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Preprint typeset in JHEP style - PAPER VERSION 



IPPP/12/81 



November 13, 2012 



J2' 



Double Virtual corrections for gluon scattering at 
NNLO 



Aude Gehrmann-De Ridder", Thomas GehrmanrA E.W.N. Glover c , Joao Pires a 

a Institute for Theoretical Physics, ETH, CH-8093 Zurich, Switzerland 
b Institutfiir Theoretische Physik, Universitdt Zurich, Wintherturerstrasse 190, 
CH-8057 Zurich, Switzerland 



c Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, University of Durham, South Road, 
^ ■ Durham DEI 3LE, England 



Abstract: We use the antenna subtraction method to isolate the double virtual infrared 
singularities present in gluonic scattering amplitudes at next-to-next-to-leading order. In 
previous papers, we derived the subtraction terms that rendered (a) the double real radi- 
ation tree-level process finite in the single and double unresolved regions of phase space 
and (b) the mixed single real radiation one-loop process both finite and well behaved in 
the unresolved regions of phase space. Here, we show how to construct the double vir- 
tual subtraction term using antenna functions with both initial- and final-state partons 
which remove the explicit infrared poles present in the two-loop amplitude. As an explicit 
example, we write down the subtraction term for the four-gluon two-loop process. The 
infrared poles are explicitly and locally cancelled in all regions of phase space leaving a 
finite remainder that can be safely evaluated numerically in four-dimensions. 
November 13, 2012 



Keywords: QCD, NNLO Computations, Hadronic Colliders, Jets. 



Contents 



1. Introduction 2 

2. Double virtual antenna subtraction at NNLO 7 

2.1 Contributions from integration of double real subtraction term: J 2 ^nnlo ^ 

2.1.1 Integration of colour connected double unresolved antennae: 

f j ~ 5,6,4 

J2 NNLO 11 

2.1.2 Integration of colour unconnected double unresolved antennae: 

2.2 Contributions from integrating the real-virtual subtraction term: J 1 d&Jf NLO 17 

2.2.1 Integration of single unresolved real-virtual subtraction: J ± da^^ a LO 17 

2.2.2 Integration of explicit poles subtraction in the real-virtual channel: 

f da VS ' (b ' c) ' 20 

3. Gluon scattering at LO and NLO 22 

3.1 Gluonic amplitudes 22 

3.2 Contributions to the gluonic final state at NLO 23 

3.2.1 The four-gluon single virtual contribution dcr]^ i0 24 

3.2.2 The integrated NLO subtraction term dafj LO 24 

3.2.3 The NLO mass factorisation term da^[ 25 

3.2.4 Finiteness of the NLO two-particle final state contribution 25 

4. Double Virtual corrections for gluon scattering at NNLO 25 

4.1 The four-gluon double virtual contribution da^ NLO 25 

4.2 The integrated NNLO subtraction term, f 2 dafj NLO + da^^Q 26 

4.3 The NNLO mass factorisation contribution da NN ' LO 27 

4.4 The four-gluon subtraction term, da^ NLO 27 

5. Conclusions 29 

A. Momentum mappings 30 

A.l Final-Final mapping 31 

A. 2 Initial-Final mapping 32 

A.3 Initial-Initial mapping 32 

B. Splitting functions 33 

C. Convolution integrals 34 

C.l Convolutions of plus distributions 40 



- 1 - 



1. Introduction 



In hadronic collisions the most basic form of the strong interaction at short distances is 
the scattering of a coloured parton off another coloured parton. Experimentally, such 
scattering can be observed via the production of one or more jets of hadrons with large 
transverse energy. In QCD, the inclusive cross section has the form, 



where the probability of finding a parton of type i carrying a momentum fraction £ of the 
parent proton momentum Hi is described by the parton distribution function /i(£, /U 2 )(i£ 
and the partonic scattering cross section d&ij for parton i to scatter off a parton j nor- 
malised to the hadron-hadron flux 1 is summed over the possible parton types i and j. To 
simplify the discussion, we have set the renormalisation and factorisation scales to be equal, 

m = = 

For example, let us consider the m-jet cross section. The (renormalised and mass 
factorised) partonic cross section for a parton of type i scattering off parton of type j, d&ij 
to form m jets has the perturbative expansion 



where the next-to-leading order (NLO) and next-to-next-to-leading order (NNLO) strong 
corrections are identified. 

The simplest jet cross sections at hadron colliders are the single jet inclusive and the 
exclusive or inclusive dijet cross sections. In the single jet inclusive cross section, each 
identified jet in an event contributes individually. The exclusive dijet cross section consists 
of all events with exactly two identified jets, while events with two or more identified jets 
contribute to the inclusive dijet cross section. These cross sections have been studied as 
functions of different kinematical variables: the transverse momentum and rapidity of the 
jets (of any jet for the single jet inclusive distribution, or of the two largest transverse 
momentum jets for the dijet distributions). Precision measurements of single jet and dijet 
cross sections have been performed by CDF [1] and DO [2] at the Tevatron and by ATLAS [3, 
4] and CMS [5, 6, 7] at the LHC. 

The single jet inclusive jet cross section has been analysed in view of a determination 
of the parton distributions in the proton [8] . Tevatron data on this observable are included 
in nearly all global fits of parton distributions, where they provide important constraints 
on the large- x behaviour of the gluon distribution. Likewise, measurements of the jet and 
dijet cross section can be used to extract the strong coupling constant a s up to scales that 
are otherwise unattainable with other collider measurements [9]. 

lr The partonic cross section normalised to the parton-parton flux is obtained by absorbing the inverse 
factors of £i and £2 into ddij. 




dai j (^ 1 H 1 ,^ 2 H 2 ,a s (n)) = da ijjL o{€iHi, £2-^2) + 





(1.1) 



- 2 - 



All these precision studies rely at present on NLO theory predictions for jet cross 
sections [10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16]. The uncertainty inherent to these predictions is the 
dominant source of error in the extraction of a s . A consistent inclusion of jet data in global 
fits of parton distributions at a given order also requires the perturbative description of the 
jet cross section to this order. Consequently, the inclusion of jet data in the NNLO parton 
distribution fits introduces an unquantified systematic error. The NNLO corrections to jet 
production are therefore of crucial importance for precision physics studies of QCD and of 
the structure of the proton at hadron colliders. 

At LO, the m-jet cross section is obtained by evaluating the tree- level cross section for 
processes with m-partons in the final state (i.e., the processes involving (m + 2)-partons 
with two partons in the initial state), and requiring that each final state parton is identified 
as a jet by some jet algorithm. In other words, 

d<7y,L0(6#l,6#2)= / d*g )£0 (£lfli,&#2) (1.2) 



where the Born- level partonic cross section is integrated over the iV-parton final state d<I> at 
subject to the constraint that precisely m jets are observed by the jet algorithm Jm \ 

s (aUnJW. (1.3) 



/ 

In this case of course, N = m. 

Suppose we now want to compute the m-jet cross section to NLO. For this, we have 
to consider the real radiation cross section dafj LO with (m + 1) partons in the final state, 
the one-loop correction da^ LO with m partons in the final state, and a mass factorisa- 
tion counter-term da^[ Q that absorbs the divergences arising from initial state collinear 
radiation into the parton densities: 

da ijyNLO = / da? NLO + / <tiYj,NLO+ / d &^ L0 . (1.4) 

The mass factorisation counter term is related to the LO cross section through 

d^ F NLO {^H u i 2 H 2 ) = - [ ^^rV kl (z 1 ,z 2 )da kl , LO (z 1 Z 1 H 1 ,z 2 &H 2 ), (1.5) 

where 

rgjU*i, *a) = 8(i - z 2 ) % r$( Zl ) + 5(i - Zl ) s ki rg } (z 2 ), (1.6) 

and r^j\z) is the one-loop Altarelli-Parisi kernel. 

The terms on the right hand side of (1.4) are separately divergent although their sum 
is finite. To write a Monte Carlo program to compute the NLO contribution to the cross 
section, we must first isolate and cancel the singularities of the different pieces and then 
numerically evaluate the finite remainders. 

Subtraction schemes are a well established solution to this problem. They work by 
finding a suitable counter-term dafj LO for da^ LQ . This subtraction term has to satisfy two 
properties, namely it must have the same singular behaviour in all appropriate unresolved 



-3- 



limits as da^ LO an( ^ be simple enough to be integrated analytically over all singular 
regions of the (m + l)-parton phase space in d dimensions. We proceed by rewriting (1.4) 
in the following form: 



d<7 ij NLO 



+ 



Jd<S> m \Jl 



NLO ~ ^ij,NLo) 



NLO + d<j(j,NLO + ^ij,NLO 



(1.7) 



In its unintegrated form the subtraction term, daf- NLO , has the same singular behaviour as 
da?!- NLO such that the first integral is finite by definition and can be integrated numerically 
in four dimensions over the (m+l)-parton phase space. The integrated form of the counter- 
term dafj NLO analytically cancels the explicit singularities of the virtual contribution 
and the mass factorisation counter-term dafj^ L0 . After checking the cancellation 



d&L 



v 

ij,NLO 



of the pole pieces, we can take the finite remainders of these contributions and perform the 
last integral on the right hand side of (1.7) numerically over the m-parton phase space. 

At NNLO, there are three distinct contributions due to double real radiation radiation 
dafj^NLQ, mixed real- virtual radiation dafj V NNLO and double virtual radiation da^^ NLO , 
plus two NNLO mass factorisation counter terms, daf^^NLO an< ^ ^ijNNLO^ suc ^ that 



d&ij,NNLO = / dafj R NNLO + / 



aa ij,NNLO 



A"VV 
aa ij,NNLO 



+ 



,.MF,1 
aa ij,NNLO 



da 



MF,2 
ij,NNLO 



(1.8) 



where the integration is again over the appropriate iV-particle final state subject to the 
constraint that precisely m-jets are observed. As usual the individual contributions in the 
m-, (m + 1)- and (m + 2)-parton final states are all separately infrared divergent although, 
after renormalisation and factorisation, their sum is finite. 

The NNLO mass factorisation counter-terms contributing to the (m + 1)- and m- 
particle final states are given by, 



dcr^NLoitiHu&fy) = - j 



dz\ dz2 

Zl z 2 



d&kl,NLO ~ d&kl,NLO 



{z 1 £ 1 H 1 ,z 2 &H 2 ), 



(1.9) 



and 



da 



MF,2 
ij,NNLO 



(6iW 2 ) = -/^ 

J Zl Z 2 



r ijfcl(*i> d°ki,Lo(zi£iHi, z 2 &H 2 ) 



d&kLNLO + da\ t NLO + da^Jf LO 



Ui 



(z 1 ^ 1 H 1 ,z 2 ^ 2 H 2 ) 



, (1-10) 



- 4 - 



respectively, where 

ri&,(*i, **) = *(i - *») 8^2 + 5(i - *i) fer[f(z 2 ) + r^)^) (l.ii) 

/2 s ) 

and r^ - (z) is the two- loop Altarelli-Parisi kernel. 

Following the same logic as at NLO, we introduce subtraction terms. The first, 
daff NLO , must correctly describe the single and double unresolved regions of the dou- 
ble real radiation contribution for da§^ L0 . The second, d<r^ LO , must cancel the explicit 
poles in da§^LO as well as reproducing the single unresolved limits. The general form for 
the subtraction terms for an m-particle final state at NNLO is therefore: 



d(Tij,NNLO - / (d&ij%NLO ~ &°ij,NNLo) + / da ijNNLO 

f (A"RV A"VS \ , f A"VS f i«MF,l 

+ / \ aa ij,NNLO ~ aa ij,NNLO) + / aa ij,NNLO + / aa ij,NNLO 

+ / da^ v NNLO + f da^ 2 NLQ . (1.12) 

Note that because the analytic integration of the subtraction term daf^ ntvlo over the single 
and double unresolved regions of phase space gives contributions to both the (m + 1)- and 
m-parton final states, we can explicitly decompose the integrated double real subtraction 
term into two pieces that are integrated over the phase space of either one or two unresolved 
particles respectively, 

/ daf j NNLO = / da^ NNLO + / ddf? NNL0 . (1.13) 

Jd$ m+2 Jd$ m+ 1 Jl Jd$ m J2 



We can therefore rewrite Eq. (1.12) such that each line corresponds to a different number 
of final state particles, 

da ij>NNLO = / [dfrijjfNLO ~ defj^NNLo] 

Jd<S> m+2 

+ / [d&ij V NNLO ~ d°Tj,NNLo] 

Jd<f> m+1 

+ / [dVij V NNLO ~ dv^NNLo] ' (- 1 - 14 ) 

Jd® m 

where each of the square brackets is finite and well behaved in the infrared singular regions. 
More precisely, 

d&Jj,NNLO = d&Yj%NLO ~ J ^ij\NNLO ~ ^ij,NNLO ' (1-15) 

d&ij^NNLO = - j^daYj S NNLO ~ J d°ij%NLO ~ ^ij,NNLO' (1-16) 

So far, the discussion has been quite general, and the form of the subtraction terms 
not specified. At NLO, there are several very well defined approaches for systematically 



- 5 - 



constructing NLO subtraction terms, notably those due to Catani and Seymour [17] and 
Frixione, Kunzst and Signer [18]. 

Several subtraction schemes for NNLO calculations have been proposed in the lit- 
erature, where they are worked out to a varying level of detail. Up to now, successful 
applications of subtraction at NNLO to specific observables were accomplished with sec- 
tor decomposition [19, 20, 21, 22, 23], c/T-subtraction [24], antenna subtraction [25] and 
most recently with an approach based on sector-improved residue subtraction [26, 27]. 
The sector decomposition approach relies on an iterated decomposition of the final state 
phase space and matrix element, allowing an expansion in distributions, followed by a 
numerical evaluation of the sector integrals. It has been successfully applied to Higgs 
production [28, 29, 30] and vector boson production [31] at NNLO. The ^T-subtraction 
method is restricted to processes with colourless final states at leading order, it is based 
on the universal infrared structure of the real emissions, which can be inferred from trans- 
verse momentum resummation. This method has been applied at NNLO to the Higgs 
production [32], vector boson production [33, 34], associated F.ff -production [35], photon 
pair production [36] and in modified form to top quark decay [37] . Antenna subtraction is 
described in detail below and has been applied to three-jet production in electron-positron 
annihilation [38, 39, 40, 41, 42] and related event shape distributions [43, 44, 45, 46, 47]. 
The sector-improved residue subtraction extends NLO residue subtraction [18], combined 
with a numerical evaluation of the integrated subtraction terms. It has been applied to 
compute the NNLO corrections to top quark pair production [48, 49, 50]. 

Here, we are interested in the application of the antenna subtraction scheme to hadron- 
hadron collisions, and specifically to processes such as pp —> jet + X, pp —> V +jet + X (with 
V = or Z) and pp — > H-\-jet-\-X . The formalism has been fully worked out for processes 
with massless partons and initial state hadrons at NLO [51] and NNLO [52, 53, 54, 55]. The 
extension of antenna subtraction for the production of heavy particles at hadron colliders 
has been studied in Refs. [56, 57, 58, 59]. Within this approach, the subtraction terms 
are constructed from so-called antenna functions which describe all unresolved partonic 
radiation (soft and collinear) between a hard pair of radiator partons. The hard radiators 
may be in the initial or in the final state, and in the most general case, final-final (FF), 
initial-final (IF) and initial-initial (II) antennae need to be considered. The subtraction 
terms and therefore the antennae also need to be integrated analytically over the unresolved 
phase space, which is different in the three configurations. All of the integrals relevant for 
processes at NNLO with massless quarks have now been completed [52, 53, 54, 55]. 

In previous papers [60, 61], the subtraction terms dafj NLO and d&Jf NLO corresponding 
to the leading colour pure gluon contribution to dijet production at hadron colliders were 
derived. dafj NLO was shown to reproduce the singular behaviour present in d<r^y i0 in all 
of the single and double unresolved limits, while dcr^; NLO analytically cancelled the explicit 
infrared poles present in da^NLO an< ^ a ^ so reproduced the singular behaviour in the single 
unresolved limits. 

It is the purpose of this paper to construct the appropriate subtraction term da^ NLO 
to render the leading colour four-gluon double virtual contribution da]^LO explicitly finite 
and numerically well behaved in all of phase space. 



- 6 - 



Our paper is organised in the following way. In Sect. 2, the general structure of 
J 2 da^ 2 NLO an d Ji ^nnlo * s discussed and analysed, together with the detailed structure 
for gluon scattering at leading-order in the number of colours. 

We review gluon scattering at LO and NLO in Sect. 3. There are two separate config- 
urations relevant for gg — > gg scattering depending on whether the two initial state gluons 
are colour-connected or not. We denote the configuration where the two initial state glu- 
ons are colour-connected (i.e. adjacent) by IIFF, while the configuration where the two 
initial state gluons are not colour-connected is denoted by IFIF. Our notation for gluonic 
amplitudes is summarised in Sect. 3.1 while the one-loop, unintegrated and integrated 
subtraction contributions and mass factorisation terms at NLO are reviewed in Sect. 3.2 

In Sect. 4 we turn our attention to the specific process of gluon scattering at NNLO. 
We consider the infrared pole structure of the two-loop four-gluon amplitudes in Sect. 4.1. 
The integrated subtraction terms J 2 ^n"nlo anc ^ Ji ^Yinlo are presented in Sect. 4.2 and 
the mass factorisation term discussed in Sect. 4.3. Together, these combine to give the the 
double virtual subtraction term da^ NLO and explicit forms for the IIFF and IFIF configu- 
rations are given in Sect. 4.4 where the cancellation of explicit poles between daJf^ LO and 
d&NNLO * s ma de manifest. Finally, our findings are summarised in Sect. 5. 

Two appendices are also enclosed. Appendix A summarises the phase space mappings 
for the final-final, initial-final and initial-initial configurations. Appendix B collects the 
splitting functions relevant to gluon scattering. Appendix C gives details of the convolutions 
of integrated tree- level antennae appearing in da^ NL0 . 



2. Double virtual antenna subtraction at NNLO 



In this paper, we focus on the scattering of two massless coloured partons to produce 
massless coloured partons, and particularly the production of jets from gluon scattering 
in hadronic collisions. We follow closely the notation of Refs. [60, 61]. The leading-order 
parton-level contribution from the (m + 2)-parton processes to the m-jet cross section at 
LO in pp collisions, 

pp — > m jets (2.1) 

is given by 

d& L o = MlO ^2 d$ ™(P3> • • • ,Pm+2;Pl,P2)-£- 
perms 

,Pm+2)- 

We denote a generic tree-level (m + 2)-parton colour ordered amplitude by the symbol 
A4 m+ 2(1, 2 . . . , m + 2), where 1 and 2 denote the initial state partons of momenta p\ and 
P2 while the m- momenta in the final state are labeled ps, . . . ,p m +2- For convenience, and 
where the order of momenta does not matter, we will often denote the set of (m + 2)- 
momenta {p±, . . . ,p m +2} by {p} m+ 2- The symmetry factor S m accounts for the production 
of identical particles in the final-state. 



-7- 



This squared matrix element is decomposed in a colour-ordered manner into leading 
and sub- leading colour contributions (as for example derived explicitly in [38] ) . At leading 
colour, \M m +2(- • -)| 2 consists of the squares of the colour-ordered amplitudes, while at sub- 
leading colour, it is made from the appropriate sum of interference terms of colour-ordered 
amplitudes. Both at leading and sub-leading colour, \M. m +2{- ■ -)\ 2 can be decomposed such 
that each potentially unresolved parton is colour connected to only two other partons. 

For gluonic amplitudes the permutation sum runs over the group of non-cyclic per- 
mutations of n symbols. The normalisation factor, Nlo, includes the hadron-hadron flux- 
factor, spin and colour summed and averaging factors as well as the dependence on the 
renormalised QCD coupling constant a s . 

The 2 — > m particle phase space d<E> m is given by 

d$ m (j> 3 , . . . ,p m +2;Pl,P2) = 

■ ■ ■ a^ (2 * )V(n + » - * - - < 2 - 3 » 

The jet function Jm\{p}n+2) defines the procedure for building m jets from n final state 
partons. The key property of jffl is that the jet observable is collinear and infrared safe. 

In a previous paper [60], we discussed the NNLO contribution coming from processes 
where two additional partons are radiated, the double real contribution d<r^ LO and its 
subtraction term daf iNLQ . da§^ LO involves the (m + 4)-parton process at tree level and 
is given by, 



d °NNLO = ^NNLO Yj d$ m+2(P3, • • • , Pm+4] Pi, P2) 

perms ° m + 2 

x |AW 4 (i, 2 . . . , m + 4)| 2 Ji m + 2 ) (M m+4 ). (2.4) 



Subsequently in [61] we discussed the NNLO contribution from one-loop processes 
where one additional parton is radiated, the real- virtual contribution da^^ LO and its 
subtraction term d&Jf NL0 . da§^ LO involves the (m + 3)-parton process at one- loop and 
is given by, 



d^NNLO = J^NNLO ^2 d$ m+ i(j> 3 , • • • , Pm+3 ! Pi , P2 ) ^— 



perms 



m+1 



x |M^ +3 (i, • • • , m + 3)| 2 Jt +1) ({ P } m+3 ) , (2.5) 

where we introduced a shorthand notation for the interference of one-loop and tree-amplitudes, 

|ACh 3 (i,...,m + 3)| 2 = 2Re (Ml n+3 (1, . . . ,m + 3) M° m * +3 (i, . . . ,m + 3)) , (2.6) 

which explicitly captures the colour-ordering of the leading colour contributions. 

In this paper, we are concerned with the NNLO contribution coming from two-loop 
processes, i.e., the (m + 2)-parton process, da^f LO and the remaining subtraction and 
mass factorisation contributions that are collectively denoted da^ NL0 . 



-8- 



In our notation, the two loop (m+2)-parton contribution to m-jet final states at NNLO 
in hadron-hadron collisions is given by 



d °NNLO = ^NNLO d$ ™fe, • • • , Pm+2] Pi, P2) 



perms 



x\M 2 m+2 (i,...,m + 2)\ 2 Jt\{p} 

m+2 ) , (2-7) 

where again we use a shorthand notation for the interference of two-loop and tree-amplitudes 
plus the one-loop squared contribution, 

\M 2 m+2 (l,...,m + 2)\ 2 = 2Re (A^ +2 (i, . . . , m + 2) A^ 2 (i, . . . , m + 2)) 

+ (Ml+ 2 (1, . . . , m + 2) M^ +2 (i, . . . , m + 2)) . (2.8) 

The subleading contributions in colour are implicitly included in (2.4), (2.6) and (2.8) but 
will not be considered in detail in this paper. 

The normalisation factor Nlo depends on the specific process and parton channel 
under consideration. Nevertheless, at leading colour N^ LO , J^nnlo and -^nnlo are 
simply related to Nlo for any number of jets and for any partonic process by 

2 



MWlo = (^) C(ef 



RV fa s N\ 2 C(e) 2 

^N R NLO=M LO (^) 2 ^ (2.10) 



where 



C(e) = (4vr)^, (2.11) 
C(e) = {ATi) e e- e \ (2.12) 

Note that each power of the (bare) coupling is accompanied by a factor of C{e). In this 
paper, we are mainly concerned with the NNLO corrections to (2.1) when m = 2 and for 
the pure gluon channel at leading order in the number of colours. For this special case, the 
leading order normalisation factor Nlo is given by 

*lo = I x A{ J_ 1)2 x (g 2 N) 2 (N 2 - 1) (2.13) 

where s is the invariant mass squared of the colliding hadrons. 

The renormalised two-loop virtual correction -M^ +2 to the (m + 2)-parton matrix 
element in Eq. (2.7) contains explicit global infrared poles, which can be expressed using 
the infrared singularity operators defined in [62, 63]. As discussed in Sect. 1, in order to 
carry out the numerical integration over the m-parton phase, weighted by the appropriate 



-9- 



jet function, we have to construct an infrared subtraction term 2 da^ NLO which removes 
these explicit infrared poles of the double virtual (m + 2)-parton matrix element. 

The subtraction term has three components given by Eq. (1.16). J 2 da^f NLO is derived 
from the double real radiation subtraction term da^ NLO integrated over the phase space 
of two unresolved particles and j\ dd^ s NLO is derived from the real-virtual subtraction 
term da^ s NLO integrated over the single unresolved phase space. These two contributions 
partially cancel the explicit poles in the double virtual matrix element. The remaining 
poles are associated with the initial state collinear singularities and are absorbed by the 
mass factorisation counter-term da NN 'l . 

One of the key features of any infrared subtraction scheme is the factorisation of the 
matrix elements and phase space in the singular limits where one or more particles are 
unresolved. In the antenna subtraction scheme, this factorisation is achieved through an 
appropriate phase space mapping described in Appendix A, such that the singularities are 
isolated in an antenna that multiplies matrix elements which involve only hard partons with 
redefined momenta. In determining the various contributions to da^ NLO , we shall therefore 
specify the integrated antennae and the reduced colour ordered matrix-element squared 
involved. For conciseness, only the redefined hard radiator momenta will be specified in 
the functional dependence of the matrix element squared. The other momenta will simply 
be denoted by ellipsis. 

In order to combine the integrated subtraction terms and the double virtual matrix 
elements, it is convenient to slightly modify the phase space, such that 

dd-NNLO = ^NNLO / d$ ™fe, • • • ,Pm+2] ZlPl , 32f>2 ) J~ — — 

perms J ^ m Zl * 2 

x \M 2 m+2 (l, . . . , m + 2)| 2 5(1 - Zl )S(l - z 2 ) (Mm+2) • 

(2.14) 

The integration over z\ and z 2 reflects the fact that the subtraction terms contain contri- 
butions due to radiation from the initial state such that the parton momenta involved in 
the hard scattering carry only a fraction Zi of the incoming momenta. In general, there 
are three regions: the soft (z\ = z 2 = 1), collinear (z\ = 1, z 2 ^ 1 and z\ ^ 1, z 2 = 1) 
and hard (z\ ^ 1, z 2 ^ 1). The double virtual matrix elements only contribute in the soft 
region, as indicated by the two delta functions. 

In Sections 2.1 and 2.2, we discuss the first two terms that contribute to da^ NL Q 
given in Eq. (1.16), namely J 2 da S ^ 2 NLO and Jida^ s NL0 . The final contribution da^^Lo ^ s 
discussed in Section 4.4. 

2.1 Contributions from integration of double real subtraction term: J 2 da^ NLO 

There are five different types of contributions to da^ NLO according to the colour connection 
of the unresolved partons [25, 38]: 



2 Strictly speaking, da^jv^o is not a subtraction term since its made up of integrated subtractions terms 
from the double real radiation and real- virtual radiation. Nevertheless, since it contains all the terms needed 
to render the m-particle final state finite, it is convenient to call it the double virtual subtraction term. 



- 10 - 





a 


b 


b, c 


d 


e 


ua NNLO 

II &&NNLO 

f A ~ S ' 2 
J2 aa NNLO 


X!\M° m+ 3\ 2 


x!\M° m+2 \ 2 

X2\M° n+2 \ 2 


X$X$\M° m+2 \-> 
^X°\Ml +2 \* 


XlX$\Ml +2 f 
X§X°\M° m+2 \ 2 


SX$\M a m+2 \ 2 
SX°\Ml +2 f 



Table 1: Type of contribution to the double real subtraction term da^ NLO , together with the 
integrated form of each term. The unintegrated antenna and soft functions are denoted as X®, 
X® and S while their integrated forms are X®, X® and S respectively. denotes an n-particlc 
tree-level colour ordered amplitude. 

(a) One unresolved parton but the experimental observable selects only m jets. 

(b) Two colour-connected unresolved partons (colour-connected). 

(c) Two unresolved partons that are not colour-connected but share a common radiator 
(almost colour-connected) . 

(d) Two unresolved partons that are well separated from each other in the colour chain 
(colour- unconnected) . 

(e) Compensation terms for the over subtraction of large angle soft emission. 

In the antenna subtraction approach, each type of contribution takes the form of antenna 
functions multiplied by colour ordered matrix elements. The various types of contributions 
are summarised in Table 1. We see that on the one hand the a, c and e types of subtraction 
terms, as well as the 6-type terms that are products of three-particle antennae, can be 
integrated over a single unresolved particle phase space and therefore contribute to the 
(m + l)-particle final state of the real-virtual contribution. This was described in detail 
in [61]. On the other hand the double unresolved antenna functions X® contribution 
to daff NL Q (which we denote by daff^ LO ) and the colour- unconnected X®X® terms of 
d&NNLO can immediately be integrated over the phase space of both unresolved particles 
and appear directly in the m-particle final state of the double virtual contribution, 

/ ^NNLO = / d °N b NLO + / d& NNLO- ( 2 - 15 ) 
J 2 J 2 J 2 

We now turn to a detailed discussion of each of the terms in Eq. (2.15). 

2.1.1 Integration of colour connected double unresolved antennae: J 2 da^^ LO 

In the antenna subtraction approach, the colour-connected double unresolved configuration 
coming from the tree-level process with two additional particles, i.e., the double real process 
involving (m + 4) partons, is subtracted using a four-particle antenna function - two hard 
radiator partons emitting two unresolved partons. Once it is integrated over the unresolved 
phase space of both partons, one recovers an (m + 2)-parton contribution that cancels 
explicit pole contributions in the virtual two-loop (m + 2)-parton matrix element. 



- 11 - 



The integrated subtraction term formally written as J* 2 da^fj^ LO is split into three 
different contributions, depending on whether the hard radiators are in the initial or final 
state. 

When both hard radiators i and I are in the final state, then X^ kl is a final-final (FF) 
antenna function that describes all colour connected double unresolved singular configura- 
tions (for this colour-ordered amplitude) where partons j, k are unresolved. The subtraction 
term, summing over all possible positions of the unresolved partons, reads, 

d&S NNLO F) = NnNLO Y] d$ m + 2 (p3, • • • ,Pm+A\Pl,P2) "7T~ 

O m -i_2 

perms 1 

x £ Xl jkl \M m+2 {. . . , /, L, . . .)| 2 4T\{p} m+ 2). (2.16) 

j,k 

Besides the four parton antenna function X^- kl which depends only on pi, pj, p k and pi, 
the subtraction term involves an (m + 2)-parton amplitude depending on the redefined 
on-shell momenta pi and pl, whose definition in terms of the original momenta is given in 
Appendix A.l. The (m+2)-parton amplitude also depends on the other final state momenta 
which, in the final-final map, are not redefined and on the two initial state momenta p\ 
and p 2 . This dependence is manifest as the ellipsis in (2.16). The jet function is applied to 
the m final state momenta that remain after the mapping, i.e., {ps, . . . ,pi,pl, ■ ■ ■ jPm+i} = 

Mm+2- 

To perform the integration of the subtraction term in Eq. (2.16) and make its infrared 
poles explicit, we exploit the following factorisation of the phase space, 

d$ m+2 (p3, ■ ■ ■ ,Pm+4;Pl,P2) 

^rr, ( \ dZl dZ2 
= d® m {P3, . . . ,p m+ 2] ZiPi, Z 2 P2) 

Zl Z 2 

xS(l - zi)S(l - z 2 )d<Z> Xijkl {Pi,Pj,Pk,Pi;Pi +Pj +Pk+Pi), (2.17) 

where we have simply relabelled the final-state momenta. In (2.17) the antenna phase 
space d&x ljkl is proportional to the four-particle phase space relevant to a 1 -> 4 decay, 
and one can define the integrated final-final antenna by 

zuz 2 ) = [ d<b Xijkl X% kl 5(1 - Zl ) 5(1 - z 2 ), (2.18) 

where C(e) is given by (2.11). The integrated double unresolved contribution in this final- 
final configuration then reads, 

*S,b,A(FF) , r vv f irf. 1 1 dz\dz 2 
a NNLO = N NNLO d$ m (p 3 , . . . , Pm+2 ; Z lPl , Z 2 p 2 )- 

x E ^( s ^i.^)|M m + 2 (...,M,...)l 2 t ) ({pW2) 



(2-19) 

where the sum runs over all colour-connected pairs of final state momenta (pi,Pi) and 
the final state momenta I,L have been relabelled as i, I. Expressions for the integrated 
final-final four-parton antennae are available in Ref. [25]. 



- 12 - 



When only one of the hard radiator partons is in the initial state, Xf- kl is a initial-final 
(IF) antenna function that describes all colour connected double unresolved configurations 
(for this colour-ordered amplitude) where partons j, k are unresolved between the initial 
state parton denoted by i (where i = 1 or i = 2) and the final state parton I. The 
antenna only depends on these four parton momenta Pi,Pj,Pk and p\. The subtraction 
term, summing over all possible positions of the unresolved partons, reads, 

d °N b NLO F) = ^NNLO E d$ m+2 (P3, • • • , Pm+A', Pi , P2) 

perms b ™+ 2 

x E E^i^™+2(...,/,A...)i 2 4 m )(M m+2 ). 

i=l,2 j,k 

(2.20) 

As in the final-final case, the reduced (m + 2)-parton matrix element squared involves the 
mapped momenta / and L which are defined in Appendix A. 2. Likewise, the jet algorithm 
acts on the m-final state momenta that remain after the mapping has been applied. 

In this case, the phase space in (2.20) can be factorised into the convolution of an 
TO-particle phase space, involving only the redefined momenta, with a 2 — > 3 particle phase 
space [51]. For the special case i = 1, it reads, 

d$ m+2 {p3, • • • ,Pm+4]Pl,P2) 

= d$ m (p 3 ,. . . ,p m+ 2;z 1 p 1 ,z 2 p2) — — S(zi - h) 6(1 - z 2 ) ^-d^ 3 (pj, Pk, Pi ; pi , q) 

Z\ Z2 2,TT 

(2.21) 

with Q 2 = —q 2 and q = Pj + Pk + Pi — Pi and where we have also relabelled the final-state 
momenta. The quantity i\ is defined in Eq. (A. 7). 

Using this factorisation property, one can carry out the integration over the unresolved 
phase space of the antenna function in (2.20) analytically. We define the integrated initial- 
final antenna function by, 

X^(sil,zi,z 2 ) = j^ 2 - I d^6(z 1 -z 1 )6(l-z 2 )X° 1Jkl , (2.22) 

where C(e) is given in (2.11). Similar expressions are obtained when i = 2 via exchange of 
z\ and Z2, 

Xl jkl (s-2 L ,z 1 ,z 2 ) = j^ I J d^6(z 2 -z 2 )6(l- Zl )X° 2Jkl . (2.23) 

The integrated double unresolved contribution in this initial-final configuration then 
reads, 



da NNLO = N NNLO >, / d<S> m (p 3 , . . . ,p m+2 ; Zip U Z 2 p 2 )- 

J 2 p ^ ns J ^ Z! Z 2 

E E Xl jkl (s lh Z U Z2)\M m+ 2(...Xh...)\ 2 jt\{p\rn + 2). 



i=l,2 



- 13 - 



In this expression, the redefined final-state momentum L (relabelled as I) and the rescaled 
initial state radiator /(= i = ZiPi) appears in the functional dependence of the integrated 
antenna and in the matrix-element squared. The other rescaled initial state momentum 
f = z r p r with r = 1, 2 with r / i, does not appear explicitly but forms part of the ellipsis. 
Explicit expressions for the integrated initial-final four-parton antennae are available in 
Ref. [52]. 

If we consider the case where the two hard radiator partons i and I are both in the initial 
state, then Xf t - k is a initial-initial (II) antenna function that describes all colour connected 
double unresolved singular configurations (for this colour-ordered amplitude) where partons 
j, k are unresolved. The subtraction term, summing over all possible positions of the 
unresolved partons, reads, 

,5,b,4,(77) _ KrRR sr^ 



da NNLO = N NNLO 2^ d<5> m+2 (p3, . . . ,Pm+4-,Pl,P2) ^ 

perms m + 2 

x E Y, X hk\M m+ 2(...J,L,...)\ 2 J^\p 3 ,...,p m+4 ). (2.24) 

i,l=l,2 j 

where as usual we denote momenta in the initial state with a hat. The radiators i and I 
are replaced by new rescaled initial state partons / and L and all other spectator momenta 
are Lorentz boosted to preserve momentum conservation as described in Appendix A. 3. 

For the initial-initial configuration the phase space in (2.24) factorises into the con- 
volution of an m-particle phase space, involving only redefined momenta, with the phase 
space of partons j, k [51] so that when i = 1 and / = 2, 

d$ m+2 (p3, • • • ,Pm+4-,Pl,P2) 

= d$ m (p3, . . . ,p m+4 ; zipi, Z2P2) x z ± z 2 5(z 1 - zi) 5(z 2 - z 2 ) [dpj] [dp k ] — — , 

z\ z 2 

(2.25) 

where the single particle phase space measure is [dpj] = d d ~ 1 pj/2Ej/(2ir) d ~ 1 and ii is 
defined in Eq. (A. 10). 

The only dependence on the original momenta lies in the antenna function - k and 
the antenna phase space. One can therefore carry out the integration over the unresolved 
phase space analytically, to find the integrated antenna function, 

*i°2jfcte Zi,Z 2 ) = 1 f [d Pj ] [d Pk ] Zl Z 2 8( Zl - h) S(Z2 ~ Z 2 ) ^I°2,jfe (2-26) 

where C(e) is given in Eq. (2.11). Explicit forms for the integrated initial-initial four-parton 
antennae are available in Refs. [53, 55]. The integrated double unresolved contribution in 
this initial-initial configuration then reads, 

('~S,bA(H) K rVV ST [ax. s \ 1 dz x dz 2 

\ do - NN LO = N NNLO y, / d$ ™(^3, • • • ,Pm+2; ZlPl, Z 2 p 2 )- 

J * perms J bm Zl * 2 

X E ^l j k(s 1 i,Z i ,Z l )\M m+2 (...Xl---)\ 2 jt\{p}rn + 2). (2.27) 
U=l,2 



-14- 



As in the initial-final case, the redefined initial state momenta are I = i = ZiPi and 
L = I = Z\p\. All of the final-state momenta affected by the initial-initial mapping are 
simply relabelled, p^ — > Pk- 

Note that in general, there may be several different four-parton antennae depending 
on which particles have been crossed into the initial state, and on whether these particles 
are directly colour connected (adjacent) or nearly colour connected (non-adjacent). In 
the gluonic case, there are two possibilities, the adjacent case (bearing in mind the cyclic 
properties of the gluonic matrix elements), F® k, 2), and the nearly colour connected 
(or non-adjacent) case, F®(l,j,2,k). Upon integration, both of the gluonic antennae will 
depend on s\ 2 and are labelled J 7 ®^ and ^4 nontM g respectively. 

So far, we have discussed the individual terms cascading down from the double real 
subtraction term J 2 da^f^Q. Collecting up terms proportional to a single colour ordering 
denoted by (. . .), we find a contribution of the form, 



da N b NLO = NnNLO [ d $m(P3, ■ ■ ■ ,Pm+2] *lPl, Z 2P2)^~ jN ({p} m+2 ) 

i J im Z\ Z 2 

xX%..;z 1 ,z 2 )\M m +2(--.)\ 2 

(2.28) 

where the ellipsis refers to the colour ordering of the partons and for gluon scattering 

X%..;z 1 ,z 2 ) = J2 -^cl^lab(^ b ,z 1 ,z 2 ) (2.29) 

ab ab 

where the sum runs over the colour connected pairs (a, b) in the cyclic list (...). The 
integrated double unresolved antenna X® ah {s ab -> z\,z 2 ) represents the sum over the antennae 
obtained by inserting two unresolved particles between and around the hard radiator pair 
(a, 6). is the symmetry factor associated with the integrated antenna. For gluons, 

S^b = 4 for the final-final case, = 2 for the initial-final case and S^ b * = 1 and = 2 
for the adjacent and non-adjacent initial-initial cases respectively. For example, in the 
four-gluon case, we find that when the initial state gluons are colour- adjacent (IIFF), 

XP 4 {l g ,2 g ,i g ,j g -zi,z 2 ) = Fl adj {s- l2 , Zl ,z 2 ) + ^^ nonadj (s- 12 ,z 1 ,z 2 ) 

+ \H{ s 2i^ z li z 2) + -^(Sij^!, Z 2 ) + -J^iSjl, Zl, Z 2 ),( 2 - 30 ) 

and when the initial state gluons are not colour- adjacent (IFIF), 
X° 4 (lg,i g ,2 g ,j g ;z 1 ,z 2 ) = ^J 7 2(sn,z 1 ,z 2 ) + ^J=2(s i2 ,z 1 ,z 2 ) 

+^(s2j,zi,z 2 ) + -J2(s fl , Zl ,z 2 ). (2.31) 



,S,d 



2.1.2 Integration of colour unconnected double unresolved antennae: f 2 da^ NL Q 

As discussed earlier in Sect. 2.1, contributions to the double real subtraction term due 
to colour-unconnected hard radiators that have the generic form A3 x A3 must also be 



- 15 - 



added back in integrated form. Each antenna is fully independent and the (m + 2)-particle 
phase space of the double real contribution factorizes into the m-particle phase space of 
the double virtual contribution times independent antenna phase spaces for both the inner 
and outer antennae. Note that each antenna phase space introduces integrals over the 
momentum fractions carried by the incoming partons. We label these momentum fractions 
as x\ and X2 for the inner antenna and y\ and 7/2 for the outer antenna. This contribution is 
then integrated over both of the antenna phase spaces to make the infrared pole structure 
explicit. 

This leads to the following structure for the integrated double unresolved colour un- 
connected contribution, 



J^ d& NNLO = ^NNLO j d ^m(P3, ■ ■ ■ ,Pm+2-,X 1 y 1 p 1 ,X 2 y2P2) 



1 dxi dx 2 dyi dy 2 
S m xi X2 yi y2 

xY,^(s,X 1 ,X2)X^s',y 1 ,y2)\M m+ 2({ P } m+ 2)\ 2 jt ) ({p}rn + 2) 

s,s' 

where all momenta lie in the set {p} m +2- Note that the invariant masses of the integrated 
antenna s and s', always involve different momenta, and the type of integrated antennae 
are fixed by the corresponding term in da^^ L0 . 

The integration over xi,x 2 ,yi,y 2 reflects the fact that the integrated subtraction terms 
contain contributions due to radiation from the initial state such that the parton momenta 
involved in the hard scattering carry only a fraction xiyi of the incoming momenta. In 
order to explicitly show the cancellation of e-poles we need to combine this contribution 
with the other integrated subtraction terms present in J 2 ^nwlO' Ji^^nnlo as wen as 
the two-loop matrix elements themselves. We therefore identify the momentum fraction 
carried by the incoming partons Xiyipi with the momentum fraction carried by the double 
virtual contribution z-ipi by imposing the following constraint, 

1 = J &Z1&Z2 5(zi - x 1 y 1 )6(z 2 - x 2 y2) ■ (2.32) 

This leads to two-dimensional convolutions of integrated antennae that we perform ana- 
lytically of the type, 

[X$ <g) X$\ (s,s';z 1 ,z 2 ) = J dx 1 dx2dy 1 dy 2 X^(s,x 1 ,X2)X^(s',y 1 ,y2) 

x 5(z 1 - x 1 y 1 )5(z 2 - x 2 y2) ■ (2.33) 

Explicit expressions for the convolutions of the gluonic antennae relevant to this paper are 
given in Appendix C. 

We note that the X® (g> X® terms coming from J* 2 da^ d NLO combine with similar terms 
coming from the integration of the do"^/^^ real-virtual subtraction term, and play a 
particular role in the infrared structure of the double virtual subtraction term da^ NL0 . 
This will be discussed more fully in section 2.2.2. 



- 16 - 





aa NNLO 


Final State Particles 


a 


a 


(b,c) 


m + 1 

m 









Table 2: Type of contribution to the real- virtual subtraction term d<r^f rLO , together with the 
integrated form of each term. The unintcgrated antenna functions are denoted as X® and X$ while 
their integrated forms are X® and X\ respectively. I-M* | 2 denotes the interference of the tree-level 
and one-loop n-particle colour ordered amplitude while |.M°| 2 denotes the square of an n-particle 
tree-level colour ordered amplitude. 

2.2 Contributions from integrating the real- virtual subtraction term: f ± da)^fj LO 

There are three different contributions to the real- virtual subtraction term da^f^ LO which 
have different physical origin: 

(a) One unresolved parton in the single radiation real-virtual contribution. Each sub- 
traction term takes the form of a tree-level or one-loop antenna function multiplied by 
the one-loop or tree-level colour ordered matrix elements respectively. It is denoted 

, i - VS,a 
W d(J NNLO- 

(b) Terms of the type X® X® that cancel the explicit poles introduced by one-loop matrix 

elements and one-loop antenna functions present in do^^LO- This term is named 

j - VS,b 
aa NNLO- 

(c) Terms of the type ^3-^3 that compensate for any remaining poles in the real-virtual 

V S c 

channel labelled da N ^ LO , 
so that 

/l-VS _ A ~VS,a . A ~VS,b . A ~VS,c (n qa\ 

aa NNLO — aa NNLO + aa NNLO + aa NNLO- \ l - 6 V 

The types of contributions present in each of these terms are summarised in Table 2 and 
were described in a previous paper [61]. We see that a, b and c types of subtraction terms 
can be integrated over a single unresolved particle phase space and therefore contribute to 
the m-particle final state, so that 

l ^ V N S NLO = I K S n1o + I ■ (2-35) 

We now turn to a detailed discussion of each of the terms in Eq. (2.35). 

2.2.1 Integration of single unresolved real-virtual subtraction: da^^LO 

In the antenna subtraction approach, the single unresolved configuration coming from the 
one-loop process with one additional particle, i.e., the real-virtual process involving (to + 3) 
partons, is subtracted using a single unresolved tree level three parton antenna multiplied 
by a (to + 2)-parton one-loop amplitude and a single unresolved one-loop three parton 
antenna multiplied by a (to + 2)-parton tree-level amplitude. Once the unresolved phase 



-17- 



space is integrated over, one recovers an (m + 2)-parton contribution that cancels explicit 
poles in the virtual two-loop (m + 2)-parton matrix element. 

The integrated subtraction term, formally written as Jida N ^ a LO , is split into three 
different contributions, depending on whether the hard radiators are in the initial or final 
state. 

In the final-final configuration, the integrated subtraction term is given by, 



J^NNLO^ = ^NNLO j d $m(P3, ■ ■ ■ , Prn+2] ZlPl, Z 2 p 2 ) 

Y,^ jk (s lk ,z 1 ,z 2 )\Mi +2 (...J,k,...)\ 2 J^\{p} m+2 ) 



1 dzi dz 2 

' S m zi z 2 



ik 



+ J2 X Usik,zi,z 2 )\M m+2 (. . . ,i, k, . . .)| 2 Jt ] ({pU + 2) (2.36) 



ik 



where the notation for the integrated one-loop three parton antenna function follows 
Eq. (2.18), 

Xl jk (s IK ,z 1 ,z 2 ) = -^ r) J d$ Xijk Xl jk 6(l-z 1 )6(l-z 2 ), (2.37) 

and in (2.36) the final state momenta /, K have been relabelled as i, k. Explicit integrated 
forms for X\- k are available in [25]. 

It should be noted that X\- k is renormalised at a scale corresponding to the invariant 
mass of the antenna partons, Sij k , while the one- loop parton matrix element are renor- 
malised at a scale /i 2 . To ensure correct subtraction of terms arising from renormalisation, 
we have to substitute 



xL^xl k + ^xL.({^-) -i 



v ijk ^ijk ' c ijk 

which in integrated form reads, 



(2.38) 



Xijk( s ik,zi,z 2 ) ->• Xl jk (s ik , Z!,z 2 ) + ^ Xf jk (s ik ,zi,z 2 ) ((j^j - l\ ■ (2-39) 

The terms arising from this substitution will in general be kept apart in the construction 
of the colour ordered subtraction terms, since they all share a common colour structure Pq. 

Similar integrated subtraction terms are appropriate in the initial-final and initial- 
initial configurations. In the initial-final case we have, 



/ d& NNLO F) = NnNLO [ d ^m(P3,---,Pm+2-,Zip l ,Z 2 p 2 )-^- 
Jl J <->m 

E Y. X iA^ik^i^2)\M 1 m+2 {. . . ,i,k, . . .)| 2 Jt ] ({p} m+ 2) 



1 dzi dz 2 

S m Z\ Z 2 



i=l,2 k 



+ E Y, X iM 8 ik,zi,z 2 )\M° m+2 (...Xk,...)\ 2 Jt\{pU + 2) 



i=l,2 k 



-18- 



(2.40) 

where the integrated one-loop three parton initial-final antenna function for the special 
case i = 1 is defined as, 

Xl jk (s lK , Zl ,z 2 ) = / d$ 2 ^ S( Zl - z 1 )5(l - Z2)Xl Jk . (2.41) 

In (2.40) the final state momentum K is relabelled as k while the rescaled initial state 
radiator I = ZiPi. Explicit integrated forms for X\ - k are available in [52]. 
Finally, the initial-initial integrated subtraction term is 



/ ^NNLO^ = ^NNLO [ ^m(P3, ■ ■ ■ ,Pm+2; Z\V\ , Z 2P2) ^~ 

J2 X&jis*, z l ,z 2 )\M 1 m+2 (. . . X k, . . -)| 2 4?\{p} m+ 2) 



1 dz\ dz 2 

S m Z\ Z 2 



i,fc=l,2 



+ E 4,ife^i^2)i< +2 (...,U,..)i 2 jH({ P } m+2 ) 

i,fc=l,2 J 

(2.42) 

where the integrated one-loop three parton initial-initial antenna function is defined as, 
*12j( s 12> zuto) = J [dPj] zi z 2 8{zi - zi) 5{z 2 - z 2 ) X\ 2 j . (2.43) 

As in the initial-final case, the redefined initial state momenta are I = i = ZiPi and 
K = k = ZkPk- Explicit integrated forms for X\i,i are available in [54]. 

So far, we have discussed the individual terms cascading down from the real-virtual 
subtraction term ^cr^fjf L Q ■ Collecting up the terms associated with a single colour 
ordering, we find a contribution of the form, 



/ da NNLO = NnNLO [ d^mfej, • • • ,P m +2] ZlPl, Z 2 p 2 )-^~ ^1^1 jH 
Jl J dm Z\ Z 2 

X%.., Zl ,z 2 ) (\Ml +2 (. . .)\ 2 - b j\ Mm+2 (. . .) 
+ 3 (. ..; Zl ,z 2 ) \M m+2 {. . .)| 2 + X£(. .., Zl ,z 2 ) \M m+2 { 



m+2) 



(2.44) 



where bo is the leading colour coefficient of j3o and, for gluon scattering 

X%(...; Zl ,z 2 ) = -^X^ ab (s ab , Zl ,z 2 ), (2.45) 



ab J ab 



X° 3 (...;^ 2 ) = £ ( lj 4) 6 -^Xl b (s ab , Zl ,z 2 ), (2.46) 



- 19 - 



and as in Eq. (2.28), the sum runs over the colour connected pairs (a, b) in the cyclic 
list (. . .). Each integrated antenna represents the contribution obtained by inserting one 
unresolved particle between the hard radiator pair (a, b). S^ b 3 is the symmetry factor 
associated with the integrated antenna. For gluons, = 3 for the final-final case, S^ b 3 = 2 
for the initial-final case and S^ b 3 = 1 for the initial-initial case. Assembling terms for the 
four gluon case, we find that when the initial state gluons are colour connected, i.e. in the 
IIFF topology, we have 

x 3(l 9; 2 9 ,i 9 ,j 9 ;zi,z 2 ) = J^(si2,zi,z 2 ) + -Js(s2 i ,z 1 ,z 2 ) 



+-J^(s ij ,z 1 ,z 2 ) + ^(s j - 1 ,z 1 ,z 2 ), (2.47) 



for n = 0, 1, while in the IFIF case we have, 



V 2 <?>i<?;^i^2) = \F^{s- li ,zi,z 2 ) + ]-F^{s i 2,zi,Z2) 



2 3 v ' ' 2 
-J%(s 2j , Zl ,z 2 ) + -. 



+oJ? 0%-. ^) + o- 7 ? K-i' *i> ( 2 - 48 ) 



X° 3 for these two processes is obtained in an obvious manner. 

2.2.2 Integration of explicit poles subtraction in the real- virtual channel: J 1 do^^o 

As discussed earlier, contributions to the real- virtual subtraction term that have the generic 
form X% x X% must also be integrated over the phase space of the unintegrated antenna. 
As for J 2 da^f NLO , each term present in da^^o produces a contribution of the form, 

f A ~VS,(b,c) Kr w [ ( \ 1 dxi dx 2 dyi dy 2 
/ jviVLO = nnlo \ d<£> m {p 3 , . . . ,p m+2 ;x 1 y 1 p 1 ,x 2 y 2 P2)-£ 

Jl J <->m x l x 2 Ul 2/2 

x^^3^ S ,x 1 ,x 2 )^3 (/,y 1 ,y 2 )|A^ m+2 (M m+2 )| 2 ji m )(M m+2 ) . (2.49) 

s,s' 

The infrared structure of these terms for gluon scattering takes a very particular form. 
For example, if we consider a particular colour ordering of gluons (. . .), the structure of 
the J l da^f LO contribution is given by, 



, ~ VS,b 
® NNLO 



Nnnlo [ d^ m (j> 3 ,...,p m+2 ;z 1 p 1 ,z 2 p 2 )-^-——J^ l \{p} m+2 ) 

J im Z\ Z 2 

[X° (g) X°] (. . . ; Zl ,z 2 ) - 2 [X§ ® X°] (. . . ; z u z 2 ) \M m+2 (. . .)| 2 (2.50) 



where, 

[Xij (8) X§] (. . . ; zi,z 2 ) = J dxidx 2 dyidy 2 S(zi - x 1 y 1 )S(z 2 - x 2 y 2 ) 



- 20 - 



E ( x \ X 3,ab( s ab,Xl,X 2 ) 
ab \ S ab) 



Y] 7 y x Xl cd {s cd ,y 1 ,y 2 ) 



dxidx 2 d?/idy2 - a;iyi)<5(z 2 - ^22/2) 
xX°(...;x 1 ,x 2 )X°(...;y 1 ,y 2 ) , 
(...;z 1 ,z 2 ) = J dxidx 2 dyidy2 S(zi - x 1 y 1 )5(z 2 - x 2 y 2 ) 



(2.51) 



E 



!<*3°a&( s ab; ^1^2)^ 3 °afe( s afe, 2/1, 2/2) 



E 

ab 



Sab*)' 



[X$ <g> X$] {s ab ,s ab ;z 1 ,z 2 ) 



(2.52) 



where, as in Eqs. (2.28) and (2.44), the sums runs over the adjacent pairs (a, b) and (c, d) in 
the cyclic list (...). The [X! 



^ "r()| 



,VS,(6) 



that absorbs 



i 3 j term is produced by the part of <ia NNLO 

[3 <g) X3] contribution comes 
from the antenna that corrects for the pole structure of Xi. 



the poles in the one- loop matrix element, Al n+2 , while the [^ 3 ^ 3 



Similarly, the contribution from the sum of J 2 da^LO and j l da^f LO is given by, 



.VS,c 



VS,c 
NNLO 



j 2 da NNLO + 

= ^NNLO f d$ m (P3,---,Pm+2]Z 1 p 1 ,Z 2 p 2 )^——J^({p} m+2 ) 
J im Z\ Z 2 

\M m+2 (...)\ 2 



--[X§®X§] (...;z 1 ,z 2 )+[X°®X° 3 \(...;z 1 ,z 2 ) 



(2.53) 



Here, all of 



and the three terms in 



where the invariants have at least 



one common hard radiator momentum are produced by j x da^^Q. The remaining terms 
in [X3 <g> X3] , where there is no overlap between the hard radiator momenta, come from 

J 2 aa NNLO- 

In our example of four gluon scattering, we see that in the IIFF case, 



[X§®X§](l 9 ,2 fl ,i 9 ,j fl ; zi,;Z2) 

[X° X°] (5 I2 , sir, zi,z 2 ) + - [X° ® X°] (s- 2l , s 2i - Zl ,Z 2 ) 

+1 [ x 3 ® x i] (sij,Sij;zi,z 2 ) + j [X° ® X°] (s fl ,s fl ; z u z 2 ), 



(2.54) 



while in the IFIF topology, 



[X§®X§](l fl ,i fl ,2 ff ,j fl ;zi,^) 

= 1 [ x i ® x s] (sii, sii; zi, ^a) + - [A- 3 ° A- 3 °] (s i3 , 21, 22) 



- 21 - 



+ \ [ X i ® ^3°] 25) + 4 [<*3 ® ^3°] Sji; ^1^2). 

(2.55) 

Explicit expressions for the convolutions of the gluonic antennae relevant to this paper are 
given in Appendix C. 

3. Gluon scattering at LO and NLO 

In this section we discuss gluon amplitudes and gluon scattering up to NLO. 
3.1 Gluonic amplitudes 

The leading colour contribution to the m-gluon n-loop amplitude can be written as [64, 
65, 66, 67, 68], 

A™ (fe,^,^}) 




,cr(m)). 



(3.1) 

where the permutation sum, S m /Z m is the group of non-cyclic permutations of m symbols. 
We systematically extract a loop factor of C(e)/2 per loop with C(e) defined in (2.11). The 
helicity information is not relevant to the discussion of the subtraction terms and from now 
on, we will systematically suppress the helicity labels. The T a are fundamental represen- 
tation SU(N) colour matrices, normalised such that Tr(T a T b ) = 5 ab /2. A^(l, ■ ■ ■ ,n) 
denotes the n-loop colour ordered partial amplitude. It is gauge invariant, as well as being 
invariant under cyclic permutations of the gluons. For simplicity, we will frequently denote 
the momentum pj of gluon j by j. 

At leading colour, the n-loop (m + 2)-gluon contribution to the M-jet cross section is 
given by, 

da = AC+2 d$ m(P3, • • • ,Pm+2-,Pl,P2)^ 

x E A^ +2 (a(l),...,a(m + 2))J^\ P3 ,...,p m+2 ) (3.2) 

where 

hclicities i=0,n 

(3.3) 

encodes the summed and squared matrix elements such that, for example, includes 
both the interference of two-loop graphs with tree-level as well as the square of the one- 
loop contribution. 



- 22 - 



The normalisation factor A/^ +2 includes the average over initial spins and colours and 
is given by, 



a s N\ m - 2 C(e) m+n ~ 2 
2^) C(e) r 



where for the 2 — > 2 Born process, A/lo is given in Eq. (2.13). As usual, we have converted 
g 2 into a s using the useful factors C(e) (2.11) and (7(e) (2.12), 



, 2vr , 

The dijet cross section is obtained by setting M = 2 in (3.2). At NLO, m + n = 3; the 
virtual contribution has m = 2 and n = 1, while the real radiation component has m = 3 
and n = 0. At NNLO, m + n = 4 and the various contributions are obtained by setting 
m = 4 and n = (double real), m = 3 and n = 1 (real- virtual) and m = 2 and n = 2 
(double virtual). We will encounter both and A\ when discussing the double virtual 
corrections to the NNLO dijet cross section in Sect. 4. 

As discussed earlier, it is convenient to introduce two different topologies depending 
on the position of the initial state gluons in the colour ordered matrix elements. These 
are labelled by the colour ordering of initial and final state gluons. We denote the con- 
figurations where the two initial state gluons are colour-connected (i.e., adjacent) or not 
colour-connected as IIFF and IFIF respectively, 

da LO = do#T + 63j& F , (3.5) 



where, 



d^LO F = Nlo J d$ 2 (P3, • • • ,PA-,PuP2)^j A 2) (ps,Pa) 



x 2A 4 (i 9 ,2 9 ,i 9 ,j 9 ), (3.6) 

P(iJ)e(3,4) 



x E A(l 9 ,i 9 ,2 g ,3 9 ), (3-7) 
P(iJ)e(3,4) 



where the sum runs over the 2! permutations of the final state gluons. 



3.2 Contributions to the gluonic final state at NLO 

In this subsection, we collect up the terms that are relevant for the 2-particle final state 
at NLO. There are three contributions, the renormalised interference of one-loop and tree 
graphs, the integrated subtraction term and the NLO mass factorisation contribution. 



- 23 - 



3.2.1 The four-gluon single virtual contribution da^ LO 

The leading colour four-gluon one- loop contribution to the NLO dijet cross section is ob- 
tained by setting m = 2, n = 1 and M = 2 in (3.2) such that N^ LO = A/4 and we 
have, 

a ,v,iiff fa a N\- [ Aih i n 1 dzidz 2 (2), . 

JVLO = A/LO I "2^T ) / d ^2(j>3, • • • ,P4| ^lPl,^2P2)2j — — J 2 iP3,P4) 

x J] 2Al(i g ,2 g ,ig,jg)S(l-z 1 )5(l-z 2 ), (3.8) 

P(ij)e(3,4) 

x E ^(i ff ,^^,i g )5(l-^i)5(l-Z2). (3.9) 
P(i j)e(3,4) 

We note that the singular part of the renormalised one-loop contribution involves the 
infrared singular operators, 

A\(i g , % , i g , j g ) = 2 J« (e; l g , % , i ff , j 9 ) A° 4 {% , 2 9 , i g , j 9 ) + O (e°) , (3.10) 
^(l^^^J^e;^ (3.11) 

where the infrared singular operators for the two permutations are given by, 

I^\e;l g ,2 g ,i g ,j g ) = lW(e, Sl3 )+lW(€,5 a ) + lW(e, SiJ + l£ ) (e,s J -i), (3.12) 
/ (1) (e; i ff ,i fl , 2 9 ,i 5 ) = I«(e, + I«(e, S , 2 ) + I«(e, % ) + I$(e, s fl ), (3.13) 



with, 



/Wfea )-- 

1 qq l fc ' — 



1 11 

? + 67 



^ 2 



(3.14) 



l gg\^°99) 2r(l-e) 
3.2.2 The integrated NLO subtraction term J x dcr)y LO 

Within the antenna subtraction scheme, the NLO integrated subtraction terms for the IIFF 
and IFIF configurations are given by, 

j i d& NLO F= ^Lo(^^- S j C(e) j d^> 2 (P3, ■ ■ ■ ,PA\ ZlPl,Z 2 P2)^ ^ ^ J2 2 \P3,P4) 

x E X 3(l 9; 2 9 ,i 9 ,j 9 ; Zl ,z 2 )2^(i 9 ,i 9 ,i 9 ,j 9 ), (3.15) 
P(i,j)e(3,4) 

^ da NLO F = NlO (~^~) ^( e ) y d$ 2 (p 3 , ■ ■ • ,P4i Z 1 p 1 ,Z 2 p 2 )-^ ^ ^ J2 2) (P3,P4) 

x ^g,ig,2g,jg;z 1 ,z 2 )Al(i g ,i g Xjg), (3-16) 

P(i,j)e(3,4) 

where the relevant X3 are obtained by setting n = in Eqs. (2.47) and (2.48) respectively. 



- 24 - 



3.2.3 The NLO mass factorisation term da^[ 
At NLO, the mass factorisation term is given by 

[ A ~MF,IIFF Kr ( a sN\~, ( , f , , si dzidz 2 T (2), s 

J da NLO = -NhO I -^T )C(e) J d^ 2 {p 3 ,...,P4;Z 1 p 1 ,Z 2 p 2 )———J^ {P3,Pa) 

x E rW. OT (z 1 ,^)2A2(i fl ,2 fl ,i fl ,j ff ), (3.17) 

P(iJ)€(3,4) 

x E rWggizu^A^igXjg) (3-18) 

P(iJ)€(3,4) 



where 



with 



r & fl (*i»^) = <5(l-z 2 )r«(z 1 ) + <5(l-z 1 )r«(z 2 ), (3.19) 
r«(z) = -ipj 9 (z). (3.20) 



3.2.4 Finiteness of the NLO two-particle final state contribution 

We see that the gluonic contribution to the two-particle final state in the IIFF channel is 
given by combining Eqs. (3.8), (3.15) and (3.18), such that the combination 

2I^(e;l g ,2 g ,i g ,j g )S(l - Zl )S(l - z 2 ) + Xl(l g ,2 g ,i g J g ; Zl , z 2 ) - r g % g ( Zl , z 2 ) (3.21) 

is finite, which is indeed the case. Similarly, the combination of Eqs. (3.9), (3.16) and 
(3.18) 

2lW(e;i g ,i g ,2 g ,j g )5(l - Zl )S(l - z 2 ) +^{l g ,i g ,%,j g \z u z 2 ) -V^z^) (3.22) 
is also finite. 

4. Double Virtual corrections for gluon scattering at NNLO 

As discussed in Sect. 2, the four parton contribution consists of the genuine two- loop 
four parton scattering matrix element together with doubly and singly integrated forms 
of the six-parton and five-parton subtraction terms. In this section, we give expressions 
for the contributions that enter in the implementation of the double virtual correction and 
construct the subtraction term da^ NLO for the IIFF and IFIF topologies. Here, and as in 
Refs. [60, 61], we focus on the leading colour contribution to the pure gluon channel. 

4.1 The four-gluon double virtual contribution da^^LO 

The leading colour four-gluon double virtual contribution to the NNLO dijet cross section 
is obtained by setting m = 2, n = 2 and M = 2 in (3.2) such that M^Yilo = ^2 and we 
have, 

a ~vv,iiff Kr ( 'a s N\ 2 2 f 1 dzidz 2 ,(2), s 

dcr NNLO =Nl0 \~2^~) C ( e > J d $2(P3,---,P^Z 1 p 1 ,Z 2 p 2 )———J 2 "'{p 3 ,P4) 



- 25 - 



x E 2Al(l g ,2 g ,i g ,j g )6(l- Zl )6(l-z 2 ), (4.1) 

P(i,j)€(3A) 

,~VV,IFIF Kr fa s N\ r 2 f 1 dzidz 2 (2), , 

d<J NNLO =Nl0 \~2^~) ^> J d$2 (P3, • • • ,P4;Z 1 p 1 ,Z 2 P2)y — — J 2 {P3,Pa) 

x Yl Al(t g ,i g ,%J 9 )S(l-z 1 )6(l-z 2 ). (4.2) 
P(iJ)e(3,4) 

Explicit expressions for the interference of two-loop amplitudes with tree-level and the 
self- interference of the one- loop amplitudes are given in Refs. [69] and [70], respectively. 

The renormalised singularity structure of the two-loop contribution in Eqs. (4.1) and 
(4.2) can be easily written in terms of the renormalised tree-level and one-loop matrix 
elements [62] . For the IIFF ordering we have, 

A4(tg,2 g ,i g ,jg) = 21^ (e;lg,2g,ig,jg) ( lg , 2g , lg , jg ) — A\ ( lg , 2g , lg , jg ) ^ 

-2I^(e;lg,2g,ig,jg) 2 A 4 (lg,%,hJ 9 ) 

+2e ~ el %\ 2 e) (j + K ) l{1 H^M^ 9 J 9 )Al(lJ g ,i g ,j g ) 
+2HW(e)Al(IgX,i 9 ,J 9 ) + O(e ) (4.3) 

with an analogous equation for the other colour ordering. At leading colour, the constants 
K and (e) are given by, 

18 6 ' 

4.2 The integrated NNLO subtraction term, f 2 daff NLO + ^da^^Q 

Combining terms as discussed in Sect. 2, the integrated four parton subtraction contribu- 
tion for this topology can be written as, 

(/ S II FF I VS IIFF \ 
J 2 d °NNLO + J i d °NNLO J 

= -^NNLO f d $2(p3,---,P4:]Z 1 p 1 ,Z2P2)^——J 2 :2 \p3,P4)2 ^ 

J Zl Z2 P(iJ)6(3,4) 

Xl(lg, 2g,ig,jg; Z 1 ,Z 2 ) + Xl(lg, 2g, lg, j g J Z lf Z 2 ) 



+ —XsjiO-g, 2 9> igJgl z ^ z i) ~ [ X 3 ® X sJ 0-g> 2 ff> *s> i»! *i> ^2) 



jX^(l fl ,2 fl ,i fl , i fl ;zi,z 2 ) + ^ [X§®X§] (l 3 ,2 s ,i 3 ,j s ;zi,z 2 ) 



-^■4 (iff) 2^, iff) is) 



- 26 - 



+ Xjftlfl, 2 g , i g ,j g ; Z!,z 2 ) A\(l g , 2 g ,i g ,j g ) } , 



(4.5) 



where the various combinations of integrated three parton antennae are given in Sect. 2. 
A similar expression with the same structure is valid for the IFIF topology. 



4.3 The NNLO mass factorisation contribution d<r 



-MF,2 



NNLO 



The four-particle NNLO mass factorisation term for the IIFF topology is 



da 



MF,2,IIFF 
NNLO 



NNNLO [ ^2(P3,---,P4;Z 1 p 1 ,Z 2 p 2 )^——J2 ) (P3,P4)2 ^ 

J Zl Z2 P(iJ)6(3,4) 

" r gg;gg( z l, z l) A lO-g, 2g,ig,jg) ~ ^g-gg^l , Z 2 ) A\(l g , %, l g ,j g ) 

0-g, 2g,ig,jg] Z\,Z 2 ) A 4 (l g , 2 g , lg,jg) 

(z 1 ,z 2 )A° 4 (l g ,%,i g ,j g ) 



+ 



r (i) (grw 

99,99 ^ 99,99 



(4.6) 



where r g 1 g \ gg (z 1 , z 2 ) is given by Eq. (3.19) and Y y gg \ gg (zi, z 2 ) is given by 



(2) 



with 



rg> = *(i - z 2 )T^( Zl ) + 5(1 - Zl )T^(z 2 ) + rU( Zl )T$(z 2 ), 



2e 



(4.7) 



The convolutions are given by, 

(l 9 ,2 9 ,i 9 ,j 9 ;zi,z 2 ; - / dx 1 dx 2 dy 1 dy 2 6(z 1 - x 1 y 1 )8(z 2 - x 2 y 2 ) 

'- r m99 ( x i ' X ^ X 3 0-g > 2 9 , i 9 , J 9 ; yi , V2 ) , 



(4.8) 



and 



r (i) gr (i) 



(21,22) = / dxxdx^yxdyi^bizx - x\y\)b(z 2 - x 2 y 2 ) 
r 8L(*i>*2) r« (yi.jft). 



(4.9) 



It is straightforward to obtain a similar expression for the IFIF topology. 
4.4 The four-gluon subtraction term, da NNLO 

By assembling the expressions given in the previous subsections, the two-particle subtrac- 
tion term d&jyNLO can now be written in the suggestive way, 



, - UJIFF 
aa NNLO 



f j - S,IIFF _ f 
J 2 aa NNLO J 



j - VS,IIFF _ , * MF,2,IIFF 
aa NNLO ® NNLO 



-27- 



NnNLO [ ^2(P3,- ■ ■ ,P^Z 1 p 1 ,Z 2 p 2 )-^ —— J2 2 \P3,P4:)2 ^ 
J Z. Z\ Z 2 



P(jj)e(3,4) 



x< - 



"^4 (Iff) 2 p , ig, jg) A®(lg,2g,ig,jg) 



( X 3- r S } ; ra ) ® ( Zl ! r S ffff )] (l fl ,2 fl ,i fl ,i fl ^i,z 2 )A2(i 9 ,2 9 ,i ff ,^) 



^ (Iff, 2 ff , zi, Z2) + X£(l ff , 2 g , i 9 , j 9 ; Zl , z 2 ) 



+ ^X23(l fl ,2 9 ,i s ,j ff ;zi,2?2) - [X§®X§](l fl ,2 s ,i ff ,j fl ;«i,«2) 



^(Ifl) 2g,ig,jg) 



(4.10) 



where we have eliminated I^ 2 ) using, 



Yf g \ gg {z u z 2 ) = L - r« 99 ®r« 99 (^^ 2 )-^rW ;ffff (z 1 ,z 2 ) + rS ) ;99 (z 1 ,z 2 ), (4.11) 



with 



-^[S(l-z 2 )p gg (z 1 ) + S(l-z 1 )p° gg (z 2 )], 



and the explicit form of the convolution (X3 — Fgg\g g ) (X° — rj^ ;S9 ) in this topology is 
given in (C.6). 

It is a key requirement of da^ NLO that it explicitly cancels the infared poles present 
in the double virtual contribution da)^ L0 . We previously observed that to cancel the 
infrared poles at NLO, the pole structure of the combination X3 — T gg \ gg must reproduce 
that appearing in the Catani 1^ operator as in (3.21). 

With this in mind, we see that the first two lines of Eq. (4.10) correspond to the first 
two terms in the Catani pole structure of the two-loop contribution Al(l g , 2 g , i g , j g ) given 
in Eq. (4.3). In fact these two lines give a contribution proportional to the finite part of 



(4.12) 



X°, 



jA° 4 x Jmite(X§). 



The remaining lines in Eq. (4.10) correspond to the remaining terms in the Catani pole 
structure where the fourth order poles cancel and, as expected, produce a deepest pole 
contribution of 



-28- 



We have checked that the remaining terms in (4.10) analytically cancel against the infrared 
poles (that start at C(l/e 3 )) coming from the I^(2e) and H^ 2 \e) terms in (4.3). 

The subtraction term for the IFIF topology can be constructed in an analogous manner 
and we find an identical structure, 



da 



UJFIF 
NNLO 



, ~ S,IFIF _ I , - VSJFIF _ j ~ MF,2,IFIF 
® NNLO I aa NNLO ® NNLO 



f , * SJFIF f 
~ J ® NNLO ~ J 1 

= -^NNLO [ d< ^2(P3,- ■ ■ ,P4;Z 1 p 1 ,Z 2 p 2 )^—— 4 2 \p3,P4) Yl 
J Z. Zi Z2 



P(jj)e(3,4) 



[ 3 ( 1 <? > h . 2 9 . i 3 ; *i >^2 ) - r W (Zi , Z 2 ) 



A\(lg,ig,2g,jg) A®(lg,ig,2g,jg) 



ro _ p(i) 

3 99;S9 



r0 _ r (i) 

3 99;S9 



2 9 ,J 9 ; Z\,Z2) A®(lg,ig, 2g,jg) 



Z 4 (lg,ig,2 g ,j g ; zi,z 2 ) + Xl(lg,i g , 2 g ,j g ; zi,z 2 ) 
+ ^ x °3(l<y^9>2 9 , j g ; zi, z 2 ) - [X§ (8) X§] (l s ,i s , 2 g , j g ; z u z 2 ) 
~^gg;gg( Zl i Z2 ^ A4(l g ,i g ,2 g ,j g ) >. 



(4.13) 



Once again, we see that there is a correspondence with the Catani pole structure and we 
have checked explicitly that Eq. (4.13) precisely reproduces this pole structure. 



5. Conclusions 

In this paper, we have generalised the antenna subtraction method for the calculation of 
higher order QCD corrections to derive the double virtual subtraction term for exclusive 
collider observables for situations with partons in the initial state to NNLO. We focussed 
particular attention on the application of the antenna subtraction formalism to construct 
the subtraction term relevant for the leading colour gluonic double virtual contribution to 
dijet production. The gluon scattering channel is expected to be the dominant contribution 
at NNLO. The subtraction term includes a mixture of integrated (tree-level three- and 
four-parton and one-loop three-parton) antenna functions in final-final, initial-final and 
initial-initial configurations. We note that the subtraction terms for processes involving 
quarks, as required for dijet or vector boson plus jet processes, will make use of the same 
types of antenna building blocks as those discussed here. By construction the counter-term 
removes the explicit infrared poles present on the two-loop amplitude rendering the double 
virtual contribution locally finite over the whole of phase space. 

The double virtual subtraction terms presented here provide a major step towards the 
NNLO evaluation of the dijet observables at hadron colliders. The expressions for &v NNLO 



- 29 - 



presented in Section 

r\ /T^ 1 \f\ 1 1 O VI f~\ r\ ST 



4, completes the required set of subtraction terms da" 



NNLO 

[60] 



daJj NLO [61] and da NNLO required to render the four-, five- and six-gluon channels ex- 
plicitly finite and well behaved in the single and double unresolved limits relevant for the 
gluon scattering at NNLO, thereby enabling the construction of a full parton- level Monte 
Carlo implementation at leading order in the number of colours. The ultimate goal is the 
construction of a numerical program to compute the full NNLO QCD corrections to dijet 
production in hadron-hadron collisions. 

Acknowledgments 

This research was supported in part by the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council, 
in part by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) under contracts PP00P2-139192 
and 200020-138206 and in part by the European Commission through the "LHCPhenoNet" 
Initial Training Network PITN-GA-2010-264564. EWNG gratefully acknowledges the sup- 
port of the Wolfson Foundation, the Royal Society and the Pauli Center for Theoretical 
Studies. 

A. Momentum mappings 

The NNLO corrections to an m-jet final state receive contributions from processes with 
different numbers of final state particles. 

In the antenna subtraction scheme, one is replacing antennae consisting of two hard 
radiators plus unresolved particles with two new hard radiators. A key element of the 
antenna subtraction scheme is the factorisation of the matrix elements and phase space 
in the singular limits where one or more particles are unresolved. This factorisation is 
guaranteed by the momentum mapping. 

If we denote the sets of momenta for the M-particle processs by {p}m, then in order 
to subtract singular configurations from one final state, and add their integrated form back 
to final states with fewer particles, there needs to be a set of consistent momentum maps 
such that 



The single unresolved emissions corresponding to Eqs. (A.l) and (A. 3) have been the 
subject of previous publications and therefore we collect here only the transformations that 
map singularities in the (m+4)-parton process to their integrated form in the (m+2)-parton 
process, i.e., Eq. (A. 2). 

If the antenna consists of two unresolved particles j, k colour linked to two hard ra- 
diators i and I, then the mapping must produce two new hard radiators I and L. Each 
mapping must conserve four-momentum and maintain the on-shellness of the particles 
involved. There are three distinct cases, 



Mm+4 ->• Mm+3, 
Mm+4 -> Mm+2, 
Mm+3 -> Mm+2- 



(A.l) 
(A.2) 
(A.3) 



final — final configuration 



ijkl — > IL 



-30- 



initial — final configuration 
initial — initial configuration 



ijkl —7- IL 
ijkl — > IL 



where, as usual, initial state particles are denoted by a hat. In principle, the momenta 
not involved in the antenna are also affected by the mapping. For the final-final and 
initial-final maps, this is trivial. Only in the initial-initial case are the spectator momenta 
actually modified. The momentum transformations for these three mappings are described 
in Refs. [71, 51] and are recalled below. 

A.l Final-Final mapping 

The final-final mapping is given in [71] and reads, 



pj = pt — 
1 (ijk) 



xpf + rip^ + r 2 p% + zpf 



(A.4) 



with p\ = p\ = 0. Defining Ski = (pk + Pi) 2 , the coefficients x, ri,r 2 , z are given by [71], 

Sjk + Sjl 



n 

T 2 
X = 



Sij + S jk + Sjl 
Ski 

Sik + Sjk + s k i 

1 



2(sjj + s ik + s it 

/ \ s ij Ski ~ SikSjl 

+(n - r 2 ) — J - 

Sil 

1 



(1 + p) Sij k i - n {sj k + 2 Sji) - r 2 {s jk + 2 s k i) 



2(sii + Sji + Ski) 



(1 - p) s^ki - ri (sjk + 2 s^) - r 2 {sj k + 2 s ik ) 



-(n - r 2 



Sij Ski s ikSjl 
Sil 



[n -r 2 )" u , 

J- "r 2 2 kli Sil Sjki Sik Sjl) 

S il S ijkl 

H {2 (ri (1 - r 2 ) + r 2 (l - n)) (s^s fei + s ik Sji - s jk s a ) 

Sil Sijkl 

111 

+ 4n (1 - n) SySj/ + 4r 2 (1 - r 2 ) s ifc s fc / jj , 
X(u, v, w) = u 2 + v 2 + w 2 — 2(uv + uw + vw) . 

This mapping smoothly interpolates all colour connected double unresolved singularities. 
It satisfies the following properties; 



p 



(ijk) 



Pi+Pj +Pk, 



p m pi 
p m -+ pi 



p m^ Pi > 



p 



(jkl) 



when pj,p k ->0, 
when pi || pj || p k , 
Pi+Pk+ Pj when pj || p fc || pi, 



-31- 



(A.5) 



P (jjk) ~^ Pu p (jk7) ~^Pl+Pk when Pj — ^ and pk || pi, 

pirn ^ pi+ p j ' P{jid) ~* Pj when Pk ~* and Pi " Pi ' 

P(^) ->• Pi + Pj, Pfjj^ -^Pk+Pl when pj || pj and p fc || pj. 

A. 2 Initial-Final mapping 

The initial-final mapping is given in [51] and reads, 

U -it " u 

Pj =Pi = Z iPi , 

Pl = P^jj = Pj+Pk + Pi-( 1 - Zi)Pi , ( A -6) 

with p? = p| = and where the bar denotes a rescaling of the initial state parton and z; L 
is given by [51], 

z % = . (A.7) 

Sjj T Sjfc T Sj; 

The mapping satisfies the appropriate limits in all double singular configurations; 



Pj- 


+ Pi, 




p (m ' 


->pi 


when pj,p k -)• 0, 


vi- 


+ Pi, 




p (m ~ 


^Pk+pi 


when pj - 


-)• and p fc pi, 


Pi~ 


+ P» 




p (jkf) " 


->• Pj + Pk + pi 


when pj 


1 Pfc II Pi, 


Pj- 


+ (1- 


w)Pi, 


p (m ~ 


+ pi 


when pj - 


->■ u>pj and pfc — >■ 0, 


vi- 


+ (1- 


w)Pi, 


P (jM) ~ 


^pi + Pk 


when pj - 


-)• ifpj and pfc pi, 


Pi ~ 


+ (1- 


w)pi, 


P W) ~ 


*pi 


when pj +pk = wpi, 



(Ai 



and where the roles of partons j and k can be interchanged. 
A. 3 Initial-Initial mapping 

The initial-initial mapping for il,jk — > IL is given in Ref. [51] and reads, 

it -it - u 

Pj=Pi = ZiPi, 

U -it u 

P\ = Pl = ZlPl, 

r = , _ 2p m -{q + q) , , y) V? y 

it u , u it ft 

<r = pf + pf - Pj - Pfc' 

r=pf+pr (a.9) 

with p| = p? = p^ = and where the bar denotes rescaling of both of the initial state 
partons and m runs over all the particles in the final state that are not actually part of the 
antenna but require boosting in order to restore momentum conservation. 



- 32 - 



The rescaling of the initial state momenta are given by the fractions Z{ and z\ given 
by [51], 



SU + Sjl + Ski Sijkl 



Sil Sij ~t~ Sik V Sn 



h = su + sij + sik sijja ^ 
y sn + Sji + s M V s u 

With these definitions it is straightforward to check that the momenta mapping satisfies 
the correct limits required for proper subtraction of infrared singularities. Specifically, in 
the double unresolved limits; 

Pj -> Pi, Pi -> Pi when pj,p k ->• 0, 

-> (1 - if p^ ->■ p/ when pj ->■ and p fe = u/^, 

p 7 - ->■ (1 - U7j)pj, p^ ->• (1 - wi)pi when pj = WiPi and p k = wipi, 

Pj ->• (1 - p^ ->• Pz when p^ + p fc = 10^, (A. 11) 

together with the limits obtained from these by the exchange pi pz and pj o p^. 
B. Splitting functions 

In this section we collect the splitting functions that appear in the NLO and NNLO mass 
factorisation counter terms, da^[ Q and da^^Q, that are required for the construction of 
the double virtual subtraction term da^ NL0 . 

The leading colour contribution to the gluonic splitting functions read [72] 



P gg(y) = Y 6{1 ~ V) + 2Voiy) + \ ~ 4 + 2y ~ 2y2 > (B ' 1} 
K ®P° 9g ) (V) = (j§ ~ 8{1 ~ V) + y (2V (y) + 2 -~4 + 2y- 2 y 2 ) 

+8V 1 (y) - m ^ y) + 12 - \2y + y y 2 - 12y H(0; y) + Ay 2 H(0; y) 

_44_ 411(0^ ^ (l_ A + 2 y-2yA (B.2) 

3y y \y / 

P\M = (| + 5 (! - y) + 27 + (1 + y) (yH(0; y) + 8H(0, 0; y) - ^ 
+2 f -L- - - - 2 - y - y 2 ) ( H(0, 0; y) - 2H(-1, 0; y) - C 2 

Vi + y y /V 



- ( - - y 2 J - 12H(0; y) - - y 2 H(0; y) 

+ Q - 4 + 2y - 2y 2 ^j - ( 2 + H(0, 0; y) + 2H(1, 0; y) + 2H(0, 1; y) 
2 /67 \ 



- 33 - 



(B.3) 



where we have introduced the distributions 



ln-(l-y) 



1 - 



(B.4) 



and where the notation for the harmonic polylogarithms H(mi, m w ; y), rrij = 0, ±1 
follows Ref. [72, 73]. The lowest-weight (w = 1) functions H(m;y) are given by 



H(0;y) = my , H(±l;y) = T ln(l T y) 
The higher-weight (w ^ 2) functions are recursively defined as 



(B.5) 



H(mi, ...,m w ;y) 



with 



dz f mi (z)B(m 2 , ...,m w ; z) 



K JO 



fo(y) 



l 

y 



f±i(y) 



if m 1 ,...,m w =0, ...,0 
otherwise 

1 



1 =F 2/ 



(B.6) 



(B.7) 



C. Convolution integrals 



In this section we collect the convolution integrals that capture the infrared structure of 
the double virtual contribution. In the most general case, we find convolution integrals 
between two integrated three-parton tree-level antennae that come from the integrated 
double real and real- virtual subtraction terms, but also convolution integrals of an Altarelli- 
Parisi splitting kernel with an integrated three-parton tree-level antenna and convolution 
integrals of two Altarelli-Parisi splitting kernels that are produced by the mass factorisation 
contribution. 

The convolution integrals described above are defined respectively as, 



[AfgtgiAfg ] (s,s';zi,z 2 ) = J dxidx2dyidy 2 ^3(s,xi,x 2 ) ^3 (s',yi,y2) 



r (i) 

1 hi 



yO 



,(1) 
kl 

,(1) 
kl 



i (s;zi,z 2 ) 
(s;z 1 ,z 2 ) 
(zi,z 2 ) 



(zi,z 2 ) 



x 8(zi - xiyi)S(z 2 - x 2 y 2 ) , 

J dxidyi r^(xi) X%{s,yi,z 2 )5(zi - xiyi) , 

J dx 2 dy 2 T$ (x 2 ) X% (s; z l ,y 2 )5(z 2 - x 2 y 2 ) , 
J d Xl d yi r^(x 1 )T^(y 1 )S(z 1 -x 1 y 1 )S(l-z 2 ). 
J dx 2 dy 2 F^(x 2 )T^(y 2 )S(z 2 -x 2 y 2 )5(l - Zl ) 
(z 2 ,zi) . 



r 



(i) 

kl 



,(1) 



(C.l) 
(C.2) 

(C.3) 

(C.4) 

(C.5) 



To explicitly show the cancellation of e-poles we perform the above integrals analytically. 
For the purpose of this paper the relevant antennae are those containing the pure gluon 



- 34 - 



final state that we recall below. The integrated final-final [25], initial-final [51] and initial- 
initial [51] to 0(e) read, respectively, 

S(l-x 1 )5(l-x 2 ) 



3 11 /73 7vr^ . 



M 2 



<5(l-x 2 ) 



r <5(l-xi) + 



1 / 11 



67 7T 



fl <5(l-xi) + 4 2xi 

6 x\ 



11 



+2x( - 2D (xi) + 5(1 - xi) — - — - — P (xi) + 22?! (xi) 



18 



_il + H (0, xx) (4 - — - — ? 2xi + 2xj) 

6x1 V xi 1 — xi / 



+H(1, xi) I 4 - — - 2xi + 2xj J + 0(e) 



-^12,7( S 12> X l) X 2) — ( "^J 



^(5(1 - xi)J(l - x 2 ) + ^ ( (5(1 -xi) 



V x 2 



x 2 + x 2 



-P (x 2 ))^ - 6(1 - xi)<5(l - x 2 )^ + 5(1 - xi)(Pi(x 2 ) 

+(H(-1, x 2 ) - log(2)) (2 - — - -i x 2 + x 2 ) 

V x 2 1 - x 2 / 

+H(1, x 2 ) (2 - - x 2 + xfj ) - 2?o(xi) (2 - ^- - x 2 + x 2 .) 

+Jz>o(zi)Z>o(z 2 ) + ~ jz * rr— r (2xtx| + 2xfxi - 4x?x 2 i 

2 2xix 2 (l + xi)(l + x 2 ) V 

-2x%x\ - 2x\x\ + 10x 2 x^ + 6x 2 x^ + 2x 2 x| + 4x 2 x^ + 2x 2 x 2 + lOxix^ 
+10xix 2 + 4xix 2 + 1x x x\ + 2xix 2 + x x x 2 + 2x 2 + 2) 

H -- ^ y^" ^ 10x^^2 ~\~ X-^X2 22x^3?2 5x^X2 ~\~ 5x^X2 18x^X2 

-4xix 2 + 2xix 2 - 3xix 2 - 5x 2 - x 2 - 4x 2 ) + (xi «-)■ x 2 ) + 0(e) 

To evaluate the finite part of the convolutions consistently, the integrated antennae are 
needed through to 0(e 2 ) and computer-readable expressions can be found in files attached 
to [25, 51]. 

Convolution integrals involving the antennae above appear explicitly in the four-gluon 
subtraction term da^ NLO derived in section 4.4. In particular the explicit form of the 
convolution (X§ - r$ ;gg ) <g> (X§ - r$ ;99 ) for both the IIFF and IFIF topologies reads, 



*3 '/;'/:////) ® ( X 3-r« 99 ) (l 9 ,2 9 ,z 9 ,i 9 ;^i,z 2 ) 



[J3 <g> Jf ] (s i2 , s i2 ; zi, z 2 ) + - [J§ (g> J^ ] (s 2i , s 2i ; zi, z 2 ) + - [J§ <g> J^ ] (s^-, zi, z 2 ) 

1 2 

+- [J^ J^ ] (sji, sji; z 1} z 2 ) + [J^<g>J^] (si2, s 2i ; «i, 22) + - [J=3 ® ^3] (ai2, «i, 22) 



- 35 - 



1 1 

+ [Jf <8> J 7 !] (§12, Sji, Z U Z 2 ) + g [J3 <8> J3] (S2i> «1, «2) + g [-^3 ® ^ ( S 2i, Sjl! «1, 32 ) 



1 



+- [J^®Tl] (s ij ,s jI ;z 1 ,z 2 ) + 



r (i) (g, r (i) 

99 ^ 99 



(Zi, Z 2 ) + 



r (l)^ r (l) 
99 ^ 99 



(zi,z 2 ) 



Zl,Z 2 

2 



2 

3 L 



{s 2i ;zi,z 2 ) - 
(s ij ;z 1 ,z 2 ) - 



(s2i;^i,«a) , 5 

(SjlJZl,^) - 



(sy-;zi,z 2 ) 
(5^52:1,2:2), (C.6) 



(x° - T« J 55 (x° - r« gg ) (l s ,i 9 ,2„i;z 1 ,z 2 ) = 



- [J^ <8> -F3 ] (aft, Sh; Z!,z 2 ) + - [J3 Jf] (s i2 , 21, 22) + ^ [>3 <8> J3] (s 2j , s 2j ;zi,z 2 ) 
+\ [H ® ^3] (Sji, Sji; ^1^2) + ^ [^3° ® ^3] ZI1Z2) + \ [H ® Jf\ (sit, s 2j ; z 1} z 2 ) 

+ \ [H ® ^3°] Sji; ^2) + 2 [-^3 ® ^3°] ( S i2, S 2j ; Zl, Z 2 ) + - [jf ® Jg ] ( Sf2 , Zi, Z 2 ) 

+\ [H ® J 7 !] (s- 2j ,s fl ; Zl ,z 2 ) + [r« ® r$] i (zx, z 2 ) + [rg ® r«] 2 (zi, z 2 ) 
+2r«(z 1 )r«(z 2 )- [rg®J§l i - [r$ ® J^l o (s^zi,^) 







l (Sj2;3L,Z 2 ) - 






5^ 


2 (s 2j ;z u z 2 ) - 


rg>®^; 



r£>®^ 



(s -i; 2:1,2:2) 
1 J 



r£®^ 



(s 2j ;zi,z 2 ) 
{s fl -z u z 2 ) . (C.7) 



The full expressions for the convolution integrals through the finite part are quite 
lengthy and are attached in computer-readable form to the arXiv submission of this pa- 
per. In this section we give only the leading singular contributions. For the convolutions 
involving two three-parton tree-level antennae we obtain, 



; 2l,Z2) 



9 33 1 /559 21 
e 1 + e3 + ^ VT~ ~ ~2 



§(l _ Zl ) S (l - Z2 ) 

7T 2 - 150C 3 ) + 



/31625 3913 2 87 4 

he + 46 7T 



-550C 3 ) 



+ 0(e), 



[7f jk ® Tl np ] (S ik , Sl p - Z!,Z 2 ) 



~7 



5(1 - 22) 



l r 

14 



65(1 - zi) 

+4 &(1 - zi) + (l2 - — - 6zi + 6z 2 - 6P (zi)) 



+- 



«5(1-Zl)(— -57T 2 



33 33 

yPo(zi) + 6Pi(zi) + 22 - — - llzi + \\z\ 



(C.8) 



- 36 - 



+H(1, zi) (l2 6z! + 6z 2 ) + H(0, «i) (l2 

+o( e - 1 ) 



21 



6zi + 6z 2 ) 



(C.9) 



£12 
/i 2 



l r 



+ 



e 3 L 2 



35(1 - zi)S(l - z 2 ) 
11 



5(1 - Z1 )5{1 - z 2 ) + 5(1 - zi) ( 6 - — - 3z 2 + 3z^ - 3D (z 2 )) 

\ z 2 ' 



+5(1 - z 2 )(6 - — - 3*i + 3z 2 - 3D (zi)) 



+0(e~ 2 ) 



2 2 ) 



(CIO) 



s lfcl 

M 2 



°lpl 

7^ 



l r 
T 



e 
1 

+^ 



45(1 - zi)5(l - z 2 ) 
22 



— 5(1 - zi)5(l - z 2 ) + 5(1 - z 2 ) (l6 - — - 8zi + 8z 2 - 8P (zi)) 



l r 

+^7 



73 



5(1 - Zl )6(l -z 2 )( — --tt 2 )+ 5(1 - z 2 ) - —V ( Zl ) + 162?i(zi) + — - — 



44 



80 88 



58 
3*i 



+ 22z 2 + H(l, zi) (32 - — - 16«i + 16z 2 ) + H(0, zi) (l6 



3 3zi 
12 12 



Zl 



-20z 2 + 12z 2 )) 



+o( e - 1 ) 



[•^ljfc ® ^np] (Slfc, «2 P ; 21, 2 2 ) 



(C.ll) 



s lfcl 

M 2 



-j |^45(1 — 2i)5(l — z 2 ) 

1 r22 / 4 o \ 

+- -^(1 - zi)5(l - z 2 ) + 5(1 - zi) 8 4z 2 + 4z 2 2 - 4D (z 2 ) 

+5(1 - z 2 ) (8 - 1 - 4zi + 4z 2 - 4D (zi)) 

1 r /7S \ / 22 

+-2 [5(1 - zi)5(l - 22) (— - 27T 2 ) + 5(1 - 21) ( - yA,(z 2 ) + 4Pi(z 2 ) + 



+^z 2 2 + H(l, z 2 ) ( 8 - - - 4z 2 + 4z 2 " ) + H(0, z 2 ) ( 8 - - 



2 2 



2 2 1 - Z 2 

! ! 11 



22 22 

3 3z 2 

- 4z 2 + 4z; 



11 



"2 2 



/ 22 22 22 11 11 / 4 

+5(1 -Z2)[- yA)(zi) + 4Pi(zi) + — - — - — zi + — z\ + H(l, zi) [8 - - 



-37- 



-4 Zl +4zj) +H(0,*i)(8 4zi + 4^)) -D (zi)f8 4z 2 

/ v z\ 1 — z\ / / v 

^o(^) (8 - ^ - 4ei + 4z 2 ) + 4V ( Zl )V (z2) + 16 + 



+4z 2 



^2 

4 8 4z 2 

ZlZ 2 Zl zi 



AzZ 8 



— - — - 8z 2 + 8z| + — - 8zi + 4ziz 2 - 4^i z| - — + 8zf - 4zfz 2 + izfz 



\z\ 



Zl Z 2 



Z2 



Z2 



+0(e- 1 ) 



(C.12) 



F hk ® ^12^ ( s ifc> s i2! *a) = 



g ifcl 

M 2 



a 12 



25(1 - zi)<5(l - z 2 ) 

^5(1 - z ± )6(l - z 2 ) + 6(1 - Zl )U--- 2z 2 + 2z 2 2 - 2V (z 2 )) 
o v z 2 / 

4 



+5(1 - z 2 ) (8 - - - 4ei + 4z 2 - 4D (zi)) 
+0(e- 2 



(C.13) 



l r 



I ^12 i I ^12 

(s i2 ,s l2 ;zi,z 2 ) = ( -j^J |^ 



6(1 - Zl )S(l - z 2 ) 

+4 U(l -zi)U- — - 2z 2 + 2z\ - 2V (z 2 )) + 6(1 -z 2 )U- — - 2z x + 2z\ - 2V ( Zl )) 



+0(e- 2 ) 



(C.14) 



For the convolution integrals involving an integrated three-parton tree-level antenna 
and an Altarelli-Parisi splitting kernel we obtain, 



99 nop 



(s np ;z 1 ,z 2 ) = — # 6(1 -z 2 ) 



i 1 



+- 
1 

+- 



—5(1 - zi) + 12 6zi + 6z 2 - 6D (zi) 

' ^5(1 - Zl ) + 22 - — - llzi + llz 2 - ll£> (zi) 
12 zi 



s( 803 77 2\ -,o 73 73 73 2 73 / x 

*(i - *i) ( - ^ + + 73 " ^ " T *i + y^i - y^) 

"^(7-2^-^1 + ^-^1) 



+O(e ) 



(C.15) 



- 38 - 



s lk\ 

M 2 



6(1 - z 2 ) 



e 3 L 



^<5(1 - Zl ) + 8 - — - 4zi + 4z 2 - 4D (*i) 



+A [<5(1 - zx) ( - ^ - ^tt 2 ) + H(l, z x ) (l6 - A - 8zi + 8z 2 ) - H(0, z x ) (^ + ^ 

44 

3zi 



+12*i - 4z 2 ) + 12 - ii - 12zi + -^z 2 + 8Pi(zi) 



+1 [5(1 _ Zl) ( _ + iivr 2 - 4C 3 ) + H(l, 1, Zl ) (24 - ^ - 12z x + 12z 2 



+H(l,0,Zi) 16-- 



zi 1 - Zl 

4 4 



8Z1 + 8Z 2 ) +H(0,l,zi)f8- A- -A i 6zi 

/ V Zi 1 — zi 



+8zf +H(0,0,zi) -- 



44 



Zl l - Zl 

12zi +4z 2 ) +H(l,zi)(l2- H - 12zi 

44 \ 11 49 

2 ) +H(0,zi)(l4- — -4zi + — zl) -6P 2 (zi) + — Pi(zi)-— Z> (*i) 



Zl 1 - Zl 

22 



+ 



571 73 437 



3zi 
389 



18 4zi 

+O(e ) 
Ti gg ® F ljk ( s lfc^l^ 2 ) 



3 

I'.y i:u ;jM9 n/ 5 '■> \ 

Iz7 " IT 1 + 18* + * " 2 + 3 * ~ 3^ + 



12 



(C.16) 



s ifcl 
^ 2 



- _ _ Z2 ) + 5(1 _ Zl ) ( 8 - - - 4z 2 + 4z 2 2 - 4V (z 2 )) 

o v z 2 / 



+- 



1 rl21 r/ xp/ , p/ x /22 11 11 11 o 11 , N \ 

36" ' " 21)4(1 " 22) + S(1 " 2i) (t " 5S " T 22 + Y 2 * " T ° (22) ) 



+5(1 - z 2 ) ( - — + — + — zi - —zl + — V (z 1 )j - 2>o(*i) (8 - - - 4z 2 + 4z 2 J 



-P (z 2 ) (8 - ^ _ 4zi + 4 z fj + 4 p ( Zl )p ( Z2 ) + i 6 + 



4 

4zi 



+ 



4 

4z 2 4z| 



ZiZ 2 Zl Zl Zl z 2 



-8z 2 + 8z| H 8zi + 4ziz 2 - \z\z\ + 8z 2 - 4z 2 z 2 + 4z 2 z| 

z 2 



4zf 

Z2 



+0(e- 1 ) 



(C.17) 



J i 



(s i2 ;zi,z 2 ) 



a 12 



l r 11 



+- 



e 2 L 3 



(5(1 - zi)5(l - z 2 ) + 5(1 - z 2 ) (A - A - 2zi + 2z 2 - 2D (zi)) 

1 9./ ^ x/ 11 11 11 11 9 11 , x\ 

-vr 2 5(l - Zl )S(l - Z2 ) + 6(l-z 1 )(- — + — + -z 2 - -z 2 2 + -V (z 2 )j 
+5(1 - z 2 ) (H(l, zi) (8 - — - 4zi + izf) + H(0, zi) ( - — - 6zi + 2z 2 ) 



- 39 - 



+4Di(zi) + yX>o(*i) + I - ^ - y*i + y z i) + P o(^i)( - 4 + ^ + 2z 2 - 2z 2 ) 
+D (z 2 ) ( - 4 + y + 2«i - 2z 2 ) + 2P (^i)^o(^) + 8 + 



4 2z 2 24 



ZlZ 2 21 Zl Zl z 2 

2 Z , 2z 2 1 
-4z 2 + 4z 2 H - 4zi + 2ziz 2 - 2ziz| 5- + 4z 2 - 2z 2 z 2 + 2z 2 z| 

Z2 Z2 J 



+o( e - 1 ) 



(C.18) 



In all the cases where an initial-final antenna involves the opposite initial state leg, the 
resulting expression can be obtained with (z\ o z 2 ) interchange. 



[Ff jk <8> Tl np ] (s ik , s 2p ; zi,z 2 ) = [T? jk <8> F^ np ] (s ik , s 2p ; z 2 , z x ) , 

[J r l jk ®j r lnp] (s2 k ,S 2p ;Zi,Z 2 ) = [Tljk <8> Tlnp] (s 2k , S 2p , Z 2 , Z\ ) , 
(Si k ,Si2,Z 1 ,Z 2 ) = F\,jk® ( s 2k,Sl 2 ,Z 2 ,Z 1 ) , 



(s np ;zi,z 2 ) 



99 no P 



(s np ,z 2 ,z 1 ) , 



gg ^ " nop 

r£ } ® Jfj fc ] 2 (s 2fc ; *i, *a) = [rW ® j? Jfc ] i (s 2fc , 2 2 , ^) , 



12,j 



(Sl2; 2 l.^) 



r£®^ 



12,j 



(Sl2)^2,^l) • 



(C.19) 
(C.20) 

(C.21) 
(C.22) 
(C.23) 
(C.24) 
(C.25) 



For completeness we give also the convolution of two Altarelli-Parisi splitting kernels, 



99 



0i,^ 2 ) 



? [ s<1 - 2i) (lr - r 2 ) + H(1 ' 2i> ( 16 -rr 8zi+ 82 + H(0 - 2l) ( - i ~ ih; 

\ 22 8 22 14 22 

-12zi + 4z 2 ) + 8X>i(zi) + yZ>o(*i) " 3 " 3^ " y 21 + y *ij S(l - z 2 ) . (C.26) 

C.l Convolutions of plus distributions 

In this section we collect the results for the convolution of two plus distributions which 
appear in the convolution integrals of the previous section. They are defined as, 



f /ln n Cl 
[V n ®V m ] (z) = / dxdy ( — 



+ 



ln n (l-j/) 

i-y 



5{z - xy) 



and read, 



[Do ® V ] (z) = -( 2 5(1 -z) + 2V 1 (z) - y ( °' 1 



— z 



\V X ® V ] (z) = ( 3 5(1 -z)- ( 2 V (z) + \v 2 {z) + + > 

[V 2 V ] (*) = -2C4<5(1 - z) + 2C 3 D (^) - 2C 2 Dx(z) + ^D 3 (*) - 2H( °'^ M) 



(C.27) 

(C.28) 
(C.29) 



-40- 



2H(l,0,l,z) 2H(l,l,0,z) 



(C.30) 



1-z 1-z 



Pi ® Pi] (z) 



^5(1 -z) + 2( 3 V (z) - 2C 2 V 1 (z) + V 3 (z) - 
2H(0,l,l,z) 2H(l,0,l,z) 2H(l,l,0,z) 



2C 3 H(0,l,0,z) 



1-z 1-z 



1 — z 1 — z 1 — z 



(C.31) 



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