Skip to main content

tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  June 16, 2017 2:07am-3:59am EDT

2:07 am
two teams. >> gop's gerald ford slams out a solid hit with two aboard. >> reporter: over the years republicans and democrats have each won 39 games and lost 39. >> way to go, democrats! >> reporter: but tonight bragging rights take a back seat to bipartisanship, at least for nine innings. >> let it be a symbol that hate and violence do not cast too long or too great a shadow, that we can and will come together this evening and the game will go on. >> reporter: now, they're expecting twice as many people than usual to attend tonight's game, 20,000 or more. that means more money for charity. and scott, after yesterday's attack, they've added a new group to those who will share in the proceeds -- the capitol police memorial fund. >> jan crawford at the game. jan, thanks. we're back in just a moment.
2:08 am
2:09 am
2:10 am
those two injured capitol police officers we mentioned a moment ago stopped what might have been a massacre. here's chip reid. [ gunshots ] >> reporter: moments after the shooting began two special agents with the capitol hill police, crystal griner and david bailey, charged onto the baseball field, exchanging fire with the shooter. >> i saw him train his gun at me. everything around me started to pop. i got hit in the leg. >> reporter: congressional staffer zach barth told "cbs this morning" he somehow made it to the dugout, where survivors say they would have been sitting ducks if not for their protectors. >> thank the lord for special agents griner and bailey. without them i don't know that i'd be talkio
2:11 am
>> reporter: agent crystal griner was shot in the ankle. a 2006 graduate of maryland's hood college, she was a star basketball player, known for her strength and athletic ability. a teammate told us she was very aggressive and was not at all surprised how she responded in a dangerous, high-pressure situation. retired capitol police chief kim dine. >> she is amazing, and she's a hero. she epitomized what being a hero's all about. >> reporter: agent david bailey injured his ankle during the chaotic gun battle. he's from brazil and graduated from north carolina central university in 2007. >> he always talked about becoming a police officer. >> reporter: friend rachael brooks says he just wanted to help people. >> as soon as i heard that, the first thing i thought was, that is definitely just leek david to do. >> reporter: there were some other heroes too, scott. henry cabrera, a special agent with the capitol hill police department, also exchanged gunfire with the shooter, as did some officers with the
2:12 am
department. at this point it's unclear who fired the shots that killed the assailant. >> chip reid, thanks. in another important story tonight, amid indications that the president himself is now under investigation. mr. trump tweeted this morning, "you are witnessing the single greatest witch hunt in american political history, led by some very bad and conflicted people." jeff pegues is following this. >> reporter: the president's tweets came after the "washington post" reported that he is now the subject of an obstruction of justice investigation. his response, "they made up a phony collusion with the russians story, found zero proof, so now they go for obstruction of justice on the phony story. nice." cbs news has learned that special counsel robert mueller will interview director of national intelligence dan coats and nsa director admiral mike rogers amid reports about
2:13 am
them to tamp down the investigation into allegations of collusion between the trump campaign and russia. >> do you solemnly swear to tell the truth? >> reporter: a week ago former fbi director james comey told senators that he believed he was fired by mr. trump because of the fbi's ongoing russia investigation, which comey was leading at the time. >> do you believe this will rise to obstruction of justice? >> i don't know. that's bob mueller's job, to sort that out. >> reporter: ron hosko, a former assistant director of the fbi, says while obstruction of justice is hard to prove the allegation itself could hurt the president. don't you have to prove intent? >> getting to intent to obstruct or impede is going to be very important. and it could be that they never are able to build that case in a meaningful way. however, damage could be done, political damage could be done during the process. >> reporter: mueller's appointment a month ago to oversee the investigationre
2:14 am
the white house even interviewed him to fill the vacant fbi director job on may 16th. but as mueller's investigation gained traction, the president's allies began accusing him of trying to undermine the trump presidency. and the president himself has chimed in, tweeting this afternoon, "why is it that hillary clinton's family and dems dealings with russia are not looked at but my non-dealings are?" a former fbi official says the president's tweets could be used by the special counsel as evidence. scott, late today cbs news confirmed that vice president pence has hired a personal lawyer to answer any questions investigators may have for him. >> jeff pegues in our washington newsroom. jeff, thank you. after four days of deliberations jurors in bill cosby's sexual assault trial told the judge today they are deadlocked. he told them "keep trying." jericka duncan is at the
2:15 am
pennsylvania. >> reporter: bill cosby remains in a small room inside the courthouse. early this afternoon jurors told the judge they could not reach a unanimous verdict on any of the three counts against cosby. cosby's attorney, brian mcmonagle asked the court for a mistrial but that request was denied. instead the judge told the sequestered jurors to keep deliberating. cosby's publicist, andrew wyatt. >> and this deadlock shows the not guilty that mr. cosby has been saying the entire time. >> reporter: the jury has paused deliberations to review evidence a half dozen times. the 79-year-old comedian has been accused by nearly 60 women of sexual assault over the past several decades. but cosby has denied those accusations. andrea constand's case was the only one that was still eligible to go to trial. lili bernard says she too was sexually abused by cosby. she got into a heated argument with cosby supporters after
2:16 am
jury announced they were deadlocked. >> he preyed upon my vulnerabilities and he drugged me and raped me against my will. >> reporter: cosby has been charged with sexually assaulting andrea constand at his pennsylvania home in 2004. constand testified that cosby drugged and molested her after giving her three blue pills which she says left her paralyzed and unable to move. cosby says it was consensual. former prosecutor dennis mcandrews. >> if the jury comes back and names that they're deadlocked, then the judge can declare a hung jury and declare a mistrial, which allows a new trial for the defendant. >> reporter: if the judge declares a mistrial, it will ultimately be up to andrea constand whether she wants to go through this process again and testify at another trial. scott, today constand posted a video on twitter of herself playing basketball with the words "always follow through," implying she is not ready to quit. >> jericka duncan, thanks.
2:17 am
north korea brutalized his son. and later, the death toll rises in a horrific fire.
2:18 am
not all fish oil supplemenprts ovide the same omega-3 power. megared advanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption. sorry about the holdup, folks. we have some congestion on the runway and i'm being told it'll be another 15, maybe 20 minutes, and we will have you on your way. ♪
2:19 am
surprising. what's not surprising? how much money evan saved by switching to geico. i would not wear that lace. hmm, i don't know? fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. what does life look like during your period? with tampax pearl. you get ultimate protection on your heaviest days and smooth removal for your lightest. tampax pearl and pocket pearl for on the go. and they happen easily. the other side of this... is they can be removed... easily. spray and wash's... powerful formula... removes over 100 stains. spray and wash. better on over 100 stains.
2:20 am
march. >> i'm so proud of otto, who has been in a pairia regime for the last 18 months, brutalized and terrorized, and he's now home with his family. >> reporter: the comatose 22-year-old college student was flown back to the united states last tuesday. fred warmbier described greeting his son for the first time in nearly two years. >> i knelt down by his side, and i hugg
2:21 am
and i told him i missed him and i was so glad that he made it home. >> reporter: north korean officials claim otto fell into a coma after he contracted botulism and took a sleeping pill a day after he was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor. he was convicted for committing a hostile act after allegedly stealing a propaganda poster during a college group tourist trip last year. today doctors at the university of cincinnati medical center said he shows no sign of a botulism infection but he did suffer severe brain damage. lead physician daniel kanter. >> he has spontaneous eye opening and blinking. however, he shows no signs of understanding language. >> reporter: kanter says the brain injury was likely caused by a sudden stopping of the heart. >> this pattern of brain injury, however, is usually seen as a result of cardiopulmon
2:22 am
where the blood supply to the brain is inadequate. >> reporter: fred warmbier says he's still in shock. >> these things are tough to process. but he's with us. and we're trying to make him comfortable, and we want to be a part of his life. >> reporter doctors say otto warmbier's heart stoppage could have been caused by trauma or drug intoxication. scott, there are currently three other americans in a north korean prison there. >> michele miller, thanks. coming up, a blimp explodes. absorption is absorbed three times better. e so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption. this clean was like pow! everything well? my teeth are glowing. they are so white. step 1 cleans. step 2 whitens. crest [hd]. 6x cleaning*, 6x whitening*á i would switch to crest [hd] over what i was using before. ♪
2:23 am
new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria without any harsh chemical residue. lysol. what it takes to protect. i just want to find a used car without getting ripped off. you could start your search at the all-new carfax.com that might help. show me the carfax. now the car you want and the history you need are easy to find. show me used trucks with one owner. pretty cool. [laughs] ah... ahem... show me the axcarf. start your used car search and get free carfax reports at the all-new carfax.com. you don't even want to know protection detergent alone doesn't kill bacteria but adding new lysol laundry sanitizer kills 99.9% of bacteria with 0% bleach. lysol. what it takes to protect.
2:24 am
today police in washington issued arrest warrants for a dozen members of the turkish president's security detail. they're accused of attacking protesters outside the turkish embassy during president erdogan's visit last month. turkey claims it was self-defense. all 12 are believed to be back in turkey. today london's police commander said that he hopes the death toll does not reach triple digits in that high-rise apartment fire. 17 bodies have been recovered, but it may take weeks to search all 24 stories. in wisconsin today a blimp flying over the u.s. open golf tournament crashed. it deflated in mid-air and caught fire. the only person on board was the pilot. he was badly burned. we do not know why it deflated. we'll be back in a moment.
2:25 am
2:26 am
2:27 am
it's time to ask whether the attack on the united states congress yesterday was foreseeable, predictable, and to some degree self-infed
2:28 am
commentators who set an example for us to follow have led us into an abyss of violent rhetoric which, it should be no surprise, has led to violence. yesterday was not the first time. in december last year a man with an assault rifle stormed into a washington-area pizzeria to free child sex slaves whom hillary clinton was holding there. or at least that's what political blog sites had said. he fired into a locked door to discover no children in chains. bernie sanders has called the president the most dangerous in history, and shooter yesterday was a sanders volunteer. you might think that no sane person would act on political hate speech. and you'd be right. the trouble is there are a lot of americans who struggle with minlness. in
2:29 am
tweeted that the news media were the "enemy of the american people." later, at a lunch for reporters, president trump was asked whether he worried that that language would incite violence. his pause indicated it had never crossed his mind. and then he said, "no, that doesn't worry me." as children we're taught "words will never hurt me," but when you think about it violence almost always begins with words. in twitter world we've come to believe that our first thought is our best thought. it's past time for all of us. presidents, politicians, reporters, citizens, all of us, to pause, to think again. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
2:30 am
>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm tony dokoupil. the special counsel investigating russia's interference in the presidential election could now be focusing on president trump. specifically whether mr. trump tried to obstruct justice in the case of his fired national security adviser michael flynn. jeff pegues has the latest. >> reporter: the president's tweets came after the "washington post" reported that he is now the subject of an obstruction of justice investigation. his response, "they made up a phony collusion with the russians story, found zero proof. so now they go for obstruction of justice on the phony story. nice." cbs news has learned that special counsel robert mueller will interview director
2:31 am
and nsa director admiral mike rogers amid reports about whether the president pressured them to tamp down the investigation into allegations of collusion between the trump campaign and russia. >> do you solemnly swear to tell the truth? >> reporter: a week ago former fbi director james comey told senators he believes he was fired by mr. trump because of the fbi's ongoing russia investigation, which comey was leading at the time. >> do you believe this will rise to obstruction of justice? >> i don't know. that's bob mueller's job to check that out. >> reporter: ron hosko, former associate director of the fbi, says while obstruction of justice is hard to prove the allegation itself could hurt the president. >> don't you have to prove intent? >> getting to intent to obstruct or impede-s going to be very important. and it could be that they never are able to build that case in a meaningful way. however, damage could be done. political damage could be done during the process. >>
2:32 am
oversee the investigation drew bipartisan praise. the white house even interviewed him to fill the vacant fbi director job on may 16th. but as mueller's investigation gained traction, the president's allies began accusing him of trying to undermine the trump presidency. and the president himself has chimed in, tweeting this afternoon, "why is it that hillary clinton's family and dems' dealings with russia are not looked at but my non-dealings are?" >> investigators are still trying to piece together the chain of events that led to the ambush of a group of republicans. they've recovered the gunman's camera, computer, and cell phone and raided his house. nancy cordes has the latest. >> he's in some trouble. >> reporter: president trump issued a sobering update today after visiting house majority whip steve scalise last night. >> he's a great fighter, and he's going to be okay, we hope. >> reporter: scalise underwent
2:33 am
democrat cedric richmond is a close friend and fellow louisianan. >> it's no secret that the bullet split up and that vital organs are -- were hit. >> reporter: another victim, lobbyist matt mika, has been upgraded from critical condition to serious. but his family warns matt was shot multiple times in his chest and arm, he requires assistance to breathe and will need additional surgeries. house republicans gathered at the capitol to sign get well cards. meanwhile, fbi agents continued to comb the scene. an alexandria, virginia ballpark. they are processing a cell phone, a computer and a camera found in the shooter's van. the atf has determined that 66-year-old james hodgkinson of illinois purchased his highly lethal rifle and handgun lethally, firing dozens of rounds before h w
2:34 am
killed by police. hodgkinson's facebook page was filled with anti-trump, anti-gop messages, leading a few conservatives to blame -- >> an increasing intensity of hostility on the left. >> reporter: new york republican chris collins told a local radio host -- >> i can only hope that the democrats do tone down the rhetor rhetoric. some people react to things like that. >> how dare they say such a thing? >> reporter: democratic leader nancy pelosi argued she's endured hostile right-wing rhetoric for years. >> so this sick individual does something despicable, and it was horrible what he did. hateful. but for them to all of a sudden be sanctimonious as if they don't -- have never seen such a thing before. >> reporter: late today the shooter's widow addressed the media for the first time. >> i can't believe he did this. i cannot believe -- i
2:35 am
leave my neighbors in peace. they don't deserve this. i don't deserve it. my daughters don't deserve all this. two capitol hill police officers are being hailed as heroes for stopping what could have been a massacre. chip reid has that story. [ gunshots ] >> reporter: moments after the shooting began two special agents with the capitol hill police, crystal griner and david bailey, charged onto the baseball field, exchanging fire with the shooter. >> i saw him train his gun at me. everything around me started to pop. i got hit in the leg. >> reporter: congressional taffer zach barth told "cbs this morning" he somehow made it to the dugout where survivors say they would have been sitting ducks if not for their protectors. >> thank the lord for special agents griner and bailey. without them i don't know that i'd be talking to you right now. >> reporter: agent crystal griner was shot in the
2:36 am
a 2006 graduate of maryland's hood college, she was a star basketball player, known for her strength and athletic ability. a teammate told us she was very aggressive and was not at all surprised how she responded in a dang dangerous high-pressure situation. retired capitol hill police chief kim dine. >> she is amazing and she's a hero. she epitomized what being a hero's all about. >> reporter: agent david bailey injured his ankle during the chaotic gun battle. he's from brazil and graduated from north carolina central university in 2007. >> he always talked about becoming a police officer. >> reporter: friend rachel brooks says he just wanted to help people. >> as soon as i heard that, the first thing i thought was that is definitely just like david to do. a criminal investigation has been launched in the deadly high-rise fire in london. fewer than two dozen bodies have been recovered so far, but the death toll could end up topping 100 once firefighters are able to search the upper floo
2:37 am
>> reporter: the building behind me looks like a skeleton. many of these floors completely gutted by these flames. firefighters are actually back here on the scene battling hot spots, these small pockets of flames. fire officials say at this hour this building is still too dangerous to gain total access inside. the morning after reveals what a day of raging flames did to this 24-story apartment. the damage so severe fire officials say it will take weeks to inspect each and every floor. for now drones are the safest tool for investigators. the cause of the fire is still unclear, as is how it spread so quickly. fire experts believe the cosmetic cladding, or siding, recently added to the building's exterior may be to blame. the fire struck in the middle of the night. trapping many. some seen desperately screaming for help. survivors say they spent years complaining about fire hazards including blocked exits but say the management company wasn't
2:38 am
more than a dozen are still missing. their faces posted around a growing donation center for the hundreds now left homeless. left untreated mucus can build up causing further problems. treat mucus buildup early with #1 doctor recommended mucinex 12 hour. the bi-layer tablet immediately releases to thin and loosen excess mucus and lasts for 12 hours. learn more at mucinex.com treat excess mucus with mucinex 12 hour and enjoy living well. you get to do the dishes.ed... bring 'em on. dawn ultra has 3 times more grease-cleaning power.
2:39 am
not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. megared advanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption. this blue goo leaves a residue quit playin' with my eyes,ghter. goo... so, seventh generation developed this powerful natural detergent it gets your clothes clean. really clean. buh bye blue goo, and come clean with seventh generation.
2:40 am
russian president vladimir putin is expected to run for an unprecedented fourth term next year. it could be a cakewalk for putin after the russian election commission ruled that his most prominent opponent alexey navalny will not be able to run. navalny was sentenced to 30 days in prison after organizing monday's nationwide protest that sent demonstrators into the streets of more than 100 cities. navalny's sentence is nothing compared to what happened to other opponents of putin. leslie stahl has that story for "60 minutes." >> reporter: vladimir karamerza was an opposition activist on the front lines, protesting putin's policies, organizing demonstrations and town hall meetings. he knew he was on a dangerous mission. when we met him last year, he
2:41 am
he learned just how dangerous. >> i was in a work meeting with my colleagues in moscow when i suddenly started to feel really sick and i went in 20 minutes from feeling completely normal to feeling like a very sick man. and i don't remember anything for the next month. >> you were out for a month? >> i was in a coma for a week and i don't remember anything for a month and had basically a cascade of all my major life organs failing one after another, just switching off. the lungs, the heart, the kidneys. >> reporter: he was shuttled from hospital to hospital in moscow for two days. as doctors frantically tried to figure out what was wrong with him. >> i was at one point connected i think to eight different artificial life support machines and doctors told my wife that it's only going to be about 5% chance that i'll survive. >> reporter: but he beat the odds. when we spoke with him last year, he'd been recovering for a year. but he was still walking with a limp from nerve damage. >> so what happened? >> well, it was some kind of a very strong toxin.
2:42 am
because with these things as people who know more about this than i do explained to me, you basically have to know exactly what you're testing for in order to find it. >> so they never found the exact compound. >> they never did. >> reporter: it wasn't till the fourth day and after he'd been on a dialysis machine that blood was drawn and sent to a toxicology lab in france. it found heavy metals in his blood but no specific toxin. still, karamerza maintains that he was poisoned. >> i have absolutely no doubt that this was deliberate poisoning, that it was intended to kill. because as i mentioned already the doctors told my wife it's about a 5% chance of survival and when it's that kind of percentage it's not to scare, it's to kill. >> can you be sure that what happened to you was directed by mr. putin? >> well, of that i have no idea. i don't know the precise circumstances. i don't know the who or the how. but i do know why. >> [ speaking russian ]. >> reporter: in recent years quite a few of putin's e
2:43 am
have perished by swallowing things they shouldn't have. in 2006 russian spy turned kremlin critic alexander lit vin enko drank tea laced with polonium 210. two years earlier the ukrainian politician victor yurchenko had somehow ingested dioxin. he survived but was disfigured. but what would the motive be in the casef othe critic vladimir karamerza? cambridge educated, he was for years a washington-based reporter for a russian tv station. so he was well connected and had perfect english, which he used to incessantly criticize the regime on the international stage. >> a government that is based on genuine support does not need to jail its opponents. >> reporter: as if 'tis outspokenness wasn't enough to anger the kremlin, he made matters worse for himself when he joined forces with this man. >> it's death if you cross the putin
2:44 am
for years the largest foreign investor in russia, and putin's champion. but he turned into a dogged adversary when his russian tax attorney sergei magnitsky blew the whistle on alleged large-scale theft by government officials. >> we discovered massive corruption of the putin regime. sergey exposed it, testified against officials involved. he was subsequently arrested, put in pretrial detention, tortured for 358 days, and killed at the age of 37. >> reporter: browder was so outraged he joined with vladimir karamerza to lobby the u.s. congress for a law targeting those responsible for that death and other human rights violations. they succeeded. the magnitsky act passed in 2012. it's the first law that sanctions individual russians, 44 so far. >> the magnitsky act is deng den
2:45 am
assets and ban the visas for people who commit these types of crimes in russia. >> they can't get to their money, which may be stashed in the united states. >> and so vladimir putin is extremely angry that the magnitsky was going to be passed. he was even angrier when it got passed. and he was even angrier when people started getting added, names started getting added to the magnitsky list. >> reporter: one reason vladimir karamerza is convinced he was targeted is because six people connected to the magnitsky case as he was ended up dead. one of them was boris nemtsov, a leader of russia's opposition and karamerza's partner in lobbying the magnitzky act. >> in february 2015 he was killed by bullets walking home as he always did out in the open without bodyguards. >> this was an assassination. in some of the deaths proving there was foul play has been a challenge. take the case of this russian
2:46 am
incriminating documents relating to the magnitsky case. >> alexander paraplichny was a whistle blower. at the age of 44 he went jogging outside his home in surrey outside of london and dropped dead. the police deemed it an unsuspicious natural death. >> they did look for poison, they just couldn't find any. >> they did a very first-round toxicology screen. they didn't find anything on the first run-through. >> reporter: detecting poison can be extremely difficult. and there's a reason. this cold war cia memo reveals that the soviets ran a laboratory for poisons in a large and super-secret installation known as the "chamber" to test undetectible compounds. in the kafts bacase of the bank london, the coroner wasn't willing to give up. he ordered more tests, and three years later it was revealed in court that an exotic toxin was found with the help of an authority on flowers. >> a small sample
2:47 am
contents was sent to a botanical garden outside of london, and one of the scientists found a compound called gelcimian elegance, which is a chinese herb. they call it's heartbreak grass. and it causes a person to die unexpectedly without explanation. >> reporter: still, there's no direct evidence of a kremlin connection. but the list of those who've come to die unexpectedly after running afoul of mr. putin is long. political opponents and human rights lawyers have been shot. overly inquisitive reporters have perished in mysterious plane crashes or by car bombs, by poison or gunfire. journalist anna poll kofs calla was poisoned and shot. then there are enemies who kill themselves. one by hanging. one by stabbing himself to death with two knives. and one by tying himself t
2:48 am
chair and jumping into a swimming pool. some of putin's opponents are in prison. others forced out of the country like mikhail khodorkovsky, probably putin's most famous living critic. are you afraid for your own life? >> translator: for a period of over ten years vladimir putin had ample opportunity to make a decision about putting an end to my life. in a very easy way. just by snapping his fingers. and today it's a little bit more difficult. >> reporter: khodorkovsky was once the richest man in russia, until he took to opposing putin. he was put on trial, his oil company confiscated, and then thrown in prison for ten years. home is now london, where he funds a russian pro-democracy movement. and this is where the plot thickens because one of his senior organizers on the ground in russia is none other than vladimir karamerza. there are people who say that what's happened to
2:49 am
a message to you, a message to you to back off. >> translator: you know, for ten years i was receiving lots of messages from authorities of various sorts. and some of these messages were unpleasant concerning my physical well-being. but the authorities saw i ignored these messages. i would like to believe they have not forgotten that. >> and you can see the full report on our website, cbsnews.com. the "overnight news" will be right back. there's a new essence in new herbal essences it's bio:renew a blend of sea kelp, aloe and antioxidants that help bring your hair back to life. new herbal essences. let life in.
2:50 am
2:51 am
not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. megared advanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption. and they happen easily. the other side of this... is they can be removed... easily. spray and wash's... powerful formula... removes over 100 stains.
2:52 am
better on over 100 stains. president trump has threatened to punish companies that make products overseas, then import them into the united states. but his own clothing line, the donald j. trump collection, is made in foreign countries. china, bangladesh, honduras, and vietnam. meanwhile, there are a lot of businesses here in the states who are redefining what it means to be made in america. i visited one in new jersey. bustling garment factories are what you may expect to find in a far-off foreign land. but this is northern new jersey, and the only thing here that's not made in america is the owner. >> it gets broken when half of it is here and half of it is outside. >> reporter: suchi ram esch was born in india and came here a decade ago to wor
2:53 am
>> i'm very much a nerd. >> reporter: but a couple years ago she quit to found suuchi incorporated hoping to revive an industry many left for dead. >> people think immigrants are taking american jobs. how do you feel about that? >> i honestly feel like you can't separate the immigrant from the american. when you think of america you think of people that have achieved their dreams, that have been successful. and in many ways that is an immigrant. >> reporter: suuchi now employs 60 people, producing clothes for other businesses including uniforms and small batches for young and not so young designers like frank bruno. >> i'm a startup company. >> reporter: after decades in blue-collar jobs bruno decided to launch a line of blue-collar shirts. >> but see, it's unique. it's a different color. >> reporter: and when it came to making them, it had to be american. >> does it surprise you that your american-made clothes are in a factory founded by an indian-born businessperson? >> yes. and it pleases me.
2:54 am
about. this is the american way. >> reporter: while it costs about 20% more to make clothes in america, suuchi says the trade-off is unmatched speed, quality, and flexibility. >> china and india and bangladesh are not set up to meet where retail is heading. and when your supply chain is halfway around the world, it just by default cannot service these needs. >> creativity happens when you are combining two new things. >> reporter: nyu economist petra moser says immigrant entrepreneurs have a long history in the u.s. >> go back as far as andrew carnegie, who came from scotland and then built a very, very large industrial, you might even call it an industrial empire, and created many, many jobs. >> reporter: suuchi now plans to add 40 more jobs by the end of the year, a reminder that immigrants don't always take work from americans. they create work too. >> if you have
2:55 am
people and you have people and
2:56 am
2:57 am
school's out in southern california, and that means beach time. except for all the sharks. jamie yuccas has that story. >> reporter: this is the first week of summer here, and that usually means parents are dropping off their kids to surf camps or the junior lifeguard programs. but with so many great white sharks spotted just offshore, some as big as 12 feet, businesses report numbers are down even with the surf up. >> who's ready to surf? >> me! >> reporter: sun shining, waves ready to ride. and this year sharks lurking offshore. after dozens of sightings, local businesses are feeling what some are calling the shark effect. for surf camp owner john pierce this is his lowest attendance in 16 years. >> normal year we'd have like 20-plus kids in a class and i'd run two classes in a
2:58 am
we'd be full all summer with wait lists. >> reporter: his business is down more than 50%. some surf camps are canceling classes entirely. from board rentals to junior lifeguard programs, fewer are willing to get in the water. >> the mom will say, i'm so sorry, i talked to my husband and it's just that one chance. they're just nervous. >> reporter: candice lazar is one of those moms. since may her family witnessed shark sightings and beach closings. that's why at the last minute she decided daughter sloan would sit camp out. >> you have to live your life. it's hard. it's hard to figure out how to react because you don't want to overreact. >> there's that chance. >> yes, there is. >> and that does weigh on your mind. like what if i put my kid in the surf cam. and something happens. you'd never forgive yourself. >> oh, my gosh. you would never forgive yourself. and i think that's why i took the step when i did. there were just so many reports, one right after the other, and it was just getting out of hand. it was crazy. >> reporter: within the last year
2:59 am
took place within a 25-mile stretch of southern california beaches. on april 29th a 36-year-old mom lost part of her right leg. she remains hospitalized. -guards now begin each morning scanning the water for sharks. >> the area is shark-free and junior guards will go on as scheduled for the day. >> reporter: san clemente lifeguard chief bill humphries says the predators impact crowds. >> the bigger pirk is there's far more sharks than there's ever been in this area. it's an anomaly right now. >> reporter: 11-year-old ava mcgovern had to convince her mom to let her train as a junior lifeguard in a group, but even she doesn't want to hang in the ocean alone. >> i'm a little scared of the sharks. >> do you usually surf? >> i did surf. but now i'm not quite sure if i am going to surf like for a long time now because of the sharks. >> and that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back a little bit later for the morning news and of course "cbs this morning."
3:00 am
york city, i'm tony dokoupil. >> smoreurgery for scalise. >> he's in some trouble. >> dr. jon lapook has the latest heon tdi contion of the critically wounded congressman. also tonight, the president under investigation for possible obstruction of justice. he calls it the greatest witch hunt in american political history. the vice president hires a lawyer. the judge tells the deadlocked cosby jury to keep going. >> this deadlock shows the not guilty that mr. cosby has been saying the entire time. >> this is not a vindication of anybody. it's not over until it's over. and it's not over yet. and democrats and republicans face off on the ball field. with one party on their mind. >> throughout the whole game we
3:01 am
will all be team scalise. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." congressman steve scalise had a third surgery on thursday as doctors worked to save the life of the third-ranking republican in the house. scalise is one of four people shot when a gunman opened fire on republicans practicing for last night's charity baseball game against the democrats. scalise, who is 51, remains in critical condition. our chief congressional correspondent nancy cordes begins our coverage. >> he's in some trouble. >> reporter: president trump issued a sobering update today after visiting house majority whip steve scalise last night. >> he's a great fighter and he's going to be okay, we hope. >> reporter: scalise underwent his third surgery today. democrat cedric richmond is a close friend and fellow louisianan.
3:02 am
>> it's no secret that the bullet split up and that vital organs were hit. >> reporter: another victim, lobbyist matt mika, has been upgraded from critical condition to serious. but his family warns matt was shot multiple times in his chest and arm. he requires assistance to breathe and will need additional surgeries. house republicans gathered at the capitol to sign get well cards. meanwhile, fbi agents continued to comb the scene. an alexandria, virginia ballpark. they are processing a cell phone, a computer, and a camera found in the shooter's van. the atf has determined that 66-year-old james hodgkinson of illinois purchased his highly lethal rifle and handgun legally, firing dozens of rounds before he was shot and killed by police. [ gunshots ] ho
3:03 am
filled with anti-trump, anti-gop messages, leading a few conservatives to blame -- >> an increasing intensity of hostility on the left. >> reporter: new york republican chris collins told a local radio host -- >> i can only hope that the democrats do tone down the rhetoric. some people react to things like that. >> how dare they say such a thing? >> reporter: democratic leader nancy pelosi argued she's endured hostile right-wing rhetoric for years. >> this sick individual does something despicable. and it was horrible what he did. hateful. but for them to all of a sudden be sanctimonious as if they don't -- have never seen such a thing before. >> reporter: late today the shooter's widow addressed the media for the first time. >> i can't believe he did this. i cannot believe it. and i just want you all to go away and leave my neighbors in peace. they don't deserve this. i don't deserve it. my daughters dones
3:04 am
this. >> reporter: this incident, scott, has sparked a whole new debate about security for members of congress and for the people who work for them. >> nancy cordes on capitol hill. also injured yesterday were special agent crystal griner of the capitol police, shot in the ankle. but she's in the hospital in good condition. special agent david bailey was treated for minor injuries. texas congressman roger williams suffered a broken ankle. his staffer, zach barth, was shot in the leg but is out of the hospital. joining us now with some insight into all of this is our doctor jon lapook. jon, we're told the congressman came into the emergency room in shock. what does that mean? >> well, scott, it means there's too little blood flow to major organs like the brain, the kidneys, the lungs, and it can cause damage to those organs. now, in this case we're thinking it's probably because of a blood vessel or blood vessels were damaged when the bullet can.
3:05 am
>> and what does it mean to suffer a bullet wound in the pelvis? >> well, we know that the bullet entered his left hip, went across the pelvis, causing fracturing of the bone and causing damage to internal organs. now, those bone fragments and also fragments perhaps of the bullet itself can act almost like a shrapnel and wreak havoc. you have such a small area. there were all sorts of structures here. you have the bladder. you have the colon. you have major blood vessels. and you have nerves. and behind it all you have the spine. now, we know from last night's announcement that they said he was expected to require further operations in the future. and we just heard that today he already had his third procedure since he entered the hospital. >> dr. jon lapook, thank you. well, all of this made members of congress all the more determined to play ball tonight at nationals park. here's jan crawford. >> reporter: there are few bipartisan traditions left in washington. but for 108 years the congressional baseball game has been one of them.
3:06 am
despite the attack there was immediate consensus to play ball tonight. >> it takes a whole different flair, whole different feel to it with this. and i hope there will be a lot of unity before the game and after the game that we can apply to what we do around here. >> reporter: some congressmen like california's doug lamalfa spent the day in a different kind of uniform than the traditional suit and tie. the attack has led to more unity. that doesn't mean it won't be a hard-fought game. >> we're going to play our hardest to win. each team will. and throughout the whole game we will all be team scalise. >> reporter: congressman roger williams of texas, on crutches after he was injured during yesterday's attack, is a coach for the gop team. >> sir, who's going to win the game tonight? >> the republicans. >> reporter: hours before the game he was suited up and ready to coach. >> this is an opportunity to begin to maybe i think dial down the verbiage a little bit here in washington, around our country.
3:07 am
>> reporter: adding to the drama, it's a tiebreaker for the two teams. >> gop's gerald ford slams out a solid hit with two aboard. >> reporter: over the years republicans and democrats have each won 39 games and lost 39. >> way to go, democrats! >> reporter: but tonight bragging rights take a back seat to bipartisanship, at least for nine innings. >> let it be a symbol that hate and violence do not cast too long or too great a shadow, that we can and will come together this evening and the game will go on. >> reporter: now, they're expecting twice as many people than usual to attend tonight's game, 20,000 or more. that means more money for charity. and scott, after yesterday's attack, they've added a new group to those who will share in the proceeds -- the capitol police memorial fund. >> jan crawford at the game. jan, thanks. we're back in just a moment.
3:08 am
3:09 am
3:10 am
those two injured capitol police officers we mentioned a moment ago stopped what might have been a massacre. here's chip reid. [ gunshots ] >> reporter: moments after the shooting began two special agents with the capitol hill police, crystal griner and david bailey, charged onto the baseball field, exchanging fire with the shooter. >> i saw him train his gun at me. everything around me started to pop. i got hit in the leg. >> reporter: congressional staffer zach barth told "cbs this morning" he somehow made it to the dugout, where survivors say they would have been sitting ducks if not for their protectors. >> thank the lord for special agents griner and bailey. without them i don't know that
3:11 am
i'd be talking to you right now. >> reporter: agent crystal griner was shot in the ankle. a 2006 graduate of maryland's hood college, she was a star basketball player, known for her strength and athletic ability. a teammate told us she was very aggressive and was not at all surprised how she responded in a dangerous, high-pressure situation. retired capitol police chief kim dine. >> she is amazing, and she's a hero. she epitomized what being a hero's all about. >> reporter: agent david bailey injured his ankle during the chaotic gun battle. he's from brazil and graduated from north carolina central university in 2007. >> he always talked about becoming a police officer. >> reporter: friend rachael brooks says he just wanted to help people. >> as soon as i heard that, the first thing i thought was, that is definitely just like david to do. >> reporter: there were some other heroes too, scott. henry cabrera, a special agent with the capitol hill police department, also exchanged gunfire with the shooter, as did some officers with the alexandria, virginia police
3:12 am
fired the shots that killed the assailant. >> chip reid, thanks. in another important story tonight, amid indications that the president himself is now under investigation. mr. trump tweeted this morning, "you are witnessing the single greatest witch hunt in american political history, led by some very bad and conflicted people." jeff pegues is following this. >> reporter: the president's tweets came after the "washington post" reported that he is now the subject of an obstruction of justice investigation. his response, "they made up a phony collusion with the russians story, found zero proof, so now they go for obstruction of justice on the phony story. nice." cbs news has learned that special counsel robert mueller will interview director of national intelligence dan coats and nsa director admiral mike rogers amid reports about
3:13 am
them to tamp down the investigation into allegations of collusion between the trump campaign and russia. >> do you solemnly swear to tell the truth? >> reporter: a week ago former fbi director james comey told senators that he believed he was fired by mr. trump because of the fbi's ongoing russia investigation, which comey was leading at the time. >> do you believe this will rise to obstruction of justice? >> i don't know. that's bob mueller's job, to sort that out. >> reporter: ron hosko, a former assistant director of the fbi, says while obstruction of justice is hard to prove the allegation itself could hurt the president. don't you have to prove intent? >> getting to intent to obstruct or impede is going to be very important. and it could be that they never are able to build that case in a meaningful way. however, damage could be done, political damage could be done during the process. >> reporter: mueller's appointment a month ago to overseth
3:14 am
bipartisan praise. the white house even interviewed him to fill the vacant fbi director job on may 16th. but as mueller's investigation gained traction, the president's allies began accusing him of trying to undermine the trump presidency. and the president himself has chimed in, tweeting this afternoon, "why is it that hillary clinton's family and dems dealings with russia are not looked at but my non-dealings are?" a former fbi official says the president's tweets could be used by the special counsel as evidence. scott, late today cbs news confirmed that vice president pence has hired a personal lawyer to answer any questions investigators may have for him. >> jeff pegues in our washington newsroom. jeff, thank you. after four days of deliberations jurors in bill cosby's sexual assault trial told the judge today they are deadlocked. he told them "keep trying." jericka duncan is at the courthouse in norristown, pennsylvania.
3:15 am
>> reporter: bill cosby remains in a small room inside the courthouse. early this afternoon jurors told the judge they could not reach a unanimous verdict on any of the three counts against cosby. cosby's attorney, brian mcmonagle, asked the court for a mistrial but that request was denied. instead the judge told the sequestered jurors to keep deliberating. cosby's publicist, andrew wyatt. >> and this deadlock shows the not guilty that mr. cosby has been saying the entire time. >> reporter: the jury has paused deliberations to review evidence a half dozen times. the 79-year-old comedian has been accused by nearly 60 women of sexual assault over the past several decades. but cosby has denied those accusations. andrea constand's case was the only one that was still eligible to go to trial. lili bernard says she too was sexually abused by cosby. she got into a heated argument with cosby supporters after the jury announced they were
3:16 am
>> he preyed upon my vulnerabilities and he drugged me and raped me against my will. >> reporter: cosby has been charged with sexually assaulting andrea constand at his pennsylvania home in 2004. constand testified that cosby drugged and molested her after giving her three blue pills which she says left her paralyzed and unable to move. cosby says it was consensual. former prosecutor dennis mcandrews. >> if the jury comes back and names that they're deadlocked, then the judge can declare a hung jury and declare a mistrial, which allows a new trial for the defendant. >> reporter: if the judge declares a mistrial, it will ultimately be up to andrea constand whether she wants to go through this process again and testify atanother trial. scott, today constand posted a video on twitter of herself playing basketball with the words "always follow through," implying she is not ready to quit. >> jericka duncan, thanks. coming up, a father says north korea bral
3:17 am
and later, the death toll rises in a horrific fire. i just saved a bunch of money on my car insurhuh. with geico. i should take a closer look at geico... geico can help with way more than car insurance. boats, homes, motorcycles... even umbrella coverage. this guy's gonna wish he brought his umbrella. fire at will! how'd you know the guy's name is will? yeah? it's an expression, ya know? fire at will? you never heard of that? oh, there goes will! bye, will! that's not his name! take a closer look at geico. great savings. and a whole lot more.
3:18 am
and they happen easily. the other side of this... is they can be removed... easily. spray and wash's... powerful formula... removes over 100 stains. spray and wash. better on over 100 stains. not all fish oil supplements provide the same omega-3 power. megared advanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption. you know new pantene.r tangles the minute you wash it? the first shampoo with active pro-v nutrient blends fueling hair 100% stronger that's instantly smoother and tangle free. because strong is beautiful.
3:19 am
no matter who was in there last. protection. new lysol power & fresh 6 goes to work flush after flush for a just-cleaned feeling that lasts up to 4 weeks. lysol. what it takes to protect. ♪ new lysol kitchen pro eliminates 99.9% of bacteria without any harsh chemical residue. lysol. what it takes to protect.
3:20 am
the american college student released from prison tuesday by north korea has extensive brain damage, and it appears the north koreans have lied about how it happened. michele miller is following this. >> reporter: fred warmbier walked into the press conference wearing the same jacket his son wore during his trial last march. >> i'm so proud of otto, who has been in a pariah regime for the last 18 months, brutalized and terrorized, and he's now home with his family. >> reporter: the comatose 22-year-old college student was flown back to the united states last tuesday. fred warmbier described greeting his son for the first time in nearly two years. >> i knelt down by his side, and i hugged him. and i told him i missed him and i was so glad that he made it home.
3:21 am
>> reporter: north korean officials claim otto fell into a coma after he contracted botulism and took a sleeping pill a day after he was sentenced to 15 years of hard labor. he was convicted for committing a hostile act after allegedly stealing a propaganda poster during a college group tourist trip last year. today doctors at the university of cincinnati medical center said he shows no sign of a botulism infection but he did suffer severe brain damage. lead physician daniel kanter. >> he has spontaneous eye opening and blinking. however, he shows no signs of understanding language. >> reporter: kanter says the brain injury was likely caused by a sudden stopping of the heart. >> this pan
3:22 am
result of cardiopulmonary arrest where the blood supply to the brain is inadequate. >> reporter: fred warmbier says he's still in shock. >> these things are tough to process. but he's with us. and we're trying to make him comfortable, and we want to be a part of his life. >> reporter: doctors say otto warmbier's heart stoppage could have been caused by trauma or drug intoxication. scott, there are currently three other americans in a north korean prison there. >> michele miller, thanks. coming up, a blimp explodes.
3:23 am
vanced triple absorption is absorbed three times better. so one softgel has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills. megared advanced triple absorption. in very old habits of using toothpaste people are stuck to clean a denture. but dentures are very different to real teeth. they're about 10x softer and may have surface pores where bacteria can grow and multiply. polident is specifically designed to clean dentures daily. it's unique micro-clean formula kills 99.99% of odor causing bacteria and helps dissolve stains. cleaning in a better way than brushing with toothpaste. that's why dentists recommend polident. polident. cleaner, fresher, brighter every day. so we got our new he washing machine but it took forever turns out it wasn't the machine, it was our detergent. so we switched to tide turbo clean. now we get way cleaner clothes way faster he turbo clean. 6x the cleaning power in 1/2 the time
3:24 am
today police in washington issued arrest warrants for a dozen members of the turkish president's security detail. they're accused of attacking protesters outside the turkish embassy during president erdogan's visit last month. turkey claims it was self-defense. all 12 are believed to be back in turkey. today london's police commander said that he hopes the death toll does not reach triple digits in that high-rise apartment fire. 17 bodies have been recovered, but it may take weeks to search all 24 stories. in wisconsin today a blimp flying over the u.s. open golf tournament crashed. it deflated in mid-air and caught fire. the only person on board was the pilot. he was badly burned. we do not know why it deflated. we'll be back in a moment.
3:25 am
3:26 am
3:27 am
it's time to ask whether the attack on the united states congress yesterday was foreseeable, predictable, and to some degree self-inflicted.
3:28 am
commentators who set an example for us to follow have led us into an abyss of violent rhetoric which, it should be no surprise, has led to violence. yesterday was not the first time. in december last year a man with an assault rifle stormed into a washington-area pizzeria to free child sex slaves whom hillary clinton was holding there. or at least that's what political blog sites had said. he fired into a locked door to discover no children in chains. bernie sanders has called the president the most dangerous in history, and the shooter yesterday was a sanders volunteer. you might think that no sane person would act on political hate speech. and you'd be right. the trouble is there are a lot of americans who struggle with mental illness. in february the president tweeted that the news media were
3:29 am
the "enemy of the american people." later, at a lunch for reporters, president trump was asked whether he worried that that language would incite violence. his pause indicated it had never crossed his mind. and then he said, "no, that doesn't worry me." as children we're taught "words will never hurt me," but when you think about it violence almost always begins with words. in twitter world we've come to believe that our first thought is our best thought. it's past time for all of us. presidents, politicians, reporters, citizens, all of us, to pause, to think again. and that's the "overnight news" for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for thers check back with us a little bit later for the morning news and "cbs this morning." from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm scott pelley.
3:30 am
>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." welcome to the "overnight news." i'm tony dokoupil. the special counsel investigating russia's interference in the presidential election could now be focusing on president trump. specifically whether mr. trump tried to obstruct justice in the case of his fired national security adviser michael flynn. jeff pegues has the latest. >> reporter: the president's tweets came after the "washington post" reported that he is now the subject of an obstruction of justice investigation. his response, "they made up a phony collusion with the russians story, found zero proof. so now they go for obstruction of justice on the phony story. nice."
3:31 am
special counsel robert mueller will interview director of national intelligence dan coats and nsa director admiral mike rogers amid reports about whether the president pressured them to tamp down the investigation into allegations of collusion between the trump campaign and russia. >> do you solemnly swear to tell the truth? >> reporter: a week ago former fbi director james comey told senators he believes he was fired by mr. trump because of the fbi's ongoing russia investigation, which comey was leading at the time. >> do you believe this will rise to obstruction of justice? >> i don't know. that's bob mueller's job to sort that out. >> reporter: ron hosko, former assistant director of the fbi, says while obstruction is justice is hard to prove the allegation itself could hurt the president. >> don't you have to prove intent? >> getting to intent to obstruct or impede-s going to be very important. and it could be that they never are able to build that case in a meaningful way. however, damage could bee.
3:32 am
during the process. >> reporter: mueller's appointment a month ago to oversee the investigation drew bipartisan praise. the white house even interviewed him to fill the vacant fbi director job on may 16th. but as mueller's investigation gained traction, the president's allies began accusing him of trying to undermine the trump presidency. and the president himself has chimed in, tweeting this afternoon, "why is it that hillary clinton's family and dems' dealings with russia are not looked at but my non-dealings are?" >> investigators are still trying to piece together the chain of events that led to the ambush of a group of republicans. they've recovered the gunman's camera, computer, and cell phone and raided his house. nancy cordes has the latest. >> he's in some trouble. >> reporter: president trump issued a sobering update today after visiting house majority whip steve scalise last night.
3:33 am
>> he's a great fighter, and he's going to be okay, we hope. >> reporter: scalise underwent his third surgery today. democrat cedric richmond is a close friend and fellow louisianan. >> it's no secret that the bullet split up and that vital organs are -- were hit. >> reporter: another victim, lobbyist matt mika, has been upgraded from critical condition to serious. but his family warns matt was shot multiple times in his chest and arm, he requires assistance to breathe and will need additional surgeries. house republicans gathered at the capitol to sign get well cards. meanwhile, fbi agents continued to comb the scene. an alexandria, virginia ballpark. they are processing a cell phone, a computer and a camera found in the shooter's van. the atf has determined that 66-year-old james hodgkinson of illinois purchased his highly lethal rifle and handgun lethally, firing dozens of roun b
3:34 am
killed by police. hodgkinson's facebook page was filled with anti-trump, anti-gop messages, leading a few conservatives to blame -- >> an increasing intensity of hostility on the left. >> reporter: new york republican chris collins told a local radio host -- >> i can only hope that the democrats do tone down the rhetoric. some people react to things like that. >> how dare they say such a thing? >> reporter: democratic leader nancy pelosi argued she's endured hostile right-wing rhetoric for years. >> so this sick individual does something despicable, and it was horrible what he did. hateful. but for them to all of a sudden be sanctimonious as if they don't -- have never seen such a thing before. >> reporter: late today the shooter's widow addressed the media for the first time. >> i can't believe he did this.
3:35 am
i cannot believe -- and i just want you all to go away and leave my neighbors in peace. they don't deserve this. i don't deserve it. my daughters don't deserve all this. two capitol hill police officers are being hailed as heroes for stopping what could have been a massacre. chip reid has that story. [ gunshots ] >> reporter: moments after the shooting began two special agents with the capitol hill police, crystal griner and david bailey, charged onto the baseball field, exchanging fire with the shooter. >> i saw him train his gun at me. everything around me started to pop. i got hit in the leg. >> reporter: congressional staffer zach barth told "cbs this morning" he somehow made it to the dugout where survivors say they would have been sitting ducks if not for their protectors. >> thank the lord for special agents griner and bailey. without them i don't know that i'd be talking to you right now. >> reporter: agent crystal grer
3:36 am
hood college, she was a star basketball player, known for her strength and athletic ability. a teammate told us she was very aggressive and was not at all surprised how she responded in a dangerous high-pressure situation. retired capitol hill police chief kim dine. >> she is amazing and she's a hero. she epitomized what being a hero's all about. >> reporter: agent david bailey injured his ankle during the chaotic gun battle. he's from brazil and graduated from north carolina central university in 2007. >> he always talked about becoming a police officer. >> reporter: friend rachel brooks says he just wanted to help people. >> as soon as i heard that, the first thing i thought was that is definitely just like david to do. a criminal investigation has been launched in the deadly high-rise fire in london. fewer than two dozen bodies have been recovered so far, but the death toll could end up topping 100 once firefighters are able to search the upper floors. jonathan vigliotti reports. >> reporter: the building behind me looks like a skel
3:37 am
many of these floors completely gutted by these flames. firefighters are actually back here on the scene battling hot spots, these small pockets of flames. fire officials say at this hour this building is still too dangerous to gain total access inside. the morning after reveals what a day of raging flames did to this 24-story apartment. the damage so severe fire officials say it will take weeks to inspect each and every floor. for now drones are the safest tool for investigators. the cause of the fire is still unclear, as is how it spread so quickly. fire experts believe the cosmetic cladding, or siding, recently added to the building's exterior may be to blame. the fire struck in the middle of the night. trapping many. some seen desperately screaming for help. survivors say they spent years complaining about fire hazards including blocked exits busa
3:38 am
responsive. more than a dozen are still missing. their faces posted around a growing donation center for the hundreds now left homeless. without any harsh chemical residue. lysol. what it takes to protect. is thno, it's, uh, breyers gelato indulgences. you really wouldn't like it. it's got caramel and crunchy stuff. i like caramel and crunchy stuff. breyers gelato indulgences. it's way beyond ice cream.
3:39 am
what does life look like during your period? with tampax pearl. you get ultimate protection on your heaviest days and smooth removal for your lightest. tampax pearl and pocket pearl for on the go. daughter: uh oh. irreplaceable monkey protection. detergent alone doesn't kill bacteria, but adding new lysol laundry sanitizer kills 99.9% of bacteria with 0% bleach. lysol. what it takes to protect.
3:40 am
putin is expected to run for an unprecedented fourth term next year. it could be a cakewalk for putin after the russian election commission ruled that his most prominent opponent alexey navalny will not be allowed to run. navalny was sentenced to 30 days in prison after organizing monday's nationwide protest that sent demonstrators into the streets of more than 100 cities. navalny's sentence is nothing compared to what happened to other opponents of putin. leslie stahl has that story for "60 minutes." >> reporter: vladimir kara-murza was an opposition activist on the front lines, protesting putin's policies, organizing demonstrations and town hall meetings. he knew he was on a dangerous mission. when we met him last year, he told us that one day in y
3:41 am
>> i was in a work meeting with my colleagues in moscow when i suddenly started to feel really sick and i went in about 20 minutes from feeling completely normal to feeling like a very sick man. and i don't remember anything for the next month. >> you were out for a month? >> i was in a coma for a week and i don't remember anything for a month and had basically a cascade of all my major life organs failing one after another, just switching off. the lungs, the heart, the kidneys. >> reporter: he was shuttled from hospital to hospital in moscow for two days as doctors frantically tried to figure out what was wrong with him. >> i was at one point connected i think to eight different artificial life support machines and doctors told my wife that it's only going to be about 5% chance that i'll survive. >> reporter: but he beat the odds. when we spoke with him last year, he'd been recovering for a year. but as
3:42 am
>> so what happened? >> well, it was some kind of a very strong toxin. we don't know what it was because with these things as people who know more about this than i do explained to me, you basically have to know exactly what you're testing for in order to find it. >> so they never found the exact compound. >> they never did. >> reporter: it wasn't till the fourth day and after he'd been on a dialysis machine that blood was drawn and sent to a toxicology lab in france. it found heavy metals in his blood but no specific toxin. still, karamerza maintains that he was poisoned. >> i have absolutely no doubt that this was deliberate poisoning, that it was intended to kill. because as i mentioned already the doctors told my wife it's about a 5% chance of survival and when it's that kind of percentage it's not to scare, it's to kill. >> can you be sure that what happened to you was directed by mr. putin? >> well, of that i have no idea. i don't know the precise circumstances. i don't know the who or the how. but i do know why. >> [ speaking russian ]. >> reporter: in recent years quite a few of putin's ene
3:43 am
have perished by swallowing things they shouldn't have. in 2006 russian spy turned kremlin critic alexander litvinenko drank tea laced with polonium 210. two years earlier the ukrainian politician viktor yush chenko had somehow ingested dioxin. he survived but was disfigured. but what would the motive be in thecase of the critic vladimir kara-murza? cambridge educated, he was for years a washington-based reporter for a russian tv station. so he was well connected and had perfect english, which he used to incessantly criticize the regime on the international stage. >> a government that is based on genuine support does not need to jail its opponents. >> reporter: as if his outspokenness wasn't enough to anger the kremlin, he made matters worse for himself wh
3:44 am
putin regime. >> reporter: bill browder was for years the largest foreign investor in russia, and putin's champion. but he turned into a dogged adversary when his russian tax attorney sergei magnitsky blew the whistle on alleged large-scale theft by government officials. >> we discovered massive corruption of the putin regime. sergey exposed it, testified against officials involved. he was subsequently arrested, put in pretrial detention, tortured for 358 days, and killed at the age of 37. >> reporter: browder was so outraged he joined with vladimir kara-murza to lobby the u.s. congress for a law targeting those responsible for that death and other human rights violations. they succeeded. the magnitsky act passed in 2012. it's the first law that sanctions individual russians, 44 so far.
3:45 am
>> the magnitsky act is designed to sanction, to freeze the assets and ban the visas for people who commit these types of crimes in russia. >> they can't get to their money, which may be stashed in the united states. >> and so vladimir putin is extremely angry that the magnitsky act was going to be passed. he was even angrier when it got passed. and he was even angrier when people started getting added, names started getting added to the magnitsky list. >> reporter: one reason vladimir kara-murza is convinced he was targeted is because six people connected to the magnitsky case as he was ended up dead. one of them was boris nemtsov, a leader of russia's opposition and kara-murza's partner in lobbying the magnitzky act. >> on the 27th of february 2015 he was killed by five bullets in the back as he was walking home, as he always did out in the open without bodyguards. >> reporter: this was an assassination. in some of the deaths proving there was foul play has been a challenge. take the case of this russian banker who came forward with
3:46 am
incriminating documents relating to the magnitsky case. >> alexander paraplichny was a whistle blower. at the age of 44 he went jogging outside his home in surrey outside of london and dropped dead. the police deemed it an unsuspicious natural death. >> well, they did look for poison, they just couldn't find any. >> they did a very first-round toxicology screen. they didn't find anything on the first run-through. >> reporter: detecting poison can be extremely difficult. and there's a reason. this cold war cia memo reveals that the soviets ran a laboratory for poisons in a large and super-secret installation known as the "chamber" to test undetectable compounds. in the case of the banker in london, the coroner wasn't willing to give up. he ordered more tests, and three years later it was revealed in court that an exotic toxin was found with the help of an authority on flowers.
3:47 am
>> a small sample of his stomach contents was sent to a botanical garden outside of london, and one of the scientists found a compound called gelcimian elegance, which is a chinese herb. they call it heartbreak grass. and it causes a person to die unexpectedly without explanation. >> reporter: still, there's no direct evidence of a kremlin connection. but the list of those who've come to die unexpectedly after running afoul of mr. putin is long. political opponents and human rights lawyers have been shot. overly inquisitive reporters have perished in mysterious plane crashes or by car bombs, by poison or gunfire. journalist anna polikovskaya was poisoned and shot. then there are enemies who kill themselves. one by hanging. one by stabbing himself to death with two knives.
3:48 am
and one by tying himself to a chair and jumping into a swimming pool. some of putin's opponents are in prison. others forced out of the country like mikhail khodorkovsky, probably putin's most famous living critic. are you afraid for your own life? >> translator: for a period of over ten years vladimir putin had ample opportunity to make a decision about putting an end to my life. in a very easy way. just by snapping his fingers. and today it's a little bit more difficult. >> reporter: khodorkovsky was once the richest man in russia, until he took to opposing putin. he was put on trial, his oil company confiscated, and then thrown in prison for ten years. home is now london, where he funds a russian pro-democracy movement. and this is where the plot thickens because one of his senior organizers on the ground in russia is none other than vladimir kara-murza. there are people who say that
3:49 am
what's happened to kara-murza is a message to you, a message to you to back off. >> translator: you know, for ten years i was receiving lots of messages from authorities of various sorts. and some of these messages were unpleasant concerning my physical well-being. but the authorities saw i ignored these messages. i would like to believe they have not forgotten that. >> and you can see the full report on our website, cbsnews.com. the "overnight news" will be right back. absorption... it supports your heart, joints, brain, and eyes. and is absorbed by your body three times better. so one megared has more omega-3 power than three standard fish oil pills.
3:50 am
where are mom and dad? 'saved money on motorcycle insurance with geico! goin' up the country. love mom and dad' i'm takin' a nap. dude, you just woke up! ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪ ♪ i'm goin' up the country, baby don't you wanna go? ♪ geico motorcycle, great rates for great rides. 60% of women are wearing the w...experience leaks. introducing always my fit. find the number that's right for your flow and panty size on the top of any always pack. the better the fit, the better it protects. always. and they happen easily. the other side of this... is they can be removed... easily. spray and wash's... powerful formula... removes over 100 stains.
3:51 am
better on over 100 stains.
3:52 am
president trump has threatened to punish companies that make products overseas, then import them into the united states. but his own clothing line, the donald j. trump collection, is made in foreign countries. china, bangladesh, honduras, and vietnam. meanwhile, there are a lot of businesses here in the states who are redefining what it means to be made in america. i visited one in new jersey. bustling garment factories are what you may expect to find in a far-off foreign land. but this is northern new jersey, and the only thing here that's not made in america is the owner. >> it gets broken when half of it is here and half of it is outside. >> reporter: suuchi ramesh was born in india and came here
3:53 am
technology. >> i'm very much a nerd. >> reporter: but a couple years ago she quit to found suuchi incorporated hoping to revive an industry many left for dead. >> people think immigrants are taking american jobs. how do you feel about that? >> i honestly feel like you can't separate the immigrant from the american. when you think of america you think of people that have chases their dreams, that have been successful. and in many ways that is an immigrant. >> reporter: suuchi now employs 60 people, producing clothes for other businesses including uniforms and small batches for young and not so young designers like frank bruno. >> i'm a startup company. >> reporter: after decades in blue-collar jobs bruno decided to launch a line of blue-collar shirts. >> but see, it's unique. it's a different color. >> reporter: and when it came to making them, it had to be american. >> does it surprise you that
3:54 am
your american-made clothes are in a factory founded by an indian-born businessperson? >> yes. and it pleases me. because this is what it's all about. this is the american way. >> reporter: while it costs about 20% more to make clothes in america, suuchi says the trade-off is unmatched speed, quality, and flexibility. >> china and india and bangladesh are not set up to meet where retail is heading. and when your supply chain is halfway around the world, it just by default cannot service these needs. >> creativity happens when you are combining two new things. >> reporter: nyu economist petra moser says immigrant entrepreneurs have a long history in the u.s. >> go back as far as andrew carnegie, who came from scotland and then built a very, very large industrial, you might even call it an industrial empire, and created many, many jobs. >> reporter: suuchi now plans to add 40 more jobs by the end of the year, a reminder that immigrants don't always take work from americans. they create work too. >> if you have hard-working
3:55 am
people and you have people and
3:56 am
3:57 am
3:58 am
3:59 am
4:00 am
. more surgery for scalise. >> he's in some trouble. >> dr. the being investigated for obstruction of justice. mr. trump fires back on twitter, of course. this morning a look at what obstruction charges could mean for the presidency and how vice president pence is protecting himself. and on the run for several days. two escaped

243 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on