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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 11, 2018 2:07am-3:57am EST

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so many things had to happen to get to the point where we were standing to feet away. a fireman got in. grabbed it. pulled it out. covered in mud. and the girl is okay. >> the girl is okay? >> the girl is okay. it was unbelievable. if you had seen that, just, there its no way that we should have found that child. and, probably 15 more minutes it wouldn't have been alive. it was cold and had been there for a while. >> at the johnson's today where everything seemed lost, a little luck was found. >> you found it. that was the bunny that i missed catching. oh, my gosh. that is unbelievable. that is the best. that its the best. >> this sign of the times in leonia, new jersey, is a low tech solution to a high tech problem. >> this will change life in leonia. it should. >> in the al
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off by deadly avalanches. >>
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>> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." federal judge here in california has blocked the trump administration from ending daca, the program that protects children brought into the country illegally, as children from being deported. more now on this from chief congressional correspondent nancy cordes. >> reporter: outrageous is the word the white house used to describe the in junction imposed by san francisco judge william alsap who ruled the administration make a mistake of law last fall when it decide to roll back the obama era daca order allowing so-called dreamers to go to school and find work without fear of deportation. dreamers like hector suarez.
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january 21st, and that is in 11 days. >> president trump hit back at the ruling on twitter. saying, it just shows everyone how broken and unfair our court system is. but the judge wrote that the president's own past tweets like this one, show he supports daca protections too. does anybody really want to throw out good educated and accomplished young people who have jobs? some serving in the military? really. >> we are going to come up with daca. >> the white house was already dealing with daca fallout after the president appeared to side with democrats yesterday. on how to solve the problem. >> what about a clean daca bill now -- >> i think a lot would look to see that. >> most republicans insist any protections for dreamers must be paired with more border security. >> i am not going to support doing daca by itself. >> buy today mr. trump was back on the same page. >> it's got to include the wa
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>> it is still unclear tonight how the department of homeland security plans to handle the judge's ruling. whether and when it will start accepting daca applications again. what is clear is that there is now new urgency after several false starts here on capitol hill to find a permanent legislative fix. jeff. >> nancy. there was an announcement about a significant republican retirement today. what can you tell us about that? >> that's right, daryl issa of california, long time republican, former chair of the house government oversight committee, he says he will not be seeking re-election in 2018. in what many republicans feel will be a very difficult midterm election season for them. the 31st republican to announce that. all right, noon see cordes, thank you very much. the president suggested to day there is not much chance he will agree to be interviewed in the
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here is our chief white house correspondent major garrett. >> there has been no collusion. there has been no crime. >> there is no collusion whatsoever. >> and there is no collusion. >> reporter: that has been president trump's mantra as special counsel robert mueller continues to investigate connections between mr. trump's campaign and russian operatives. the president's lawyers are now negotiating with mueller over when and how an interview with mr. trump will occur. but today the president said that may not be necessary. >> when they have no collusion, and nobody has found any collusion, at any level, it seems unlikely that you would even have an interview. >> he did point to a precedent for potential interview comparing his situation to the hillary clinton e-mail investigation. >> hillary clinton had an interview where she wasn't sworn in, she wasn't given the oath, they didn't take notes, they didn't record, and it was done on the fourth of july en
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fbi occurred july 2nd, 2016 and lasted 3 and a half hours. investigators did take notes, despite mr. trump's claim. on twitter the president for the first time called on republicans to "finally take control of the russia investigation that he said was making the country a laughingstock." >> they had this phony cloud over this administration, over our government, and it has hurt our government. it does hurt our government. it is a democrat hoax. >> the president's lawyers believe an interview with mr. trump would signal the imminent conclusion of mueller's investigation. we learned today, that in early november, mueller added a justice department expert in cybercrimes to his team of investigators. jeff. >> major garrett. thank you very much. >> a hospital in baltimore is investigating the treatment of one of its patients. staffers left the woman dressed only in her hospital gown near a bus stop last
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freezing cold. jeff pegues has the story. >> y'all are going to leave this lady out here with no clothes on? >> overnight he was walking past a baltimore hospital when he noticed something he says he will never forget. >> assuming you are all with the security department? okay. is there a supervisor available? >> i am the supervisor. >> the hospital security guards wheeled a patient to a bus stop. in the freezing temperatures they left her there. the only thing she had on was a hospital gown. >> it is about 30 degrees out here right now. are you okay? are you unable to speak? are you okay, ma'am? do you need me to call the police? >> it is called patient dumping and it doesn't just happen in baltimore. in
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investigated removing homeless patients from los angeles hospitals and leaving them downtown. often the patients are not insured or have financial issues. it is unclear if that was the case in baltimore. >> go ahead and sit down. [ sobbing ] [ crying ] >> okay, ma'am. go ahead and sit down. thank you. i'm going to call to get you some help. >> in a statement the university of maryland medical center said they share the shock and disappointment of many who have viewed the video. in the end they say we clearly failed to fulfill our mission with this patient. >> the man who recorded the video called 911, he says medics ended up taking the patient back to the same hospital. a review is under way that could lead personnel action against the hospital employees involved. jeff. >> jeff pegues, thank you
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much. i'm never gonna be able to sleep with this cold. i'll take a sick day tomorrow. on our daughter's birthday? moms don't take sick days... moms take nyquil severe. the nighttime, sniffling, sneezing, coughing, aching, fever, best sleep with a cold, medicine.
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now to other stories we are following. immigration agents today raid
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17 states and washington, d.c. at least 21 suspected undocumented immigrants were arrested. officials say the sweep was a follow-up to the 2013 arrests of nine 7-eleven managers for harboring illegal immigrants. the aclu says it is investigating at rest of a teacher monday night at a school board meeting in louisiana. the teacher had spoken out against a pay raise for the superintendent. the deputy city marshal escorted her out and cuffed her in the hallway. >> stop resisting. >> i am not. you just pushed me to the floor. >> the teacher was arrested for resisting the officer, the charges were dropped. >> if there is one thing you need at the world's biggest electronics show, it is electricity. but the power was knocked out for two hours at the ces technology show in las vegas. nevada energy blamed the blackout on the convention center's equipment. the cbs "overnig
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if you find yourself in a highway traffic jam here on the california coastan
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roads. some who live on the roads want to close them to outsiders. jim axel rod explains. >> this will change life in leone. >> it should. >> reporter: this sign in leone, new jersey is a low tech solution to a high tech problem. >> there is approximately 60 streets closed. >> a way to control the out of control traffic, for residents like melissa sulsman. >> how long does it take? >> 10, 15 minutes. depend who will be nice and how much i will push up against their car to let me out. >> leonia is a one square mile town in the shadow of the george washington bridge. for years whenever traffic would back up at the bridge. savvy commuters would get off the highway and take a sthort cut. if you knew the secret there were ways to beat the jam. >> stay to the right to exit 78, leonia. >> reporter: but now everyone has ways, or other traffic apps that routes them through leonia. once the main str
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to residential side streets. >> may your juda ziegler. they have an app to shave three minutes. now all over the side streets in the municipality. >> this is what it can look like on the once quiet streets of leonia. restrict the streets during rush hour, just to leonia residents. have a hang tag in your car, or get a ticket. >> we are not talking $20. >> no, talking $200. $200 has some teeth. >> for medford mass to freemont, california. victims of the traffic apps. as tom row discovered if you pass a law the app will remove side streets from its menu of short cults. >> people will do whatever the app tell them to do. and it's scary some times. >> it's what the an stops telling them to do that should make life legislation scary here. >> in 1,000 feet. stay off to the right.
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leonia, new jersey. up next, the
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6,000 miles from here in the alps, the threat is not mudslides but avalanches. some areas got six feet of snow. a swiss town was cut off for days but trains are running again. in france, workers needed heavy equipment to dig out a village. they carved a path that has walls. more than 20 feet high. a book about world war ii has suddenly and accidentally become a best-seller. nearly a decade after it was first published. fire and fury, the allied bombing of germany apparently is being confused with fire and fury inside the trump white house. the moral of this story, read the fine print. the first woman to become a u.s. army general has died. anna mae hayes born in buffalo, new york served as front line nurse during world war ii an
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korea. in 1970 promoted from colonel to brigadier general. she died monday of a heart attack. she was 97 years old. up next, they have been on the front lines of fires and floods.
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>> special nod to the cbs crews. to their ankles. beyond covered in mud. working in santa barbara, county, california. that is nothing compared to what fire rescue crews are face tonight as they search through the mud for the missing. here, they came to the rescue of a 14-year-old girl. trapped in the wreckage of a house. many of these unsung heroes are the same men and women who risk their lives, fighting the wildfires that destroyed acre after acre here, setting up the conditions that led to the mudslide disaster. as the rain storm ended, a rainbow appeared in the sky. a symbol of hope when needed the most. that's the "overnight news," i'm jeff glor.
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hi, welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. search-and-rescue teamsen southern california are in a race against time off to find survivors. trapped amid the debreis of deadly mudslides. torrential rains, center trees, boulders rumbling down the hillside. hundreds of homes are destroyed. power lines down. gas lines snapped. in some places the only way into the disaster zone is behind a bulldozer or inside a helicopter. jeff glor begins coverage with a bird's eye view, in the devastation in and around montecito. >> look at that, the 101 underneath us. you get a sense how much damage was done.
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damage was done and how difficult the clean-up process is. in some cases the mud is three feet deep. some of this areas are so vulnerable to mudslides because the topography is so rugged, it goes from sea level, to moun mountains that are a few thousand feet high within a few miles. in some cases the mud moves so fast it was so deep it swept homes right off their foundations. >> when you get down to the ground this is what you see. this is just one of the homes that has been overtaken by mud. and you hear the fire alarms. that is a sound that is going off all over this neighborhood. >> the 101 is one of the nation's most famous freeways also one of the busiest. but, look, from this everpass you can see it is -- it is little more than a sink of mud. and debris. at this point. look at that one car, still, out there, stranded. all alone. on the 101.
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>> search-and-rescue teams were poking with sticks looking for any one trapped. >> you do like in an avalanche. you poke. feel something different figure out what it is. >> more than 100 people were rescued many from rooftops by helicopters. >> stuck in the mud with chest pain. >> scorched by the massive thomas fire in december, hillside in montecito collapsed when more than an in. of rain fell in 15 minutes. marco farrell had just gone outside his parents' hem and shot the video on his cell phone when he saw the mud and debris coming. >> the flash flood is right there. get out of here. go. oh, my god, mom. >> i basically ran for my life. >> i ran for my life. ran as fast as i could. made it back to my house within 30 second with the front of the flash flood hitting. second later, boulder crashed through. >> waist deep mud raging through my house. every inch of the house. >> the river of mud and debris swept up everything in its p
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over here, a classic car. now it is literally wrapped around a tree. major roads were swamped. trapping many in their homes. >> this is how deep the mud is. >> oprah winfrey posted a video walking through the mud at her montecito estate. >> the house in the back is gone. >> voluntary evacuation orders were issued, but only 15% of residents left. many who got caught in the mudslide had just evacuated in december during the wildfires. after what you have seen are you surprised so many people died? >> absolutely not. this town has evacuation fatigue. a lot of people were complacent. >> this its what people had to escape through. large treats, boulders, even cars, rushing down the street. and through these homes. if you look past the search-and-rescue team here, there is still three feet of mud inside this home. and it is thick. it is
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orange x means this home has been checked and so far, no one has been found. president trump, blasted a federal judge that blocked the move to daca program. daca and so-called dreamers it protects is central to an everall immigration bill taking shape on capitol hill. nancy cord? -- cordes reports. >> reporter: outrageous is the word the white house used to describe the in junction imposed by san francisco judge william alsap who ruled the administration make a mistake of law last fall when it decide to roll back the obama era daca order allowing so-called dreamers to go to school and find work without fear of deportation.
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dreamers like hector suarez. >> my daca expires. january 21st, and that is in 11 days. >> president trump hit back at the ruling on twitter. saying, it just shows everyone how broken and unfair our court system is. but the judge wrote that the president's own past tweets like this one, show he supports daca protections too. does anybody really want to throw out good educated and accomplished young people who have jobs? some serving in the military? really. >> we are going to come up with daca. >> the white house was already dealing with daca fallout after the president appeared to side with democrats yesterday. on how to solve the problem. >> what about a clean daca bill now -- >> i think a lot would look to see that. >> most republicans insist any protections for dreamers must be paired with more border security. >> i am not going to support doing daca by itself.
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>> buy today mr. trump was back on the same page. >> it's got to include the wall. we need the wall for security. >> it is still unclear tonight how the department of homeland security plans to handle the judge's ruling. whether and when it will start accepting daca applications again. what is clear is that there is now new urgency after several false starts here on capitol hill to find a permanent legislative fix. >> the investigation into russian interference. president trump told reporters it seems unlikely he will speak with the special counsel. major garrett has the the story. >> there has been no collusion. there has been no crime. >> there is no collusion whatsoever. >> and there is no collusion. >> reporter: that has been president trump's mantra as special counsel robert mueller continues to investigate connections between mr. trump's campaign and russian operatives. the president's lawyers are now negotiating with mueller over when and how an interview with mr. trump will occur. but today the president said
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that may not be necessary. >> when they have no collusion, and nobody has found any collusion, at any level, it seems unlikely that you would even have an interview. >> he did point to a precedent for potential interview comparing his situation to the hillary clinton e-mail investigation. >> hillary clinton had an interview where she wasn't sworn in, she wasn't given the oath, they didn't take notes, they didn't record, and it was done on the fourth of july weekend. >> clinton's interview with the fbi occurred july 2nd, 2016 and lasted 3 and a half hours. investigators did take notes, despite mr. trump's claim. on twitter the president for the first time called on republicans to "finally take control of the russia investigation that he said was making the country a laughingstock." >> they had this phony cloud over this administration, over our government, and it has hurt our government. it does hurt our government. it is a democrat hoax. >> the president's lawyers believe an interview with mr. trump would signal the imminent conclusion of mueller's investigation. we learned today, that in early november, mueller added a justice department expert in cybercrimes to his team of investigators. jeff.
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this is the cbs "overnight news." science is learning more about the degenerative brain disease, cte, caused by blows to the head, and affects an alarming number of football players. but they're not the only ones. since 9/11. more than 300,000 u.s. soldiers have returned home with similar brain injuries. our correspondent has the story for "60 minutes." ♪ ♪ >> when joy keifer buried her 34-year-old son this past summer it was the end of a long goodye
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>> keifer's son enlisted in army reserves at age 18. over three deployments. he was exposed to 12 comb batat blasts. many roadside bombs. he returned home in 2012, a different man. >> his whole personality, had changed. i thought it was, exposure to, to all of the things that he had seen. and heap just had become harder. he was not happy. at this point. you are thinking the design. my child, he has been in war. he has seen too much. did he tell you about blast he's experienced during the time. >> uh-huh. >> what did he tell you. they shook him. and he was having blackouts. and -- and, it, it frightened him. >> he withdrew from families and friends. he was angry. depressed.
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his health begin to decline quickly. by his 34th birthday. sergeant kevin nash was unable to speak, walk or eat on his own. >> looking back on it now. was there anything you feel look he could have done. >> huh-uh. >> no it was his brain. the thing i didn't know his brain was continuing to die. i mean before he went into the service. he said, you know i could come back with no legs. or no arms. or even blind. or i could be shot. i could die. but nobody ever said -- that he could lose his mind. one day at a time. >> his final wish was to serve his country one last time, by donating his brain to science. a gesture he thought would bring belter understanding to the invisible wound of war. joy reached out to the va, boston university, concussion legacy
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n neuropathologist is researching head trauma and cte. mckey has spent 14 years looking at the post-mortem brains of hundreds of athletes who suffered concussions playing their sport. this past summer her findings shook the football world when sheep discovered, cte in the brains of 110, out of 111 deceased nfl players. using serious concerns for those in the game today. and when doctor mckey autopsied, the patriots tight end, aaron hernandez who killed himself after being convicted of murder she found most severe case of cte ever in some one under 30. now she is seeing a similar pattern. experienced a different kind of head trauma. comb battle blasts.
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doctor examined. 66 had cte. >> i can understand a football player who keeps hitting his head and having impact and concussions. but how is it that, the combat veteran who may be just experience aid blast has the same type of injury? >> this blast injury causes a tremendous sort of ricochet or, or a whiplash injury to the brain inside the skull. and that's what gives rise off to the same changes that we see in football players, as in, military veterans. >> the blast trauma was first recognized in world war i. known as shell shock, poorly protected soldiers often died immediately or went on to suffer physical and psychological symptoms. today, sophisticated armor allows more soldiers to walk away from an explosion. but exposure can still damage the brain an injury that can worsen over time. >> not a
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what's really been stumping us i think as physicians it is not easily detectable, right. you have got a lot of psychiatric symptoms. you can't see it very well on images of the brain. so it didn't occur to us. i've think that's been the gap, really, that this has been, what everyone calls an invisible injury. >> this is the world's largest cte brain bank. >> the only foolproof way to diagnose cte is testing a post-mortem brain. >> full of hundreds of brains. >> hundred. thousands really. >> researchers carefully dissect sections of the brain where they look for changes in the fold of the frontal lobes. an area responsible for memory, judgment, emotions, impulse control, and personality. >> do you see there is a little tiny hole there? an abnormality. a clear abnormality. and what would that affect? >> well it is part of the memory circu circuit. you can see that clear hole there shouldn't be there. it is connecting the important, you know, memory
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so, that, that is a soon of cte. >> the thin shivers are stained and viewed microscopically. it is in the final stages where a diagnosis becomes clear. as in the case of sergeant kevin ash. >> so this is sergeant ash's brain? >> right. this is, four sections of his brain. what you can see its the lesions, are cte. characteristic. and, a unique feature of cte. in a healthy brain you wouldn't see an of the brown spots? >> no. no. completely clear. then when you look microscopically you can see that the towel which is staining brown and is inside nerve cells is surrounding these little vessels. >> explain. what is the towel? >> towel is a protein that is normally in the nerve cell. it helps with structure. and, after trauma, itrt
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clumping up as a -- as a toxin inside the nerve cell. over time, and even years, gradually that nerve cell dies. >> dr. lee gold stein has been building on dr. mckey's work with testing with mice. >> in the trauma laboratory. >> inside his boston university lab, dr. goldstein brilt this 37-foot blast tube and a mouse in this demonstration. a mouse and model its exposed to explosion equivalent to ieds used in iraq and afghanistan. >> when it reaches 25 this thing is going to go. dr. goldstein's model shows the what is going on inside the brain, during a blast. the brightly colored waves illustrate stress on the soft tissues of the brain. as it ricochets back and forth within the skull. >> what we see after the last exposures, they looked fi
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they come out of -- what is a near lethal blast exposure. just like our military servicemen and women do. and they ha peer to be fine. what we know is that -- that that brain, is not the same after that exposure as it was, microsecond before. and if there is a subsequent exposure, that change will be accelerated. ultimately this triggers a ne o neurodegenerative disease. in fact we can see that even after one of the exposures. >> the department of defense, hundreds of thousands of soldiers who experience aid blast like this. what does that tell you? >> this is a disease and problem we are going to be dealing with for decades. and it is a huge public health problem. huge problem for the veterans administration. it is a huge moral responsibility for all of us. >> a sponlt owed to soldiers like 33-year-old sergeant
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brat balt bates. >> bates walked away from the mangled humvee. one of four ied blasts he survived during deployments in iraq and afghanistan. >> do you remember feeling the impact in your body? >> yes. >> what does that feel like? >> basically like get hitting by a train. >> put back on the front lines? >> yes. >> that was it. >> uh-huh. >> when he returned home in 2009, his wife libby immediately saw a dramatic change. >> i thought something is not absolutely right here. something is going on. for him to just lay there and -- and sob, and be so sad. you know what do you do for that? how do i, how do i help him? he would look at me and say if it wasn't for you, i would end it all right now. you know. and like what do you -- what do you do to, what do you say to somebody who says that? you know. i love this man so much. and
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you can see sharon's full report on our website, cbsnews.com. the "overnight news" will be right back.
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theseare heading back home.y oil thanks to dawn, rescue workers only trust dawn, because it's tough on grease yet gentle. i am home, i am home, i am home "the new york times" canceled a panel discussion featuring james franco after he became the latest hollywood heavy weight to face accusations of sexual misconduct. franco claims the claims are not
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issue on late show with stephen colbert. >> the questions surrounding james francfranco's conduct wit women didn't begin at golden globes but picked up momentum following the show. stephen colbert pressed him on the decision to wear a time's up pin and accusations. >> you got criticized for wearing that. do you know why, do you have a response anything you want to say? >> first off i've want to say, i do support it. >> appearing on tuesday's late show with stephen colbert, james franco addressed sexual misconduct allegations on line this week. >> there were some things on twitter. >> today. >> yeah, i didn't, i didn't -- i haven't read them i have heard about them. >> james franco. >> following franco's appearance and golden globe victory sunday, a number of women spoke out
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a deleted tweet appeared to write. james franco, just won. please, never, never, ask me why i left the film tv business. actress violet paly, cute time's up pin, james franco. remember the time you pushed my head down in a car towards your exposed penis. >> i have no idea what i did to aly sheedy, directed her. in a playoff broadway. had nothing but a great time with her. total respect for her. i had, i have no idea why she was upset. took the tweet down. i've don't know. >> the things i heard were on twitter. are not accurate. but i completely support people coming out and being able to have a voice. because they didn't have a voice for so long. i don't want to, don't want to, shut them down in any way. it's -- it's a, a good thing. i support it. >> despite james franco's vocal support for the ti
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movement. he did not thank a single woman during his acceptance speech. we reached out to franco and the
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we end this half-hour along the california coast where it is mating season for the elephant seal. they're huge, they are loud. and they look lazy. but researchers know differently. here is john blackstone. >> reporter: watching elephant seals resting lazily on a california beach it can be hard to imagine that unseen far out in the ocean they're athletes. >> they're really the polympian yaz of the diving world. >> the lab put tracking devices on elephant steals to follow themho
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the pacific. >> each white line here its t t trajectory of an animal we tagged. >> this becomes solid. >> there is a lot of animals. >> no idea they were diving to 2,000 feet or more and doing it routinely. >> researchers are impressed with what elephant seals do right here on the beach. >> did that guy send a message to the other one coming in here? >> that message says the researcher is surprisingly sophisticated. so that's not just a grunt? >> definitely not. no. >> elephant seals are the only animals known to recognize and remember each other through the unique rhythm of their call. in effect, the elephant seal is shouting its name. >> so for example, if he interacted with, with sam, and he can actually hear sam's cowl. and say, oh, sam, i remember sam. he beat me last time. not going to mess with
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again. off a what could be a cacophony on the beach makes sense in the lab. >> play you the first call. from a male. and he has kind of like a gallop. we have another one. this one is amazing. these are so short. and super staccato. >> often you sit and see these sleepi ining slugs. when you understand what they do. diving behavior. on the beach behavior. a pretty amazing animal. >> their looks may leave something to be desired. but their skills have earned our seal of approval. john blackstone, cbs news, santa cruz, california. that's the joiovernight new for some of you check back later. frommed bro e
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oh, my god. >> an onslaught of powerful deadly rivers of mud here in southern california. >> the water is waist deep. homes were washed right off their foundations. >> tonight the destruction, dramatic rescues and the search for victims. >> people are buried in there. we are just doing anything we can. >> also tonight the president says it is not likely he will agree to be interviewed by the special counsel. >> hillary clinton had an interview where she wasn't sworn in, wasn't given the oath. >> a hospital leaves a woman dressed only in a patient's gown in the freezing cold of a baltimore night. >> in 1,000 feet stay to the right. >> when the gps rerouted cars to local streets, a town fought back.
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>> recalculating. >> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." with jeff glor reporting from california. good evening, first fire, now water. this area of southern california has been hit by back to back natural disasters. just weeks after wildfires stripped the land of natural barriers, heavy rain touched off massive mudslides. that are now blamed for at least, 15 deaths. more than two dozen others have been hurt. some are still unaccounted for. rescue teams are searching the mud for victims who didn't or couldn't evacuate. more than 50 were fortunate enough to be rescued. at least 100 homes have been wiped away. 1500 more are in danger. the best way to understand the scope of the disaster that has unfolded here is to walk among the once magnificent homes for a close-up look and to fly above the devastation as we did earlier today. >> look at tha
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the 101 underneath us right now. you get a sense of just how much damage was done and how difficult the clean-up process is. in some cases the mud is three feet deep. some of this areas are so vulnerable to mudslides because the topography is so rugged, it goes from sea level, to moun mountains that are a few thousand feet high within a few miles. in some cases the mud moves so fast it was so deep it swept homes right off their foundations. >> when you get down to the ground this is what you see. this is just one of the homes that has been overtaken by mud. and you hear the fire alarms. that is a sound that is going off all over this neighborhood. >> the 101 is one of the nation's most famous freeways also one of the busiest. but, look, from this everpass you can see it is t
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little more than a sink of mud. and debris. at this point. look at that one car, still, out there, stranded. all alone. on the 101. >> and as we have seen in this neighborhood, all afternoon, search-and-rescue dogs are leading the effort to find the missing. carter evans tonight shows us, how this disaster unfolded, and the challenges still ahead for first responders. more than 36 hours after the flood began, search-and-rescue teams were poking through mud with sticks. looking for any one who might be trapped. >> you are doing what they do when there is an avalanche. you go around and poke. if you feel something different. you try to figure what it is. >> more than 100 people were rescued. many from rooftops. by helicopter. female stuck in the mud with chest pains. >> already scorched by the thomas fire in december. hill sides collapsed when more
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less than 15 minutes. marco farrell had gone outside his parents home and shot the video on his cell phone. when he saw the mud coming. >> the flash flood is here. go. oh, my god, mom. >> i ran for my life. ran as fast as i could. made it back to my house within 30 second with the front of the flash flood hitting. second later, boulder crashed through. >> waist deep mud raging through my house. every inch of the house. >> the river of mud and debris swept up everything in its path. look at the huge boulders. over here, a classic car. now it is literally wrapped around a tree. major roads were swamped. trapping many in their homes. >> this is how deep the mud is. >> oprah winfrey posted a video walking through the mud at her estate. >> the house in the back is gone. >> voluntary evacuation orders were issued, but only 15% of residents left.
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mudslide had just evacuated in december during the wildfires. after what you have seen are you surprised so many people died? >> absolutely not. this town has evacuation fatigue. a lot of people were complacent. >> this its what people had to escape through. large treats, boulders, even cars, rushing down the street. and through these homes. if you look past the search-and-rescue team here, there is still three feet of mud inside this home. and it is thick. it is like quicksand. but the good news, jeff, that orange x means this home has been checked and so far, no one has been found. >> carter evans, thank you very much. a man who lives here in montecito told me an extraordinary story today. in a flash he went from witnessing the horror of what was happening last noegt to -- night to becoming a hero. first berkeley johnson heard the roar and then he saw the rush of mud. >> coming up from the river was trees just dropping.
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probably, 20, 20 feet high. of just rock and cars and, and, trunks of trees. i just ran for it. we kicked out the window there to keep the water pouring out. till we got up on the roofer here. and huddled up there. >> did you think you were going to die? >> yeah. yeah. potentially. >> the wall of dirt and debris left his home ad his neighborhood devastated. power lines down. trees snapped and piled up. but in the darkness, he heard a buried cry of life. >> he heard this little cry. i don't know how we heard it. it was so loud with all the stuff went into the pile. in the muck in the middle of nowhere was a little baby. little, little child, just, just, in the mud. up to its, tangled in the, in the roots and the metal and the rock. and if we weren't standing
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would have never heard of it. so many things had to happen to get to the point where we were standing to feet away. a fireman got in. grabbed it. pulled it out. covered in mud. and the girl is okay. >> the girl is okay? >> the girl is okay. it was unbelievable. if you had seen that, just, there its no way that we should have found that child. and, probably 15 more minutes it wouldn't have been alive. it was cold and had been there for a while. >> at the johnson's today where everything seemed lost, a little luck was found. >> you found it. that was the bunny that i missed catching. oh, my gosh. that is unbelievable. is the best. that its the best. >> this sign of the times in leonia, new jersey, is a low tech solution to a high tech problem. >> this will change life in leonia. it should. >> in the alps, villages are c
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off by deadly avalanches. >> and the crew whose fought >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life.
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>> announcer: this is the cbs "overnight news." federal judge here in california has blocked the trump administration from ending daca, the program that protects children brought into the country illegally, as children from being deported. more now on this from chief congressional correspondent nancy cordes. >> reporter: outrageous is the word the white house used to describe the in junction imposed by san francisco judge william alsap who ruled the administration make a mistake of law last fall when it decide to roll back the obama era daca order allowing so-called dreamers to go to school and find work without fear of deportation. dreamers like hector suarez. m
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january 21st, and that is in 11 days. >> president trump hit back at the ruling on twitter. saying, it just shows everyone how broken and unfair our court system is. but the judge wrote that the president's own past tweets like this one, show he supports daca protections too. does anybody really want to throw out good educated and accomplished young people who have jobs? some serving in the military? really. >> we are going to come up with daca. >> the white house was already dealing with daca fallout after the president appeared to side with democrats yesterday. on how to solve the problem. >> what about a clean daca bill now -- >> i think a lot would look to see that. >> most republicans insist any protections for dreamers must be paired with more border security. >> i am not going to support doing daca by itself. >> buy today mr. trump was back on the same page.
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>> it's got to include the wall. we need the wall for security. >> it is still unclear tonight how the department of homeland security plans to handle the judge's ruling. whether and when it will start accepting daca applications again. what is clear is that there is now new urgency after several false starts here on capitol hill to find a permanent legislative fix. jeff. >> nancy. there was an announcement about a significant republican retirement today. what can you tell us about that? >> that's right, daryl issa of california, long time republican, former chair of the house government oversight committee, he says he will not be seeking re-election in 2018. in what many republicans feel will be a very difficult midterm election season for them. the 31st republican to announce that. all right, noon see cordes, thank you very much. the president suggested to day there is not much chance he will agree to be interviewed in the russia investigation. he said "we'll see." here is our chief white house correspondent major garrett.
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>> there has been no collusion. there has been no crime. >> there is no collusion whatsoever. >> and there is no collusion. >> reporter: that has been president trump's mantra as special counsel robert mueller continues to investigate connections between mr. trump's campaign and russian operatives. the president's lawyers are now negotiating with mueller over when and how an interview with mr. trump will occur. but today the president said that may not be necessary. >> when they have no collusion, and nobody has found any collusion, at any level, it seems unlikely that you would even have an interview. >> he did point to a precedent for potential interview comparing his situation to the hillary clinton e-mail investigation. >> hillary clinton had an interview where she wasn't sworn in, she wasn't given the oath, they didn't take notes, they didn't record, and it was done on the fourth of july weekend.
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fbi occurred july 2nd, 2016 and lasted 3 and a half hours. investigators did take notes, despite mr. trump's claim. on twitter the president for the first time called on republicans to "finally take control of the russia investigation that he said was making the country a laughingstock." >> they had this phony cloud over this administration, over our government, and it has hurt our government. it does hurt our government. it is a democrat hoax. >> the president's lawyers believe an interview with mr. trump would signal the imminent conclusion of mueller's investigation. we learned today, that in early november, mueller added a justice department expert in cybercrimes to his team of investigators. jeff. >> major garrett. thank you very much. >> a hospital in baltimore is investigating the treatment of one of its patients. staffers left the woman dressed only in her hospital gown near a
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freezing cold. jeff pegues has the story. >> y'all are going to leave this lady out here with no clothes on? >> overnight he was walking past a baltimore hospital when he noticed something he says he will never forget. >> assuming you are all with the security department? okay. is there a supervisor available? >> i am the supervisor. >> the hospital security guards wheeled a patient to a bus stop. in the freezing temperatures they left her there. the only thing she had on was a hospital gown. >> it is about 30 degrees out here right now. are you okay? are you unable to speak? are you okay, ma'am? do you need me to call the police?
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>> it is called patient dumping and it doesn't just happen in baltimore. in 2007, 60 minutes, investigated removing homeless patients from los angeles hospitals and leaving them downtown. often the patients are not insured or have financial issues. it is unclear if that was the case in baltimore. >> go ahead and sit down. [ sobbing ] [ crying ] >> okay, ma'am. go ahead and sit down. thank you. i'm going to call to get you some help. >> in a statement the university of maryland medical center said they share the shock and disappointment of many who have viewed the video. in the end they say we clearly failed to fulfill our mission with this patient. >> the man who recorded the video called 911, he says medics ended up taking the patient back to the same hospital. a review is under way that could lead personnel action against the hospital employees involved. jeff. >> jeff pegues
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now to other stories we are following. immigration agents today raided nearly 100, 7-eleven stores in 17 states and washington, c.
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at least 21 suspected undocumented immigrants were arrested. officials say the sweep was a follow-up to the 2013 arrests of nine 7-eleven managers for harboring illegal immigrants. the aclu says it is investigating at rest of a teacher monday night at a school board meeting in louisiana. the teacher had spoken out against a pay raise for the superintendent. the deputy city marshal escorted her out and cuffed her in the hallway. >> stop resisting. >> i am not. you just pushed me to the floor. >> the teacher was arrested for resisting the officer, the charges were dropped. >> if there is one thing you need at the world's biggest electronics show, it is electricity. but the power was knocked out for two hours at the ces technology show in las vegas. nevada energy blamed the blackout on thco
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center's equipment. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back. it's a small finger...a worm! like, a dagger? a tiny sword? bread...breadstick? a matchstick! a lamppost! coin slot! no? uhhh... 10 seconds. a stick! a walking stick! eiffel tower, mount kilimanjaro! (ding) time! sorry, it's a tandem bicycle. what? what?! as long as sloths are slow, you can count on geico saving folks money. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance.
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if you find yourself in a highway traffic jam here on the california coast or anywhere else.
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an app can guide you to open roads. some who live on the roads want to close them to outsiders. jim axel rod explains. >> this will change life in leone. >> it should. >> reporter: this sign in leone, new jersey is a low tech solution to a high tech problem. >> there is approximately 60 streets closed. >> a way to control the out of control traffic, for residents like melissa sulsman. >> how long does it take? >> 10, 15 minutes. depend who will be nice and how much i will push up against their car to let me out. >> leonia is a one square mile town in the shadow of the george washington bridge. for years whenever traffic would back up at the bridge. savvy commuters would get off the highway and take a sthort cut. if you knew the secret there were ways to beat the jam. >> stay to the right to exit 78, leonia. >> reporter: but now everyone has ways, or other traffic apps that routes them through leonia. once the main streets get clogged start sending commuters
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>> may your juda ziegler. they have an app to shave three minutes. now all over the side streets in the municipality. >> this is what it can look like on the once quiet streets of leonia. restrict the streets during rush hour, just to leonia residents. have a hang tag in your car, or get a ticket. >> we are not talking $20. >> no, talking $200. $200 has some teeth. >> for medford mass to freemont, california. victims of the traffic apps. as tom row discovered if you pass a law the app will remove side streets from its menu of short cults. >> people will do whatever the app tell them to do. and it's scary some times. >> it's what the an stops telling them to do that should make life legislation scary here. >> in 1,000 feet. stay off to the right. >> jim axelrod, cbs news, leonia, new jersey.
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up next, the accidental best-seller.
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6,000 miles from here in the alps, the threat is not mudslides but avalanches. some areas got six feet of snow. a swiss town was cut off for days but trains are running again. in france, workers needed heavy equipment to dig out a village. they carved a path that has walls. more than 20 feet high. a book about world war ii has suddenly and accidentally become a best-seller. nearly a decade after it was first published. fire and fury, the allied bombing of germany apparently is being confused with fire and fury inside the trump white house. the moral of this story, read the fine print. the first woman to become a u.s. army general has died. anna mae hayes born in buffalo, new york served as front line
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nurse during world war ii and korea. in 1970 promoted from colonel to brigadier general. she died monday of a heart attack. she was 97 years old. up next, they have been on the front lines of fires and floods.
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>> special nod to the cbs crews. to their ankles. beyond covered in mud. working in santa barbara, county, california. that is nothing compared to what fire rescue crews are face tonight as they search through the mud for the missing. here, they came to the rescue of a 14-year-old girl. trapped in the wreckage of a house. many of these unsung heroes are the same men and women who risk their lives, fighting the wildfires that destroyed acre after acre here, setting up the conditions that led to the mudslide disaster. as the rain storm ended, a rainbow appeared in the sky. a symbol of hope when needed the most. that's the "overnight news," i'm jeff glor.
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hi, welcome to the "overnight news." i'm demarco morgan. search-and-rescue teamsen southern california are in a race against time off to find survivors. trapped amid the debris of deadly mudslides. torrential rains, center trees, boulders rumbling down the hillside. hundreds of homes are destroyed. power lines down. gas lines snapped. in some places the only way into the disaster zone is behind a bulldozer or inside a helicopter. jeff glor begins coverage with a bird's eye view, in the devastation in and around montecito. >> look at that, the 101 underneath us. you get a sense how much damage was done.
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difficult the clean-up process is. in some cases the mud is three feet deep. some of this areas are so vulnerable to mudslides because the topography is so rugged, it goes from sea level, to moun mountains that are a few thousand feet high within a few miles. in some cases the mud moves so fast it was so deep it swept homes right off their foundations. >> when you get down to the ground this is what you see. this is just one of the homes that has been overtaken by mud. and you hear the fire alarms. that is a sound that is going off all over this neighborhood. >> the 101 is one of the nation's most famous freeways also one of the busiest. but, look, from this everpass you can see it is -- it is little more than a sink of mud. and debris. at this point. lot
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there, stranded. all alone. on the 101. >> search-and-rescue teams were poking with sticks looking for any one trapped. >> you do like in an avalanche. you poke. feel something different figure out what it is. >> more than 100 people were rescued many from rooftops by helicopters. >> stuck in the mud with chest pain. >> scorched by the massive thomas fire in december, hillside in montecito collapsed when more than an in. of rain fell in 15 minutes. marco farrell had just gone outside his parents' hem and shot the video on his cell phone when he saw the mud and debris coming. >> the flash flood is right there. get out of here. go. oh, my god, mom.
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>> i ran for my life. ran as fast as i could. made it back to my house within 30 second with the front of the flash flood hitting. second later, boulder crashed through. >> waist deep mud raging through my house. every inch of the house. >> the river of mud and debris swept up everything in its path. look at the huge boulders. over here, a classic car. now it is literally wrapped around a tree. major roads were swamped. trapping many in their homes. >> this is how deep the mud is. >> oprah winfrey posted a video walking through the mud at her montecito estate. >> the house in the back is gone. >> voluntary evacuation orders were issued, but only 15% of residents left. many who got caught in the mudslide had just evacuated in december during the wildfires. after what you have seen are you surprised so many people died? >> absolutely not. this town has evacuation fatigue. a lot of people were complacent. >> this its what people had to escape through. large treats, boulders, even cars, rushing downhe
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and through these homes. if you look past the search-and-rescue team here, there is still three feet of mud inside this home. and it is thick. it is like quicksand. but the good news, jeff, that orange x means this home has been checked and so far, no one has been found. president trump, blasted a federal judge that blocked the move to daca program. daca and so-called dreamers it protects is central to an everall immigration bill taking shape on capitol hill. nancy cord? -- cordes reports. >> reporter: outrageous is the word the white house used to describe the in junction imposed by san francisco judge william alsap who ruled the administration make a mistake of law last fall when it decide to roll back the obama era daca order allowing so-called dreamers to go to school and find work without fear of deportation. dreamers like hector suarez.
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january 21st, and that is in 11 days. >> president trump hit back at the ruling on twitter. saying, it just shows everyone how broken and unfair our court system is. but the judge wrote that the president's own past tweets like this one, show he supports daca protections too. does anybody really want to throw out good educated and accomplished young people who have jobs? some serving in the military? really. >> we are going to come up with daca. >> the white house was already dealing with daca fallout after the president appeared to side with democrats yesterday. on how to solve the problem. >> what about a clean daca bill now -- >> i think a lot would look to see that. >> most republicans insist any protections for dreamers must be paired with more border security. >> i am not going to support doing daca by itself. >> buy today mr. trump was back on the same page. >> it's got to include the wall. we need the wall for security. >> it is still unclear tonight how the department of homeland
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judge's ruling. whether and when it will start accepting daca applications again. what is clear is that there is now new urgency after several false starts here on capitol hill to find a permanent legislative fix. >> the investigation into russian interference. president trump told reporters it seems unlikely he will speak with the special counsel. major garrett has the the story. >> there has been no collusion. there has been no crime. >> there is no collusion whatsoever. >> and there is no collusion. >> reporter: that has been president trump's mantra as special counsel robert mueller continues to investigate connections between mr. trump's campaign and russian operatives. the president's lawyers are now negotiating with mueller over when and how an interview with mr. trump will occur. but today the president said that may not be necessary. >> when they have no collusion,
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and nobody has found any collusion, at any level, it seems unlikely that you would even have an interview. >> he did point to a precedent for potential interview comparing his situation to the hillary clinton e-mail investigation. >> hillary clinton had an interview where she wasn't sworn in, she wasn't given the oath, they didn't take notes, they didn't record, and it was done on the fourth of july weekend. >> clinton's interview with the fbi occurred july 2nd, 2016 and lasted 3 and a half hours. investigators did take notes, despite mr. trump's claim. on twitter the president for the first time called on republicans to "finally take control of the russia investigation that he said was making the country a laughingstock." >> they had this phony cloud over this administration, over our government, and it has hurt our government. it does hurt our government. it is a democrat hoax. >> the president's lawyers believe an interview with mr. trump would signal the imminent conclusion of mueller's investigation.
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we learned today, that in early november, mueller added a justice department expert in cybercrimes to his team of investigators. any object. any surface.
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jeff. this is the cbs "overnight news." science is learning more about the degenerative brain disease, cte, caused by blows to the head, and affects an alarming number of football players. but they're not the only ones. since 9/11. more than 300,000 u.s. soldiers have returned home with similar pbrain injuries. our correspondent has the story for "60 minutes." ♪ ♪ >> when joy keifer buried her 34-year-old son this past summer it was the end of a long good-bye.
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>> may his soul rest in peace. >> keifer's son enlisted in army reserves at age 18. over three deployments. he was exposed to 12 combat blasts. many roadside bombs. he returned home in 2012, a different man. >> his whole personality, had changed. i thought it was, exposure to, to all of the things that he had seen. and heap just had become harder. he was not happy. at this point. you are thinking the design. my child, he has been in war. he has seen too much. did he tell you about blast he's experienced during the time. >> uh-huh. >> what did he tell you. they shook him. and he was having blackouts. and -- and, it, it frightened him. >> he withdrew from families and friends.
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depressed. doctors prescribed medication. his health begin to decline quickly. by his 34th birthday. sergeant kevin nash was unable to speak, walk or eat on his own. >> looking back on it now. was there anything you feel look he could have done. >> huh-uh. >> no it was his brain. the thing i didn't know his brain was continuing to die. i mean before he went into the service. he said, you know i could come back with no legs. or no arms. or even blind. or i could be shot. i could die. but nobody ever said -- that he could lose his mind. one day at a time. >> his final wish was to serve his country one last time, by donating his brain to science. a gesture he thought would bring belter understanding to the
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joy reached out to the va, boston university, concussion legacy foundation brain bank. neuropathologist is researching head trauma and cte. mckey has spent 14 years looking at the post-mortem brains of hundreds of athletes who suffered concussions playing their sport. this past summer her findings shook the football world when sheep discovered, cte in the brains of 110, out of 111 deceased nfl players. using serious concerns for those in the game today. and when doctor mckey autopsied, the patriots tight end, aaron hernandez who killed himself after being convicted of murder she found most severe case of cte ever in some one under 30. now she is seeing a similar pattern. experienced a different kind of head trauma.
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of the 102 veterans brains, the doctor examined. 66 had cte. >> i can understand a football player who keeps hitting his head and having impact and concussions. but how is it that, the combat veteran who may be just experience aid blast has the same type of injury? >> this blast injury causes a tremendous sort of ricochet or, or a whiplash injury to the brain inside the skull. and that's what gives rise off to the same changes that we see in football players, as in, military veterans. >> the blast trauma was first recognized in world war i. known as shell shock, poorly protected soldiers often died immediately or went on to suffer physical and psychological symptoms. today, sophisticated armor allows more soldiers to walk away from an explosion. but exposure can still damage the brain an injury that can worsen over time.
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>> not a new injury. what's really been stumping us i think as physicians it is not easily detectable, right. you have got a lot of psychiatric symptoms. you can't see it very well on images of the brain. so it didn't occur to us. i've think that's been the gap, really, that this has been, what everyone calls an invisible injury. >> this is the world's largest cte brain bank. >> the only foolproof way to diagnose cte is testing a post-mortem brain. >> full of hundreds of brains. >> hundred. thousands really. >> researchers carefully dissect sections of the brain where they look for changes in the fold of the frontal lobes. an area responsible for memory, judgment, emotions, impulse control, and personality. >> do you see there is a little tiny hole there? an abnormality. a clear abnormality. and what would that affect? >> well it is part of the memory
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you can see that clear hole there shouldn't be there. it is connecting the important, you know, memory regions of the brain with other regions. so, that, that is a soon of cte. >> the thin shivers are stained and viewed microscopically. it is in the final stages where a diagnosis becomes clear. as in the case of sergeant kevin ash. >> so this is sergeant ash's brain? >> right. this is, four sections of his brain. what you can see its the lesions, are cte. characteristic. and, a unique feature of cte. in a healthy brain you wouldn't see an of the brown spots? >> no. no. completely clear. then when you look microscopically you can see that the towel which is staining brown and is inside nerve cells is surrounding these little vessels. >> explain.
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>> towel is a protein that is normally in the nerve cell. it helps with structure. and, after trauma, it starts clumping up as a -- as a toxin inside the nerve cell. over time, and even years, gradually that nerve cell dies. >> dr. lee gold stein has been building on dr. mckey's work with testing with mice. >> in the trauma laboratory. >> inside his boston university lab, dr. goldstein brilt this 37-foot blast tube and a mouse in this demonstration. a mouse and model its exposed to explosion equivalent to ieds used in iraq and afghanistan. >> when it reaches 25 this thing is going to go. dr. goldstein's model shows the what is going on inside the brain, during a blast. the brightly colored waves illustrate stress on the soft tissues of the brain. as it ricochets back and forth within the skull. >> what we see after the last exposures, they looked fine.
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they come out of -- what is a near lethal blast exposure. just like our military servicemen and women do. and they ha peer to be fine. what we know is that -- that that brain, is not the same after that exposure as it was, microsecond before. and if there is a subsequent exposure, that change will be accelerated. ultimately this triggers a neurodegenerative disease. in fact we can see that even after one of the exposures. >> the department of defense, hundreds of thousands of soldiers who experience aid blast like this. what does that tell you? >> this is a disease and problem we are going to be dealing with for decades. and it is a huge public health problem. huge problem for the veterans administration.
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it is a huge moral responsibility for all of us. >> a sponlt owed to soldiers like 33-year-old sergeant tom bates. >> bates walked away from the mangled humvee. one of four ied blasts he survived during deployments in iraq and afghanistan. >> do you remember feeling the impact in your body? >> yes. >> what does that feel like? >> basically like get hitting by a train. >> put back on the front lines? >> yes. >> that was it. >> uh-huh. >> when he returned home in 2009, his wife libby immediately saw a dramatic change. >> i thought something is not absolutely right here. something is going on. for him to just lay there and -- and sob, and be so sad. you know what do you do for that? how do i, how do i help him? he would look at me and say if it wasn't for you, i would end
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it all right now. you know. and like what do you -- what do you do to, what do you say to somebody who says that? you know. i love this man so much. and -- you can see sharon's full report on our website, cbsnews.com. the "overnight news" will be right back.
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issue on late show with stephen colbert. >> the questions surrounding james franco's conduct with women didn't begin at golden globes but picked up momentum following the show. stephen colbert pressed him on the decision to wear a time's up pin and accusations. >> you got criticized for wearing that. do you know why, do you have a response anything you want to say? >> first off i've want to say, i do support it. >> appearing on tuesday's late show with stephen colbert, james franco addressed sexual
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this week. >> there were some things on twitter. >> today. >> yeah, i didn't, i didn't -- i haven't read them i have heard about them. >> james franco. >> following franco's appearance and golden globe victory sunday, a number of women spoke out against him. including actress aly sheedy, in a deleted tweet appeared to write. james franco, just won. please, never, never, ask me why i left the film tv business. actress violet paly, cute time's up pin, james franco. remember the time you pushed my head down in a car towards your exposed penis. >> i have no idea what i did to aly sheedy, directed her. in a playoff broadway. had nothing but a great time with her. total respect for her. i had, i have no idea why she was upset. took the tweet down. i've don't know. >> the things i heard were on twitter. are not accurate. but i completely support people coming out and being able to have a voice. because they didn't have a voice for so long. i don't want to, don't want to, shut them down in any way. it's -- it's a, a good thing. i support it. >> despite james franco's vocal
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movement. he did not thank a single woman >> i'm alex trebek. if you're age 50 to 85, i have an important message about security. write down the number on your screen, so you can call when i finish. the lock i want to talk to you about isn't the one on your door. this is a lock for your life insurance, a rate lock, that guarantees your rate can never go up at any time, for any reason. but be careful. many policies you see do not have one, but you can get a lifetime rate lock through the colonial penn program. call this number to learn more. this plan was designed with a rate lock for people on a fixed income who want affordable life insurance that's simple to get. coverage options for just $9.95 a month, less than 35 cents a day. act now and your rate will be locked in for life.
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captioning funded by cbs it's thursday, january 11th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." deadly mudslides, the search for survivors isn't stopping in southern california as casualties rise. president trump will not commit to giving an interview to special counsel robert mueller in the russia investigation. his reasoning -- >> there's been no collusion between the trump campaign or russians or trump and russians, no collusion. and two new dog breeds are joining the american kennel club pack.

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