckage caught fire and shortly thereafter there 
was a terrific explosion, presumably a car load of explosives. Hardly a house 
in Greenwood escaped damage of some sort, three were set afire amd one was 
burned down. The recently rebuilt M. P. church was severely damaged. The 
Delaware Railroad paid for repairing the church. The name “Grace” was 
adopted in 1940. 


Lutheran meetings at Greenwood have been held in private homes since 
1914. During 1927-28, the meetings were held in the schoolhouse at Owens. 


Graham A. M. E. Church, at Greenwood, purchased the old M. E. build- 
ing and moved it to its present site. This site was purchased from Simeon 
Pennewill on June 2, 1900. The church was dedicated in 1902. The social- 
hall, to the rear of the church is the old Macedonia church building. In the 
top riser of the cement steps of the church there is a marble tablet listing the 
fourteen brothers and sisters who contributed to the erection of the steps. 


Epworth Methodist Church (M.E.) is located four miles north of Dublin 
Hill. It was built in 1906, under the leadership of the Rev. W. R. Mowbray 
who was stationed at Bridgeville. He built, with his bare hands, almost all 
of the building. In early life in addition to teaching school Mr. Mowbray had 
learned the brick-mason, lathing and plastering trades. He personally did all 
of this work on Epworth Church. The site was donated on Apr. 25, 1906, by 
Robert Priestley. The corner-stone was laid and the church was dedicated at 
an all-day service held early in October, 1906. 


Trinity Methodist Church (M.E.) is located two miles west of Dublin 
Hill. It is claimed that the first church was built in 1843. On Jan. 4, 1861, 
Lewis N. Wright donated a half-acre church site which was described as being 


She st re T_T ie 


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318 THE GH UR CAESMOF UDELL AWAR E 


on the road toward Roger Adams’ steam-mill. It was agreed that the trustees 
would erect a church. Ninety perches of land were donated on May 15, 1867, 
by Hugh Martin. A new church was completed and was dedicated on Sun., 
Aug. 25, 1867, with the Rev. J. S. Willis in charge of the services. Trustees 
were elected on Dec. 14, 1870. In 1885, the church was destroyed by fire and 
a new church was built immediately. It is beautifully situated in a well-kept 
clearing with magnificent trees and a good lawn. 


Trinity M. E. Church, colored, is located about two miles n. w. of Dublin 
Hill on a dirt road. It was built in 1886. On Mar. 3, 1897, Isaac K. Wright 
donated land to the church. The church was remodeled in 1925. 


St. Mary’s P. E. Church at Bridgeville. Episcopal services were started in 
Bridgeville, in 1888, in Patton’s Hall. St. Mary’s Mission was organized and 
their first service was held on Mar. 31, 1889. The Ladies’ Guild was organized 
in May, 1889. Land on Church Alley was purchased on Nov. 6, 1889, from 
Richard W. Cannon. On Feb. 22, 1892, Hue Martin, M.D., donated additional 
land to the church. The corner-stone of the present church was laid on Mon. 
evening, May 25, 1891, by Bishop Leighton Coleman. The completed building 
was consecrated on Sept. 29, 1893, by Bishop Coleman as a memorial to Bishop 
Alfred Lee. It was named “The Memorial Church of St. Mary.” Holy com- 
munion was held at 7 A. M. by the Rev. M. L. Woolsey. At 10:30 A. M. the 
Bishop conducted the service assisted by the Revs. J. Leighton McKim and 
Eugene Griggs. The Bishop consecrated the church-yard at 3:30 P. M. The 
lectern was a gift of St. John’s Church in Wilmington and the main doors 
were presented by the family of Bishop Lee, | 

A bell was secured in 1895-96. The church-yard was enclosed with a 
fence in 1905-06. In 1906-07, a Bishop’s chair was presented by Mrs. M. C. 
Jacobs in memory of her daughter. New pews were installed in 1907-08. _ 

_ The erection of a parish-house adjoining the church was started in 1946, 
It was first used for Sunday School purposes on March 2, 1947. On Wed. of - 
Easter Week, 1911, a service was held in Greenwood. * ee 


Union Methodist Church (M.E.) at Bridgeville. In 1777, a Methodist 
Society was formed in the home of Robert Layton. This Society continued in 
existence and Union M. E. Church was built in 1805. The church site, de- 
scribed as being located in the Village of Bridge Branch, was donated on Mar. 
11, 1805, by Thomas Sorden. It was one of the early Methodist churches in 
Sussex County. The church was incorporated on Aug. 11, 1853. A new church 
was completed and was dedicated on Nov. 27, 1853, by the Revs. Solomon 
Higgins and Peter J. Cox. A new building was erected in 1871. The present 
church was completed and was dedicated on Nov. 3, 1889. Improvements were 
made in 1920. A new Sunday School room was added in 1933. In 1938, a new 
, organ was installed. On July 24, 1942, at 10:30 P. M. fire was discovered in 
‘the steeple but it was subdued without serious damage being done. 


The First Presbyterian Church of Bridgeville was started immediately after 
the Civil War. They were incorporated on Mar. 3, 1866. A church was built 
and it was dedicated in Mar., 1866 by the Rev. Alex Gulic. The church site 
was donated by Abraham G. R. Hale on Aug. 18, 1869. After functioning 
for fifty years, the congregation became so small that the church was sold, in 
1917, to the Tuesday Night Club. This is an organization of Bridgeville women. 
In 1919, they instituted a circulating library. | 


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GREENWOOD METHODIST CHURCH 
(Page 318) 


(Page 317) 








320 DAE. C HU RC Hel Se Ba DiE Dif WAAIR EB 


The Baptists held meetings in Bridgeville in 1907. 


The Apostolic Holiness Union of America at Bridgeville. They purchased 
a site on Walnut St., on Feb. 9, 1609, and built a church. They were incor- 
porated on July 22, 1910. The property was bought by the Georgetown B. & L. 
Assn. at a Sheriff's sale. It was purchased by the Wesleyan Pentecostal Church 
of the Nazarene on Feb. 18, 1914. This church had been incorporated on Jan. 
17, 1914. They sold the property to the Pilgrim Holiness Church on Sept. 29, 
1926. This church had been incorporated on Dec. 12, 1924. They became 
defunct and sold the property to Alex. Tatman on Oct. 21, 1931. 


There are two colored churches in Bridgeville. Mt. Calvary M. E. Church 
was built in 1908. They were incorporated on Apr. 1, 1911. They purchased 
land from Fred L. Willey on June 30, 1916, from Chas. W. Pullet on Aug. 27, 
1918 and from the State Board of Education on Jan. 25, 1924. Macedonia 
Holy Church of God was built in 1907. Wm. W. White donated land to 
them on Nov. 17, 1921 and on Jan. 21, 1922, they purchased a property from 
Luther Rust. 


Mt. Olive Baptist Church, colored, met in a former schoolhouse one and 
one-half miles below Bridgeville. They were organized in 1938. Previous to 
that time the building was occupied by a Holiness group for about a year. 


Gravelly Branch Primitive Baptist Church was located at Coverdale’s 
Crossroads. It was organized on July 30, 1785 and met in the home of John 
Willis. In 1788, a revival was held. On Sept. 16, 1801, one-half acre of land 
was conveyed by Samuel Lafferty to a board of trustees and a church was built. 
By 1880, the church was only a memory. 


McColley’s Methodist Church (MLE.) is located one-quarter of a mile 
west of the Highway on the road to Redden Forest. The church site was 
donated on May 20, 1857, by James Redden. The first church was built, in 
1858, through the efforts of the Rev. Truston P. McColley, for whom it was 
named. The dedication was arranged for Sun., Oct. 24, 1858. A new church 
was built in 1898. The reopening service was held on July 10, 1898, by the 
Revs. J. S. Willis and A. D. Davis. A window in memory of the Rev. T. P. 
McColley, a gift of P. T. Hart, was unveiled on Apr. 16, 1899. There is a well- 
kept graveyard beside the church, the tombstones dating back to 1859. 


Onin’s M. E. Chapel, better known as “Gulley Swamp Chapel,” was lo- 
cated two and one-quarter miles north of Coverdale’s Crossroads. The site was 
donated on Mar. 1, 1844, by Tilghman Layton and the chapel was built during 
that year. Services were held until 1860. At that time the membership trans- 
ferred to Chaplain’s Chapel. There was a camp-ground beside the chapel and 
camp-meetings were held until more recent times. There js no evidence of the 
“amp today and the chapel was moved away to become a farm building. 


Russell M. E. Church was located one mile east of Chaplain’s Chapel. This 
church was built in 1848 and was active until 1860. At that time Gulley Swamp 
Chapel united with the members of Russell Church to build Chaplain’s Chapel. 


Chaplain’s Methodist Chapel (M.E.) is located two and three-quarters 
miles north of Coverdale’s Crossroads. Previous to the erection of this chapel 
the members had met at Onin’s Chapet and Russell Church, both of which 


WOE Sele UN OS U* 57S EX CIOS LENT Y aon 


were abandoned when Chaplain’s Chapel was built. The land was donated 
by Charles Macklin and Fisher Willis. A board tent was erected and it was 
dedicated on July 17, 1859. The erection of a chapel was started on July 23, 
1859. It was completed and dedicated in 1861. The chapel was named for the 
Rev. John S. Chaplain, the minister in charge of the church. There is a small 
graveyard beside the church. The tombstones date back to Apr. 9, 1870. 


Nanticoke Hundred A. M. E. Church. This church was located four miles 
east of Bridgeville on the road to Redden Forest. The half-acre church site 
was secured from James L. Sharp, on Feb. 13, 1867, upon the payment of 
$10.00. A church was built and it was quite active for several years and then 
was abandoned. There is nothing to mark the site which was close to the 
present home of John Donovan. Mr. Sharp was a famous teller of “tall tales” 
and was given the nickname of “Lying Jim Sharp.” 


Cokesbury Methodist Church (M.E.) is located three miles east of Cover- 
dale’s Crossroads. The first building was erected, partly of logs, in 1803. On 
Dec. 17, 1803, Wm. Swain donated a church site on the road from Evan’s 
Saw Mill to Deep Creek, to a board of trustees. They, in turn, agreed to erect 
a building to be used as an M. E. Church and a day-school. When this school 
was opened, it became the first free school in that neighborhood. The church 
was incorporated on Nov. 22, 1816. 

When it was decided to build a new church a deal was arranged with 
Walter Swain whereby he gave them the present site of 60 perches in trade 
for the old church and site. The new church was completed and was dedicated 
on Nov. 26, 1869. Mr. Swain’s deed to the church was executed on Jan. 
31, 1871. 

There is a large cemetery across the road from the church. Land was 
purchased on June 10, 1893, from Noah Isaacs, Sr., with four burial plots ex- 
empt. The ornamental gateway of frame construction was built in 1915. The 
oldest tombstone is dated 1865. 


Pepper’s M. E. Church, located two and one-quarter miles west of George- 
town, was organized and incorporated on Mar. 17, 1894. The church was then 
built and on Oct. 13, 1894, the property was transferred to a new board of 
trustees. During a heavy storm on Feb. 21, 1912, it was blown down. A new 
chapel, on a site closeby, was completed and was dedicated on Feb. 16, 1913, 
by the Rev. James L. Derrickson, who did most of the carpenter work him- 
self. The one-acre site was donated by the Georgetown Land Co., on Mar. 22, 
1913. It was closed in 1929, the building was sold and is in use on a nearby 
farm. | 


Hebron Methodist Church (M.P.) is located six miles east of Coverdale’s 
Crossroads. The church was organized in the schoolhouse where it was in- 
corporated on Apr. 16, 1888. The church site was secured from John A. Day, 
on Oct. 24, 1888, with the understanding that the church would be built im- 
mediately. Through lack of interest the church was closed in 1933. Through 
the efforts of Virgil C. Littleton, a local-preacher, the church was reopened 
and is making some progress. There is a graveyard beside the church, the tomb- 
stones dating back to 1889. 


Cannon Methodist Church (M.P.) was incorporated on Oct. 4, 1902. The 
church site was donated by James W. Ward on Nov. 19, 1902. The church was 
built of frame, in 1903. This building was destroyed by fire and the present 


plete. akan . 


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522 TH EG HU RCA SaOl ke eD EE AW AR 


church was built of cement blocks in 1924. The dedication service was held 
in April, 1925. 


Brown's M. E. Church was located a short distance north of Hearn’s Mill. 
This church was incorporated on May 1, 1883. The church site was donated on 
June 30, 1883, by Kitty Cannon. The church was built in 1883 and was dedi- 
cated on Oct. 6 of that year. The building was improved in 1895. Interest 
waning, it was closed in 1933. On Oct. 29, 1933, it was reopened as a Pilgrim 
Holiness church. In 1936, it was closed forever. It was sold in 1937 and in 
1939 it was torn down, the lumber being used in building a cottage at Re- 
hoboth Beach. 


Middleford M. E. Church was located about two hundred yards north 
of the highway at Middleford. The old graveyard with a single vault and sev- 
eral tombstones can still be seen, overgrown with brush and briers. David 
Smith donated this land, on June 29, 1821, upon which a chapel was built and 
the graveyard was laid out. The site was described as being located on the road 
from Milford to Concord and the building -was to be used both as a church 
and a school. The Methodists and the Presbyterians both met in the church. 
This, apparently, did not suit some of the Methodists and on Jan. 25, 1827, 
Thomas Townsend donated town lot No, 31, at the corner of Gay and Oak 
Sts., measuring 120 ft. by 140 ft. as a site for a new Methodist Church. 

Mr. Townsend died on Feb. 22, 1827 and because he had died within 
twelve calendar months after executing the deed and because of the small con- 
sideration mentioned in the deed, some doubt was expressed as to the validity 
of the deed. To remedy this, on Feb. 4, 1833, the General Assembly passed an 
Act “for quieting and conferring the title to the trustees of the church.” No 
church was built on the new site and in 1846 the Methodists took full charge 
of the first church. When Brown’s Church was built in 1883, the church was 
closed and turned over to a negro congregation. | . 

Mr. Townsend’s grave is marked with a well-preserved tombstone. One 
gathers from the inscription that during the last few years of his life he was 
in a very feeble condition. The single vault is the grave of Eliza Stuart, who 
died on Oct. 12, 1831. 


Shiloh M. E. Church, colored. When the white Methodists at Middleford 
moved into Brown’s Church, in. 1883, they turned the Middleford Church over 
to Shiloh Church. New trustees were elected on Nov. 24, 1908. By 1918, the 
building had become so dilapidated that the church was dissolved and the 
building was torn down. ; . 


St. Mary’s P. E. Chapel was located on Chapel Branch, west of Seaford. 
It was built in 1704 and was closed during the Revolution. It was reopened in 
.1791 and became defunct a few years later. St. Mary's was last mentioned in 
‘the diocesan records in 1803. | 


St. Luke’s P. E. Church at Seaford. The first Episcopal services in Seaford 
were held in 1834, by the Rev. Joseph Glover, in a union meeting-house. Mr. 
Glover died the following year and the Rev. Cory Chambers took over the 
work. He organized the parish in 1835. It was incorporated on Feb. 20, 1837. 
The erection of a brick church was commenced in 1838. It was completed and 
was consecrated on May 28, 1843, by Bishop Alfred Lee. The land was do- 
nated by Dr. John Gibbons. Dr. Gibbons was an eminent physician and the 


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(Page 322) 


McCOLLEyY’s METHODIST CHAPEL, 
(Page 320) 








324 J fh oO SN, OY AR EL SOLOS UN NS AN ie ORS SR) Bio AL 9 BE Ca 2 


name ‘St. Luke's’ was selected in honor of the apostle who was known as the 
“beloved physician.” 

On Apr. 24, 1872, Wm. H. Ross donated land at Third and Front Sts. 
to the church. A communion service was donated by Miss Laura Wright. 
The rectory was completed in 1872-73. In 1886, a recess chancel, an organ 
chamber and a vestry-room were built and new pews were installed. An organ 
was presented by the wife of the Rev. Edward Wootten, the rector. Addi- 
tional land was purchased on Nov. 24, 1890, from Wm. Skellinger. 

In 1890-92, a pipe-organ and a heater were presented by Colonel Ross. 
Bishop Leighton Coleman consecrated the churchyard on May 30, 1893. In 
1896-97, a desk and lectern were installed. Extensive improvements were made 
in 1905. The rectory, at Arch and Poplar Sts., was purchased on Sept. 6, 1918, 
from John R. Eskridge. Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman conducted a service of 
benediction, at the rectory on Nov. 3, 1918. 

The parish-house was built in 1931 and it was dedicated on St. Luke’s 
Day, Oct. 18, 1931, by Bishop Philip Cook, assisted by the rector, the Rev. 
John R. Crosby. On St. Luke’s Day, 1937, a plaque in memory of Dr. Crosby 
was unveiled in the parish-house. More land was purchased on Feb. 28, 1941, 
from Sheriff E. J. Suthard. 

During 1943, the church walls were strengthened by the building of con- 
crete abutments outside of the church. On Sun., Oct. 17, 1943, a national em- 
blem was dedicated to the memory of Capt. Charles S. Rogers, by Bishop A. R. 
McKinstry. The 100th Anniversary of the church was celebrated at this time. 
On Oct. 18, 1943, at 10 A. M. an addition to the graveyard was dedicated by ) 
Bishop McKinstry. 

There is a large graveyard surrounding the church and former Governor 
Wm. H. Ross is buried here. Close to the rear of the church is the grave of 
the Rev. Richard F. Cadle, who died on Nov. 9, 1857. He was the founder of 
St. Mark’s Church and had won fame as a missionary in the mid-west. The 
earliest tombstone is dated June 20, 1821. 


| Bochim’s M. E. Meeting-House was first located on Chapel Branch and 

faced the main road to Seaford. On Aug. 8, 1804, Jonathan Cannon and 
Jeremiah Rust Jackson donated an acre of land upon which it was agreed to 
erect a Methodist Meeting-House. The writer is of the opinion that this was 
also the site of St. Mary's P. E. Chapel, built in 1704, from which Chapel Branch 
took its name. The 1804 deed describes one of the lines as “passing between 
the old chapel and the mill pond.” 

On June 5, 1817, the chapel was incorporated as “Wesley M. E. Chapel,” 
with the following trustees: Wm. Davis, Henry Little, John Allen, Sr., James 
Conwell and John Allen, Jr. The chapel was described as being located at - 
Chapel Branch on the road to Crauche’s Ferry. Bochim’s Meeting-House on 
Chapel Branch was used until 1818. In 1831, it was sold to the Methodist 
Protestants and moved to Seaford. - 

On Apr. 29, 1818, James Conwell donated to the Bochim’s Meeting- 
House trustees a church site on Front St., extending from Second to Third 
Sts., in Seaford. The.deed stipulated “that a meeting-house for public and 
evangelical worship should be erected and a burying-ground laid out.” More 
land was purchased from Henry Little on May 12, 1830. The church was in- 
corporated on Dec. 27, 1841. A new church was erected in 1860 and the old 
building was sold to a negro congregation. The name “St. John’s” was adopted 
in 1870 in honor of the Rev. John L. Taft, the retiring pastor. 

On July 25, 1863, Mary Cannon donated a lot on Cannon St., as a par- 
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(Page 324) 


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BETHEL METHODIST CHURCH, OAK GROVE 
(Page 330 











226 PHE GHOR GHESMO RY D bE ww ARE 


Church was purchased on Nov. 2, 1889, from Minos H. C. Wilson. The ad- 
jacent lot was donated on Sept. 6, 1889, by Caroline Hallowell as a parsonage 
site and the parsonage was built during that year. 

Ground was broken for the present church on Apr. 27, 1897, with the 
Rev. R. K. Stevenson, in charge. The bell, a gift of the Junior Epworth League 
was erected on Dec. 11, 1897. The dedication services were held on Jan. 2, 
1898, with Mr. Stevenson, in charge. A pipe-organ was installed in 1905. The 
church was incorporated on May 2, 1929 and on May 3, 1929, land adjacent to 
the church lot was purchased from Parker R. Knowlton. 

In 1934, the church was rebuilt and the entire building was brick- 
veneered. The corner-stone was laid and the dedication services were held 
on Oct. 28, 1934, by the Revs. W. J. Duhadaway, W. E. Habbart and R. D. 
Bisbee. It is a large edifice and contains thirty rooms. 

After moving into their new church in 1898 the old Bochim Meeting- 
House, on Front St., was leased to Jesse N. Wright who operated a shirt fac- 
tory there. Later, he built an ice-house, at which time many of the tomb- 
stones in the burying-ground were destroyed. Mr. Wright converted the shirt 
factory into Seaford’s first movie theatre. The buildings were destroyed by fire 
on Christmas Eve, 1910. 

A few of the tombstones still remain, the oldest being that of Leonard 
H. White, who died on Apr. 9, 1837. Death struck the Coulbourne family a 
stunning blow in 1842, tombstones recording the deaths of Sally on Mar. 15, 
Chas. R. on Apr. 1, Amanda on Apr. 2 and Wm. H. on Apr. 3. The Log 
Cabin of Nanticoke Post of the American Legion occupies a part of the site. 


Mt. Olivet Methodist Church (M.P.) of Seaford. In 1831, this congre- 
gation purchased the old Bochim Meeting-House at Chapel Branch and moved 
it into Seaford. It was placed on a portion of the Hooper burying-ground, 
which is still the church site. This burying-ground was laid out for his family 
by Thomas Hooper, the first owner of the present site of Seaford of whom 
the county has any record. Ais : ie | 

The church was incorporated on Feb. 13, 1847. A new church was built 
in 1862. The present brick church was built in 1897. The old church was used 
for the last time on May 29, 1898. The new church was dedicated on June 5, 
1898, by the Rev. F. T. Tagg, D.D., assisted by the Revs. D. W. Austine and 
F. T. Little. All of the windows were memorial windows. A new organ was 
used for the first time on Easter Sunday, 1911. The organ was entirely rebuilt 
and was used for the first time on Sun., July 22, 1945. 

Among the old and interesting tombstones in the cemetery beside the 
church, the earliest is over the grave of Molly Tennent, who died on July 
17, 1793. She was one of Thomas Hooper's daughters, 


The Church of God at Seaford was organized in 1929 and the church 
_ was erected in 1930. The church site was purchased on June 11, 1930, from 
Chas. H. Coulbourn, ~ } 


A Lutheran Mission at Seaford was opened in the spring of 1940. The 
meetings are held in the Log Cabin. 


St. Mary’s R. C. Mission was opened at Seaford, where a store-room on 
Pine St. was fitted up as a church. The first Mass was said here in April, 1938. 
A church site on Du Pont Road at Broom St. was donated to the Catholic 
Foundation of the Diocese of Wilmington by Leroy B. Hurley on July 6. 1939. 


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(Page 332) 
CENTENARY METHODIST CHURCH, 








328 THEO CH UR GH ESROTED E\LIALAAIE 


It was made a separate parish on Jan. 1, 1945, by Bishop Edmond J. 
FitzMaurice. 


Seaford Baptists. On Aug. 2, 1883. Angeline Vaughn donated a lot at the 
cor. of Hall St. and Harrington Ave., to the Del. Baptist Union upon which to 
build a church. The deed stipulated that the church should have an end gallery 
and if it was not built within fifteen years, the land should revert. No church 
was ever built. 


There are three colored churches in Seaford. The Church of God was 
built in 1935. It was gutted by fire on Dec. 30, 1941 and was replaced by a 
larger church. John Wesley M. E. Church was founded in 1879. Land was 
purchased on May 26, 1881, from Annie K. Cannon and on Sept. 22, 1924, 
from Geo. W. Wright. On Dec. 5, 1930, the Seaford Special School District 
donated the school property adjacent to the church, so long as it should be 
used as a community-house. The congregation of the Macedonia A. M. E. 
Church purchased the frame church building from Bochim’s Meeting-House 
and the church was established in 1861. The quarter-acre church site was 
purchased from Spencer Blocksom on Apr. 18, 1862. The church was rebuilt 
in 1879 and again in 1915. 


Blades Methodist Church (M.E.) was originally called ‘“Bladesville M. E. 
Church.”” The first church was built in 1871-72 and was located on Concord 
Road. The site was donated on Oct. 7, 1871, by James M. Blades. It was also 
called “Cannon’s Chapel.” They were incorporated on July 16, 1877. The old 
graveyard still remains and the oldest tombstone is that of John E. Taylor, 
who died in 1883. 

On Nov. 15, 1887, a lot was secured on Main St., from Leonard J. 
Blades, and the corner-stone of a new church was laid on Dec. 7, 1887. It was 
dedicated on Jan. 13, 1889 and named “Gregg” in honor of the pastor. Those 
taking part in the services included the Revs. C. W. Prettyman, W. J. Duhada- 
way, J. H. Howard and W. E. England. The church was again incorporated 
on Jan. 26, 1921. The work of rebuilding the church was started in 1921 and ~ 
the corner-stone was laid on Jan. 1, 1922. The church was rededicated on 
June 18, 1922 and the name “Blades M. E. Church” was adopted. The service 
was in charge of Bishop John W. Hamilton, assisted by Dist. Supt. W. R. 
Mowbray. 

The Ladies’ Aid Society purchased a lot on w. 4th St., on Aug. 22, 1928 
from the Allen Pkg. Co. A large social-hall was built on this site. The name 
“Blades Methodist Church” was adopted in 1940. 


A Church of the Nazarene was organized at Blades on Oct. 13, 1940. A 
new church building was finished in 1941. The church site, on ,w. 4th St., 
vhad been donated, by Wm. F. Allen, on Dec: 7, 1939. 


Concord Methodist Church (M.E.) at Concord was organized in 1804. 
On Aug. 24, 1804, Robert Boyce conveyed to a board of trustees one-half of 
an acre of land upon which a church had been built. The interior of the 
church was never plastered and, in 1841, it was torn down and rebuilt. In 
1870, a new church was built and it was dedicated on Oct. 9, 1870. Those 
taking part in the services included the Revs. J. B. Merritt, Jacob Todd, J. O. 
Sypherd and J. B. Mann, the pastor. The church was incorporated on Nov. 
22, 1872. A parsonage for the circuit was purchased on Pine St., in Seaford, 
on Dec. 23. 1896 from Tames H. Bovce. 


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(Page 338) 
(Page 339) 


Si: 
ALL SAINTS’ P. E. CHURCH, DELMAR 














330 BHE’ CHUR GHEE SSO FADE LW ARE 





The church was remodeled, after which a reopening service was held on 
Sept. 12, 1937, by Dist. Supt. E. C. Hallman and the Rev. Louis Dennis, the 
pastor. The church bell hangs at the rear of the church on a framework of 
galvanized pipe. This is the only arrangement of this kind that the writer has 
seen in Delaware. There is a large graveyard, the tombstones dating back to 
1862. In August of each year a home-coming is held here and many sons 
and daughters of Concord return for a visit. 


Mt. Calvary A. M. E. Church at Concord was built in 1872. Trustees were 
elected on Oct. 10, 1874. Additional land was purchased on June 9, 1893, 
from Wm. Graham. The church was rebuilt in 1894 and in 1921. Land was 
donated to the church on Aug. 4, 1903, by Eliza Jane Stuart and on Feb. 1, 
1922 by Joshua A. Ellegood. 


Gethsemane Methodist Church (M.P.). This church is located at Reli- 
ance, formerly known as Johnson’s Crossroads. The first church was built, in 
1835, on land granted by Tyrus Phillips. A half-acre of land was donated, on 
Nov. 13, 1850, by Tyrus S. Phillips. A new church was built in 1851. It was 
incorporated on Feb. 17, 1853. A third church was built in 1872. It had two 
stories and the second floor was used for a lodge room. An opening service 
was held on Nov. 17, 1872. This building was dedicated in 1889. The parson- 
age lot was purchased on Feb. 15, 1890 from Geo. H. Huston. 

When the Rev. Thomas Wheeler was assigned to Gethsemane Church, 
he seriously objected to any part of a church building being used for secular 
purposes. He enlisted so many followers that a fourth church, the present one, 
was erected, in 1904, with no lodge room. This church was dedicated, in 
1905, by the Rev. Thomas Wheeler. Extensive renovations were made in 
1941, including the installation of electric lighting. There is a social-hall be- 
side the church. 


Bethel Methodist Church (M.E.) is located one mile north of Oak Grove 
on the western boundary line of Delaware. On Oct. 23, 1780, White Brown 
donated one acre of land, a part of his holdings called “Canaan,” to Hum- 
phreys Brown, Wm. Ross, John Flowers, Henry Smith, Thos. Lyton, A. S. 
Hitch, Thos. White and Edward White, trustees. They agreed to erect ‘a 
preaching-house for the use of Methodist preachers or the friendly clergy of 
the Church of England.” The chapel was built in 1781 and was called 
“Brown's Chapel.” 

Lemuel Davis, a local-preacher, and Jacob Kinder are credited with as- 
sisting in the building of the chapel and their descendants have ever since 
been numbered among the leading members of the church. The Rev. Mr. 
Davis was known for his popularity and for the large number of marriages 
that he performed. At one of these, the groom failed to give Mr. Davis any 
compensation. About one month later the minister met the man and re- 
: marked pleasantly to him: “You did not think to present me with anything 
for the service I rendered you recently.” The groom replied with great emo- 
tion: “Mr. Davis, if you will unmarry me, I will pay you double.” 

The building was of frame construction with galleries on three sides 
and was not fully completed until 1806. On Mar. 5, 1807, it was incorporated 
as “Bethel Church.’ More land was purchased on Oct. 11, 1871, from John 
W. Twiford. The present church was built in 1894. Land was secured from 
James A. Lowe on July 22, 1920. A large, well-kept cemetery adjoins the 
church. The oldest tombstone is over the grave of Mary Davis, who died on 
Mar. 8, 1815. A short distance south of Bethel Church an the enad tn A.L 


FOE SPE RN SUS SEX SOOUR NET. Y a Sh 


Grove an original Mason and Dixon boundary stone can be seen close to the 
side of the road. 


Wesley Methodist Church (M.E.) is located three miles s. w. of Atlanta. 
This congregation was organized in the local schoolhouse. On Nov. 18, 186192 
half-acre church site was donated by Henry Little. The deed stipulated that the 
building should also be used as a day-school for the white children of School 
District No. 138. A small church was built and it was called “Little’s Chapel.” 
A half-acre of land was donated on June 1, 1882, by Wm. W. Dashiell. A 
new church was erected in 1882 and it has a particularly pleasing background 
of trees. The dedication services were held on Sept. 23, 1883 and were con- 
ducted by the Revs. W. Underwood and J. B. Mann. 

The district schoolhouse was donated to Wesley Church by the Seaford 
Special School District on Dec. 5, 1930. It is located to the rear of the church, 
facing on another road and has been converted into an attractive social-hall. 


Bethel Methodist Church (M.E.) at Bethel was originally called ‘‘Sailor’s 
Bethel.” Bethel, known as Lewisville until 1880, was quite a seafaring village 
with several shipyards and many sea captains. The church was organized in 
1852 and a building was erected in 1855. A new church was built in 1884 and 
it was dedicated by the Rev. J. B. Quigg. The church was incorporated on 
Oct. 12, 1887. The present church was dedicated in February, 1895. The old 
church is now on the farm of J. Garfield Moore. The church was incorporated 
on Oct. 20, 1932. There is a large graveyard, the tombstones of which date 
back to 1814. 


St. John’s M. P. Church, at Bethel, was built in-1858. The present build- 
ing was erected in 1884. Jonathan Moore, upon his death in 1890, bequeathed 
a half-acre of land adjoining the church Pe erty as a parsonage site. The 
old church is now on the farm of J. Garfield Moore. Services were discon- 
tinued in 1902. The building was then purchased by the Ladies’ Aid Society 
of Bethel M. E. Church and converted into a social-hall. The adjoining grave- 
yard is still used for interments. , 


Mt. Lebanon Methodist Church (M.P.) at Portsville. Portsville Chapel 
and Academy was organized in 1832 and a frame building for church and 
school purposes was erected about one-half mile west of the present site. This 
church site was secured from James H. Phillips on Apr. 30, 1832 and the 
deed was executed on Feb. 21, 1834. 

The present church was built, in 1868, on land donated by James W. 
Phillips and the name “Mt. Lebanon” was adopted. Land in the village was 
secured on Feb. 4, 1869, from Isaac G. Phillips and on Aug. 1, 1874, from 
Jesse Wright. The church was incorporated on Jan. 21, 1911. It was rebuilt 
in 1920 and again in 1935. There is a small graveyard, the earliest tomb- 
stones of which are dated 1875. | 


Mt. Calvary M. E. Church, colored, at Portsville. On Sept. 6, 1861, Sam- 
uel Spencer donated 15 perches of land, s. w. of Portsville as a church site. 
This church was known locally as “Spencer’s Chapel.’’ On Mar. 10, 1900, they 
purchased the old Dist. No. 162 school property on the southern edge of 
Portsville and moved the church building to this site. 


Woodland Methodist Church (M.E.) is located beside the broad Nanti- 
‘ coke River at Woodland, which was known for many years as “Cannon's 


PEN Ei LION ys RIT ah ac tne pe ee 











332 TOBE 4 CH URC HBS GOW) (DCE LAAN WAARRGE 


Ferry.’ Here, is located the only :ntrastate ferry in Delaware, under the 
supervision of the State Highway Department. The ferry is a flat-boat of 
two-car capacity, powered by an automobile engine. It is guided by a steel 
cable that sinks to the bed of the river when the ferry has passed. It is oper- 
ated from sunrise until sunset and there is no charge for crossing. 

On Dec. 10, 1832, Isaac and Jacob Cannon donated the site to Canton 
M. E. Church with the provision that the church would then be built. It was 
incorporated on May 18, 1833 and again on June 13, 1843. 

A new church was erected in 1883. In 1941, it was remodeled and the 
reopening service was held on Sept. 21, 1941. It has a county-wide reputation 
for its fine fish-fry and fried-chicken suppers which are served in the social- 
hall beside the church. In the graveyard there is a walled-in plot of the Nichol- 
son family, the stones of which date back to 1811. This is undoubtedly an 
instance of a church being built beside a graveyard. 


Wallace M. E. Chapel was organized and met in Quinton’s School, be- 
tween Laurel and Cannon’s Ferry. They were incorporated on Mar. 4, 1881. 
No church was ever built. 


Mt. Zion Methodist Church (M-E.) is located on the Du Pont Highway 
three miles north of Laurel. The original church was built on the road to 
Bethel. The congregation was organized in 1809. On May 19, Matthias and 
Charles Moore deeded 81 square perches of land at Manlove’s Grove to a 
board of trustees headed by Elzy Moore. The church was built and was 
called “Elzy Moore’s Meeting-House,” until 1825, when it was given the 
name “Wesley Chapel.” The building was of frame construction. In 1852, 
the chapel was torn down and the congregation divided; one group organized 
Sailor’s Bethel at Bethel and the second group organized Mt. Zion Church. 
For a short time the second group met in a district schoolhouse. 

The present church site was donated on Jan. 8, 1853, by Wm. Wheatly. 
A church was erected during that year. In 1872, the church was extensively 
repaired. A rededication service was arranged to be held on Nov. 3, 1872, by 
the Rev. Messrs. Wm. Urie, J. B. Mann and Ridgeway. The church was in- 
corporated on Oct. 31, 1881. | 

Four acres of land, opposite the church, were secured from Robert T. 
Spicer on Oct. 4, 1918. The present church was built in 1921 and was dedi- 
cated on June 11, 1922. The old church was moved to the opposite side of 
the road where it is used as a social-hall. There are two graveyards, one to 
the rear of the church and one north of the social-hall. | 


Christ Methodist Church (M.P.), at Laurel, was Organized in 1831. The 
first meetings were held in the schoolhouse. The first church was built in 
1832 and a graveyard was laid out. It was located on West St., just west of the 
railroad where the old graveyard can still be seen. The oldest tombstone is 
that of Susan Townsend, who died on April 28, 1852. The church was dedi- 
cated by the Rev. Samuel Rawleigh. It was not plastered until 1841 at which 
time the benches without backs were replaced with comfortable seats. The 
church was incorporated on Feb. 4, 1843. sale 

On May 14, 1866, a new church site on Wheat St.—now Central Avenue— 
was purchased from Geo. B. Phillips. The new church was completed and 
was dedicated on Nov. 10, 1867, by the Revs. J. J. Murray, R. Semple Rowe 
and L. W. Bates, D.D. The old church was sold to a negro congregation and 
moved to a new site. More land beside the old graveyard was purchased on 
Mar. 4, 1881, from Joshua H. Marvil. 





FIRST METHODIST CHURCH, DELMAR 
(Page 340) 





Curist P. E. CHURCH, CHIPMAN’S POND 
(Page 342) 





334 THE CHG RGAE SO BeDLErL ARE 


Property on the cor. of 6th and Central Ave., was purchased on Apr. 10, 
1884, from Edward L. Wolfe. Additional land was purchased on Feb, 26, 
1887 from Wm. J. Hitch. Land on 6th St. was purchased from Martha A. 
Hearn on Mar. 23 and on Oct. 27, 1911. The present stone church was built 
in 1911 and was dedicated in 1912. 


Centenary Methodist Church (M.E.) at Laurel. This church was an out- 
growth of a most successful revival meeting held at Mt. Pleasant Church in 
1801. The number of converts was so great that they were divided into sev- 
eral groups which met ‘at their leaders’ homes. George Adams, who lived on 
the edge of the present town of Laurel, was one of the leaders who took 
charge of a large group. His home was located about one-quarter mile south 
of the Odd Fellow’s Cemetery gate. It was burned quite a long time ago. 
The scoffers called it “Daddy Adam’s House of Glory.” This group decided, 
in 1802, to build a frame church in Laurel. 


The church was incorporated on Aug. 14, 1809, as “Zion Meeting- 
House.” A lot was purchased, on Sept. 9, 1809, from Thomas and Eleanor 
Skinner at a cost of $100.00. It was located at Back and Corn Sts., being the 
present church site. In the meantime the street names have been changed to 
Poplar and Market Sts. The building had a gallery on three sides, no heat 
and was lighted by pine knots placed in earthen scones. It had an extremely 
high pulpit, the benches were hewn planks with no backs and the altar was 
also built of hewn planks. This church was called “Old Zion.” In 1833, a 
new frame church was built on the same site. It had a rear gallery, was 
heated by stoves and was lighted with oil lamps. It was called “New Zion.” 

The old church was given to a negro congregation who worshipped in it 
until 1866, when they secured a second building from Centenary Church, | 
after which the old church was used as the first negro schoolhouse in Laurel. 


It served this purpose until the County built a new negro school. The old 


first church was used for various purposes until 1924, when it was torn down. 


In 1866, a new church was framed on the lot of Isaac W. Sirman. The 
former church was sold to a negro congregation. The new building was moved 
to the church site and completed. It had a high spire, the Sunday School and 
classrooms were located on the first floor and the church auditorium was on 
the second floor. The dedication services were held on Feb. 24, 1867, with’ 
the Rev. Alfred A. Cookman in charge. At this time the Methodists were 
preparing to celebrate the centennial of Methodism and it was decided to call 
the new church “Centenary.” The first pipe-organ was installed in 1895. The 
last service was held in this building on July 23, 1911, with the Rev. George 
C. Williams in charge. The lumber salvaged from the church was used to 
build houses on State St., in Delmar. 

Ground was broken for the present stone church on Sept. 10, 1911. The 
corner-stone was laid on the afternoon of Dec. 17, 1911, by the Rev. Dr. 
George P. Jones, Dist. Supt., assisted by the Revs. Samuel McWilliams and 
George C. Williams. While the church was under construction services were 
held in Bacon’s Hall. The church was completed on Sept. 15, 1912. It was 
dedicated on Sept. 22, 1912, following a full week of services. The baptismal 
font was a gift of Dallas Marvil in memory of his father, former Governor 
Joshua H. Marvil. There is a large enclosed cemetery beside the church, the 
tombstones dating back to the 1850's. After extensive renovations, in 1942, 
the church was reopened on Sept. 6, of that year. 

The*church was incorporated on July 13, 1943. On Nov. 2, 1943, addi- 
tional land was purchased from the Farmer’s Bank. It was announced on 


PS ESS REMCEN ed CSS ee OU Ie ae 335 


Feb. 7, 1947 that the church intended to proceed with the plans to erect an 
educational and recreational building on Market St., beside the church. 


St. Philip’s P. E. Church at Laurel. The first Episcopal services in Laurel 
were held in 1834, by the Rev. Joseph Glover in a meeting-house conducted 
on the union plan. Mr. Glover die¢ shortly thereafter and the mission was 
closed. In 1836, the Rev. Cory Chambers started a Sunday School. A dispute 
arose over the name of the Sunday School and it was closed in 1837. 

The church site was purchased from Jonathan A. Hearn on Apr. 8, 1847. 
St. Philip’s Church was built, in 1848, to serve more conveniently the mem- 
bers of old Christ Church at Chipmaa’s Pond. The church faced 6th St., with 
a graveyard toward Central Ave. It was dedicated on May 22, 1850. In 1870, 
a lot was purchased upon which to build a rectory. Land was purchased on 
May 11, 1871, from James H. Tyre. The corner-stone of the present church 
was laid on June 5, 1874, by Bishop Alfred Lee. The old church was sold to 
Geo. E. Smith who used it as a theatre for three years. It was then moved to 
Spruce St., and converted into a double dwelling which is still in use. The 
bodies in the graveyard were reinterred in Odd Fellow’s Cemetery. The church 
was consecrated on Tues., May 17, 1887, by Bishop Boone of China. 

A parish-house was built in 1890-91. During that year a lectern was 
blessed to the memory of G. W. Horsey. Altar rails and a Bishop’s chair were 
also installed. In 1891-92, two memorial windows were unveiled. On Sept. 
27, 1896 Bishop Leighton Coleman blessed a new altar and reredos presented 
by the children of Mrs. S. E. Giles. In 1901-02, a new organ was presented by 
the Ladies’ Guild. In 1908-09, St. Helena’s Guild presented a silver alm’s basin 
in memory of Miss Emily F. Hearn. On Apr. 27, 1913, Bishop Frederick J. 
Kinsman consecrated a pulpit, presented by St. Helena’s Guild, in memory of 
Bishop Coleman. 

In 1914, the church was shifted to a new position on the lot, the parish- 
house was moved and a new rectory was built. It was occupied on Sept. 14, 


1914 and on Oct. 5, 1914, a service of benediction was conducted by Bishop 


Kinsman. In 1925, the church was rebuilt and the entire structure was brick- 
veneered. A service of dedication was held at 11 A. M. on Sun., Nov. 8, 1925, 
with Bishop Philip Cook officiating. More land, on Central Ave., was pur- 
chased on Sept. 29, 1934, from the Sussex Trust Co. 

The present parish-house was built in 1936, by Mrs. Harry Kandall Fooks, 
in memory of her husband. It was dedicated on St. Mark’s Day, Apr. 25, 1937, 
by Bishop Philip Cook. He was assisted by the Rev. Robert Y. Barber, th 
rector. . 


The Wesleyan Church of the Nazarene. The Union Gospel Mission at 
Laurel was organized, in 1919, by the Rev. J. G. Chamberlain. They purchased 
the third floor of the Odd Fellow’s Hall where they held their services. 

The Wesleyan Church of the Nazarene was organized at a tent meeting 
held on Delaware Ave., near the cannery, on July 16, 1920, by the Revs. J. ¥: 
Maybury, and W. D. Shelor. On Sept. 4, 1920, the Union Gospel Mission, 
“the lawful owners,” sold to the Nazarenes, “forever,” their title in the third 
floor of the Odd Fellow’s Hall for the sum of $1.00. The church was incor- 
porated on Feb. 26, 1925 and on Dec. 5, 1925, the present church site on n. 
Central Ave., was purchased from Geo. T. Purnell. 

The corner-stone was laid on July 25, 1926, by Dist. Supt. John T. May- 
bury assisted by Howard Stall, the pastor. The church was dedicated in 
1930, by Dist. Supt. Daniel E. Higgs, assisted by the Rev. Daniel W. Sweeney, 
the pastor. A parsonage was built opposite the church in 1946. 


NERO ll ON Mie ean et 





336 IA EY CH OR GHG) OF DED AWARE 


The First Presbyterian Church at Laurel. Previous to the settlement of 
the boundary dispute, in 1767, the southern part of Delaware was claimed as 
a part of the Province of Maryland. On Aug. 11, 1747, the Rev. Charles Ten- 
nent, a Presbyterian minister, appeared before the Somerset Court and took 
the oath of allegiance as prescribed by English Parliament for dissenting min- 
isters. He registered the places at which he intended to preach. He included 
“the meeting-house at Wm. Olliphant’s and also at Broad Creek Bridge and 
also’’—several dwelling houses were included in the list. 

If the meeting-house at Broad Creek Bridge near Laurel had not been 
built at that time, it was built shortly thereafter. It was located on the north 
branch of Broad Creek and was called the ‘Broad Creek Presbyterian Church.” 
When the Revolution broke out the church was abandoned and, in 1778, it 
was maliciously burned. On Sept. 15, 1791, a new board of trustees was in- 
corporated as the ‘Presbyterian Church at Broad Creek Wading-Place.” 

By a deed acknowledged in Court on May 27, 1793, the estate of John 
Mitchell donated an acre of land on the north side of Broad Creek where a 
church was built. From 1799 until 1817 only occasional services were held, 
after which the church was closed until 1832, On Aug. 18, 1832, a new board 
of trustees was elected and the name was changed to the ‘Presbyterian Church 
of Laurel.” In 1858, the building was moved into Laurel and placed on a lot 
of land, on Delaware Ave., donated by Dr. Stephen Green on Oct. 9, 1858. 
The building was dedicated on Dec. 12, 1859, by the Rev. J. B. Spottswood. 
Services were abandoned in 1864. In 1874, services were again held for a 
short time. The building was destroyed by fire on Aug. 19, 1886. The old 
graveyard can still be seen although it is grown up and matted with briers. 
One of the tombstones is that of Isaac W. Copes, who died on Oct, 30,1850. 
The sexton’s house, considerably enlarged, is still standing. 


The Pilgrim Holiness Church at Laurel. The church site on e. 4th St. 
was purchased on Dec. 4, 1928 from Thomas J. Waller. The church was built 
in 1929. They were incorporated on Nov. 19, 1940. Additional land was ~ 
donated on April 21, 1941, by Merrill G. King. Rit 

There are two colored churches in Laurel both located in the section 
known as “Suburb,” with the accent on “su.” Zion M. E. Church was built in 
1884. Land was purchased.on Oct. 28, 1902:and on Apr. 9, 1913 from Geo. 
W. Gunby and Elizabeth J. Whittington. The church was rebuilt in 1924 and 
was incorporated on Sept. 24, 1924 as “Water's New Zion M. E. Church.” 
The new name caused so many complications in their property titles that the 
church was incorporated on Feb. 21, 1936, under their old name ‘New Zion 
M. E. Church.” Land was donated on Feb. 26, 1936 by Annie G. Young, et. al. . 
Mt. Pisgah A. M. E. Church purchased land from Wm. Sipple on Feb. 26, 
1881, the deed stating that the church had been erected. 


St. Matthew’s First Baptist Church, colored, is located at Bacontown, out- 
side of Laurel. It was founded in 1928 and built in 1931. The present church 
was built in 1944, 


Mt. Pleasant Methodist Church (M.E.) is located five miles west of 
Laurel just off the Sharptown Road. This was one of the early Sussex County 
Methodist churches, presumed to have been built in 1780. It was known as 
the “Church in Broad Creek,” while, at this time Laurel was known as “Broad 
Creek Wading-place.”” For many years the church was known as “Moore's 
Chapel.” The early churches had galleries to accommodate the negro wor- 


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Curist P. E. CHURCH, CHIPMAN’S POND 
(Page 342) 


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St. THOMAS’ METHODIST CHURCH, W. OF MILLSBORO 
(Page 346) 














338 THE CHURCHES OF) DELAWARE 


shippers. In 1801, during a love-feast the negroes gave such a lusty shout that 
it caused the gallery to collapse. The white members were packed so densely 
that no one was injured. On Oct. 25, 1805, a camp-meeting was held beside 
the church; it was one of the first to be held in Sussex County. 

In 1824, a second-hand stove was purchased in Salisbury and installed 
in the church. Previous to this time the only heat in the building was supplied 
by the footstoves a few of the members brought with them. In 1842, backs 
were added to the benches for the first time. These facts are mentioned to 
illustrate the development from the crude structures of the early days to the 
comfortable churches of today. The church was incorporated on June 25, 1853. 
Extensive repairs were made in 1878. The present church was built in 1895. 
On Fri., June 17, 1898, thieves tore out the corner-stone and stole the con- 
tents. In the graveyard beside the church the tombstones date back to 1860. 


St. Andrew’s P. E. Church is located seven miles s. w. of Laurel in Ellis’ 
Grove. Services were started in Collin’s School in 1877. These were continued 
until a frame church was built and opened on June 1, 1880. The church site 
was donated on Oct. 20, 1880, by Joseph Ellis. An organ was installed in 
1881. In 1889-90, a communion service was presented by Mrs. Geo. W. John- 
son. The church was consecrated on Sun., May 22, 1898, by Bishop Leighton 
Coleman. The Bishop's chair and priest’s chair were gifts from St. Andrew's 
Church in Wilmington as memorials to Bishop Lee and the Rev. Geo. W. 
Johnson, the clergy stall and desk were from Archdeacon George C. Hall and 
friends and the font was from Immanuel Church at New Castle. 

Due to lack of interest the church was closed in 1925. Through the 
efforts of the Rev. Robert Y. Barber of Laurel the church was reopened in 
1932. After the Christmas festivities of 1932 the discarded decorations were 
burned in the stove which became overheated and caused a fire which de- 
stroyed the building. This was at a time when the entire country was in the 
depths of a serious depression. Bishop Philip Cook gathered a group of young 
men from throughout Sussex County who were members of the Episcopal 
Church. He rented a house in Laurel to be used as a dormitory and engaged 
a builder to serve as instructor and foreman. This group proceeded to build 
a church, gaining the knowledge of building as the work progressed. The 
church was completed and was dedicated by Bishop Cook on Oct. 27, 1933. 
This was the last church built by Bishop Cook previous to his death in 1938. 

A boy was employed to get the building heated in time for the services 
in cold weather. In 1940, the stove became overheated and the building was 
again seriously damaged by fire. The building was repaired and an oil heater 
was installed. In the meantime, considerable landscaping has been done. There 
are two graves on the lawn beside the church. : 


Horsey’s Methodist Church (M.P.) is located at Horsey’s Grove, three 
and one-half miles s. w. of Laurel. The first meetings were held in private 
homes. The church site was donated on Dec. 16, 1895, by Thomas C. Horsey. 
The church was completed in 1896. They were incorporated in February, 
1897. On Fri., June 17, 1898, thieves attempted to loot the corner-stone but 
did not succeed in tearing out the stone. 


St. Mark’s P. E. Church is located six miles s. w. of Laurel. It was organ- 
ized on Jan. 13, 1857, by the Rev. Richard F. Cadle. Mr. Cadle was famed as a 
missionary in the mid-west and St. Mark’s was the last church that he organ- 
ized. Born in New York on Apr. 17, 1796, Mr. Cadle died, near Laurel, on 


WOE SIT LESRENS OS. USS BGXe FC.OTUSNGE mM Bie pe, 


Nov. 9, 1857, and is buried close to the rear of St. Luke’s Church in Seaford. 
The church site was donated on June 22, 1857, by Samuel Ralph. The present 
St. Mark’s Church was completed and was consecrated on May 28, 1858, by 
Bishop Alfred Lee. In 1868, the property was enclosed with a fence. In 1889- 
90, a communion service was presented by Mrs. Geo. W. Johnson. A new or- 
gan was installed in 1891. In 1898-99, a lectern was presented by St. Paul's 
Church of Camden. In 1899 a font was secured by Bishop Leighton Coleman. 

In 1917, the church was repaired and a recess chancel was built. A serv- 
ice for a restored church was conducted by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman on 
Apr. 25, 1918. The chancel furnishings were all memorial gifts. Regular 
services are held with an annual homecoming service that is held on the Sun- 
day nearest St. Mark’s Day. There is a small graveyard, the tombstones dating 
back to June 22, 1872. 


St. George’s Methodist Church (M.E.) is located one and one-half miles 
s. w. of Bacon. The first meetings were held in private homes in 1842. In 
July, a camp-meeting was held and enough persons were converted to form a 
congregation. The meetings were then held in Beach’s School. 

A half-acre plot was donated on Aug. 12, 1842, by Wm. C. King and 
more land was donated on Sept. 27, 1842, by Samuel and James Kenney. In 
1844, a frame church was built near the present site. The weather-boarding 
was donated by Wm. H. Ross, of Seaford, who was later elected Governor 
of Delaware. It was remodeled in 1878. The present church was built in 
1888, repaired in 1916 and rebuilt in 1928. 


Mt. Hermon Methodist Church (M.P.) is located one and one-half miles 
south of Columbia. The congregation was organized in 1877 and meetings 
were held in the district schoolhouse. A church site was donated on Oct. 19, 
1880, by John Cooper. In 1880, a frame church was built. Additional land 
was donated on Dec. 31, 1902, by John S. Cooper. The church was rebuilt in 
1908. It was incorporated on Mar. 12, 1909. There is a social-hall to the rear 
of the church. : 


Mt. Nebo A. M. E. Church is located one mile south of Columbia. It 
was built in 1904. 


Mt. Moriah M. P. Church and Providence M. P. Church. On Nov. 27, 
1835, Robert Elsey donated 81 sq. poles of land, on the road from Spring Hill 
to Laurel, upon which Mt. Moriah Church had been built. On Oct. 29, 1873, 
Andrew J. Horsey donated one acre of land on the north side of Ralph’s Hill. 

Seeking a more desirable location, on Oct. 20, 1875, Ebenezer M. Lowe 
donated 48 rods of land about three miles west of. Delmar, as a site for the 
new church, which was built in 1875. At a later date, the name was changed 
to “Providence M. P. Church.” Additional land was donated on Oct. 25, 1917, 
’ by Samuel M. Ellis. Through lack of interest, the church was closed in 1936. 
During the following year meetings were held by the Pilgrim Holiness. It 
has been closed since 1938. 


All Saint’s P. E. Church at Delmar. In 1885, services were conducted in 
Delmar by a missionary of the P. E: church. A mission was organized in 1886. 
The services were held in a hall. On Aug. 17, 1892, the hall was burned after 
which services were held in the Baptist Church until a new hall was built. It 
was known as “Mission Hall.’’* A Sunday School was organized in March, 1894. 


Pact ARAL ENO RA Os EES ATI aah a kh 





340 THE CHURCHES OF DELAWARE 


A church site was purchased on July 16, 1898, from Robt. Ellegood. The 
corner-stone was laid on Thurs., June 29, 1899, at 6:30 P. M., by Bishop 
Leighton Coleman. He was assisted by the Rev. Dr. Spaulding and the Rev. 
E. K. Miller. The church was consecrated, by Bishop Coleman on All Saint's 
Day, Nov. 1, 1900. In 1905-06, a new organ was purchased. The belfry was 
built in 1908 and a bell was purchased by the women of the congregation. It 
was dedicated by Bishop Frederick J. Kinsman. 

In 1908-09, a Bishop’s chair was purchased by the All Saint’s Guild as a 
memorial to Bishop Coleman. On Nov. 3, 1910, Bishop Kinsman dedicated a 
window and an eagle lectern of oak, presented as a memorial to Bishop Cole- 
man, by Miss French, of Boston. The first Easter service to be held in All 
Saint’s was conducted by Bishop Kinsman, in 1912. 

Ground was broken for the parish-house on Apr. 26, 1915. The corner- 
stone was laid, by Bishop Kinsman, on June 5, 1915. It was dedicated on 
Oct. 15, 1915. The parish-house is connected to the church by a vestry-room. 
The rectory at 8th and State Sts. was purchased on July 15, 1922, from John 
W. Culver. In 1941, the church was redecorated and repaited. This church 


was known locally as the ‘little gray church” although it is now sheathed with 


white asbestos shingles. 


The First Methodist Church (M.E.), at Delmar. The first sermon, in 
Delmar, was preached on Sept. 4, 1867, in the home of M. M. Hill. A plank 
church was built in 1868. The last sermon, in Mr. Hill’s home was preached 
on Jan. 26, 1868. The new church was dedicated on Feb. 16, 1868, by the 
Rev. Joseph Cook and was named “Wesley.” 

A new church was built in 1872. It was dedicated on Nov. 30, 1872, by 
the Revs. Enoch Stubbs and W. E. England. The church site was purchased 
on Nov. 28, 1873, from Elijah Freeney. In 1884, a tower and steeple were 
added. The church was improved in 1891, and it was rededicated on Sun., 
Oct. 25, 1891, by the Revs. J. D. C. Hanna, H. S. Dulaney and A. D. Davis, 


~ the pastor. : 
| On Aug. 17, 1892, in a conflagration that destroyed one-half of the town, 
the church was burned. After this, meetings were held in the cannery and then 


in the Baptist Church. A new church was built immediately. 


Land was purchased from Nathaniel Hitchens on Feb. 15, 1893, from 
S. J. Hitchens on May 21, 1908 and from Fannie E. Elliott on Aug. 7, 1913. - 


The church was incorporated on Mar. 11, 1929. In 1932, the steeple was re- 


placed with a tower and the entire building was brick-veneered. The work — 


was completed in 1933. A new organ was installed in 1939. The name “First” 
was adopted in 1940. The church maintains a large cemetery on e. State St. 
Additional land for this purpose was purchased from Chas. C. Jones, on Oct. 
20, 1934 and from John P. West on July 2, 1937. ) 


Mt. Olive Methodist Church (M.P.) at Delmar was organized in 1889. 
Services were held in a hall until 1890 when the first small church was built. 
It was located on State St.,,west of the railroad and was named “Bethesda 
M. P. Church.” The site was purchased on Feb. 26, 1891, from S. J. Hitchens. 
A site at the corner of 2nd and State St. was purchased and the second church 
was completed and was dedicated on Nov. 12, 1893. At this time it was made 
a separate charge and the name “Mt. Olive” was adopted. It was incorporated 
on Feb. 25, 1897. 

The ‘church was improved and was rededicated on Feb. 6, 1898, by the 
Rev. T. P. Revelle. It was enlarged and was rededicated in May, 1908. Land 





BETHANY METHODIST CHURCH, LOWE’S CROSSROADS 
(Page 347) 


ST. JOHN’s P. E. CHURCH, LITTLE HILL 
(Page 347) 























342 THE CHURCH ESO DLE DAW AICE 


was purchased on Sept. 25, 1918 from Frank E. Lynch. Improvements were 
made, including brick-veneering the building, and a rededication service was 
held on Dec. 17, 1933. After extensive improvements to the chancel, rededica- 
tion services were held on Mar. 2, 1940. This church maintains a large ceme- 
tery on e. State St. 


The First Baptist Church at Delmar was organized in 1883. The church 
site at Main and Park Sts. was purchased on Mar. 27, 1883, from Elijah 
Freeney and the church was built during that year. It was dedicated on Sun., 
Nov. 25, 1883, by the Rev. Dr. G. J. Johnson, of the American Baptist Pub- 
lication Soc. The church was officially recognized on Apr. 17, 1884. A re- 
dedication service was held on Apr. 20, 1884. Among those taking part were 
the Revs. J. T. Craig, James Hope and I. M. Haldeman. The evening sermon 
was preached by the Rev. M. Chandler of the Delmar M. E. Church. The 
church was rebuilt in 1925. A rededication service was held with Dr. Joseph 
T. Watts, Gen. Sec. for Maryland and the Rev. J. E. Berkstresser, the pastor, 
officiating. The church was incorporated on May 1, 1935. 


Delmar Primitive Baptist Church was organized in 1882. The meetings 
were held in private homes and in a nearby grove. The church was built in 
1883. The church site at Second and Jewel Sts. was purchased from Levin S. 
Hastings on Aug. 30, 1883. 


The Roman Catholic Mission at Delmar was opened in 1941. 


Metropolitan M. E. Zion Church, colored, at Delmar was built in 1919. 
The church site was purchased on Nov. 26, 1920, from Mary A. Hastings. 


Old Forge A. M. E. Church was located beside James’ Branch a short dis- 
tance s. w. of the old Broad Creek Bridge. Near this point, a forge, a saw-mill 
and a grist-mill were erected in the late 1700's. The forge was the first to be 
abandoned, the saw-mill was closed about 1880 and the grist-mill was closed 
some time later. . : 

On Sept. 16, 1848, James Horsey donated a half-acre church site to a 
group of free Africans headed by Samson Matthews. Old Forge Church was 
built and a graveyard was laid out. An active camp-meeting was conducted 
each year in the woods beside the church. The church was closed about 1909 
and the land reverted to Wm. De Shields who had purchased the Horsey farm. 
ghee ees no tombstones in the graveyard and there is nothing to mark 
the old site. 


Christ P. E. Church, located three miles east of Laurel beside Chipman’s 
_ Pond, was built in 1771. It was incorporated on Feb. 2, 1808. It is believed 
to have replaced a church built here at an earlier date. 

Any definite information as to any deed or land grant to Christ Church 
before 1793 appears to be lost in the mists of history. As is generally known 
the ownership of the “Three Lower Counties,” now Delaware, was in dispute 
between Lord Baltimore and Wm. Penn for many years. During this time, 
grants of land in Delaware wete made by both Lord Baltimore and Wm. Penn. 
This applied especially to Sussex County and to the section close to the west- 
ern boundary of the State. It is possible that a church site was granted to Christ 
Church by Lord Baltimore at the time the first church was built, but this 1s 
very doubtful. 

This chapel at Broad Creek was a chapel-of-ease for Stepney Parish. 
Stepney Parish Church was Gfeen Hill Church located at what was then Green 


( 


KOE STOR CN SS OS SEX © 'C 10 BIN Way 343 


Hill Town about twelve miles s. w. of Salisbury. It is built of brick, has two 
doors, the old box pews, a high pulpit and an arched ceiling built of pine. 
A tiny bell hangs on the front gable which is surmounted by a wooden cross. 
It is very well kept, has spacious grounds and is close to the banks of the 
Wicomico River. Quite isolated at the present time, only annual services are 
held. It is now known as St. Bartholomew P. E. Church. 

The present church at Chipman’s Pond was built in 1771 and Robert 
Houston, the great grandfather of former Congressman Robert G. Houston, 
was the builder. In addition to his other interests, Mr. Houston operated a 
ship-yard at Concord. Some persons believe that Mr. Houston used his ship- 
carpenters to build the church and claim that the building shows evidence 
of joiner work as performed in ship-yards. 

At the sale of the estate of John Mitchell, Robert Houston purchased 1 
acre 90 poles of land for 1 pound, 10 shillings “lawful money of Delaware 
State.” This purchase was made on behalf of the trustees of Christ Church 
who were Robert Houston, Jonathan Cartrell, Henry Edger, Wm. Vaughn, 
Leonard Houston and Geo. Bacon. The deed was acknowledged on May 1, 1793. 

In the partition of the estate of Robert Houston, who owned several 
thousand acres of land, between his widow and his eight children, made by 
the Orphans’ Court on May 4, 1797, the following appears: “We allot to the 
use of the Episcopal Church the quantity of two acres of land called ““Ramble- 
indeed” for which the said Robert Houston hath heretofore gave Bond or 
obligation to the Wardens of the, said Court for conveyance of the same, 
etc.” The description mentions one line as being on the s. w. side of the 
church. / 

In order to determine the boundaries of the land owned by Christ Church 


a quit-claim deed was executed on Jan. 2, 1891, by Wm. H. Chipman and — 


Wm. H. O'Neal, the adjoining owners. At that time permanent boundary 
markers were set in place in accordance with this deed. ) 

In the early days this church had a nickname variously quoted as ‘‘Old 
Lightwood, Old Light’ard and Old Lighterknot.” The nickname is presumed 
to have been derived from the fact that lightwood knots were used for 
illumination. 

It is a fine example of Colonial church architecture. It has the old high 
pulpit and the square family pews. Except for necessary repairs, it stands to- 
day as originally built, “changeless in a changing world.” A Centenary cele- 
bration was held on July 2, 1873. The number of trustees was increased on 
Nov. 4, 1912. The outside walls received their first coat of paint in 1941. 

Since St. Philip’s Church was built in Laurel, only two services are held 
each year. The first is held on Whitsunday and the second is held on the 
third Sunday in September. The church and graveyard are well cared for by 
Christ Church League of.which Daniel K. Short is the treasurer. Former 
Governor Nathaniel Mitchell is buried in a vault close to the church. The 
Rev. Hamilton Bell who died in 1811 is buried in a vault to the rear of the 
‘ church. He founded St. Paul’s Church at Georgetown and St. John’s Church 
at Little Hill. f 


Broad Creek Primitive Baptist Church, known locally for many years as 
“Benson’s Old Side Church’’ is located six miles n. e. of Laurel. It was or- 
ganized on May 31, 1781 and was the third church of that denomination in 
the State. The Rev. John Benson, from whom it got its popular name, was 
born, in Sussex County, on July 22, 1758. He was ordained on June 14, 1790. 
He then took charge of this church and of Gravelly Branch Church. The first 
church building was erected about 1800.0n land purchased from John Benson. 





i Ti 








344 THE CHURCHES; OF) DELAMARE 


In 1856, the church was remodeled and completed, not having been plastered 
previous to that time. Two acres of land were secured from John H. Ellis, on 
May 25, 1889 and on Feb. 20, 1891, another acre was secured from Thomas 
P. Dukes. 

Additional land was donated, on May 30, 1902, by Martha J. Pollitt. 
Services are held regularly once each month. There is a graveyard beside 
the church. The Boyce family plot is enclosed with an iron fence. The oldest 
tombstone is dated 1840. The small plot in which two members of the Short 
family are buried is enclosed with a brick wall probably built about 1855. The 
ravages of time have left its marks on the wall. 


Asbury Methodist Church (M.E.) is located eight miles n. e. of Laurel. 
The first church was built in 1812. On Mar. 12, of that’ year, trustees were 
elected. On May 16, the plot of land was donated by Minos Tindall. They 
were incorporated on Mar. 20, 1813. The first building was used until 1857 
when a new church was erected. The church records were all destroyed when 
the custodian’s home was burned. There is a large cemetery beside the church. 
The oldest tombstone is over the grave of Elizabeth Warren who died on 
Oct. 1, 1831. A short distance away was the location of Tindall’s camp-ground 
which was dismantled in 1939. 


St. Paul’s Methodist Church (M.P.) is located near Hearn’s Crossroads. 
It was organized, in 1863, in Sharp's School. In 1868, an effort to build a 
church was started and it was completed and was dedicated in 1871, by the 
Rev. W. D. Litsinger. The church was incorporated in February, 1897. 


Mt. Zion Holy Church, colored, is located a short distance s. w. of Hearn’s 
Crossroads. The church was organized in 1943. They meet in a house con- 
verted for church purposes. It was the former home of a colored Methodist 
church. 

- King’s Methodist Church (M.E,) is located three and one-quarter miles 
east of Bacons. It was founded in 1842 when the first church was built. The 
half-acre church site was donated by Wm. King on Aug. 12, 1842. It was first 
called “Oak Grove,” then called “Hepburn” after which the name “King’s” 
was adopted. The original building was not plastered until 1848. A new 
church was built in 1884. The dedication services were held on Jan. 25, 1885, 
by the Revs. E. L. Hubbard and I. T. Fosnocht. More land was secured on 
Nov. 2, 1886 from Wm. F. King. The church was rebuilt in 1925. There is 
a small graveyard and a social-hall. The tombstones date back to 1857. There 
is one roofed-over grave. 


Little Creek Primitive Baptist Church is located three miles east of Bacons. 
In 1802, Gillis Smith conveyed to tr&stees an acre of land near Marshall 
Smith’s grist-mill. A church was erected and was called ‘“‘Smith’s Mills 
Church.” Later, the name was changed to “Little Creek Church.” Meetings 
are held once each month. There is a graveyard and a social-hall. The oldest 
tombstone is dated 1858. 


Trinity Methodist Church (M.P.) is-located six and one-half miles east 
of Laurel. This church was organized, in 1866, in the Dorothy schoolhouse 
under the name of the “Dorothy M. P. Church.” On May 14, 1873, the trus- 
tees secured from Geo. W. McGee, forty sq. rods of land adjoining the 








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(Page 348) 


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BETHEL METHODIST CHURCH, S. OF GUMBORO 


(Page 348) 





346 HAE GHURGHESBOFODE LAWARE 


Dorothy school lot, described as being on the road to Little’s Mill. The 
church was then built and dedicated. The name ‘“'Trinity’’ was then adopted. 
A parsonage lot was donated on Sept. 24, 1880, by Jacob M. Cannon. The 
church was rebuilt in 1907. There is a graveyard a short distance from the 
church on the opposite side of the road. The graves date back to 1882. 


St. John’s A. M. E. Zion Church is located at Ross’ Point. They were 
incorporated on Dec. 3, 1892, as the Star of Zion A. M. E. Zion Church. They 
purchased the church site on Oct. 27, 1894, from Samuel B. West. In the 
meantime they adopted the name “St. John’s.” During 1944, the church was 
entirely renovated, including a sheathing of asbestos shingles. 


Gray’s Church, colored, was located south of Record’s School near Gray’s 
Branch. 


Epworth Methodist Church (M.E.) is located six miles n. e. of Laurel. 
The congregation was organized in 1889 and met in Sycamore schoolhouse. 
The church was built in 1890 on land secured on June 6, of that year from 
Benjamin H. Elliott. There is a burial-ground beside the church, the tomb- 
stones dating back to 1893. 


Shiloh Methodist Church (M.P.) is located four miles east of Laurel. It 
was organized in 1873 and a small church was built. On Sept. 2, 1880, Wm. 
W. Dashiell donated a half-acre of land as a church site. The corner-stone of 
the present church was laid on Thanksgiving Day, 1880, by the Rev. Messrs. 
Ewell and Shermer. This church site is on the old camp-meeting grounds, 
well known throughout Sussex County. The church was incorporated on June 
19, 1887. There is a social-hall beside the church. | 

St. Thomas’ Methodist‘Church (M.E.) is located seven miles west of Mills- 
boro. It was organized, in 1840, at meetings held in the home of Thomas 
Phillips. The first church was built of frame in 1841. The site was donated, 
by Levin Hopkins, on Feb. 16, 1841. The church was burned in 1857 and a 
new church was built. It was remodeled in 1892, 1906 and 1914. It was closed 
for a time in the 1920's, reopened and then closed again in 1939. Annual 
homecoming services are held in September. There is a graveyard beside the 
church, the tombstones date back to 1854. 


Phillip’s School P. E. Mission. Phillip’s School was located about midway 
between Millsboro and Laurel and south of St. Thomas’ M. E. Church. Serv- 
ices were started here in 1890 and apparently they were quite successful for a 
time. On Mar. 29, 1893, a church site was donated by Miss Nancy Phillips 
and a building committee was appointed. No church was ever built and the 
effort was abandoned in 1895. 


Mt. Olivet Brethren Church is located at Shortly. This congregation was 
organized in 1925, when meetings were held in private homes. Later, they 
secured the use of St. Thomas’ Church which was inactive at that time. When 
a move was made to sell St. Thomas’ to the Brethren, the Methodists awakened 
and reopened their church for services. This was in 1930 and the Brethren 
proceeded to erect their present church building. This is the only congrega- 
tion of this sect in Delaware. Among their customs are triune baptism, face 
forward, and the ritual of foot-washing. 


ES a re ee eT ee ee, ae 


WA BE S>IMEARENG SS USS EQS ¥C-OFU\NET YY 347 


Providence Methodist Church (M.P.) is located at Piney Grove, four 
and one-quarter miles s. w. of Georgetown, on the road to Shortly. The 
church was erected in 1886. The one-acre church site was donated on July 17, 
1886, by Harrison Rogers. Charles H. Elliott donated one acre of land on 
Sept. 24, 1924. There is a small graveyard. 


Bethany Methodist Church (M.E.) is located at Lowe’s Crossroads. In 
1913, a group from Jones’ Church decided to build this church believing the 
location to be more convenient for the congregation. The church was incor- 
porated on Mar. 5, 1914, at which time the site was donated by Sara C. Col- 
lins. The dedication service was held on June 14, 1914. It is famous through- 
out Sussex County for the bounteous church suppers held in the social-hall 
beside the church. 


Bethesda Methodist Church (M.E.) is located seven miles s. e. of Laurel, 
near Pepper Box. The first meetings in this section were held by the Meth- 
Odists at the home of Philip West in 1816. A small frame church was built in 
1823. They were incorporated on Jan. 21, 1826. On Feb. 2, 1826, Geo. H. 
Vinson conveyed to a board of trustees, two rods and twelve sq. perches of 
land upon which the church stood. It was described as being near Thompson's 
Branch. This branch rises near Pepper Box and empties into Trap Pond. 


This church was used until 1879 when the present church was built. It 
was remodeled in 1897. In lettering the corner-stone the stone-cutter reversed 
the numeral 9, creating a curious effect. There is a graveyard beside the church, 
the tombstones dating back to Nov. 10, 1879. 


St. John’s P. E. Church, located at Little Hill, formerly Greenville, was a 
mission of old Christ Church, east of Laurel. The church was incorporated on 
Jan. 7, 1808. It was a going organization in 1809 and sent lay delegates to 
the Diocesan Convention that year. A church was built in 1811. This church 
was founded by the Rev. Hamilton Bell, who died in 1811. The building was 
still uncompleted in 1836. There were no pews and no windows although the 
building was equipped with shutters. The church became defunct in 1841. 

Bishop Alfred Lee visited the church in July, 1842 and, at his request, 
the building was repaired. The remodeled church was consecrated, on Nov. 3, 
1843, by Bishop Lee. Regular services were abandoned in 1876. In 1888, the 
church was rebuilt and it was consecrated, by Bishop Coleman, on Nov. 14, 
1889. Four acres of land were donated on Jan. 16, 1899, by A. L. Ellis. In 
1907-08, a Bishop's chair, in memory of Bishop Coleman, was installed by the 
congregation. By 1914, only occasional services were being held. Repaits to 
the building were made in 1920 and 1936. At the present time annual services, 
only, are held on the Sunday nearest June 24. In 1870, services were conducted 
at Elliott’s School and in 1900 services were held at Morris’ School and Ricard’s 
School. 

Just across the road from the church there is a low granite monument 
with a sloping top upon which is the following inscription: “Ebenezer Hearne 
son of Thos. and Sally b 1717 d 1785 his wife Priscilla Fooks d 1796 they are 
buried 21/4 mi. s. east.” Ebenezer Hearne was the grandson of William Hearne, 
a London merchant. He settled on a farm near Delmar where he died in 1691. 
In 1895, the late Wm. T. Hearne of Independence, Mo. published a history 
of the Hearne family and waged a campaign for funds to erect this monument 
and another near Delmar in memory of the pioneer, Wm. Hearne. Ebenezer 
and his wife were buried on a farm two and one-half miles s. e. of Little Hill 


Pie wae ates! 


Pree enn = 


348 TOH'E “CHVOCREC OT Esa OIF VD B/W ArR 


where they had lived at the time of their deaths. Being unable to locate the 
exact spot Mr. Hearne erected the monument beside St. John’s Church at 
Little Hill. 


Jones’ M. E. Church is located one and one-half miles south of Lowe's 
Crossroads. The one-acre church site was purchased on Nov. 22, 1856, from 
Jacob Jones. The church was erected in 1857 and was rebuilt in 1896. The 
corner-stone states—'‘Presented by G. E. King.’’ Since most of the congrega- 
tion transferred, to assist in building Bethany Church in 1913, meetings are 
held only once a year. 


Line Methodist Church (M.E.) is located just south of Whitesville at the 
Maryland line. It was founded Jan. 31, 1785 and a small church was built 
across the road from the present church. The one-acre plot, called ‘Pleasant 
Grove,’ was donated by Planner Shores, on Jan. 31, 1785, to a board of trus- 
tees four of whom lived in Sussex County and five of whom lived in Worcester 
Co., Md. The deed stipulated that the trustees would build a preaching-house 
for the use of Methodist preachers or the friendly clergy of the Church of 
England. Francis Asbury preached here on Nov. 12, 1788. 

In 1838, a new and larger church was built. Line Church stands at the 
Delaware-Maryland line, hence its name. The corner-stone of the present 
church was laid in 1874. The site was donated on Nov. 6, 1874, by James P. 
McFadden. The church was rebuilt in 1895. Additional land was donated on 
Feb. 17, 1932 by Chauncey A. Mitchell. 

A large graveyard, on both sides of the road is well maintained. The 
oldest tombstone that the writer could find is that of Elizabeth Jones, who 

| » died on Aug. 25, 1839. In 1938, a social-hall was built on the site of the old 
fa" hurch. Across the road from the church is an original Mason and Dixon 

stone. Closeby is a concrete marker with a bronze plate placed by the U. S. 
Geodetic Survey, in 1932, showing only a slight deviation from the line as 
— @run by Mason and Dixon. Ke ’ 





Te 


Bethel Methodist Church (M.E.) is located on the Line Road, south of 
Gumboro. It was built in 1841 on a site purchased on Feb. 23, 1841 from 
Jos..S. Barnard. The first services were mee on February 23 of that year. The 
church was rebuilt in 1892 when the two doors were replaced by one door. 
The interior fittings are the same as originally built. In 1941, the old camp- 
meeting tabernacle was converted into a social-hall. In the old graveyard a 
few roofed-over graves can be seen, one of the few places in Delaware where 
any of these graves remain. These roofs are A shaped with the gables closed 
in, rest directly on the ground with the entire frame-work covered with shin- 
gles. One can only conjecture as to the reason the graves of a century ago 
were so covered yet when one considers how shallow the graves were dug 
at that time it is not surprising that sensitive persons felt the need of added 
< protection for the bodies of their loved ones. | ; 

The writer is convinced that these roofs were for prote