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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 15, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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>> nowhere at the moment. >> chris christie is on the campaign trail. >> i will not flip-flop. anybody that has a chance to run for president, we'll see how she does. >> can you beat her, chris christie? >> there is hillary clinton 2 .0. >> good luck omen. >> it set off a stampede of photographers and reporters. >> what's your strategy? >> i'm having a great time. i can't look forward to any more than i am. >> we had a hillary sighting. she has been found en route to iowa. that's good. >> not eight years ago, we are talking the fate of the united states of america. >> do you have a verdict? >> the senate foreign relations committee voted 19-0 to insure engagement. >> 19-0 my goodness. >> once they saw we were way beyond the number of people to
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overside a veto. >> we are all united. today iran cannot become a nuclear state. today we became closer to making that a reality. >> all right, welcome to "morning joe." we are in walk. we have the washington post david ignacious, he's here in his regulation grey suit as he says. >> i was told to wear this. >> you were? >> please you look great. >> senior political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post sam stein and senior national correspondent for bloomberg "business week" josh green. good to have you all on board this morning. >> we have a lot to talk about. we will be going to the iran deal first. but you got hillary out in iowa. >> yes. >> that's very interesting. >> we will see how that works for her. >> it's going to work. >> a lot of other people on the campaign trail and chris christie emerging. >> that is interesting. we have interesting angles as well. he speaks about hillary.
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>> yeah. >> and also talks about some of his conservative points of view. >> he talks about entitlement reform and fought backing down. as we have been saying for some time, don't underestimate him. you have obviously a judicial decision or investigation coming down soon. if he gets past that, i think he will be -- >> i think he will be another one in. >> i think he will make noise in new hampshire. >> let's begin with that unanimous vote yesterday on capitol hill related to the controversial nuclear agreement with iran. in a 19-0 vote the foreign relations committee approved legislation that would let lawmakers weigh in on any deal. hours before the vote secretary of state john kerry was on capitol hill trying to urge lawmakers to oppose the bill. now the white house is withdrawing its threat to veto the legislation after a series of compromises. foreign relations committee claire bob corker and ranking member ben cardon actled as a
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liason between corker and the white house and senator corker says the white house agreed when it realized there was strong support from democrats. >> you will never find any administration that they have a role in anything whether democrats or republicans t. war powers act was passed over a presidential ve tomplt it was not surprising to see some reluctant se on the executive branch for congress to be involved in the process. what we were able to work out in a way the administration understands the prerogatives of dock and congress and our role needs to be carried out. >> they said on behalf of the american people we believe it is our role to insure that any deal with iran makes them accountable, is trance parent and is enforceable. >> the legislation calls for a 30-day congressional review
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period and states that no sanctions can be lifted during that time. president obama must also update lawmakers every 90 days if iran is still honoring the agreement. but others remain strongly opposed, including the man who wrote the controversial letter to iran senator tom cotton. >> we just received a classified and technical briefing from the administration but there is nothing classified or technical about the fundamental flaw with the president's proposal. it puts iran the world's worst state sponsor of terrorism, on the path to nuclear weapon. whether that's a matter of months or a matter of years, it's a dangerous outcome, not just for the united states and our allies and israel and the entire world. >> what do you think, mica? >> i think there are major league, some were on capitol hill and then there are the little leagues. they were there, too. >> tom cotton you believe like me she major league talent. >> at some point you have tow
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owe. >> -- >> you wouldn't have minor leaks on capitol hill. david ig nation kerry is fighting harold to keep his reputation up across the world and capitol hill and have people respect and honor what he says and act with authority goes up to capitol hill, sent up by the white house to capitol hill to lobby only to be struck down 19-12k3w4r06789 well -- >> i guess what i'm saying is the white house sort of hung him out to drive. they shouldn't have had him -- >> they reversed course as lathe as 11:30 john kerry was saying we really need you to vote against this. the white house counted the votes and they realized they were getting clobbered. so they turned course and left kerry looking like a beached wale frankly, defending the position they have abandoned him. we now have a rare 19-0 bipartisan vote supporting a
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bill the president didn't want to see and realized he had no alternative. >> how surprised were you, did bob corker and ben carden were able to hold this together? >> bob corker among the ones in the senate is one of the most responsible, that is the white house's view from the beginning they thought they could work out a deal with him. ben carden is replacing menendez, this was his make or break opportunity. the questions whether the compromise they've put together is enough to let senators register their disagreement their strong concerns about this deal but still let the deal go through t. white house was spinning last night that's what they got. it may look like a defeat for them but they got enough built in to go to the iranians and say we can lock this in. >> sam stein, obviously, few look at it if you look at the vote, it is a big loss for the white house but a loss that everybody saw coming. >> yeah. >> i'm surprised john kerry was
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lobbying yesterday morning. they did not serve him very well by making him do that. but that said it could give the president, the white house, a lot moron latitude going back to the iranians saying there are some things we can get through, there are some things we can't. >> i wondered if there was a three dimensional game here. i assumed they would never pass the bill. what they've made clear is they had a big loss yesterday and they want to say, well, we sfwot the review period down from 60 days to 30 days. few look at the technical details of this deal congress can have a number of ways to actually get that review period back to 52 days. so we're talking an 8-day difference. it's not that much. i think a key point is talking to officials in the administration was they didn't want to have an amendment in the deal that said if deal with only go through -- it's certified if iran can no longer sponsor terrorism. they felt it was a poison pill. they took that out. >> compromise? >> i was shocked how many
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democratic aides who praised bob corker, said he managed the processer very well very smoothly respectfully. they enjoyed working with him. he got a very comprehensive important policy done unanimously. >> wow! >> david ignacious has been around washington a pretty long time have missed characters like bob corker people that could talk to both sides of the aisle, most importantly, when they came at him with a condescending letter, the president of the united states he wasn't afraid to say no in fact it was hell no that's not going to help me. >> he comes out of the middle south, the border of america. he's a deal-maker. he was smart in leaving the doors open with the negotiationsed with white house until very late. he's didn't having unusual. let's think about it. we just had a 19-0 bipartisan
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vote. >> how does that happen? >> it's a piece of policy crucial to the united states. i would say that's prince ply corker. >> i want that make one point that's fascinating and for the white house they are so eager to jump in on the iran deal. there is a huge another matter congress looks like it whether duck. i'm not ready to jump on the applause train for congress completely here. >> realize also there is some figure leaf for the white house, there is some hope the won't all blow up. because you do have a process now where the legislation could be voted down and the question is can the senate override a presidential veto? you still have a scenario for the white house all you do is amass 34 senators to say we're not going to do that. >> that's precisely what they will be saying to the iranians come tomorrow. this is a small number to convince really honestly mr. ayatollah. >> the legislation really lies
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with democratic senators and congress. you have a hard time believing they would blow up a deal. >> let me get to some other news this morning. because there is a report that claims hillary clinton was questioned more than two years ago about using a personal e-mail account when she was secretary of state. according to "new york times," congressman darryl issa was investigating the personal e-mail by obaum administration officials. one of the questions from the december 2012 letter to clinton asks, quote, have you or any senior agency official used a personal e-mail account to conduct personal business. if so please identify the account used. >> i would say that's sort of dead on it can't get moron on board than that david ignacious? >> clinton did not reply and resigned as secretary of state seven weeks later. the state department responded with a summary of the e-mail
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policies but failed to include an answer to that question. yesterday, a clinton aide said in part her usage was widely flown to the over 100 department and u.s. government colleagues she e-mailed and her address was invisible on every e-mail she sent. >> that's irrelevant to the question from the committee that had oversight. >> is she about to answer those questions? >> yes, you have to respond and reply. >> do you have to? >> yes. of course. >> then what happens when you don't? nothing. in this case nothing. >> well, they can -- >> then you decide to run for president you are if a lot of trouble? >> really? >> i think this is going to be a continuing issue. this will dog her now for months and months. they will have a drib drab of e-mails and say what about the other ones. >> i am seriously asked if you get pelted with questions from the committee, darryl issa's committee, do you have to answer them? >> if you are an administration
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official, so you are, are you being argumentative? >> i am. >> oh come on. it's transparency. >> i love being argumentative. yes. >> if my car if congress asks you and you are an administration official for this information, you do have to turn it over unless you claim privilege. here they just ignored it. >> what i'm trying to understand is how bake story is this? >> well few look at all the polls we have been reading the last couple of days this has had a real impact in her campaign and the fact that god, three years ago, she had a question sent to her about her personal e-mail and it was directly on point and she ignored it and didn't answer it. >> that will have an impact too. >> to the extent she's handled this issue with a ho-hum manner saying well, everyone knew we did e-mail it was no big deal everyone else does it. it proves at least a couple years ago, they were having to figure out how to answer this
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and chose not to answer it at all. >> bloomberg came out with a poll something like a 2-to-1 margin, people believe she's lying. it's a favorable issue. >> when she left the secretary of state that seemed to be her primary asset going into this presidential campaign. she had been a pretty good secretary of state. now she's spenting all her time talking about e-mails, when did she get a letter what does she do? the whole question of her conduct in office has gone out the window. >> as for her campaign for president, clinton held her first public event yesterday. shelves at a community college in iowa where she laid out broad campaign themes to a small group of students and teachers. >> the deck is still stacked in favor of those already at the top and there's something wrong with that. there's something wrong when ceos make 300 times more than the typical worker and there is something wrong when hedge fund
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managers pay lower tax rates than nurses or the truckers that i saw on i-80 when i was driving here over the last two days. i am running for president because i think that americans and their families need a champion and i want to be that champion. i want to stands up and fight for people. >> so what do you think of that? >> i just feel like she's, it's a great message, but she's got to stop sounding like if this is going to resonate with people. it has to stop sounding like she talked to elizabeth warren on the phone and repeated everything elizabeth warren said. i don't know. i wish she had said this a little before the two of them met and people started talking about elizabeth warren. >> absolutely also if you are running for the democratic nomination being an economic populous, being the mold of elizabeth warren it's the safest thing. >> it's not running for the democratic nomination.
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republicans are using this rhetoric. too. a month ago i was at a firefighters union hall where ted cruz got up. he started talking about two america, one for the well off. i was like this is john edwards embodied if ted cruz. >> i want to believe that is her message. it's a great message. >> i think you can look. even alan greenspan's message two or three years ago, david ignacious. i've said it on this show a thousand times over the past several years, there are two americas. there are two americas in criminal justice. there are two americas in education. there are two americas in economics and the rich do keep getting richer the poor keep getting poorer. wages are flat and going down since 1973 if real terms. these are fought democratic or public issues. we fix them and you can blame it on attacks policy here or attacks policy here. but the tide of change i.t. revolution globalization, there
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are a lot of forces that are pushing this and we have to push back. >> i think you are absolutely right. there is the issue that candidates on all sides will have to deal w. hillary clinton is beginning. you know you remember the clintons are associated with a kind of center right version of the democratic party. the democratic leadership council, pro wall street. she's trying to break away from that. i don't think she knows the answers yet to the questions she was posing. >> she has to crush the very forces that have supported her along the way that don't fit into this message. >> she has to find her own way. it may look like elizabeth warren. >> it las to sound like hillary. let's bring in kristen welker live this morning in norwalk, iowa. you caught up with hillary clinton before that round they believe in iowa. how was that? >> reporter: well it was before the round table and also before that "new york times" story came out. here's what happened secretary clinton's new campaign strategy
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was on display yesterday. she was holding moron intimate events trying to get up moron close and personal with voters. so before that round table at the community college, she met with a few folks at a coffee shop and she decided to stroll aroundor on the street for a few blocks. i caught with up with her and asked her how she lost here in 2008 how she will do differently this time around. here's that exchange. take a look. >> hillary clinton. >> great to see you. >> you lost in iowa if 2008. how do you win this time what's your strategy? >> i'm having a great time. i can't look forward any more than i am. >> thank you. what did you learn from 2008? so secretary clinton declining to directly answer my question. instead, reiterated what we heard from her, which is she is excited to be back in iowa. she will have to answer that question for voters though. i have talked to other voters including democrats who say they want to see her getting up close and personal with voters.
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they want to hear what she has to say about issues like health care and education. as for that "new york times" story about the congressional investigators asked about her personal e-mail use back in 2012 and she essentially ignored that request. no reaction yet from the clinton campaign, but i can tell you a number of the voters i have spoken here in iowa have said they are really concerned about that issue. they want clarity on that point. polls show she has a healthy lead here in iowa. i can tell you it's resonating with voters. she will be talking to visitors in norwalk later on today. she could get a few shouted questions from the press and maybe back to that round table. >> nbc's kristen welker thank you very much. so sam stein, can we say it? there was some laughter when she was going out to the van. some here i won't say who, suggested there might have been a lack of sincerity or a stiffness in her one-sentence answer. >> my laughter was the whole
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process, which is so ridiculous on its face that like we have to rush to her as she makes her way from the coffee shop to the van. like that ten-feet is like the most critical juncture where we can only get her. >> all you get is an answer in english. >> do we want to sign up for this again? deal with these people? >> for two years. >> here the reporters running. you almost think they did that on purpose just to make the reporters look stupid. no, i'm serious. >> i think they did it just to make the reporters look stupid. kind of like james baker did when dan quayle went out after the '88 convention and made him look stupid. i think they sped this up. and it also doesn't help that hillary's one answer if you break down the sentence it is neo-yoda can't be looking
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forward to it any more. >> all right. >> the last line of the sentence first. >> we bought the the republican senator cory gardner here on set. independent senator bernie sanders, who is nearing a decision on running as president ahead. also ahead, rand paul's closest adviser, his wife kelly joins us in studio and valeri nichushkin jarrett, senior adviser and grover norquist on the pledge he expects from the 2016 presidential contenders. >> i think he is changing this year actually from cutting taxes. >> is le? >> to losing 10% body mass. i'm not exactly sure why. >> all right. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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12k3w4r0april ryan. beats a reserved deputy claims he accidentally pulled out his gun instead of a taser. the incident is raising questions about the work of reservists who are volunteers in law enforcement. nbc's kevin tibbles reports. >> reporter: 73-year-old bob beat the part-time tulsa deputy sheriff was formally charged with second degree manslaughter. >> how do you deal e feel about the charges? >> i feeler that unwarranted and shouldn't have been charged. >> reporter: beats was acting as backup when eric harris was selling an illegal gun and bolted. a scuffle ensued picked up by police body cam. beats pulled what he said he thought was his taser but,
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instead, fired his gun. >> i slot him. i'm sorry. >> lrs later died. beats claimed in the heat of the moment he mistook his pistol for the taser. nationwide, the number is about 50,000. in many jurisdiction reservists make financial contributions to the department. beats has contributed thousands. >> the point is if have you enough money, you get to go play cop. >> reporter: the sheriffs office says beats has once been a police officer and has had more than 400 hours of training as a reservist, logging 300 hours of service. >> he was not playing anything. he was there like the other officers doing their job, that he's play acting? >> no. he was there to help. >> reporter: the reserve officers association says some 200 volunteer versus lost their lives in the line of duty.
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>> we talked about this yesterday. it doesn't look any different and i asked the question yesterday whether or not he sort of bought his way into that job, a volunteer job and at 72-years-old, was he truly qualified to be handling a gun and a taser? >> kevin tibbles said the same thing in april it seems these days with more and more reports coming out on video. because we have video before. >> accountability. i love it. >> there is the accountability piece. there are even cops that are on the beat every every day that make mistakes in life or death situations and a lot of times we can't judge them. 72, 73-year-old reservists. i say we can't judge them because it's hard to put yourself there. there are some things straight forward and horrific. but in those life or death situations, don't you want a cop that's trained and active instead of a 73-year-old insurance salesman who paid his way onto the force? >> it's really sad to pay your
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way onto the force. it's basically a hobby he's paid up paid into. >> right. >> there is accountably, policing from this nation. there are issues where many of these persons who are in policing, are if reserve, working these jobs. they have to go through training and the question is what kind of training did he have? was he able, was he capable at 72 to be able to think back to what he did in the training to go through to pick out whether he had his taser or his gun? these are issues that need to be questioned. we need to ask the people who hired this man, who he paid as well to get on this reserve group. it's a sad situation. but one of the great things about it. i love there is video for us to be able to sit here and talk about the question. the accountability piece is the amazing piece. >> we know what happened. >> we see it. yes. >> and we do know mica these
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reservists i don't think a 73-year-old would be on active duty covering an investigation. they can do work patrolling malls. they can do work like patrolling patrolling -- by the way the second the gun went off, he said "i shot him." >> i have a gun. i haven't looked that deep into this. was the department suffering from a lack of resource bucket cuts, did they need people to come in and helpful fill positions? >> look. i think there is a lot we don't know about why he was there. it may not have been necessarily everything we see but it doesn't look good and we have to address it. >> what's appalling the setup, the idea you can buy your way on to a police force like a fantasy sports camp for people that want to be cops and have a gun and the ability -- >> and a taser.
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if i they want to run around and play barney fife put them in the back of the car and, yeah. >> it is a different feel between a taser and a gun. i don't carry guns and i don't use a gun. you can definitely see there is a feel between a gun and a taser. >> why would someone like that be carrying a gun like that in the first place? >> that's the question. also let's not question his intentions. we are making the leap of buying his way onto the force. it certainly looks like that his heart might have been in the wrong place but other people shouldn't have let him be there. still ahead -- >> i think that's the thing. i said it yesterday. somebody is responsible. the person that's responsible is the one that put a retired insurance agent, a 73-year-old man. >> in that position. >> in that position in hot pursuit who was fumbling around. >> oh it's horrible. >> yeah. >> we'll follow this story as we cover a lot of these different cases. >> and a man is dead because of it. >> around the country.
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>> just unbelievable. >> with video to boot. all right, still ahead, senators cory guard in other words and chris coons joins us on set and john harwood joins us with the outgoing minority leader harry reid who let it fly on hillary clinton, her husband bill and the gop field. >> thank you very much. i talked to the president yesterday, clinton i love how he ends his conversation with me, so sincere. >> how does he end his situation v conversation? >> i love you. >> every time? >> yes. >> who is the republican nomination? >> i don't really care. i think they're all losers. ♪ ♪ ♪
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reliably fast internet starts at $69.95 a month. comcast business. built for business. . >> are you entirely comfortable with hillary clinton as the democratic nominee in 2016? >> i love the way he end his conversation with me. it's so sincere. >> how does he end his conversation with you? >> i love you. >> he says that every time? >> every time. >> that was the political writer for the "new york times" john harwood speaking with senate democratic leader harry reid on cnbc. john joins us now with luke russert. who covers capitol hill.
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john, he didn't seem to have a lot of guilt trip there. >> no. >> what happened? >> harry reid doesn't have too much of a filter. once he announces he is not running for election the wheels come off. >> the wheels come off the bus. >> exactly. >> what did you learn? >> i learned he likes john boehner a lot. he does not seem to like mitch mcconnell all that much. i must say i assumed they came into the senate at the same time. very close, two years apart and i assumed that all of the fighting they do it is very professional and cordial and it may be at some level. but he was much moron effusive of other people john boehner, the former republican leader than mitch mcconnell when i asked him about pittsburgh connell, he said you know he comes from a coal state and he is a lump of coal. >> before we move on to hillary
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clinton, josh has a great piece on that. you also asked him about john boehner. >> i did. >> that was kind of had lots of a filter as well. take a look. >> you said boehner was acting like a dictator and cussed you out at the white house. >> if i had known it i wouldn't have said it. john boehner is a person i like a lot. we had done a lot. congress has serious problems. do you go and see all the crisis we had go away. we've had our fingerprints on that. >> mitch mcconnell sent out letters to states saying don't follow through on obamas a plan. >> i don't criticize mcconnell. he comes from a coal state. i don't mean to be mean spirited, but he is a lump of coal. he is -- he believes that coal is the salvation of the world. i don't believe that. >> mitch mcconnell put out a statement after you announced
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you were retiring. it did not include the word "friend." what does that tell you? >> i guess he should have had me write his press release. >> where do we begin. >> did he call mitch mcconnell a lump of coal? >> a lump of coal he's from a coal state. you know what i think harry reid is interesting on that and he's about the coal issue. china is trying to buy all of our coal and that's the crazy thing about it. coal is not that much of a big deal. we have to still learn what to do with our coal. we are talking about gasification and it's harming the ecosystem. but i think china and their want for our coal puts coal into place. i kind of differ what he says. >> looking at this interview, he's not there anymore, what is changing, what is shift income reid's absence? >> well, he has a little time. he will take the rest of this material and his anointed successor, cluck schumer. >> disdifferent.
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>> you have to look at the divide harry reid was effective of bringing the coal issues to the democratic party. >> that will be a challenge for chuck schumer. chuck schumer is somebody who has a lot moron media flair than harry reid did. so chuck schumer is going to have to pacify elizabeth warren wing and still move forward. it will be an interesting dynamic to see. i think chuck schumer can do it. he has been effective in new york. somebody from brooklyn going out to places like buffalo and work with people like that is respected. however, as the party continues to get a lot moron aggressive when you have hillary clinton being the head and her ties with wall street. his ties to wall street. you will have to try to mesh all that together. nancy pelosi though will probably help him out. >> from our last final seconds, meet hillary clinton's greatest challenger hillary clinton, what's the focus there? >> basically, what happened last time in her campaign. a lot of people forget the
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legend of obama has grown about he's this physical of destiny. if you look at what happened last time her campaign fell apart because it was mismanaged. so we come in and look at her from the standpoint of does she have the ceo skills to keep it together this time as the cover shows, it's been four days, she's managed to do it four days. what we won't really know is can she do that when se encounters some turbulence. maybe not in the democratic primaries, when she finally gets the republicans. >> john harwood, thank you once again, a great interview. wow! you can see john's full interview with senator reid online at cnbc.com. up next president obama long called for the two parties to come together. they just did and it's throwing a big wrench in the white house's plans, senators cory gardner and chris coons comes to break down the vote on iran. good morning, gentleman.
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the gun piece legislation that the president would veto to a piece legislation that's undergone a stshl revision such that it is now in the form of a compromise that the president would be willing to sign. >> that would certainly be an improvement. we want to make clear to democrats and republicans in the senate foreign relations committee is that the president would be willing to sign the proposed compromise that is working its way to the committee today. >> at 44 past the hour. joining us now, members of the not committee, cory gardner of colorado and democratic senator chris coons of delaware. good to have you both with us this morning. i want to hear about the dynamics if these closed door meetings. what were the sticking points? unanimous is pretty impressive. cory you?
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>> again, i think this is testament to senator cordon corker behind the scenes. >> what did they do that make that happen? >> they talked to leadership to make sure what we put forward was a bill we could all support. there were other amendments filed and withdrawn. it's a testament to their work. >> are you happy with this bill happy, happy, happy as a clam? >> look at him. >> i am pleased we have broad bipartisan support for a vote in a structured narrow and importantly, it's we've got an opportunity here for the congressional input on the deal around iran's nuclear weapons program one time in a concise and structured way, rather than what was the alternative. 20 different attempts to take down the deal by attaching it to an apresentations bill. so instead of a messy process that might well happen in july
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and september with a republican dominated congress likely opposed to any deal. we've got a bipartisan deal that allows us our constitutionally appropriate role as congress and it doesn't tank the deal because the veto threat got withdrawn. >> sam stein. >> i guess the broader question what does it say that congress works so hard and unanimously to have its input, its fingerprints on this iran deal. then you have the authorization against isis. it looks like you don't want to touch him with a ten-foot pole. >> we've spent time on the authorization. we held a hearing a couple weeks ago, prior to the most congressional work period. we've held hearings with dempsey, kerry carter. >> that work will continue. >> yes, work is going to continue. but it doesn't seem very likely an authorization is going to get passed. i think you can admit that at this point. >> i think there is discussion over the language the time frame, the authorization, itself, the associated groups. >> i want to go to the issue of
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iran t. white house says in the white house briefing distrust on verify where is the trust? will this bill help bring the trucks with iran or should we never, always keep this distrust but verify mentality? >> the important progress we made is trust between the republicans and democrats. frankly the distrust between some members of congress and president obama was at times seemingly greater than our mutual distrust of iran. what brought us together in this particular instance i think, is our shared objective of preventing a nuclear capable iran and our willingness to have two leaders here and for corker and senator cordon to aardin and the structure is rooted in a distrust of eastern. >> so down the road we will learn moron about iran's nuclear weapons capability. is this really something that is
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really considered good vs. compared to before? our intelligence is really faulty. are we going to know a lot moron? >> do we have the capacity? the agency that will be tasked with making sure we know as much as we are supposed to know in this framework. can they do it? >> this allows us the opportunity to speak with one voice. coming together allowing congress to have oversight the input and the vote will allow the president and congress to speak with one sois. the bill itself the framework, the opportunity for us to receive the documentation, it lays out the materials the documents we need to see as we move forward on a vote for this. so it will provide the information we need. there are details worked out. there are negotiations continuing. the bottom line is we don't want any deal. we want a good deal. this allows congress and the president to speak with one voice. if he reject that deal. that's the kind of unification
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this country needs zpli think it's what do you have to see, whether it's 30 days or 52 days to provide things to get hit. what do you need to see to say, yeah, you know what iran deserves to see some sanctions. >> a key question is what we raised. will the iaea have the resources -- >> some say they don't. >> some say they don't. i think the frame if turned into a final deal provides us with a broader, dealer thorough insight. moron eyes on the iran's elicit nuclear weapons program than we've ever had. the entire production klain from uranium mining to milling, to centrifuge production one of many unresolved issues is will the iaea have the resources they need. i think you can be confident to 62 you are that. >> how does congress push the iaea to have everything they should have in looking into what's happening in iran?
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>> well, i think that's a part of the process if this agreement is going to be agreed to we have to know how that will work. we have to know the centrifuges. the number. i'm concerned about the advanced nuclear research. i am concerned about some of the comments made by the leadership of iran in terms of access to military bases, what their possible military dimensions have been. those are all things we can work out. thanks, to this framework. thanks, to congress's work we're going to get that information. this is absolutely critical. >> senators cory gardner and chris coons, thank you so much. a step bipartisan it's so hard to believe in this coming age. coming up congratulations, valerie jarrett joins us with the white house vote in congress. plus eight people learn their fate in connection to a cheating
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scandal in atlanta. the stiff sentences imposed. how the judge did not mince words. keep it here on "morning joe." hello! this little beauty here is top-of-the-line. see, you just pull like this to go left. and like so to go right. where are the brakes? uh, just grab ahold of both and pull straight back. and the "whoa!" is optional. you wouldn't buy a motorcycle without handlebars. no thanks. and you shouldn't ride a motorcycle without geico insurance. roadside assistance, 24 hour service, great rates. geico motorcycle. see how much you could save.
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from your desk phone to your mobile with no interruptions. i've never felt so alive. get the future of phone and the phones are free. comcast business. built for business. all right. it is 54 past the hour. an atlanta judge handed down
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stiff sentences to eight atlanta educators who declined to take plea deals no for their convictions in a massive cheating scandal. three former teachers and administrators were sentenced to 20 years. seven behind bars and the rest on probation. the others were sentenced to five years with one-to-two years to be served in prison. we've heard about this judge before. as usual, he didn't mince words. >> this thing was pervasive. it's like the sickest thing that happened to this tale. there were thousands of children harmed in this thing. this is not a victimless crime. all i want from any of these people is just to take some responsibility, but they refused. they refused. >> one of the two educators who accepted plea deals, one completely avoided jail time t. other will serve six months of weekends if jail.
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so, turn it dun. coming up at the top of the hour the white house is dealing with a defeat over its controversial nuclear deal with iran t. strong message senators are sending with a unanimous vote. president obama is also facing criticism for removing cuba from the list of state sponsors of terrorism. why republican candidates for president wasted no time to respond. plus hillary clinton starts to layout the focus of her presidential campaign. do her words sound similar to another top democrat? cokie roberts, catty kay steve smidt join us next. we'll be right back. so,as my personal financial psychic, i'm sure you know what this meeting is about. yes, a raise. i'm letting you go. i knew that. you see, this is my amerivest managed... balances. no. portfolio. and if doesn't perform well for two consecutive gold. quarters. quarters...yup. then amerivest gives me back their advisory... stocks. fees.
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b b . chris christie is on the campaign trail in new hampshire and making news. >> i will not pander i will not flip-flop. i'm not afraid to tell you the truth as i see it. we'll see how she does. >> can you beat her, chris christie? >> if i do. >> i also live chives. >> there is hillary clinton 2.0. >> a good luck omen. >> it set off a stampede of flafrs and reporters. >> they run pretty quick. >> what's your strategy? >> i'm having a great time. i can't look forward any more than i am. >> we have a hillary sighting. she's en route to iowa.
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that's good. >> we have a vision we are talking about the fate of the united states of america. >> have a good birthday. i look forward to moron today. >> the senate committee voted 19 h 0. >> 19-0 my goodness. >> once they saw we were way beyond the number of people that would take over at a veto. >> we are all united. iran cannot become a nuclear weapon state. today we took a step making that closer to reality. >> welcome back to "morning joe." we are live in washington. we have former mccain senior campaign strategyist, msnbc political analyst steve smidt. bloomberg politics and bloomberg tv phil mattingly. >> we are excited about phil being here. tell you later. >> oh okay. world news catty kay, i'm excited about her being here and i'm excited about senior analyst
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cokie roberts who has a book out today. if you have a book out, you come here. this book is called "capital dame" type 30 red cards a bit. now i have my second copy for my daughter. every daughter should have one. >> all right. it sound good to me too. >> it's fantastic. >> yesterday last night, did you know it the 150th anniversary of lincoln's assassination. >> yeah. >> today is the day he died. >> thank you for that. >> it's amazing. >> the women of the civil war. it changed a few things. >> they did, indeed. >> speaking of capital gains. let's talk with politics. shall we? we begin with a new report that claims hillary clinton was questioned more than two years ago about using a personal e-mail account when she was secretary of state. according to "new york times," congressman darryl issa the then chairman of the house oversight committee was investigating the possible use of personal e-mail by obaum
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administration officials. one of the questions from the december 2012 letter asks quote, have you or any senior agency official used a personal e-mail account to conduct official business. if so please identify the account. >> you know that, question was so general. you could drive mack truck. no it wasn't. it was dead center. >> clinton did not reply. >> dead to center. >> clinton did not reply to this letter. she resigned as secretary of state seven weeks later t. state department did respond with a summary of it's mail policy, failed to include an answer to that question. yesterday, a clinton aide said in part quote, her usage was widely known to government colleagues she e-mailed as her address was invisible on every e-mail she sent. i asked joe earlier can i ask the same question to cokie? >> you are allowed to ask the same question twice. >> i can, really?
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i can see it's competitive, interrupting. all right. cokie, does she have to answer? >> she has to have some kind of answer. >> does she have to answer that question is eight big deal she didn't answer that question? >> i don't think it does anything beyond what we already have. the people who from fought going to vote on hillary clinton based on e-mails are not going to vote on her, which is about three people. >> based on the bloomberg poll it seems to have a big impact. >> on people's attitudes. >> is she trust worthy the numbers keep breaking against her. >> it plays into that hole. voters vs. attitudes. >> right. >> and it plays into that whole story line of can you trust her? and can you trust the clintons? >> exactly. >> how big a story is there? if colin powell or john kerry got an e-mail from darryl issa asking that question would they
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feel compelled to answer? do they have to? >> no is the answer. >> that is always an executive branch resis tabs as you know from your days in the house to those kind of requests. >> at the same time, though, i would venture to say colin powell would not just ignore a democraticing from an oversight committee and then when it is under subpoena erase the survey. if there are examples of colin powell doing that i would like people to let me know. steve smidt, nothing i say or on this set says will impact voters next year. at the same time this does feed into an exhaustion narrative much like if jeb -- the drama much like if jeb bush went around saying it wouldn't be prudent. >> few look at the political climate in the country t. fe
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finding characteristics of the time we live in. not just in political institution, but very nearly every institution in the country, and so when you look at hillary clinton with this particular issue, the rules regarding the e-mail are unambiguous. like a traffic light. red and green mean something very specific. not very difficult to understand. and clearly her approach is that i'm too big to fail. >> right. >> it doesn't matter. there is no consequence to me. willfully, premeditatively, breaking the rules on this. and, in fact there won't be an electoral consequence to it. but i think the issue that voters will focus on it is a person with that personality quality. >> right. >> do you want to make that person the most powerful in the world? >> but that person vs. whom? and that's always the question. >> we shall see. >> they seem to like her
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personally. if you like hillary clinton and are you a democrat and you are going to support the democratic nominee, what she did or didn't do with her server is probably irrelevant. if down the middle. then that's the question. >> we do know smatter what she did and didn't do. we also know what the rules are. there is no ambiguity. >> we do know how many minds it's changed. >> i just said i think it won't have an impact politically on votes. but the question about whether it's the right thing to do whether it's the wrong thing to do. whether there ought to be accountability to rules and regulations by senior government officials, we shouldn't be having a debate about that. >> there is no debate. there was regs in 2009 that were passed. she ignored them. she blew through it. the clintons for the most part don't believe the rules apply to everybody else applies to them. i think that's without debate. phil. >> we can actually debate it. >> you can debate that with bill and hillary clinton?
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really? >> i think you can. >> let me just say there is an easier side of that debate that is they do not believe. like the kennedy's often believe t. rules apply to the rest of the world. phil, let me ask you, though is this one nick is this significant because the next shoe that falls and the next because the clintons always have them might have moron of an impact. and this plays how they are type cast and one or two moron of these, it could have an impact. >> look the history of the executive branch not responding into full correspondents is long and detailed. this issue in and of itself is not in detame. it feeds the narrative. it's a narrative that has had the impact on like ability numbers and the idea that republican members of congress who have had any interaction with hillary clinton's state department will be searching their files just like darryl issa did see any possible opportunity to send something out like this to keep this narrative going.
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>> that will be something they will have to deal with going forward. >> and they have files kept searchable. >> and the narrative does keep going. like we thought this story was over a week ago or two weeks ago. it keeps on keeping on. >> you have this letter. go ahead. >> i think the interesting thing is right now hillary clinton is not focused on talking to the media, just on individuals in iowa. this is becoming a big story on this day. you want to know why she's not talking to the media. >> that's true. >> it has an impact. >> on the republican side new jersey governor chris christie kicked off a two-day trip through new hampshire on tuesday and he gave a detailed speech on his ideas for entitlement reform saying it's time to raise the retirement age for social security. >> come tof new hampshire today to talk about the challenges that we're phasing as a countries. one of the challenges we face is the unrestrained growth of government spending on entitlements. we need to raise the retirement
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age for social security as a result. i'm proposing we raise the age to 69. frankly, washington is afraid to have an honest conversation about social security medicare and medicaid with the people of our country. i am not. >> let me ask you about misclinton's campaign can you beat her, chris christie? >> if i run,ly beat her. >> and which blue states do you take away that mitt romney could not get and why do you win there? >> let's start in pennsylvania, where folks have seen me operate as governor of new jersey over the course of the last five.5 years. i think i have a real comfort level with the type of leadership i provide. if i were to run, i think pennsylvania is a state very much in play. i think new mexico is a state very much in play. i think the state i'm in today nampb is a state very much in play. -- new hampshire is a state very much in play. so let's start off with those three. >> one little hitch here though, new polling suggests
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voters in christie's home state may not agree. a recent poll shows 69% of registered new jersey voters don't think he would make good president. >> but, steve! mid schmidt. it's about new hampshire. i wonder the reform, that's a guy that might get some attention. >> look. i think when you look at the qualities that make a nominee and a party resiliency is an important one and it's overlooked. you look at the summer of 2007 john mccain was broke. he was bankrupt. he was in last place. he was the nominee seven months later. so chris christie is indisputably someone with skills. the republican race remains wide opened. new hampshire is a state that has given many politicians, including a 42nd president of the united states named bill clinton a second look a second
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chance. if you spend the time in that state, you commit yourself to the grass roots politics that new hampshire voters demand and expect. can you come back. so we'll see what happens to chris christie. but i know for sure every candidate running in this race is going to get knocked down. the question is can they get back up? >> right. >> chris christie is ahead of the pack. because he's already been like that. >> new hampshire also. new hampshire also gave the first president a second win as you will remember george h.w. bush stumbled out of iowa in 3rd place. >> third place. >> said he always remembered new hampshire because new hampshire saved his political life. >> bob deal does too. >> george w. bush he looked like he had been struck by a cattle prod after john mccain beat him by 19 points. >> unless hillary clinton won in new hampshire. so it does not always signify. >> the thing about chris christie 70% don't think he
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should be president in new jersey. that's the state he's delivered governance a. big part of christie's! tick is i can govern effectively. get things done for my state. even his state doesn't think he's qualified. i know it's a democratic state. he didn't have to be running there. one of his thing is i am a delivery person. >> it's 3-to-1 and pamplt he says is in play. well they've -- pennsylvania he says is in play. well they've seen a lot of him. i don't think to see him is to love him. >> you don't? >> the mid-west. >> can you say that? >> if chris christie starts inching up in some of these polls in some of these states and does a good job, phil, watch those new jersey numbers turn too. >> that's true. >> oh, yeah. >> everybody loves a winner. right now, this is a guy. this is what people need to realize. i remember on mccain, i remember i was leaving to come back up to do "morning joe." i was living in pensacola, the
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king was in dead last place. we were all making fun of him. my dad goes hey, joey you watch mccain, he's going to win. i was like you pat them on the hid. head. that's sweet. with chris christie, though here's a guy again, if he's -- if he starts doing well we've seen how this works. and he has had the absolute tar beaten out of him for two years straight. two years straight and there are still some polls that have him in 2nd 3rd 4th place in new hampshire. just imagine a month of good press. >> if you look at what he's gone through the last years, no potential national candidate would ever want to deal with that. most would never consider getting into a race in the wake of. that the fact that he's still in play he had a good performance at c-pack, a crowd not necessarily his own. the fact that he can raise money all makes him a player no matter what happens. one of the things most
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interesting is how many people so far early on are targeting new hampshire as the key state for them to win. whether it's jeb bush or potentially marco rubio, clearly chris christie, i'm kind of interesting to see how that dynamics works out for months. >> partly because they don't expect independence to be voting in the democratic primary. it's playing to the independence in new hampshire and saying to people, see, we're working in general. >> you look also chris christie jumps in chris christie jeb bush, and marco rubio, i mean the brackets the bill. >> one of the things that benefits chris christie enormous enormously right now none of the other competitors think that he's going to be the nominee. which means he's out of the line of fire. you look at the marco rubio messaging right now on the old vs. new. >> that is potentially lethal messaging for jeb bush over the course of his driving it for six or seven months and that advantage is ultimately chris christie. but a as these guys all start
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attacking each other, people who are out of the line of fire can get politically healthy from a place of political -- >> like when john mccain was in last place. one of the things i always say to people that are running, that are asking me about fields a lot of times i say beware the man with nothing to lose and right now, chris christie is the man with nothing to lose and that's why he's the only politician out there talking about entitlement reform which most economists say is at the heart of their economic challenge over the next generation. >> so we got to get to iran and capital gains. >> still ahead on "morning joe," senator bernie sanders will be here on set, also most of the gop contenders have taken grover norquist's tax pledge not everyone. grover refuses to sign on the dotted line if he runs for president. plus a ceo taking a major
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pay cut while employees see double digit raises. he joins us ahead to explain why he did it. first iran and capital gains. . the conference call. the ultimate
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arena for business. hour after hour of diving deep, touching base, and putting ducks in rows. the only problem with conference calls: eventually they have to end. unless you have the comcast business voiceedge mobile app. it lets you switch seamlessly from your desk phone to your mobile with no interruptions. i've never felt so alive. get the future of phone and the phones are free. comcast business. built for business.
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. >> the united states senate stood and said that on behalf of the american people the state foreign relations committee said that on behalf of the american people we believe it is our role to insure that any deal with iran is makes them accountable, is trance parent and is enforceable. >> you are never going to find any administration that believes congress has any role in anything. that's how presidents feel whether democrats or republicans. the war powers act was passed over a presidential veto. it was not surprised to see congress to be involved in the process. what we were able work out is a
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way that the administration understands the prerogatives of congress and that our role needs to be carried out. >> all right. thofs senators bob corker and ben cardin deciding the 19-0 vote to let lawmakers weigh in on any deal with iran. just hours before the vote secretary of state john kerry was on capitol hill trying to urge lawmakers to oppose the bill. what did david ignacious call him this morning? he was like a beached whale? i would not say that about secretary kerry. >> i would say i did get an e-mail from a very well placed member of the committee. >> yes. >> that said the white house knew this was coming. kerry knew this was coming along. yesterday quietly behind the scenes he was telling them their goal was to make this much ado about nothing and katty this member says they have a bill.
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they will allow them to review it. mitch mcconnell is in a glorious position. all of his republicans vote against it. be pro israel t. democrats have to step up and vote for it. it passes anyway. something mitch mcconnell wants. >> it's the sound and fury out of the white house was directed at tehran they have to show the iranians that were doing what they could in their relationship with congress to try and resist congressional oversight of this agreement and the president saw the the way it was going to go. i think the actual agreement. what impact does it have on the time table for sanctions relief and how did the iranians respond to that? that i think has real substance or potentially real substance. >> i feel surprised by -- >> sort of three audiences for all of these things. the congress and the american people and there is iran and there is israel and so all of
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these messages have to be written in certain ways or spoken in certain ways so that one audience hears one thing, one audience hears another thing. >> although it didn't get what it wanted. in the end, the israeli constituents didn't get what it wants out of this bill. >> >> the low grade the low analysis not only in the news but also for members of congress that have been railing, being shocked that the ayatollah would say one thing and shocked that members of congress would say on another end. it's as if they have never been through negotiation before either on capitol hill or analysis. >> some of them haven't been through a negotiation. >> that's what's so stunning. there is so once you have a general bill you just know the iranians are going back and say we win, americans are going back and say, we win. and while they're talking. >> and so now it happens all the time it happened all the time on the hill. when i was around. where you have -- >> where have you negotiation, they haven't negotiated.
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>> newt gingrich would always go to bill clinton and say i would love to help you on balances the bug, but they're crazy. bill clinton would say, i'm sorry. they work together. you use both sides. >> of course. >> maybe because nobody negotiates anymore. >> that's what i'm saying. this is all very new to them. >> well if there were moron women. speaking of women, the capital gains, cokie, the civil war and the women of walk. 1848-1868. history has been pretty goods ability looking at what the men did during that time. women might have gotten a short shift until this book. tell us about it. >> the short shift in all of history. when you don't write about half of the human race. >> there's that. >> distorts the story. but i actually have never planned to write. you know i have written revolutionary books. i was never going to write a book since my ancestors were on the losing side t. fact is the
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publisher, it turns out to be fascinating the civil war had the same impact on women's roles in world war ii. >> talk about some of the big players. >> the players in this book. they're both political women like marina davis who is absolutely fascinating. jefferson davis' wife. of course, i get to read their mail. >> i love it. >> most of the letters have never been published before. >> what made marina davis fascinating? >> she was very skeptical about the confederacy to put it mildly. also she had strong political views, which she wrote to people then later in life when he had died and she moved to new york and the confederacy went crazy. oh, the confederacy is moving to new york. she insisted she was, you know she was always sort of olive complected and the south didn't like that. so she said i'm free brown and 64. i can move wherever i want to go. she wrote that. then she got there and became a
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friend of julia grant. you ulyssus grant's waive. some other side of a woman virginia clay who before the war was, before the war they all described themselves as welles and they were here in washington and delightful. but also very political, going to congress every day and all that. and she after the war ended up as an ardent suffer rajragist. this is new for women to be in politics. john c. freemont was the first republican nominee for president in 1856. brand-new republican party. her father thomas benton had been senator for missouri for
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years. she was very well known and everybody talked about freemont and our jessie the vice president forget. he was never mentioned. >> oh. >> she was so out there soond out and so out front and you can read the papers from the 19th century on. they're all online. you can read what everybody everybody else is reading. >> can i read a line i love? when dolly madison, she accumulated extraordinary honors, a seat in the house of representatives, the privilege of sending the first personal telegraph. heads of state called to pay her hom annual. her funeral shut down the city. she was a woman with power. >> then she died and everybody vied with each other for power. jesse benton freemont was so powerful that the democrats were very upset with this and they had. one newspaper said the way it
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should read the slogan should be for president john c. freemont husband of jesse benton. >> oh my god. >> they were quite of course the women like clara barton who founded the red cross. i love the way history books say. that then she founded the red cross. what was there a struggle involved? was that difficult? you know. then she then years after the war got the congress to ratify the geneva conventions. >> oh my god. >> huge. >> great stories. the book is capital games. cokie roberts, best selling author and "founding mothers." i love it. >> cokie, this is a fantastic book. mica, if only there were powerful women in washington now. >> oh. >> oh, wait, there is valerie right over there is there look who is coming umm. yeah is left on president obama's agenda now there is so much focus on the race to replace him, white house senior adviser valerie jarrett joins the set. plus msnbc political director
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you guys switched spots. >> it's an empty studio. >> we told you we were coming to washington. >> we got out of manhattan. he always said, it's the center of the world there. >> that is one sinful guy when it comes to new york city. >> we like washington. >> i like the east side. >> it's too new york. >> i don't go over there. >> valerie. >> let's look for, good morning, a couple things john kerry goes up on the hill. reports are that he's lobbying the try to kill the corker bill. it ends up passing 19-0. is that a white house defeat? >> no not at all. secretary kerry was doing what he has been doing consistently which is briefing the hill touching as many of the members as possible because it's important that they understand how what we're trying to accomplish here t. president's primary goal is to ensure iran
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does not develop nuclear weapons. he thinks the path forward is through diplomatic challenges. that's what he's about. secretary kerry has no space between the two. >> so the white house obviously didn't like the corker bill didn't like the idea of it passing. is it possible it actually would strengthen john kerry and the white house to go back to the iranians and say, hey, listen we can on give you so much. there is only so much congress is going to give you. >> keep in mind senator corker worked hard to make accommodations to the bill that were particularly troubling to the white house and secretary kerry. so this is a compromise. joe, how many times have you been saying what should happen here ago it's a compromise, so that's what we have here. it stays the way it is when it's on the floor. then the president would not veto it. >> were you impressed by senator corker's decision not to sign that letter? >> yes. absolutely. >> then to be able to keep this coalition together. this hasn't happened much over the past.
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>> no it hasn't. he and senator cardin dade trick job of working together and listening. and in the end compromiseing. we want to move forward. we want to keep the focus where it should be. >> that is the negotiations. it's not just the united states. it's russia china, france germany, great britain. >> the russians have been really good partners. okay. >> you walked right into that. right here. it's important to keep that coalition together and move forward. >> the missile technology in iran isn't that very troubling? >> of course it is. we're not going to agree with them on everything. that was my point. the point is we have a fragile opportunity right now. we want to make the best of that opportunity and move forward. >> oh. i want to talk about charlotte. i'm curious -- >> has putin moved tanks into charlotte? >> you are going into charlotte
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tomorrow. >> today. >> i'm a little jealous. >> i love charlotte. >> [ talking at one time ] >> so today you talk to iran about the brought's budget. what are you looking to get across? >> the president will have a conversation in charlotte with a group of women, blockers and she knows exactly put together consortium that he's going to have a chance to have a town hall with them and talk about issues mica you and i have been talking about very a very long time. what do people talk about around the kitchen table? the budget the president proposed reflects those values. so how can we make child care moron affordable? how can we make college moron
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affordable? how can we make sure paid leave both in the private sector and when people retire can retire with money in their pocket and not be taken advantage of. all in issues that people sit around the kitchen table, the president will have a chance to talk about today. >> manhattan's chuck todd is with us. he has a question. >> yes, chuck. >> how are you doing? how important do you think it is for hillary clinton's campaign message and what you guys are doing in the white house to be in sync? i'll be honest it looks from an outsider's perspective as if you guys are trying to be in sync this week. you are trying to make sure you are both on the same economic message. how much coordination is there going to be? >> the president has been on this message since day one. yesterday we celebrated equal pay day. you know the first bill the president signed was the lily ledbetter consistent pay act. we have been talking about manners important to working
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families. we had last june so focused. mica participated to focus on what are the issues that will enable the 21st century worker to thrive. the 21st century work place the ones most profitable and recognize those issues are addressing them. so this is something that has been a passion of the president since day one? >> i understand that. the coordination. >> there isn't a coordination. i think that secretary clinton shares a lot of the values that the president has been prioritizing and those whether probably be reflected in her campaign. but there isn't a coordination of a message here. >> so i went to a white house meeting on these issues even before last june and you have business people in who were all talking about how it actually benefitted their businesses to have flexible time to have day care, to have all these, why doesn't that message get across? >> i think it is getting across. what's interesting, cokie, small, medium and large businesses that recognize that work place flexible schedules that accommodate the needs of
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the worker outside of the home equal pay for equal work paid leave, paid sick leave the companies that recognize that and change their programs accordingly, actually i have have a moron productive work place. they are more profitable. what we're trying to do is put the spotlight on what works. there are great examples of what works. part of what secretary perez and i are doing, we're traveling around the country to cities and states embracing paid leave and sick leave, you are saying overwhelming support for it for the american people. we want to make sure businesses know about the opportunity that's right there and if they don't do it we're going to lose our goals competitively. >> they get the spotlight put on them for that hard move. all right. 39 past the hour. valerie jarrett, thank you so much. >> thanks for coming to d.c.. >> thank you. >> tell them "morning joe" loves them except for the liberal wing over there. >> charlotte. >> all right. up next quite possibly his
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least favorite day of the year. grover norquist is here. also ahead, an exclusive look at the cutting edge technology being used to track down criminals in cyberspace. keep it right here on "morning joe." the pursuit of healthier. it begins from the second we're born. after all, healthier doesn't happen all by itself. it needs to be earned... every day... using wellness to keep away illness... and believing that a single life can be made better
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which leads to better decisions for our clients. it's a uniquely collaborative approach you won't find anywhere else. put our global active management expertise to work for you. mfs. there is no expertise without collaboration. all right. joining us now, president of americans for tax reform grover norquist. he's the author of a new book "and the irs report ends us." wow. >> you know what you are the hunter or the hunted. >> wow, that's some title. >> for me he's picked the right sight. grover, you tweeted this on jeb bush if my dad threw away a
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perfectly good presidency i would honor him by learning to avoid that mistake. unforced error he should have learned from dad's screw-up. what are you talking about there? >> well, dad got elected because he took the pledge in the primary. >> george h.w. bush. >> george herbert walker bush. he was 49 behind when he said read my lips. he run, running as reagan i'm not going to raise your taxes. in 1990 he got tricked into the deal, raise some taxes cut a bunch of spending taxes were raised. no spending was reduced if either case spending actually went up. they cheated reagan. they cheated bush. then he lost. he was a very good president in many ways. many successes, managed the collapse of the soviet union. >> but now you are saying his son should not make the same mistake, jeb is refusing the same pledge? >> it's beyond that. he said he would consider a deal which would include a tax inkreechlts i think we learned
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in 2011 when we take the tax increase off the table, on this show if you take tax increases off the table, then and only then you get spending cuts. which is what happened. we got real limits on spending because taxes were never on the table. >> cokie. >> i think you can make a very good case the sequester is not turning out so well. >> for the democrats. >> no or for people who i think that the military needs moron and all of that. but i think you have to say that michaelkechael dukakais had something to do with the victory. >> bush ran behind. on the sequester, we're actually looking at very serious reforms in the pentagon. the calgorate legislation to reduce the bureaucracy to save a whole bunch of money. >> let me ask you this do we spend too much money? somebody asked me a couple days
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ago, what do you think about the defence budget? we spend too much. we are spending over $500 billion. we can't audit the pentagon. it's impossible. tom coburn tried. it is impossible to audit the pentagon. one weapon system is going to cost more than the entire iraq war. it's just a disgrace. >> we spend poorly. how much exactly do you need is the question? we spend too much on civilian employment. we have moron guys in the orlando services. the ratio is way out of whack. the sequester gives us an opportunity to begin. if you don't raise tax, you have to reform government. so the pledge not to raise taxes that i share with people is actually the pledge to reform government. >> you must be terribly disappointed with republicans in the house. they have essentially put tens of millions of dollars in unoffset spending for military operations. that's one thing they've done
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recently then they've just passed a dock fix which is not offset to the tune of tens of billionsing of dollars again. so you must be if this is the case you must be terribly disappointed in the house leadership. >> i am frequently disappointed. i see the memos. they don't do what i tell them to do. it's just crushing. >> what do you make of those two recent decisions, which is essentially deficit spending? >> two things. i think it is key to hold the overall sequester and key, what we do need to do is reform military spending to save a great deal of money and that isn't focused on sufficiently. >> steve schmidt. >> at the end of the day, the tea party rise if american politics is misunderstood i think by a lot of commentators in the national press core. it's at least as much a reaction to the prophecy of the republican congress and republican president as it is to do with barak obama. >> that's where the anger comes
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from. the genuine anger and resentment comes from the fact that george w. bush is spend figure 2001 to 2009 was as reckless as any left wing -- >> well some of that was medicare spending for the prescription drug. so they might be angry, but they love it. right. and in fact the first tea party rally that was on the mall i happened to be taking my grandchildren to museums and they were there with signs saying, get the government out of our medicare. so you know come on. >> don't come on. i'm telling you, when you have when you elect somebody who promises less government and grover they end up passing a $7 trillion unfunded mandate they don't pay one dime for, which at the time was split between seniors on whether they wanted the drug benefit or not. that's not conservative leadership. medicare medicaid.
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social security, entitlements. they've got to be reform and george w. bush put in $7 trillion burden on systems that were already -- >> they were loved. >> he did not have the understanding. >> he did not have a focus on spending. >> the book i wrote about the irs is the history of taxation. how it grew. we used to pay 1 to 2% of our taxes prior to 1774. the rich are paying 20% in london having fun occupying us and we are spending 1 to 2% him it's drifted up to where the government takes 30%. it's what way too much. we need to bring it down. >> the book is the irs before it ends us. grover norquist. thank you very much. good to have you on. >> he needs to help me with my next book title. that's boom! >> yours are good. coming up what authorities are doing to make sure the next attack from isis does not take place on the internet.
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it is 53 past the hour. joining us now, co-host of "the cycle" on msnbc. ari, you've been working on a big piece that debuts today that takes us inside the fbi and the
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realities of the new frontier of crime fighting. tell us about it. >> thank you mika. yes, i visited the fbi's new york field office where the bureau has been expending its efforts against the cyber threats we see today in the financial and national security areas. the bureau tapped leo t actiontattio to investigate. >> we have to adapt, we have to constantly keep up with the threat and what you saw in the cart program is a significant investment in our forensic capabilities. >> we got a behind-the-scenes look at the fbi's computer analysis responsibility team, cart, where agents and technical experts around the nation support about 10,000 investigations a year. >> we have our stuff stored in the servers in this rack. we have approximately 80
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terabytes worth of data storage in this rack here. >> to naught in perspective, all the books in the library of congress comprise about 10 terabytes of data. nationwide, the fbi processes about 10,000 terabytes a year. so it's a massive amount of investigation they're processing. another big issue you talk about, as far as we know isis has not successfully used a cyber terror attack yet, but here's what some analysts are saying. i spoke to sean henry, a former fbi agent and mary galligan, one of the highest-ranking women in the fbi about the threat. >> they are calling for electronic jihad. they are calling for the next generation of terrorists to use their technical capabilities to target the infrastructure. >> it's a matter of can they get the tools and what would the target be? >> terrorists can also outsource the job. mary galligan is a former terror and cyber agent at the fbi. >> hacker for hire is what we're talking about. you can sell certain tools for a
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couple of hundred dollars. you can sell your actual services for a couple thousand dollars. it depends on getting the right tool with the right knowledge of what it is that you're attacking. >> and a lot of it mika is scary and the rest of that report we also look at the dark web, the part of the internet most people don't see where you have everything from drugs to child pornography to even assassinations for hire. a lot of it sold -- bought and sold with bitcoin. a lot of stuff the fbi is trying to keep pace with mika. >> we'll be looking for ari's special rules of engagement series on "the cycle" and at msnbc.com/rules. and ari has been named the chief legal correspondent among msnbc. so what else will you be covering? >> thanks, mika. i'll be covering the supreme court, the justice department, fbi like we mentioned in this package and also trying to look and law and policy on law enforcement issues.
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obviously that's been in the news a lot when you think about policing, when you think about a lot of the challenges the country faces so i'll be on the cycle but excited to do that for msnbc. >> ari thank you so much. congratulations. up next, hillary clinton is on the road in iowa and laying out a vision for her campaign. but while she tries to move forward, new details emerge about the e-mail scandal that continues to loom over her campaign. plus, a big change of heart from the white house. why president obama is now willing to let congress have a say on the nuclear deal with iran. and the debate over volunteers serving in law enforcement. e. how a deadly shooting involving a sheriff's deputy in tulsa is raising major concerns about that issue. we'll be right back with much more "morning joe." sometimes the present looked bright. sometimes romantic. there were tears in my eyes.
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>> where are you on announcing for president? >> nowhere at the moment. >> chris christie is on the campaign trail in new hampshire and making news. >> i will not pander. i will not flip-flop. i'm not afraid to o tell you the truth as i see. >> it anybody who wants to run for president has the chance to do it. we'll see how she does. >> can you beat her, chris christie? >> if i run, i would beat her. >> i also love chai. >> reporter: this is hillary clinton 2.0. it set off a stampede of photographers and reporters. >> guy in the orange pants is
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pretty quick. >> what's your strategy? >> i'm having a great time. can't look forward any more than i am. >> we had a hillary sighting. she's been found en route to iowa. >> we need to hear a vision that relates to this time. not eight years ago. we ear talking about the fate of america. >> the senate foreign relations committee voted 19-0 to ensure congressional engagement. >> 19-0? my goodness. >> they released their veto prep once they saw we were way beyond the number of people that would take over on a veto. >> we were all united. iran cannot become a nuclear weapon state. today i think we took a step closer to making that a reality. welcome to "morning joe." we're in washington this morning. with us on set we have columnist in and associated editor of the "washington post" david ignatius. he's here in his regulation gray suit, as he says. >> i was told to wear this. >> you were? >> oh please! >> i believe it. >> senior political editor and white house correspondent for
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the huffington post sam stein. and senior national correspondent for bloomberg business week josh green. good to have you all on board this morning. >> a lot to talk about. we'll be getting to the iran deal first but you've got hillary out in iowa. >> yes. >> that's very interesting. >> fun to watch. >> we'll see how that works for her. >> it's going to work. >> and a lot of other people on the campaign and chris christie emerging. >> yes. that is going to be interesting. we have interesting angles on that as well. he speaks about hillary and also talks about some of his conservative points of view. >> also talks about entitlement reform. talks about not backing down as we've been saying for some time don't underestimate him. you've got obviously a judicial decision coming down or an investigation decision coming down soon. if he gets past that -- >> we could have another one. >> i think he'll make noise in new hampshire. >> let's begin with that unanimous vote yesterday on capitol hill related to the
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controversial nuclear agreement with iran. in a 19-0 vote, the foreign relations committee approved legislation that would let lawmakers weigh in on any deal. just hours before the vote secretary of state john kerry was on capitol hill trying to urge lawmakers to oppose the bill but now the white house is withdrawing its threat to veto the legislation after a series of compromises. foreign relations committee chair bob corker and ranking member ben carden worked together on the bill. senator carden reportedly acted as a liaison between corker and the white house about changes along the way and senator corker says the white house agreed when it realized there was strong support from democrats. >> you'll never find any administration that believes congress has any role in anything. that's how presidents feel whether democrats or republicans. the war powers act was passed over a presidential veto. so it's not surprising to see reluctancy on the presidential branch to be involved in the
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process. what we were able to work out is a way that the administration understands the prerogatives of congress and our role needs to be carried out. >> the united states senate stood and said that on the behalf of the american people at least the foreign relations committee has said that on behalf of the american people we believe it is our role to ensure that any deal with iran is -- makes them accountable, is transparent, and is enforceable. >> the legislation call farce 30 day congressional review period and states no sanctions can be lifted during that time. president obama must update lawmakers every 90 days if iran is still honoring the agreement. others remain strongly opposed, including the man who wrote the controversial letter to iran senator tom cotton. >> we just received a classified and technical briefing from the administration but there's nothing classified or technical about the fundamental flaw with the president's proposal.
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it puts iran, the world's worst state sponsor of terrorism on the path to a nuclear weapon. whether that's a matter of months or matter of years that's a dangerous outcome not just for the united states and our allies like israel but the entire world. >> what do you think, mika? >> i think there's the major leagues and some of them were on capitol hill yesterday and then there's the little leagues and they were there, too. >> tom cotton i know you believe like me he is major league. >> um, no. >> major league talent. >> at some point you have to -- >> you don't want to have the minor leagues on capitol hill. david ignatius john kerry who is fighting hard to keep his reputation up not only across the world but also in capitol hill and have people respect and honor what he says and act with authority goes up to capitol hill, sent up by the white house to capitol hill to lobby only to be struck down 19-0. >> well -- >> the most important to me -- i
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guess what i'm saying is the white house sort of hung him out to dry. >> they shouldn't have had him lobbying up there. >> they reversed course as late as 11:30 john kerry was saying "we really need you to vote against this." and the white house for once counted votes and realized they were going to get clobber sod they turned course and left kerry looking like a beached whale, frankly, defending a position they had abandoned. so we now have a rare 19-0 bipartisan vote supporting a bill that the president really really didn't want to see but realize head had no alternative. >> how surprised were you that bob corker and ben cardin were able to hold this together? >> bob corker among republicans in the senate is one of the more responsible. that's certainly the white house's view. they thought from the beginning they could work out some kind of deal with him. ben cardin is replacing bob menendez as the ranking member. he's a new figure up there, this was his make-or-break
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opportunity. the question is whether the compromise they've put together is enough to let senators register their disagreements. their strong concerns about this deal but let the deal go through. and the white house was spinning last night that's what they've got. it may look like a defeat for them but they've got enough built in that they think they can go to the iranians and say "we can lock this in." >> sam stein, obviously if you look at it looing at the vote it's a big loss for the white house but a los that everybody saw coming. they did not serve him very well by making john kerry do that. that said it could give the president, the white house, a lot more latitude going back to the iranians saying there's some things we can get through, there's some things we can't. >> i've always wondered if there was a three dimensional chess game but i assumed they would be very close to passing the bill but never pass the bill. but what david made clear is they had a big loss yesterday and they want to say we got the
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review period down from 60 days to 30 days. if you look at the technical details of this deal congress can have a number of ways to get that review period back to 52 days so we're talking about an eight-day difference. it's not that much. the key thing from the white point talking to officials in the administration was they didn't want to have an amendment in the bill that said the deal can only go through if it's certified iran is no longer sponsoring terrorism. they thought that was a poison pill and it got taken out. from that vantage point -- >> compromise? >> i was shocked at how many democratic aides i talked to on the hill who praised bob corker. said he managed the process very well very smoothly very respectfully. and they just enjoyed working with him and he actually got a very comprehensive important foreign policy piece of legislation unanimously. >> david ignatius. those of us who have been around washington a long time have missed characters like bob corker. people that could talk to both sides of the aisle and, most importantly, when they came at him with a condescending letter
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to the president of the united states he wasn't afraid to say no. in fact it was hell no that's not going to help me. >> he comes out of the middle south, kind of border state america. he talks to everybody. he's a deal maker. he was smart in this in leaving the door open for negotiations with the white house until very late. and he's done something which is unusual. think about what sam said. we had a 19-0 bipartisan vote. >> when does that happen? >> to support a piece of foreign policy that's crucial to the united states. i would say that's principally corker's doing. >> i want to make one broader point. it's very fascinating and for the white house frustrating that congress is so eager to jump in on this when it comes to the iran deal but there's a huge other matter which is the authorization for isis where congress looks like it will duck. so i'm not ready to jump on the applause train for congress completely here. >> realize also there issing? this -- some fig leaf for the
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white house, some hope this won't all blow up because you do have a process now where the legislation could be voted down and the question is can the senate override the presidential veto? you still have a scenario where you just need to amass 34 senators. >> that's precisely what they're going to be saying to the iranians come tomorrow is this is such a small number of people we have to convince we honestly mr. ayatollah, we've got this locked? >> it lies with democratic senators in congress and you have a hard time believing they would blow up a deal. let me get to other news because there is a report that claims hillary clinton was questioned more than two years ago about using a personal e-mail account when she was secretary of state. according to the "new york times," congressman darrell issa, the then chairman of the house oversight committee, was investigating the possible use of personal e-mail by obama administration officials. one of the questions from the
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december, 2012 letter to clinton asks "have you or any senior agency official ever used a personal e-mail account to conduct official business? if so please identify the account used." >> i would say that's sort of dead on. >> can't get any more specific than that. >> clinton did not reply to the letter and she resigned as secretary of state seven weeks later. the state department did respond with a summary of its e-mail policies but failed to include an answer to that question. yesterday a clinton aide said in part her usage was widely known to the over 100 department and u.s. government colleagues she e-mailed and her address was visible on every e-mail she yesterday? that's toir the question from the committee that had oversight. >> you have to answer those questions. >> yes. and you have to respond and reply. >> do you have to? >> of course. >> what happens when you don't? >> well --
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>> nothing. >> then again it's a -- >> no nothing. in this case nothing. >> but then they could charge her with contempt. >> then if you decide to run for president you're in a lot of trouble? >> really. >> well, i think this will be a continuing issue. this will dog her for months and months, there may be a drib drab of e-mails and they'll say what about the other ones? >> i'm seriously asking. if you get pelted with letters from a committee, of darylrell issa issa's committee, do you have to answer them? >> if you're a government straight official yes. >> says who? >> are you being argumentative? >> i am. >> oh come on you know -- >> transparency alone. >> i am being argumentative. the answer is yes. >> if congress asks you and you're an administration official for this information, you do have to turn it over unless you claim privilege. here they just ignored it. >> i'm trying to understand how big a story this is. >> if you look at the polls we've been reading the last couple days this is having a real impact in her campaign and
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the fact that three years ago she had a question sent to her about her personal e-mail and it was directly on point and she ignored it and didn't answer it that will have an impact too. >> to the extent that she's handled this issue with like a ho-hum manner saying everyone knew that we did e-mail and it wasn't big a big deal because everyone else does it. this proves that at least a couple years ago they were having to figure out how to answer this and chose not to answer it at all! this is already a problem. bloomberg came out with a an article last week saying 2-1 people think she's lying so it's favorable for republicans to keep pounding on that. >> and the "new york times." >> when she left as secretary of state that seemed to be her primary asset as her presidential campaign. now she's spending all of her time talking about e-mail when did she get a letter the whole
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question of was she a good secretary of state? . it's gone out the window. >> as for her campaign for president, clinton held her first public event yesterday. she was at a community college in monticello iowa, where she laid out broad campaign themes to a small group of students and teachers. >> the deck is still stacked in favor of those already at the top and there's something wrong with that. there's something wrong when ceos make 300 times more than the typical worker and there's something wrong when hedge fund managers pay lower tax rates than nurses or the truckers i saw on i-80 as i was driving here over the last two days. i'm running for president because i think that americans and their families need a champion and i want to the be that champion. i want to stand up and fight for people. >> what do you feel about that? >> it's a great message but she
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has to stop sounding like if this is going to resonate with people it has to stop sounding like she talked to elizabeth warren on the phone and releeted everything elizabeth warren said. i wish she had said this before two of them met and people started talking about elizabeth warren. >> josh, is that a fair critique? >> yeah but if you're running for the democratic presidency, being in the mold of elizabeth warren is the safest thing you can do. >> republicans are using this rhetoric, too. a month ago i was at this firefighters' union hall where ted cruz got up and started talking about how there was two americas, one for the well off and -- this is john edwards, buddy. >>'py -- i want to believe it i guess is my point. i want to believe this is her message. >> it's even alan greenspan spat's message two or three years ago, david ignatius. i said it on this show over a
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thousand times, there are two americas. there's two americas in criminal justice, two americas in education, two americas in economics. and the rich do keep getting richer, the poor keep getting poorer wages have been flat or going down since 1973 in real terms. these are not democratic or republican issues. these are issues that confront americans in the new century moving forward and we fix them. you can blame it on tax policy here or tax policy here but the tide of change, the the it revolution, we have to focus on this and push back. >> i think you're right. this is the issue candidates on all sides will have to deal with. hillary clinton is beginning. you remember, the clintons really were associated with a kind of center-right version of the democratic party. the democratic leadership council, pro-wall street. and she's trying to break away from that. i don't think she knows the answers yet to the questions that she was supposing. >> she has to crush some of the
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very forces that have supported her along the way that don't fit into this message. >> she has to find her own way. that may look like elizabeth warren but she's not elizabeth warren. >> it's got to sound like hillary. coming up on "morning joe." how a deadly shooting involving a sheriff's deputy is raising questions about reservists who volunteer in law enforcement. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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joining us now, white house correspondent for american media networks, let's get to some of the other headlines we have this morning. in tulsa, oklahoma 73-year-old robert bates was formally
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charged with second degree manslaughter on monday in the death of an unarmed man. bates, a reserve sheriff's deputy claims he accidentally pulled out his gun instead of the taser. the incident is raising questions about the work of reservists who have volunteers in law enforcement. nbc's kevin tibbles reports. >> reporter: 73-year-old bob bates, the part-time tulsa deputy sheriff was formally charged with second degree manslaughter. >> how do you feel about the charges? >> i feel they're unwarranted and shouldn't have been brought. >> bates was acting as backup when the suspect in an undercover sting operation bolted. 44-year-old eric harris was selling an illegal gun. a scuffle ensued pick up by police body cam. bates pulled what he said he thought was his taser but instead fired his gun. >> i shot him, i'm sorry. >> reporter: harris later died. bates claims in the heat of the moment he mistook his pistol for
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his taser. there are more than 100 reserve deputies with the tulsa sheriff's office. nationwide that number is about 50,000. in many jurisdictions, reservists make financial contributions to the department. bates has contributed thousands. >> the point is that if you have enough money you get to go play cop. >> reporter: the sheriff's office says baits had once been a police officer and has more than 400 hours of training as a reservist, logging 3,000 hours of service. >> he was not playing anything. he was there like the other officers doing their job. he's play acting? no. he was there to help. >> reporter: the reserve officers' association says some 200 volunteers have lost their lives in the line of duty. >> i mean look. we talked about this yesterday. it doesn't look any different and i asked the question yesterday whether or not he sort of bought his way into that job,
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a volunteer job. at 72 years old, was he qualified to be handling a gun and a taser? >> kevin tibbles said the same things n april. it seems these days with more and more reports coming out on video because we have video and not before -- >> the accountability piece. i love it. >> there is the accountability piece and there are even cops on the beat everyday that make mistakes in life or death situations and a lot of times we can't judge them. but 72 3773 reservists? i say we can't judge them because it's hard to put yourself there. there's things that are very straightforward and horrific. but in those life or death situations don't you want a cop that's active? that's trained day in and day out instead of a 73-year-old insurance salesman who paid his way on to the force? >> it's sad. to pay your way on the force, it's basically a hobby, almost that he's taken up to pay his way into. but there is an accountability there. policing in this nation there are issues where many of these
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persons who are in policing are in reserves working these jobs they have to go through training and the question is what kind of training did he have? was he able was he capable at 72 to be able to think back to what he did in the training? to go through to pick out whether he had his taser or his gun. these are issues that need to be questioned. we need to ask the people who hired this man who he paid as well to get on this reserve group. i mean it's just a sad situation. but one of the great things about it i love there's video for us to be able to sit here and talk about these questions. the accountability piece is the amazing thing. >> we know what happens. we see it. >> and we do know that. you know mika these reservists, retired reservist, i don't think a 73-year-old would be on active duty in hot pursuit in an undercover investigation. they can do work patrolling malls. they can do work like patrolling
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parts of town just -- >> the eyes and ears. >> but this is such horrific judgment on the part of this department to put this 373-year-old man in this position. who, by the way, the second the gun went off he said "i shot him, i'm sorry." >> he was very apologetic. >> i do have a question about that. i haven't looked that deep into the story. was this department suffering from a lack of resources? budget cuts? did they need people to come in and help fulfill out positions? >> i don't know. >> look, i think there's a lot we don't know about why he was there. it may not have been necessarily everything we see. but it doesn't look good and we have to address. >> it what's appalling is this set up. the whole idea you can buy your way on to a police force like a fantasy sports camp for people who want to be cops and have a gun -- >> a gun and a taser. if they want to run around and play barney fife put them in the back of a car.
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>> and there's a different feel between a taser and a gun and i don't carry guns, i don't use one, but you can see there's a different feel. >> why would someone like that be carrying a gun in the first place? you can't get around that. >> and also let's not question his intentions. i mean i know buying -- we're making the leap of buying his way on to the force, its certainly looks like that. his heart might have been in the right place. >> he seemed remorseful. >> i think that's the thing and i said it yesterday. somebody is responsible and the person that's responsible is the one that put a retired insurance agent, a 73-year-old man in that position in hot pursuit who is fumbling around. >> it's so horrible. >> we'll follow this story as we cover a lot of these different cases that are coming up. >> and a man is dead because of it. it's unbelievable. coming up on "morning joe," will bernie sanders take his inspect streak into the race for
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the white house? the potential presidential candidate joins us just ahead. the new minimum wage. we'll talk to the ceo of a company whether even the lowest-paid worker will bring home at least $70,000 a year. why he's doubling his workers' paychecks and slashing his own million dollar salary. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. that make bad choices. woman: honey, i'm home! anncr: now there's petarmor plus. so you can protect your pets without the shame of overpaying. petarmor plus. available at your local supercenter. "ride away" (by roy orbison begins to play) ♪ i ride the highway... ♪ ♪ i'm going my way... ♪ ♪i leave a story untold... ♪
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fast in other tom's office. fast in the foyer [pronounced foy-yer] or is it foyer [pronounced foy-yay]? fast in the hallway. i feel like i've been here before. switch now and get the fastest wifi everywhere. comcast business. built for business. - electronics don't live forever. but even if they're dead, they've got more to give. recycle them. their parts can be reused to make new devices. so your trash could be someone else's treasure. the more you know. >> effective immediately we're going to put a scaled policy
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into place and we're going to have a minimum $70,000 pay rate for everyone that works here. it's going to go into effect over the next three years or so. my pay is set based on market rates and what it would take to replace me. and because of this growing inequality as a ceo, that amount is really really high. i make -- my compensation is really high. and so i'm actually taking my salary down to the minimum salary as well until our profit goes back up to where it is before we made this policy change. [ applause ] [ cheers and applause ] >> you know i think they were a little stunned at first, like t "did he just say that?" that was the ceo of gravity payments dan price announcing to his 120 employees that every one of them will soon be earning at least $70,000 a year and that he's slashing his own salary to help pay for it.
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dan price joins us now from new york. it's great to have you on. sam stein and catty kay are back with us. we have independent senator bernie sanders of vermont who tweeted a note of congratulations to dan price. very nice senator sanders, we'll get to you in just a moment. dan price, i think sam stein crystalized it in the break. he had a question for you. go ahead, sam. it's what you were thinking. say what you were thinking? >> no i don't want to say that! >> go ahead, sam. i can take it. >> are you crazy? no, it's very kind. what has the reaction been in terms of people wanting to work for your company or applying to work for your company? do you see an uptick in applicants? >> we've just been overwhelmed by emotion, to be honest with you. this has been a big thing. i've been wanting to do something like this for a long time. it's been in my heart. when i started the company the most i could afford to pay was $24,000 a year no health care benefits and some of those people are still with me. so i've been used to feeling
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guilty and wishing i could do better wishing i could be part of the solution to this inequality problem and i was excited to come up with something to at least try and make it work. so i might be crazy. [ laughter ] >> you might be. you just might be. do you think this will increase productivity? the quality of the product that you -- i mean, what is it that drove this beyond inequality? and also -- because i would -- i always talk about this being a -- i would never want to run a company if the people who worked for me didn't live very well or didn't live in a way that was appropriate. and people would probably say back to me dan price, "you're a terrible manager." >> yeah you know i think that's -- i think what it's about here is we're trying to find a capitalist solution to a very large social problem that just keeps getting worse and worse. i mean look at the statistics on inequality and it just keeps getting worse. in my own city of seattle it's getting less and less affordable for somebody to kind of make
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ends meet and so we looked and we saw there's a study done in 2010 by princeton that said around $70,000 or so money makes a big difference to happiness. and not having enough money can have an impact on emotional health and those type of things. in my mind when you solve that people can focus on their work. so i'm not looking for a carrot or a stick, but what i'm looking for is allowing people to unleash their passion and continue to serve our clients and not be distracted by money. >> so senator sanders, what did you think of this? is he a terrible manager? [ laughter ] >> i think what dan has done is not only extraordinary for his own employees, i hope it sets an example for companies all over this country. look, corporate profits are at an all-time high and yet today 99% of all new income is going to the top 1% the top one-tenth of one percent owns more wealth than the bottom 90%. so this issue of income and
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wealth inequality is the major issue we face and dan has shown when what a decent company can do. by the way, i bet it pays off. i bet workers feel ownership, they're going to work harder feel part of the team and i bet it becomes a good business model. >> a gamble worth taking. catty. >> dan how concerned are you about the impact this might have on company profits? have you done a risk analysis on this calculation? and then the other thing is have you heard from any other companies who might be interested in what you've just done? >> absolutely. i've become totally overwhelmed with e-mails from clients who are small business owners medium-sized business owners that they're really proud of this. and the overwhelming message i've heard from my clients are, you know, i might not be able to afford to do what you did but i'm working to get there someday. for me there's a moral imperative that comes with leadership to do what's right for those you're leading and those you've made promises to. for us first and foremost,
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that's those independent businesses processing their credit cards for cheaper but secondly the entire team i'm leading and i'm responsible partially to make sure they succeed and continue to growened a improve. >> dan price, thank you very much. let us know how it's going. we'd love to hear. senator sanders, let's talk politics. are you running? >> giving very serious thought to running. we'll make a decision very shortly. the issue that we have to deal with is that with super pac pouring hundreds of millions of campaigns where it's possible to run a credible campaign when you're taking on the billionaire class and trying to defend working families. >> you saw hillary clinton's launch, i take it. what do you think of her message and do you think her message -- how does it compare to for example, an elizabeth warren if she were to run. >> the issue is frankly it's not just hillary or elizabeth or
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bernie sanders. this country faces enormous problems. our middle-class is disappearing. we have more people living in poverty than any time in the history of america. we're the only major country without a national health care program guaranteeing health care for all people. what's that about? the question is how do you take on a billionaire class which has so much economic power and with citizens unite canned now buy elections where we are moving in many ways toward an oligarchic form of society rather than traditional democracy. so let me say this no president, not hillary clinton, not bernie sanders, not anybody unless there is a mass mobilization of millions of people who say enough is enough, koch brothers and billionaires can't have it all. >> well someone like hillary clinton who has announced has the capacity has the abilities in my opinion to do any of that. do you think she will if elected? >> i've known hillary clinton for many years and i like hillary clinton very much and
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clearly this is a very capable person but she has to answer some very significant questions. right now coming to the floor of the senate pretty soon is another disastrous trade agreement called the tpp. trade agreements have cost us millions of jobs pushed by corporate america. where does hillary clinton stand on that? i have been one in the leaders in trying to oppose the keystone pipeline and say that climate change is one of the gate global crises we face. we have to rapidly move away from fossil fuels. where does hillary stand on that. in terms of wall street i believe we have to break up giant banks, they're too powerful. where does hillary clinton stand on that? the bottom line is we need people to stand up to the billionaire class and their economic and political power. >> senator, if you run do you think you can win, really think you can win? >> i would not run, to be honest with you, unless i thought that i could. i go around the country a bit and i think beltway pundits are
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out of touch with where real people are. people are saying enough is enough. i'm working longer house for lower wages. >> president obama made a college in his previous two campaigns not to take a single dollar from lobbyists and he didn't. would you like to make -- see hillary clinton make a similar pledge talking about the oligarchical interests? >> there's so many ways around it. the campaign system is so corrupt that we need to overturn citizens united. we need to move to public funding of elections. let me be very clear, it will shock people. we are losing our democracy in this country. billionaires are buying the united states congress. and we need to stop that. >> senator bernie sanders, thank you very much. come back soon. make your announcement here okay? still ahead, the 8 track, the cassette tape now the cd? the ground-breaking number about music sales that suggests compact disks may soon be a thing of the past. that story ahead on "morning joe."
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all the confidence you need td ameritrade. you got this. it is time now for "business before the bell" with cnbc's brian sullivan. brian, google has been accused of abusing its power in europe and this morning it's facing antitrust charges from the e.u. what is at stake here? >> it's a big case. you have to go back 15 years, guys. remember the antitrust case against microsoft and their internet browser? this is being compared to that. the european union filing antitrust charges against google really has less to do with their search feature per say than their comparison shopping feature. they say it will block people
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out. monopolies are not per say illegal, only when you use them to block out other competition. they also reference google's travel offerings and mention the android operating system. this is shaping up to be a massive case that could drag on for years just like the microsoft case which took years to get through. watch this very closely. no reaction from the u.s. yet. again, this is companying from the e.u. a couple other quick stories, retail sales yesterday coming out looking pretty good. we had a slowdown in the first quarter. when you're under seven feet of snow like they were in boston it's hard to sell anything. retail sales rebounding a bit except for cds. as you referenced going into the break, for the first time ever digital download sales surpassing sales of cds not by much, $6.8 billion but the cd on its way out, digital sales on their way up. guys, just quickly. i know you don't have video yet, mario draghi the janet yellen or ben bernanke of europe
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they're giving an interest rate conference in europe just got basically -- i want to say attacked by a protester, but this woman jumped up on a table, looked to dump confetti on him and wore a shirt that said "end ecb dictatorship." it was spelled with an added letter. i will leave that to your imagination. we just rolled the video here. >> dictatorship? >> two "ps" on the end. >> sam, you brought up a good point. like my kids they say "what is a cd?" >> i'm convinced we should hold on to our cds because in 40 years time they'll be hip and cool like vinyl right now. up next on "morning joe," coming up she knows rand paul's plans better than anybody. the senator's wife kelley paul talks presidential politics and the inspiration behind her new book. we'll be right back. lenge all across america. here we go! check out escape and find out why ford is the brand more people buy and buy again.
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[♪] there is an ancient rhythm... [♪] that flows through all things... [♪] through rocky spires... [♪] and ocean's swell... [♪] the endless... stillness of green... [♪]
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[♪] and in the restless depths of human hearts... [♪] the voice of the wild within. [♪] someone just told me i was hot. >> no, it means your mic is hot, that people can hear you talk not that you're hot. >> no i think she was telling me i'm hot. she goes "you're hot." >> did you pay them joe? >> yes, a little money spread around helps. >> you're hot. joining us now, kelley paul the author of the new book "true and constant friends, love and inspiration from our grandmothers mothers, and friends." she just so happens to be the wife of presidential candidate rand paul.
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kelley welcome to the show good to have you on. how does it feel being the wife of a presidential candidate so far? >> it's not too bad. pretty exciting. >> not too bad. [ laughter ] >> having a good time with it. >> some people say it's gruelling so get ready. we're glad to have you on the show. the book looks amazing. i understand your grandmother inspired the book. before we get into what exactly the inspiration was, she apparently gave you all kinds of things and she was -- had a huge love of fashion and there's a purse in particular of hers that you took to the white house. tell us about it. >> it always goes back to purses with mika. >> i love it. yes, my grandmother she came to this country in 1929 from ireland. she worked as a maid for the founders of the saks fifth avenue store. she was a live-in maid. she worked for a lot of wealthy families in new york and she would always bring me wonderful things when she came to visit during my childhood.
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one of which was that beaded the urs which her employers gave her. when she gave it to me i was about 15. i'll never forget she told me she thought i would take it lots of wonderful places and it was very special to her and she wanted me to have it. my grandmother had a beautiful lyrical way of speaking and she always made a big production out of everything. she was very dramatic and i just remember her giving me that purse and so it's been something that i do want to take special places and the first time i took it to the white house i felt like she was there with me. >> lovely. >> dramatic, great storyteller. i read she embellished stories. who would ever guess she came from ireland? [ laughter ] but anyway, you always talked about your friends, though. your friends are inspiration from this book. this book is about women who get together every year and you guys talk about all your problems and share your problems whether it's divorce or you say abusive husbands or just -- >> whatever. >> problems in life. talk about how that inspired this book as well.
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>> very much so. we're a source of support for each other through the tough times but also all the great times, too. and there are a group of amazing women that i met the very first week of my freshman year in college and i decided when i started thinking about this book to reach out to them and find out who in their life was like julia o'toole, my grandmother was for me. with was there a woman either a mother grandmother, aunt someone who shaped who they were when they were younger and it was a great experience going back in time as much as 100 years with each friend and really exploring the women that made us who we are. >> lovely. >> kelley can i ask you what it's like to be a candidate's wife because i've never been one, obviously but they're in a curious position. the "new york times" has a headline which says "kelley paul has a task to make rand paul more approachable." how weird does that seem to you?
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>> pretty weird. that's something a journalist wrote. i don't see that as a task. it is an odd position to be in and i don't think it's just women in this position. i'm friends with some senate spouses that are males in d.c. and being a spouse you're in this kind of semi public position. i still feel like i'm just primarily rand's spouse and there to support him and our family but at the same time people are curious about who he is as a person so that kind of gets me out in the spotlight some and i'm happy to do that. i'm very proud of rand. >> and happy to defend him on some of the charges that he has a problem with women? >> absolutely. to me the whole gender angle on that was a bit of a false construct construct. that's not who rand is as a person. he wrote the forward in my book and he talks about all of the women in his life and his whole family is full of strong women, three female doctors,
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veterinarian chemical engineer. his long-time partner in his ophthalmology practice is a female surgeon he worked with for every ten years. so rand is someone who truly looks at the substance of a person, their intellect and their ideas and is the last person to judge someone based on their gender or anything else. >> mika that lines up with what you said after the savannah guthrie interview. you said this is not about being women. this is -- they can take care of themselves. >> savannah was fine. i thought there was a good strategy going there, one that you often use, but that's for another day. >> i have no idea what you're talking about. >> the book is "true an constant friends" kelley paul thank you so much for being on. >> good luck with the book. >> thank you so much for having me. up next what, if anything, did we learn today?
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a nice questioniet weather day across the country. you'll need your umbrella in areas of the southeast, especially the carolinas. one or two strong storms ins can kansas but the big story is the cold through the rockies. tomorrow is a bigger way across the nation with more severe storms in texas. i mean, come on. national gives me the control to choose any car in the aisle i want. i could choose you... or i could choose her if i like her more. and i do. oh, the silent treatment. real mature. so you wanna get out of here? go national. go like a pro. ♪ turn around ♪ ♪ every now and then i get a little bit tired ♪ ♪ of craving something that i can't have ♪ ♪ turn around barbara ♪ ♪ i finally found the right snack ♪ ♪ ♪
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i care deeply about the gulf. i grew up in louisiana. i went to school here. i've been with bp ever since. today, i lead a team that sets our global safety standards. after the spill we made two commitments. to help the gulf recover and become a safer company. we've worked hard to honor both. bp has spent nearly 28 billion dollars so far to help the gulf economy and environment. and five years of research shows that the gulf is coming back faster than predicted. we've toughened safety standards too. including enhanced training... and 24/7 on shore monitoring of our wells drilling in the gulf. and everyone has the power to stop a job at any time if they consider it unsafe. what happened here five years ago changed us. i'm proud of the progress we've made both in the gulf and inside bp.
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bring us your baffling. bring us your audacious. we want your sticky notes, sketchbooks, and scribbles. let's pin 'em to the wall. kick 'em around. kick 'em around, see what happens. because we're in the how-do-i-get-this-startup- off-the-ground business. the taking-your-business- global-business. we're in the problem-solving business. 400,000 people - ready to help you solve problems while they're still called opportunities. from figuring it out to getting it done we're here to help.
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so sam stein had one question. have you ever committed adultery. >> oh, my god! >> joe, that was an offset joke not an on set joke. >> if the people of the huffington post cannot trust you -- >> look at these reporters notebooks. sam stein, thank you very much. >> thank you so much for watching today. >> oh, many i god! the news continues now -- >> that was just role-play. >> it's way too early. what time is it? >> i learned joe's a terrible
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reporter. >> have a great day, everybody. bye. >> i learned katty is really mean. and good wednesday morning from washington. i'm jose diaz-balart. good morning. first on "the run down," they're off and running -- literally. we will see weather reporters and photographers chase after hillary clinton as they did tuesday afternoon in iowa. it's clinton's second day of meeting voters. she'll hold another invitation-only event, this a round table with small business community members but this morning clinton is facing new questions about that e-mail controversy during her time as secretary of state. let's get right to nbc's kristen welker who met up with clinton on tuesday, she's in norwalk, iowa. kristen, good morning. >> reporter: jose good morning to you. that's right. hillary clinton arrives in norwalk for that business round table in just a few hours. so far, her viscid has sparked a media

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