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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 8, 2015 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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video, he will be charged with murder. >> tonight, officer slager is behind bars and he has been denied bail. i am putting myself forward as a candidate for president of the united states of america. >> president of the united states. >> senator rand paul launched his presidential campaign. >> too often when republicans have won, we have squandered our victory. that's not who i am. >> paul's world view could be a stumbling block with the waning of the republican party. >> i will do whatever it takes to defend america from these haters of mankind. >> they lack a focus on foreign policy. i think they are afraid of him for a lot of other reasons he wants to expand the party. >> we have to return to our populous roots. i like cruz and paul. >> you can't like all of them. >> today begins the journey to take america back. >> well he launched it mica
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how great is that? >> quite a launch. >> i have a rand button very exciting. >> i don't mind rand paul. >> you like rand paul. you know what she don't mind. >> what? >> connecticut basketball. you know you did it again, incredible. >> i covered him as a local reporter like 20 years ago? yoevenlt i don't want to count. he is a fantastic coach. so happy for him. >> we talked about coach k. now he has ten national title, ties him with john wooden. what is more remarkable. he is ten10 and 0 he never loses. >> me and the local news in connecticut made a cut of history out of covering the
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yucon husky women which were just back in the days of rebeckco lobo how bad does that date me? >> that's lying. i think i was in my 40s. >> all right. so from happy news to sad and tragic news you just wonder. >> more than that. >> what goes through. well a guy's mind. >> i want to know more about the hero who shot this video? >> absolutely. >> who i think we will be hearing from. >> but let's begin right there. on the front page of the "new york times" as it should be. a north charleston south carolina police officer is charged with murder this morning after opening fire on a man as he ran away and as we've seen in a series of recent incidents, it's raising issues of race and the issue of deadly force by law enforcement. this shooting occurred on saturday and was captured on video by a bystander provided to the "new york times." it shows the officer firing his
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weapon eight times. we should warn our viewers, this contains graphic images. there's more. the officer is 33-year-old michael t. slager, a five-year veteran of the department t. man killed is identified as walter scott, a 50-year-old arkin american. they say he first fired his taser after he ran from his car in a traffic stop. as the two men struggled, the stun gun wires appear to be extending from scott's body the victim, according to "new york times." the time's also reports and object. it's not clear whether it is the stun gun is tossed or knocked behind the men as they scuffle. then as the video shows, scott turns to run and is about 20-feet away when the officer draws his gun and fires. according to a police report the
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officer then radios into dispatch saying quote, shots fired and the subject is down. he took my taser. but then watch, as the video continues, the officer then places mr. scott in handcuffs. he then returns to where the two initially struggled, picks something off the ground. the officer then returns and drops that object near scott's body. the new york time's highlights that portion of the video. is that the taser? i don't know, what is that? the police report says the officer performed cpr but in the video there are no attempts to resuscitate. mr. scott remains handcuffed and face down for several minutes. the u.s. justice department is involved. they said they will investigate. it is the 11th time this year
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someone in south carolina has been shot by a police officer. on monday the attorney for slager said he opened fire because he felt threatened and that he followed all procedures but that attorney says he no longer represents him. you should have seen sand we'll show the police chief and others talking about him being charged with murder. they're saying it's a relief. >> it is sickening. it's sickening. there are no words to watch a man get murdered. there are no words. you watch a man get murdered. >> especially in 2015. >> disgusting. that's where we are. joining us from north charleston, south carolina nbc news correspondent gabe go out res, what can you tell us how officials are reacting to the case? >> reporter: good morning. well, officials here are calling it extremely tragic. as you mentioned, this was a very emotional news conference yesterday where they announced this murder charge against
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officer michael slager. this incident happened as you mentioned on saturday it wasn't until this video surfaced that these city officials announced this murder charge and as can you see here the mayor was stunned. >> when you are wrong, you're wrong. and if you make a bad decision, i don't care if you are behind the shield or just a citizen on the street you have to live by that decision and so we as a city want the family to know that our hearts and our thoughts are with them our prayers are with them. anything that we can do for them, we are hear here to do. >> reporter: now the city of north charleston has about 100,000 residents, about half of them are african-american and black officers make up only
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about 20% of the police force. now, as for this officer who is charged, he could face anywhere from a 30 years behind bars up to life if prison and even the death penalty. so far, he has not commented and as you mentioned, an attorney he previously had is no longer representing him. it is unclear whether he currently has a lawyer. guys back to you. >> all right. nbc's gabe gutierrez, thank you. the only thing i will say at this point at least the mayor and it appears the police department isn't hedgeing here. >> i just don't know what to say. this is really we saw eric guard in other words and we called it. at least i called it what i thought it was, murder the day after and we're seeing this time and time again. i mean i'm speechless. this is just devastating. >> the video is horrifying on a lot of levels watching a man get murdered on television is horrifying. then also the officer is
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screaming at the guy to put his hands behind his back. he can't, because he's dead and then if you continue to watch the video, i know they say they performed cpr. they did what they could to save his life. you don't see those attempts. you don't see a rush to help this man as he lays face down. >> no, you don't. it appears there will be an investigation. it appears you are watching police officer meddling with the crime scene to apparently frame the dead man. i mean this is a tragedy. it's also an obscenity, what we're watching here mica as you say, fortunately the police department acted swiftly t. officer has been fired. he is being charged with murder the fbi is investigating. >> let's show a picture of the murdered man again for so many reasons, what is he 50-years-old? >> he's got four children. >> four children who is slowly going away from the guy. might not only does he pose any threats, it's obvious from the
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video he could have easily apprehended him. the guy that shot him eight times in the back is 20 years younger. >> it's also the entire scene, everything that we have seen so far on this tape is nearly incredulous, obviously what we haven't seen there was a chase prior to where the scenes begin that we are seeing. so you chased him from where the stop occurred for a broken taillight. >> a traffic stop. it's 9:30 in the morning. it's not midnight. a broken taillight. what does that sound like? >> it sound like a revenue stop. what we heard and what's happening all over the country. >> correct, you pull over, a broken taillight. you get the $50 for the municipal coiffures, so that occurred and to some distance we don't know how much the distance occurred between the initial stop and where that tape begins and then clearly there is no threat posed to the officer os life. >> there is information on the victim as well. mr. scott has been arrested about ten times mostly for family and to fail to pay child
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support which is one of the notions he was running away he didn't want to get picked up at this time. that's just at this point a hypothesis. he was arrested in 1987 on assault and battery charges and convicted in '91 of possession of a blunlen, the newspaper's reporting. mr. scott's brother anthony said he believed mr. scott had fled from police on saturday because he owes child support. >> you have to be a boy scout. >> exactly. yeah. >> no it was not an argument. it was more just trying -- >> and there is a lot we don't know. when the official stop occurred. when the revenue stop occurred for the broken taillight, does he punch in the tail number does he know who the person is? >> again, if you listen to that there is no need to fire a shot. there is no need to tasary guy.eto
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taser a guy. he's running away. >> you don't run after them and shoot them dead. >> he was slowly going away. >> he faced two complaints in the past including one in 2013. in that case a man claimed the officer shot him with a taser without justification. slager was cleared of using excessive force. but the suspect was not arrested. >> well, you know mick if you go if. if you have been hearing for years that about excessive force by members of the police force, i money, this is just the result of having video cameras out there. again i would say one more argument for cameras on cops everywhere, because the guy looked like he thought he was in a closed off area where nobody would see him. >> and he got away with moving the evidence around. >> he was going to get away with moving the everyday around. he would never do that.
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this guy is filming over the fence. he would never do this if he had a camera on him and he knew if somebody was shot and killed and he turned his camera off, he was presumed guilty. >> what about the courage of the fell lie, whoever it is with the cam-corder. >> stunning. look at him walking. >> walking up to the scene, a man is more likely than not dead there on the ground. >> the police officer just shot him. you got to wonder how many bullets does he have left in his gun? he's still shooting. >> he doesn't back off, either, he walks, he gets closer as other officer arrives, he moves in. >> we should make an effort actually to find out what about officer slager is he held on bail? is he incarcerated today? is there a bail hearing for him? is he going to be released on bail? >> there is to your point about cameras in february north charleston was given $300,000
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for body cameras, they're probably in the process of implementation at this point. but i wonder how this officer thought he would get away with it even without a camera because presumably an autopsy would show this man was shot eight times in the back the taser or whatever. >> mike your question you denied bail at a hearing last night. you know how he thought he could get away with it. the same way theme choked and killed eric gardner did onstant island. they get away with it. they just do that's got to change. >> we will have to push politics the next block. this was worthy conversation for sure as well. >> stunning video. >> i have to say, we're all in kind of a shock after all we've seen. we knew about this problem on one level but to see something like this before our eyes takes it to another. still ahead on morning joe,
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dealing with iran may have been the easy part. how the president is setting up a serious obstacle to the new deal. we will talk to congressman steve israel about the democratic deflection. plus, tom coburn was never afraid to speak his mind. that was before he retired. >> oh no it should be very interesting to hear him now he's left capitol hill and later his project has been nominated for 49 oscars the producer's most meaningful moments happened off camera. he will be here to explain why he's had conversations with everyone from princess diana to andy warhol and fidel castro. we will talk about all that straight ahead on "morning joe."
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it's back! xfinity watchathon week. the biggest week in television history. it's your all-access binge-watching pass to tv's hottest shows free with xfinity on demand. xfinity watchathon week. now through april 12th. perfect for people who really love tv. well. it's 17 past the hour. just like that ted cruz has company in the field of 2015 presidential candidates. kentucky senator rand paul made it official and launching his
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campaign in front of a ball room in louisville. he mulligan laying out what he believes arguing both parties are to blame. >> i have a message. a message that is loud and clear and does not mince word. we've come to take our country back. the washington machine that gobbles up and invades every nook and cranny of our lives must be stopped. as i watch our once great economy collapse under mounting spending and debt i think what kind of america where our grandchildren will see. >> it seems to me both parties and the entire political system are to blame. if we nominate a candidate who is simply democrat-like, what's
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the point? why bother? i envision in america with the national defense unparallelled, undefeatable and unencumbered by overseas nation building. i see an america strong enough to deter foreign aggression yetwise enough to avoid unnecessary intervention. i see in america where criminal justice is applied equally and any law that disproportionately incarcerates people of color is repealed. >> okay. i'm sorry, i called you a republican independent. my bad. rand paul some would say a conservative independent. what do you think of rand paul? >> i think he's a libertarian. >> how is rand paul going to do in the republican primary? is he going to do better than his father you think? >> oh certainly. we know that these paulistas, they are active.
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they are local. they are passionate. rand paul has been doing all this legwork. he has been to new hampshire, nevada this week. he is trying to broaden his appeal where his father didn't. >> a lot of the conservative base doesn't like him right now. that's really the question on foreign policy bs is that a big killer in the republican party? >> i don't know a deal killer. he is pivoting on that issue. i hate to say it. i think the rise of the islamic state has given him a reason to become more interventional. >> that lindsey graham game on the sunday morning show they're already poking at him. let's bring in more guests heater. rand palm travels to new hampshire today. that's where we find the "new york times" reporter jeremy peters and former democratic national committee howard dean. good to have you both this morning. >> howard you did the before you did it pretty darn successful. you know what it feels like
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what do you think? how do you think rand paul's criticism of both parties of the two party system is going to play? >> i think it plays very well less so new hampshire actually does have a strong libertarian streak. iowa does not on the republican side. so i think it's going to be a fascinating candidate. the candidacy. the problem is when are we going to see the real rand paul? he is all over the map on issues. he's not interventionist. he wants to do something about isis. he's got these multiple positions on issues. he's going to get pushed hard if he takes off. right now he's in single digits. we'll see what happens. >> do you see we're in this australian him craft with rand paul. >> first of all the stranl craft and the first two presidential announcements we have seen has been way too grandiose and the father on the side lines.
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i want what you want actually it's a real discussion and bar-b-ques. >> you know, talk to me tell me why, where do you go from here? there was one former presidential candidate in the audience at rand palm's announcement yesterday. you are talking about this leaving mr. to wonder what if any role the former congressman and libertarian icon will play in his campaign. ron paul didn't speak and the new york sometimes reports he's expected to maintain a quote silent rule in this quest to the white house moving forward. here is for paul seeking to politico after yesterday's announcement. >> you know, my dad is a great guy i have a great deal of respect for my dad. my dad is probably one of the most honest and genuine characters in history. we don't agree on everything. not everyone agrees with tear dad on anything. i think everyone's dad gives them a sense of reference and there are a lot of people who
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actually became involved in politics because of him and i think what my job is is to take what he started and make it bigger. >> you know he didn't mention his father by name. is that true? >> my father. >> he wouldn't say my dad rand paul. there are a lot of republicans. it's his dad. his dad. >> they call him dad. >> you don't have to call him dad. >> my parents, as long as i -- >> ron paul. i do like ron. that's what i said. i wonder if one of my advisers calls him by name. don't look at him. pretend he's not there. >> but to call him dad also humanizing. >> he talked about his parents. he did not reference a guy that launched his career. i'm not knocking him. i'm saying to some adviser, i germany tee you, listen your
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father on israel and your father on 9-11. pretend he's fought there. talk it out. your parents. i mean you know i'm serious. like ron paul is like a huge force of libertarian politics. >> let's get to what we are saying here. i remember in st. paul minnesota, i went to the parallel ron paul convention a huge crowd, incredibly passionate. big supporters. there were some fringe people there. there were weird people there. i think that's what you were getting at. your dad on some of the issues don't want to play because we don't want to go. >> are you calling ron paul frin him? >> no some that were there. >> some would say. >> it's kind of interesting. >> jeremy you are up there by the mills on the river. that's a beautiful shot. i love how the sun rises. it's a bright morning in new
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hampshire. >> very manchester. >> but it strikes me that new hampshire might be fairly receptive to rand paul because of this querkiness because there were a lot of querky voters in new hampshire. >> what are you talking about? it's now from boston. go ahead, is there any play in boston where are you not a snob? >> no i think that's a description of the electorate in the primaries. >> no it's not. >> you think they're querky up there because they don't steal money like boston politicians. >> i'm not going to say anything to that. >> you can't. you told me a thousand stories. >> go ahead, respond to this querky question from this querky man from a place there isn't politicians that steal millions of dollars. go ahead. >> i think if it's not new hampshire, it has to be another one of the first four states.
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like certainly, you are right, the libertarian streaks that this state has would be something that rand paul could tap into. now he probably has a better shot, a clearer shot at some place like nevada which is in the first four as well. he has to win one of those four states to remain viable. >> can he break out from where his father was? is there any evidence he will be better than his father did in '08 or '12? >> reporter: i think is there any evidence right now? i guess you would have to point to what he has been doing on the ground. he has been reaching out to african-americans and college students. he agrees like many other republicans agree right now, that the republican party is not large enough to elect a president in scent e 2016. what is he doing? he is going out and trying to connect with voters and people that have never voted republican before. somebody said to me yesterday, which was one of the most
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interesting lines all day yesterday, i think he's a guy that can appeal to the person with the nra bumper sticker and the co-exist bumper sticker. whether or not that bears out or is conservative just say to themselves to feel better about supporting him. i think we'll find out and that will be the ultimate test for rand paul. >> there is one thing about this. we haven't talked about it in new hampshire that's unique. independent voters are allowed to vote in the republican party. this year they will. presumably, if hillary clinton is not opposed meaningly, a tremendous number of voters will go into the republican party. rand paul really could be a beneficiary. she probably about the only republican idea logically acceptable in some ways to some of the democrats. i should say is independents. if you are registered as a democrat you continent. a lot will become independent for the sake of voting this.
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new hampshire could be his state. >> could be big if my plans afford it. to draft howard dean to run against hillary and have a great, great democratic primary. we will talk to howard about that in a little bit. i will say this about rand paul like his father there are some stuff i have big questions about. i think he's a very very important candidate for the republican party at this stage of its history where it has gone inward and they recycled ronald reagan campaign, 35 years later, this is the first guy that has actually dared to break at the party orthodoxy. i'm for less taxes, less spending and more freedom. you know we have been hearing that since 1980. rand is going places where republicans den go. he's saying things republicans don't say running for president. that's a good thing for the
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party. >> jer ply peters thank you very much. coming up a unique confrontation for governor chris christie at a town hall. why a kindergarten teacher is giving the 2016 candidate a grade of "needs improvement" we'll be right back with that. ♪ it's not about hugging trees. it's not about being wasteful either. ♪ you just gotta find that balance. where taking care of yourself takes care of more than just yourself. anncr: lease an mkz hybrid for $299 a month plus competitive owners and lessees get $500 bonus cash, only at your lincoln dealer. in just this one moment, your baby is getting even more than clean. the scent, the lather, even the tiny
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all right. let's take a look at the morning papers. from usa today government under surveillance of american's phone calls apparently mulligan long before president obama took office. the report claims that justice department and dea mulligan collecting international phone calls of u.s. citizens in 1992 under the george h.w. bush administration. the paper writes that the agency stored logs of virtually all telephone calls from the usa to as many as 116 countries linked to drug trafficking. >> from the boston globe, they adjourned without a verdict after deliberating seven hours in the boston bombing trials. the jurors submitted two questions at the end of the day tuesday, which are expected to be addressed by the judge this morning. they are expected to decide tsarnaev's guilt on 30 charges, several of which carry the death
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penalty. st. louis dispatch in ferguson missouri changed the makeup of their city council by electing two african-american council members on tuesday in the first election there since the shooting death of unarmed teenager michael brown last august. 30% of registered voters showed up to cast their ballots, that's more than double the typical turnout. from the chicago tribune, mayor rahm emanuel is looking ahead to a second term after a divisive victory in the first ever mayoral runoff election. he received 56% of the vote against jesus garcia. emanuel failed to get 50% six weeks ago and in the course of the campaign raised $20 million. much more than his opponent. the mayor prized the opponent for running quote an excellent campaign, the u.s. postal service is coming under fire for a quote that accompanys dr.
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angelou's postal stamp. the quote doesn't belong to her. it's actually from a 1967 children's book. the postal service says angelou used the quote frequently and she probably identified with its popularity. however. >> the problem is, you know, se only wrote a short 64. they didn't have a lot to work on. actually there is good. >> the agency told the washington post they had known about the issue beforehand it would have been one of her other many works. >> i will say the, willie it reminds me of the time winston churchill went before the british people and he said ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. i mean, they had that quote. they had one small step -- four score, all of these quotes that they could have picked. >> life is like a box of
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chocolates. >> exactly. >> that's church hill. yeah. >> i actually think that moment after dun kirk when he said that, i think that's what liberalized the british. >> i like this next story. don't kill it. >> new jersey governor potential candidate chris christie is being urged to tone down his steel by one kindergarten teacher. she delivered the message saying it was hard for students to say why it's okay for him and not them to say words like idiot and shut up. governor christie says sometimes he used different languages, meaning there are times when critics succeed in pushing his buttons you have a lot of followers here that's wonderful. i follow you, i feel that you need to tone it down a little bit if you want to commit.
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i would love to see more of this christie that i love today than i'm seeing >> on the news. and i hope i'm not offending you. >> why offend me? sometimes i just walk into it. i sometimes say the heck with this, i'm doing it. i know i am criticized. why,? why did you do that today? right. but the second piece is sometimes you are just having a bad day. i think you've had too much and it's not republican or democrat. i think we have too much of people in a public fight pretending to be something. and so something in the today,
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chris, thank you very much. in other days you will say, i'm glad he said that, because it needed to be said. >> you know looking at chris christie there, you see why he was such a compelling figure and he could be a compelling figure again if he decides to go up to new hampshire. he's very human. he's very real. no he is. and by the way, with that realness, sometimes comes explosions. if chris christie were more calculated and more poll driven and more market taeventd more slick, then he would have never probably been elected government of new jersey. so many people wouldn't have fallen in love with him politically. >> i always found him refreshing. i will say the use of the word shut up. >> it's terrible. >> i was brought up to think that was as bad as a curse word. that was the only time i criminal himmed. >> you know my car we have said things before on this many
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times that we would love to take back. >> really. >> i'm just saying. it hasn't especially when you are being hammered. i'm not making apologys for the guy. i'm just saying. >> i don't think he knows who he is. governor christie said that. >> hey, howard howard dean still there? howard i bet have you 30 seconds or 45 seconds you'd love to take back. that's thing it is so easy the morning after to at this time there and go, oh you know he should have pivoted to his left and rubbed his chin and talking about the gettysburg address. it's not like that when the camera is in your face you have been hammered every day for a year or two. i'm not even talking about chris christie, i'm talking about you had and everybody else that puts their neck out on the line. >> i know it's true. i was thinking about this as you guys were talking about it. the public holds you to a higher standard. it's not all.
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that if you are going to be the president of whatever you are not allowed to react to what everybody else does. it does endear you, when you do a lot, if i were a governor it would be worse for me than the scream speech. i shouldn't have said and it was hurtful to people and we are all humanist as christie said but you are expected as a public official particularly up the high ter ladder you go not to be like everyone else. that's the leader what a leader is. >> you have found people will forgive you, you go up and say, i'm human, i had a possible day. >> fought if you keep doing it. >> up next between the president and the party's leader in waiting. democrats must side whether to black the white house deal with iran or side with senator chuck schumer, member of the foreign relations committee. joins us next on "morning joe."
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still to come we go back to north carolina with more on the police officer cardinaled with murdering a suspect on a traffic stop. what we know about the officer's past and the stunning piece of evidence that prompted officials to act. we'll be right back. you drop 40 grand on a new set of wheels, then... wham! a minivan t-bones you. guess what: your insurance company will only give you 37-thousand to replace it. "depreciation" they claim. "how can my car depreciate before it's first oil change?" you ask. maybe the better question is why do you have that insurance company? with liberty mutual new car replacement, we'll replace the full value of your car. see car insurance in a whole new light. liberty mutual insurance.
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chuck schumer? >> joe, man, a hardball ride early. it's not a choice between the two. i am a strong supporter of the legislation that senator corker has before the summitt that would say that congress needs to have an ultimate role if there is a final deal with iran. like my position on congress needs to weigh in on whether we are at war with isil that's not to counter the president's explanation of the american public we feed to take military action. it's congress needs to take a role. >> that actually provides john kerry kerry. they may not want it. it provides him much more lever annual when negotiateing with the iranians listens, as you know, you always play up somebody else. i would love to give you this i can't give you this because we will get killed in congress. chuck schumer is not going to do it. bob corker is not going to do it. this actually doesn't this help them in the end?
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>> joe, that's my sense. i think that having a clear set of rules when there is an ultimate deal how congress will review it helps negotiators. for example, the iranian parliament has to approve aspects of a final deal especially regarding the inspections. they've understood that from the very beginning. i think it will help them. >> senator, what, if anything is in this piece of legislation that would restrict or impede of do anything to the president's ability to lift or reduce sanctions on his own? >> mike yeah great question. three kind of sanctions here executive sanctions. the president can lift those on his own without congress under this bill. there is international sanctions. the president can lift those without congress if he persuades the international congress to do it. it's only when there is relief given that congress has to review for a 60-day period and
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then pass judgment either by approval or disapproval or no action which is defined as approval. so it's only the congressional sanctions and relief that generate a congressional review under this bill. >> senator kain it's willie. a couple of the wise men of american diplomacy, henry kissinger and george schultz wrote an op-ed for the "wall street journal" constructive critical of the deal. what concerns do you have we don't know the full deal but what concerns do you have? >> willie so there's things that i like that still have to be reduced to be validated from 10,000 kilograms is massive. exactly how that will be done and can it be important. the regimes, iran has agreed by
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permanently not a period of years additional property call but that's got to be reduced to an agreement by solid. the thing that's still vague in the agreement, very kaig vague is what is the timing of sanctions relief? that is a really important piece and vague in the frame because it wasn't yet agreed to. i would say that is a key area. you have to see them reduced to an agreement. the inspections regime is a critical piece of it. >> senator mccain, i want to follow up on the issue of sanctions. president rhani was on news saying it is his understanding sanctions will be immediately lifted the day a deal is signed. where is this misunderstanding coming from? >> well, that is obviously a pretty big difference from how it was reported in the framework last week. amy, you might see, i'm not
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giving you insight intel just an intuition, you could potentially see a deal where there would be some immediate sanctions relief again under executive or examiner national sanctions for a period of time before you move into the relief under the congressional sanctions that would trigger congressional review and at the end of the day, which would likely be long down the road, congress would need to affirmatively act to repeal the congressional statute, itself. i think it's always been thought that this would be a deal over some period of time with phases sort of with toll booths along the way. it may be that there is some immediate sanctions relief under international or executive but the congressional sanctions and especially the repeal of the sanctions statute would come somewhere down the road. >> can you verbalize? what does the white house say if terms of the pushback and your efforts for the bill? >> well they don't like the bill. they don't like me being on the bill. they've made that very plain. however, when i started to work with senator corker on an earlier version that he had that
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i didn't support we started to work together in january. then we filed the bill in late february. the white house has given me every bit of information i need when i have questions of the technical aspects of the deal. they provided information. no congress shouldn't be weighing in on this. my argument is look you are arguing over a statute. >> that is the core of this negotiation. what will iran do to get out from under statutory sanction congress is going to be involved. the only question is will it be according to some deliberate process or free for all rules and i think we're trying to set up our deliberate process. >> senator tim kain thank you very much. still ahead, we will meet the press secretary. look at them. they're hanging out. it's okay. robert gibbs and ari fleischer join the table ahead. >> dogs and cats. >> guess what joe? >> what?
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>> we're two days away from friday's -- philadelphia. >> willie the kid are getting excited. i almost sold out. >> for ticket information go to msnbc.com. msnbc.com. >> donny deutsche. >> oh my god. >> we'll be right back. with more "morning joe." hey! have an awesome vacation everyone! thank you so much! you're so sweet. yummy!
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>> oh my god, oh my god. >> a non-republican strong libertarian offering an alternative to the bush and clinton presidential dynasty. let's get right to the big announcement. >> this is the start of a cause. the cause to elect rand paul to the next united states of america. >> now i knew that rand paul had some unconventional ideas. but electing him the next united states of marc is i think. >> oh, stop joe. you are laughing. >> he's a great speaker. >> not fair everybody. >> he did in the look into it. he was not into it.
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coming up at a very past 7:00 hour "morning joe" we have a big political round table, press sect ari fleischer and rob gibbs and also the shocking video that appears to show police officer fatally shooting an unarmed black man in the back after a traffic stop. the officer is now facing murder charges. how a stunning piece of everyday changed the whole case. we'll show you the video. we'll go live to south carolina for all the information on this fast breaking story. we'll be right back. taxi. vo: after years of being treated like she was invisible it occurred to mindy she might actually be invisible. ♪♪ but mindy was actually not invisible. ooh, what are you doing? can you see me? she had just always been treated that way. yeah. you don't have to look at me like that. there are worst things than an attractive
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>> it started with a routine traffic stop and followed him into this field officer slager followed him and shot eight times is there that was no animal he killed. that was my son. >> i can tell you as a result of that video, officer slager will be behind bars. >> i am putting myself forward as a candidate for predecessor of the united states. >> senator rand paul launched his presidential campaign. >> too often when republicans have won we've squandered our victory. >> that's not who i am. >> all the world view could be a
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stumbling block with the large hawk issuing of the republican party. >> i will do everything to protect macrofrom the haters of man kind. >> i think they want to hate him for a different reason he wants to extend the populous party. >> i think a cruz and paul. >> you can only vote once. >> wait a minute. you can't do that. >> today begins the journey to take america back. >> you are beginning a journey, joe. let's do it. >> we will retake america. >> welcome back to "morning joe." all right. >> what was that great point of view with bob roberts, right? >> yeah. >> tim robbins, yeah? >> such an incredible move. >> okay. >> he played guitar there. >> in the "wall street journal" henry kissinger and george
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schultz have a really comprehensive piece on the iran deal and its consequences we'll get to in a bit. they raised fundamental substance of the deal. let's begin in charleston south carolina. >> do you believe that? >> no, i don't. >> just stagger, you keep getting, you are shocked by eric gardner, you are shocked by the justice department report coming out of ferguson how the revenue stream the people are basically economically enslaved by just one small cut after another and it looks like these two terrible, terrible realities came together in one instance here. >> yes. absolutely a police officer is charged with murder this morning after opening fire on a man as he ran away. as we've seen if a series of recent incidents, as joe mentioned, it's raising issues the race and use of deadly forcely law enforcement. it started on saturday and captured on video and provided to the fork times that shows the
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officer firing his weapon eight times and we should warn our viewers, this is graphic. >> if officer is 33-year-old michael t slager, a five-year veteran of the department t. man killed is identified as walter scott, an african-american, an father of four. they say he fired after scott ran from a car during a traffic stop. ed that two men struggled, the stun gun wires appear to be extending from scott's body according to "new york times" the times also reports an on. it's fought clear whether it's the stun gun is either tossed or knocked to the ground behind the men as they scuffle then as the video shows scott turns to run and is about 20-feet away when the officer draws his gun and
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fires. according to a police report the officer then radios into dispatch saying close shots fired and the subject is down. he took my taser. as the video continues, the officer then places mr. scott in handcuffs. he then returns to where the two men initially had struggled and picks something off the ground t. officer goes back and drops the object near scott's body. the "new york times" highlights that portion of the video. look carefully. the police report says officers performed cpr but in the video there are flo attempts to resuscitate mr. scott who remains handcuffed and face down for several minutes. the u.s. justice department is already involved saying the fbi will investigate along with a state law enforcement division
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and south carolina's attorney general. you see 11 times this year someone in south carolina has been shot by a police officer. on monday an attorney for slager said he opened fire because he felt threatened and he followed all procedures but that attorney now says he is no no longer involved with the case. slager appeared in court yesterday. he was denied bail with a judge saying she didn't have authority to set bond on the charge. here's the reaction from north charleston's mayor. >> when you are wrong, you are wrong and if you make a bad decision, i don't care if you are behind the shield or a citizen on the street you have to live by that decision so we as a city want the family to know that our hearts and our thoughts are with them our prayers are with them. anything we can do for them we
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are here to do. >> god. >> really it's just so lard to catch it's sickening. all the started as mike said last hour by a routine traffic stop. >> pulled over for a broken taillight. if we take the officer's account. he felt threatened that mr. scott may have reached for his taser gun mr. scott was tased. we think we see the wires from the taser gun coming out of mr. scott as he freezes slowly the officer points eight times, hits him five times, four in the back. one of the shots went through his heart. he died very quickly right there on the schooner. there are obviously a lot of questions about why the officer did this also i think the immediate reaction you hear on the tape the officer screaming at walter scott, get your hands behind youring ba get your hands behind your back as he lies face down. he can't, he's dead or dying in
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that moment. the other thing as we watch this video is the witness who frankly has the guts to continue to roll and get closer to approach the officer who he just seen shot someone then as other officers respond to the scene, this guy continues to film and captures it on videotape a pretty horrifying scene that who knows which way this could have gone if there were not tape of it. >> mike. >> well, you see, you are going to see something different in this each time you see the kwlip. >> what is he doing, getting the stun gun here and putting it by his body? >> you see obviously there was some conversation going on prior to the start of the cell phone video we see. then you see actually a police officer in the united states of america, removing his gun as if he's qualifying it at pistol range shooting someone running away from him eight items hit him in the back. it is vivid. it is murderous. it is incredible. >> well, what you are seeing is
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essentially a snuff video. i think it's important that we do see the truth of it. also in the police report as we were discussing in the previous hour the family said thank good there is for this video so the truth can come out. >> a reporter for the post andrew knapp what else can you tell us about the victim here? >> well what we so often seet the victim of gunfire quite frequently has a long criminal history but mr. scott in this situation had about ten arrests in his lifetime but there were no indications of real violence during that time most of the arrests have come in the past decade and in regard to failure to pay child support.
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the only indication violence is a charge of 1987 for assault and battery. we don't know yet what happened to that charge. but mr. scott actually liked the officer, officer slager he served about two years in the coast guard. he had four children. i know mr. slager had two stepchildren and one child on the way, actually. but mr. scott was described by a family as a family man who for something like this to happen is out of his character. >> so they could not fathom a situation in which he posed a threat for the officer. >> two questions here. one, can you tell us are you familiar with the action of the stop that occurred the vehicle, when it was pulled over and where this conversation mulligan with the cell phone video that we see?
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how long is that distance between the stop occurred and where two people are and the second question is can you talk if you can about the relationship between the police and the community in your city? >> sure. well the area where the confrontation occurred was probably less than a quarter mule away from the traffic stop. the traffic stop occurred in an auto parts store parking lot. then mr. scott apparently fled from that scene down a dirt road. >> on foot? >> that's correct. >> he got out of his car and fled on foot down this dirt road. it's rather secluded. there are businesses that get a lot of traffic. but it was towards the end of that dirt road in a little park there but it is quite surprising to see someone is there to' l see someone there at the time the confrontation occurred.
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as far as the relationship between the police and the community. it has been strained a lot in the history of the north charleston police department. it depends on who you ask about how bad it has been though the police commander says they have a good relationship with community and community leaders and activists. but along the actual people who live in the community and the rank and file members of the police department there have been some issues between them in the past and especially recently. the past few years. the police department has tried to address that. they've opened some dialogue with community leaders and activists, but there is still that problem along the regular officers on patrol and how they deal with peel in the community. there is perceptionally their police and tactics have been barely targeting black
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communities. >> really quickly, watching the video, police officer slager is shooting a man running away from him in the back. he claims that he was following police procedure. now, he's been fired. he is being charged with murder. is there any justification in that claim that there is anything that justifies shooting a man in the back as he runs away? >> well, we've talked to experts in the situation and from the video, they don't see any evidence that the officer's life was threatened. at that point where the video shows the officer and mr. scott struggling. he is in the process of basically trying to get away. experts say that's him running away from the officers, fought necessarily is a justification for shooting and some situations where the officer has probable cause to believe the suspect is
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going to pose life-threatening risk to the community, the court case versus said that they can use deadly force in those situations. so there is no indication of that here. >> thank you very much. we're going to get much more on this including a really compelling emotional reaction from the victim's mother who says that was not an animal that was my son and we'll have that in just a moment. turning now to breaking news out of afghanistan, where afghan and nato security forces are engaged in a firefight this morning according to a report. the u.s. ambassador to afghanistan, a senior official confirmed to nbc news as the ambassador was leaving the city in a helicopter an afghan army soldier opened fire on the security team on the ground. the official said that the shooter was shot dead and that there were work casualties among security forces following that as well mike a lot of people
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ewe need to stay in afghanistan forever, things went badly when we left iraq. if we do that this is the price. this is going to happen. we're at a place where you are having afghan security forces turning and shooting americans. it's been happening for years now. >> we will have 10,000. people on the ground there. mostly special ops, ten years, who knows? you are exactly right. this will be a regular occurrence, there will be casualties from afghanistan for years. >> so for people think tanks in washington, sitting there trying to calculate there out, let them go. let them go over there. let their sons and daughters go over there. within they want to sit and be clicken hawks and talk about how america needs to be all over the world, let them go. let them send their families. it's so easy for somebody that is at a brookings institute, not the brookeingbs institute would do this at a think tank or heritage or anywhere amy.
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we need to stay in afghanistan for as lodge as it takes. find fine send your sons or daughters there. we have veterans that we can't take of that have been fighting these wars for 12 years. >> these are very difficult issues to weigh. i think on the other side they would argue whether the alternative if we leave a vacuum and the islamic state moves in and we have a bicker threat to the united states. i don't think it's that easy just to say, pull out, let them live in their rubble. >> it's not that easy. but it's also. >> you make a decision knowing you have -- >> what if they had gone to iraq and afghanistan to serve in a capacity there for united states? >> maybe, i don't know what the number is mike you know this better than me. i know though what offends me is not that we make the tough decision. i just said at the beginning of this we will make that decision. no, young americans are going to be shot and killed over there. and that's why when it is so easy for somebody in a think tank or somebody on capitol hill to sit there and say, we need to
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stick it out. it's, you know what i think it's time we reinstitute a draft. let americans have skin in the game. all americans have skin in the game. we institute the draft and we will have more members in congress in the senate more people running for president that maybe they won't be. maybe they won't see this as toy soldiers moving across the globe. >> there is a concern that that's happening. still ahead on "morning joe," we'll follow this on breaking news, he backed the president, why is he seen deeply skeptical about the white house deal with iran? the new york democrat joins us next. you are watching "morning joe." we'll be right back.
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like a gold-plated soybean. reliably fast internet starts at $69.95 a month. comcast business. built for business. everybody's wondering when to tackle the kissinger and george schultz op ed. >> i am ready. >> because it is so long by op ed. >> it's fantastic. >> it's a great read though.
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it's very important. >> robert gibbs is here. ari fleischer is here. >> who would ever think kissinger would write something not succinct. >> where is my father in this? they didn't collaborate? welcome back. good to have you. >> good to be with you. >> all right. guys. >> we also of course you get into this? yeah, ari and skippy. >> all right. that's great. so congressman, i'll say on air what i said off air. a lot of my reservations and fears about this iran deal were originally because they thought the president was going to say, we're going to negotiate it. we're going to basically decide ourselves and have no input. i'm hearing people like you, chuck schumer, tim kain say, no we got to look at this first and certainly that lessens the tension and helps the president and john kerry negotiate with the iranians go we just can't get provision x past our congress, so don't even try it. >> joe, i was telling ari off
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air, if president bush had demanded there dell i would demand to vote on it. president obama is voting on this deal i reserve the right. it doesn't matter who the president is, congress has the deal toway weigh in on things of this magnitude. >> what is your biggest deal? >> a lot of people are for or against it without reading the bill. >> what is holding you back from reviewing it? >> no, i read the monitors. >> it sounds like a false argument. >> we have been invited to a series of briefings on it. the parameters are fought as good as they could be. not as bad as some people say. i felt the president will use the next several months on that foundation. >> what's your biggest concern? >> the parameters continue to be able to enrich uranium at a low level. i think that should be improved. we should use the next two to three months to inprove the deal
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and get a better deal if we can. congress should be able to vote on it. >> i think we got an important moment here where we have the opportunity through diplomacy to avoid the only other real option and that is as john said is to go to war. i think that's why you see the american people backing the idea of diplomacy here. i do think and i think you are right. the white house has strengthened their argument by giving congress a el. >> reporter: i don't think they've determined that role. >> did they give congress that role or did congress take that role? did chuck schumer take that role. >> >> potato potato come on. >> ari, let me ask you, potato, pa potato, fine. some republicans like me i think that's a false choice, what object you? >> it's a total false economy. let my come back to one of these things first he wants to read
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the parameters of it. here's the problem, you are reading an american version, the iranian version is different, the french is different still. there are three different interpretations. >> we are talking the final deal. >> the preliminary quote/unquote deal is so loosely defined you cannot know what is in it. >> but congressman, though you are talking, though about the final bill. >> exactly. >> and you are absolutely right and that's why congress should be able to read every wordch every vowel, every syllable and weigh in. >> but my point is. >> weigh in on a final deal if there is a final deal. >> i think the likelihood is you will have a different interpretation of tehran and the french are saying the characterizations of the americans and iranians are wrong. this is not what we agreed. it's already starting to unwind. >> when you have a final deal in writing, the russians can go back and say salt two being x,
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y, oz. >> have you negotiated with iranians before? that's not necessarily so. the essence was the soviet union. we had a track record. >> you are stirring things up here confusing things. a little reality. >> i know that's my problem. my problem is i am far too tough on israel and not tough enough on the iranians oh wait, it's the opposite. >> it has nothing to do with tougher or fought. i have a fundamental deal with the iranians. >> i understand that. we're talking about congress having the right to review the final deal that's done. now, if you are just saying here today you don't want any deal i can respect that. but i don't really understand what your point is. >> of course i don't trust the fundamental problems. i want to explain that. there is a better alternative. it would have been a better deal along with what barak obama prime minister issed and the united states. >> what deal are you talking about? >> eastern would not be able to
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get nuclear weapons under this deal iran will be able to get nuclear weapons. it's a question of overnight or in a week. >> is that a fair assessment? we'll give it to robert. >> right now they have a three-month breakout. under this deal, they have a year. again, ari, there are things in this deal that are okay. there are things in that deal that are not okay. we have an obligation to make this deal as good as it can get and congress decides whether or not to distort it. >> i think if we bring reality to this let's be realistic. as the congressman just said there is a three to four month breakout period. if we do nothing. if the iranians decide it's more in their best interest to find that bomb and we have three months and probably a hard set of options militarily. this does push it back to a year. it does that for a ten-year period of time. it gives iran a series of incentives to do so. and obviously you hope there is a change in leadership and tenure that governs after that.
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we have to decide what are our best options right now. >> congressman, let me ask you, how do we prevent 1994 from happening. i know that's something ari remembers, we made a deal with the north koreans, it was a deal that kept nuclear weapons away all it did is provide cover so they can develop nuclear weapons. >> this is why i have been skeptical about the deal and i want to see the final terms of this deal. >> fair enough. in terms of interpretations, i would push back and say the different companies are emphasizing different parts of the deal that appeal to their people. in different interpretations. i'm not sure. i think you might go too far there. >> you take the sanction iranians are saying sanctions will be fully lifted immediately t. united states are saying it's over time. that's not an emphasis. >> we'll know on june 30th. >> we're assuming joe, why don't we know now? >> because it's not the final deal now, ari. >> you are saying let's go to
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war, am i right? >> i'm not saying that. >> let's be clear, we're the ones and the international xuntd are the ones instituting the offensive. they pay be telling their people in iraq the sanctions come off automatically. if they got to decide the sanctions, they wouldn't be worried about either the sanctions or a run up to a nuclear weapon. >> come on, we're all grown-ups around the table. we've all played the game. some of you at much higher levels of the other. as a lawyer you get a framework of the deem. your client goes out and has the swagger. the other client goes out, we got the best of them. you have the press conferences, everybody is shooting past each other. that's baked into the deal. that's baked into the negotiations. you know the iranians aren't going back and going wow, john kerry really screwed u.p.s. how, oh my god. >> no if you have a sale of the house and one party says it's
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$250,000 and the other says 750. you have a big gap. >> oh know i'm not playing 750 for this trade. >> let's wait and see what happens on june 30th. i will predict to you you will have again the same fight over what's in the deal. the iranians will have a totally different interpretation let alone they follow what they agree to. >> so of all the people around the table, you and i would be a little worried the deal didn't go through. my biggest concern is transparency. that itself what i fear. if it's really trance parent ari, can't you support this deal? >>. let's say all the party agree there is one deal and we can talk about it. exactly right, let's see what's in it. how close iran is to getting a nuke cheer weapon. it still comes down to fundamentally trusting the yiern i iranians who are ready to see
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the inspectors. >> ronald reagan trusted them time and ayen gen in the 1980s. >> the iranians have already deceived the international -- >> you are saying that the soviets were trustworthy partners? >> in terms of the negotiating the treaties. they absolutely were. they honored the treaties. so did we. the international atomic administration have kept up the inspectors. >> so this is why we're trying to -- let me tell you this and the words of mejia angelou, try to verify. >> two press secretarys and i got a word if. >> you know when i was saying my biggest fear is transparency. >> that's a very big concern. we are seeing where we end up on june 30th. >> all right. thank you so much. >> come back after july the 1st. >> ari and robert stay with us.
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i am getting tired. still ahead, the step down they're great. for tom coburn speaking of great promised his colleagues they haven't heard the last of him. he will make good on that coming up. our round table, anne geren, chuck todd and the man of the moment senator rand paul who reveals how he would manage his e-mail from inside the oval office. . >> i think i'll get on hmm, maybe a private server and then when people start asking for my e-mail i take a sledgehammer and break it. . that's already been done. no i probably won't do that. . is there such a thing as a sure
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thing in business? some say buy gold. others say buy soybeans. i say, buy comcast business internet. unlike internet providers that slow down when traffic picks up, you get speed you can rely on. it's a safe bet.
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like a gold-plated soybean. reliably fast internet starts at $69.95 a month. comcast business. built for business. . i think a lot of americans will say, hmm, that doesn't sort of pass the smell test. i think when you combine that with the shenanigans going on at the clinton foundation and we see the trail of money going round about to foundations to bill clinton to shareholders of big companies that had toshto be approved by hillary clinton. there will be a lot of things that will salt lake the confidence in americans in her ability to lead in an honest fashion. >> that report of politicos mike
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allen's interview with senator rand paul. >> it's a heck of a budget. you look at the background it's kind of sort of like when you interview the president in the west wing. willie, they set that up pretty nice. >> gorgeous. >> it's nothing like your favorite here. the cook case set here. >> can we get the floor shot again? that floor shot. >> that is stark. >> i like it. >> the plug there is perfect. >> look at mike. my camera with politico gives the best interview of the day and we're sitting here of course, because we're very shallow. >> it's actually like a fleeceing. >>s this a fleeceing. >> it's like an undercover video. >> that's not what she says. >> authenticity. >> oh authenticity. >> he says you're the one it was a driving the car. >> so tell us about rand paul. what did you like about him? >> first of all, happy birthday to chuck todd. >> fantastic. >> oh, thanks, i think.
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>> oh. you stop counting after a while. >> yeah, i will stop counting when i get to 30. t so the thing about rand palm first you will see him make a broad case against hillary's character. you saw him again and again if those clips talking about her honesty, talking about both the foundation which he clearly is going to be continuing push by him until the foundation gives back. some of the foreign money. the second thing, we saw is a very deliberate effort both in his comments in this interview and in the staging of his events to be more main stream than his father. you all have been to ron paul rallies where it's a little fringy. they're rabid, but you have a lot of the defense signs. none of that yesterday. yesterday you had to have an online issue ticket from event
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price to get into the event. no outside signs, which is the kind of decoration you usually get at a national political convention, only there signs with their approved slogans. some are handwritten. so we want to look ahead. >> i'm sorry, who is running this campaign? >> so at the top of his campaign, are people have been around him for a long time and these are not, he does not have a washington crowd. he wants to make that clear. also, wants to show that he's ready for prime time with the six states in five days whereas ted cruz just did one day, they're making a big point about that. >> right. >> conducthuck todd, i asked about his campaign. it was impressive more impressive than most candidates on their first day out. >> well he's got some pretty impressive people helping him run the consultant. a veteran strategist out of
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virginia did a lot of work with the nrc. he's a guy that some believe saved pat roberts in 2014. so he's got some folks that he has expanded his circle. most of his campaign is being run by the long-time paul crowd run with both liss father and him. he has slowly expanded his circle with national consultants because everything yesterday and everything watching him even this morning, it struck me it goes to mike's point. he is trying to say, i am not my dad. i am not just a main stream candidate. by the way, i'm organizationally much more of a first tier candidate than maybe people realize. i think he's trying to flex an organizational muscle this week by showing, look what i can do. you are impressed by the staging in kentucky. they hope, joe, that same impression is left in iowa in south carolina in new hampshire and in nevada this week where he is able show hey, this is what big time presidential candidates
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do. in an odd way, it's very for a guy that wants to be the unconventional candidate this is a conventional rollout. i think that's the point. >> speaking of rollouts i want you to touch on what's going on with hillary clinton. i will ask you what paul said about hillary clinton. a set up by mike asking how he would handle his e-mail. a sarcastic remark taking a jab at hillary clinton. >> that in some ways seems exactly like what the clinton camp would want. >> well they the clinton's camp, have tried to put it behind them. >> or to put it in the context of see, these are the people attacking me. so it's a likely place for the argument. >> sure. hillary clinton would like nothing better than for an e-mail date to phase into like crazy -- just something they say all the time that nobody really totally listens to and totally processes. unfortunately, there is a little more there and it's going to be a continuing question. >> what do you mean by that?
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>> well i mean she's still, although she has answered why she set up the e-mail system the way she did, i think there are still going to be some lingering questions for voters about whether she was doing everything that she was supposed to do as a public servant and that is going to be a slightly harder question for her to answer politically going forward than you know did, were you hiding anything? right. i think she's shown to an extent that she has that part of it answered. >> hmm. >> so to mike and chuck, i think the paul candidacy is a very interesting one. how does he cap cure the libertarian portion of his dad's support. >> without his dad. >> also without his dad, also more importantly, it seems like every step towards that leads the conservative base behind. how do you bridge those two camps and is this a campaign and a candidate that's capable of doing that? >> chuck.
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>> well, look i think paul thinks the anti-washington message is the way that unites sort of the sort of tea party conservatives that were responded early to paul when he was a for and the libertarian wing of the party. look clearly, he's got to hind find you know as we saw with ron paul, there is a ceiling for being the libertarian candidate. that ceiling in any state is anywhere from 20 to 25%. he's got to figure out how to get to 30 25, 40. at least in the early states he has the figure out how to basically get at working class conservatives. he has to figure out how to marry that. this is the part where i think people underestimate paul. his foreign policy views that are some want to call it isolationist, some non-conventionists, with, i think there is a constituency that's not libertarian of sort of the old buchanan constituency that was an america first attitude. you sort of heard pieces of that message in his announcement
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speech yesterday. how can we borrow money from china to build schools in other countries. how about doing it here? i think that's how he has to do it. whether he does we'll see. >> mike allen, chuck todd thank you very much. you will come back with us later in the show. still ahead, we will talk to a film maker behind the documentary that took sundance by storm. a haunteding look inside the syrian civil war. .
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coming up on "morning joe," you got to have occurious mind to be responsible for this. >> why does everybody think i'm scared of girls?
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>> because you're a chicken. >> you're a chicken, coup coup kacha. >> what are you doing? >> afraid of women? >> i was just telling him. >> look i haven't found the right girl. when i, doily ask her out. has anyone in this family even seen a chicken? >> the producer brian grazeer is here to talk about the return of "arrested development" my favorite show of all time and his new book "occurious mind." we'll be right back. you can't predict the market. but at t. rowe price we've helped guide our clients through good times and bad. our experienced investment professionals are one reason over 85% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper averages. so in a variety of markets we can help you feel confident. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information
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"empire". it's like the crazy new hit. >> one record after another and i would love to talk about all of this, but i think we have something more interesting here. >> yeah. i'm curious. >> you know how your parents always say, well only boring
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people get boer edred? they're extraordinarily hair. >> and have crazy hair. >> don't talk about me that way. >> emmy winning producer brian grazer. sequel to "a beautiful mind". >> your life is amazing but nots what's up in lights. it's just where "your curious mind" has taken you through your life. >> doing it about 30 years, as you said. at the same time for 30 years in another vertical i have every two weeks met somebody that's expert in anything other than entertainment. so out of the pool of hollywood completely, but science, medicine politics religion every art form known to man. cia directors, police chiefs. endless amount of people. hundreds of nobel laureates.
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>> have you picked up what makes somebody succeed, what makes them excel? >> encapsulated in this book in a way, because the common thread is curiosity. any of these people whether they're scientist ss, or in medicine, serm in the work die all breakthroughs come through curiousty, by using your curiosity as a super power a as tool to enter the psyche of others. living -- >> and enter that psyche you require them sometimes to let down their shell. it was fastencinateing when you talked to michael jackson. you're going to have to take off the glove because i can't have a conversation with a guy that's wearing just one glove. >> michael jackson was the biggest pop icon of the world but knew he to be able to talk about the creation of music. i mean, i melt like he could be -- heats mozart you know
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but he wore those goofy gloves and when i saw him it wasn't premeditated in any way, i thought if he takes this gloves off he will become another person. he will become the person i -- >> did he? >> yes. he was able to granulate with great specificity how he creates beats, music and the entire composition how that blends with his dance. >> and princess diana, you talked about a deep humanity you could just pick up in her presence presence presence. >> i had a good fortune of meeting her, the release of" pail oheh "apolo 13" i thought, i'll ask her to share a bowl of ice cream, break etiquette. it opened her us and for me it felt like date with princess di.
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>> were you preparing when isaac walked off? >> so prolific difficult on all scientific fiction robotics and sat with him, supposed to be an hour. in a couple of minutes he said i think we're finished. here in new york. >> oh, definitely happen mike barnicle. >> the book which you've done a wonderful anecdote to what goz on today. i want to ask you, are you at all concerned, given your curiosity, the fact you have these conversations with a wide variety, broad menu of people are you worried for your children, for our children that google is going to kill your curiosity rather than conversations which is so integral to it. >> it's a very very good question. if it's thought out properly google just helps curiosity, because you do have to do real research any tombtime you're going to meet someone you're going to learn something from. google itself digital format
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all that augustments your curiosity, but you do have to get in front of people face to face, and when you do you build questions. you can't really build questions on google. you can build them through the biochemistry that actually evolves in one-on-one conversations. >> plus no substitute for eye contact. >> exactly. and body language. all that stuff is read. >> following on michael question seems so often we confuse fascinating with celebrity and a lot of young people, they think being a celebrity is and of itself fascinating. how do we build in that curiosity to look beyond that? >> wow. that's so right, actually. our pop culture and how it evolves right now celebrity is so central. how do you do it? you have to get kids to wonder what the celebrity is actually doing. same i did with michael jackson. i had to find what created him?
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there's always a basis for the celebrity, and there should be. not always. the minute i said that i thought about the kardashians. there's probably yet still some basis. >> i could talk to you for hours about this. thank you so much for coming in thaunkd for thank you for "arrested development" and all those others shows. the book is "the curious find." brian grazer come back. >> i will. coming up at the top of the hour,ious rage after video appears to show a police officer shooting and killing an an ared man in the back after a traffic stop in south carolina. we're going to play you the new key piece of evidence. how this emerged, why officials wasted no time responding. much more "morning joe" when we come back. >> he needs to know that that
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it started with a routine traffic stop. >> police say the victim fled down the street and into this field where officer slager fired eight times. >> that wasn't an animal that he killed. he was my son. >> i can tell you that as the result of that video he will be charged with murder. >> tonight officer slager is behind bars and he has been
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denied bail. >> i am putting myself forward as a candidate for president of the united states. [ cheers and applause ] >> senator rand paul launched his presidential campaign. >> too often when republicans have won, we've squandered our victory. that's not who i am. >> paul's world view could be a scumbling block with the large, hawkish wing of the republican party. >> ewill do whatever it takes to defend america from these haters of mankind. >> a lot of focus on his forren policy but i hi they're afraid of him for a lot of other reason reasons. >> we've got to return to our populist roots. >> i like cruz and rubio and paul. >> can only vote once. >> wait a minute. you can't do that. he likes all of them. >> today begins the journey to take america back. >> wow. >> how great that? >> quite a launch. very -- >> i got a rand button for you. very exciting. >> lots of fanfare.
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i don't mind rand paul. >> i know you don't mind rand paul. you know what else you don't mind? connecticut bask. geno did it again. he did it again. >> i covered him as a local reporter like 20 years ago. i don't know. i don't even want to count but she a fantastic coach. i'm so happy for him. so happy for the team. >> we talked yesterday about coach k historically winning five titles. do you know he has ten titles tying him with john wooden and 10-0 in national title games. never lost. gets to the game and he wins the game. >> unbelievable. >> and mike in connecticut mika's always said that women's basketball much bigger than men's basketball. >> well -- >> in stores. >> in stores. absolutely. me and the local news in connecticut made a cottage industry out of covering the uconn husky women which were just, back -- i'm going to say it. back in the day of rebecca lobo how badly does that date me?
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>> no. that's fine. >> i'm a mother of six now. >> i think i was in my 40s when she was in her heyday. so from happy news to very sad and tragic news you just wonder. >> more than that. >> what goes through -- what goes through -- well a guy's mind. >> i want to know more about the hero who shot this video. i think think we're going to be hearing from. >> yeah. >> let's begin right there, what you're looking at on the front page of the "new york times," as it should be. a north charleston south carolina police officer is charged with murder this morning after opening fire on a man as he ran away. and as we've seen in a series of recent incidents, it's raising issues of race and the use of deadly force by law enforcement. this shooting occurred saturday captured on video by a bystander and provided to the "new york times." it shows the officer firing his weapon eight times and we should warn viewers this contains graphic images. [ gunfire ]
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>> there's more. the officer is 33-year-old mike's t. slager a five-year veteran of the department. the man killed is identified at walter scott, a 50-year-old african-american. the officer says he first fired his taser, according to police reports, after scott ran from a car during a traffic stop. as the two men struggle the stun gun wire appears to be extending from scott's body that's the victim according to the "new york times." the "times" reports an object not clear whether it's the stun gun that is tossed or knocked to the ground behind the men as they scuffle. then as the video shows scott turns to run and is about 20 feet away when the officer draws his gun and fires. according to a police report the officer ven radios into dispatch saying "shots fired, and the subject is down. he took my taser."
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then watch. as the video continues, the officer then places mr. scott in handcuffs. he then returns to where the two initially struggled, picks something off the ground. the officer then returns and drops that object near scott's body. the "new york times" highlights that portion of the video. is that the tase jer i don't know. what is that? the police report says officers performed cpr but in the video no attempts to resuscitate mr. scott who remains handcuffed face-down several minutes. the u.s. justice department is involved saying the fbi will investigate along with the state law enforcement and the attorney general. the 11th time someone in south carolina has been shot by a police officer. on monday an attorney for slager said he opened fire because he
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felt threatened and followed all procedures but that attorney says he no longer represents him. you should is seen and we'll show the police chief and others talking about him being charged with murder. let's just say -- >> it's sickening. >> it's a relief they don't mince words. >> sickening. it's sickening. there are no words. >> there are none. >> you're watching a man get murdered. >> there are no words. >> you're watching a man get murdered on television. >> and in 2015. >> disgusting. >> where we are. joining us from north charleston south carolina nbc news correspondent gabe gutierrez. what can you tell us about how officials are reacting to the case? >> reporter: mika good morning. well officials here are calling this extremely tragic. as you mentioned, this was a very emotional news conference yesterday where they announced this murder charge against officer michael slager. this incident happened, as you mentioned, on saturday. it wasn't until this video surfaced the city officials
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announced this murder charge, and as you can see here, the mayor was stunned. >> when you're wrong, you're wrong. and if you make a bad decision don't care if you're behind the shield, or just a citizen on the street you have to live by that decision. and so we as a city want the family to know that our hearts and our thoughts are with them. our prayers are with them. anything that we can do for them we are here to do. >> reporter: now the city of north charleston has about 100,000 residents. about half of them are african-american, and black officers make up only about 20% of the police force. now, as for this officer who is charged, he could face anywhere from 30 years behind bars up to
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life in prison and even the death penalty. so far he has not commented. as you mentioned, an attorney he previously had it no longer representing him. it is unclear whether he currently has a lawyer. guys back to you. >> nbc's gabe gutierrez. the only thing i'll say at this point at least the mayor and it appears the police department isn't hedging here. >> i just don't know what to say. this is willie i mean we saw eric gardner and we called it at least what i thought it was, murder the, dat after and we're seeing this time and time again. i mean i'm speechless. this is just defbvastating. >> the video is horrifying on a lot of levels watching a man get murdered on television is horrifying. also the officer screaming at the guy to put his hands behind his back. he can't, because he's dead. and if you continue to watch the video, they say they performed
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cpr, did what they could to save his life. you don't see those attempts. you don't see a rush to help this man as he lies facedown. you don't. it appears there will be an investigation. appears you're also watching a police officer meddleing with the crime scene to frame the dead man. it's a tragedy and obscenity as we watch here. the police department act the swiftly. the officer fired, charged with murder. the fbi is investigating. >> and let's so a picture of the murdered man again. for so many reasons. what is he? 50 years old? >> he's got four children. >> got four children. who slowly going away from the guy -- not only did he not pose any threat mike it's obvious from the video, he could have easily apprehended him. the guy that shot him eight times in the back was 20 years younger. >> it's also -- the entire
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scene, everything that we've seen so far on this tape is nearly incredulous, because obviously what we haven't seen, there was a chase prior to where the scene begins what seve seen. he chased him from where the stop occurred for a broken taillight. >> a traffic stop. >> it's 9:30 in the morning. it's not midnight. >> a broken taillight. what does that sound like? >> like a revenue stop. >> yeah. >> what we heard in ferguson and what's happening all over the country. >> pull over. $50 for the taillight for the coffers, that occurred. some distance we don't know how long before that initial stop and that tape begins and clearly no threat posed to the officer's life. >> none. and information on the victim. mr. scott has been arrested about ten times mostly for failing to pay child support. one of the notions why he might have been running away didn't want to get picked up again noor. that's just at this point a hypothesis. he doesn't show up for court
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hearings on that. arrested in 1987 on assault and battery charges and convicted in '91 of possession of a bludgeon the newspaper's reporting. mr. scott's brother anthony said he believed mr. scott had fled from police on saturday because he owed child support. >> you shouldn't have to be a boy scout to avoid bug murdered. >> not an argument just trying to -- >> there's a lot we don't know. when the initial stop occurred, the revenue stop for the broken taillight. does he punch in the plate number? does he know who the person is? no problem with identification. >> regardless of that, there's no need to. >> none. >> to fire a shot. >> a taser? >> no need to taser. the guy's -- again, look at him. loping away. just a slow -- >> you don't feel like running after him, that's your problem, but you don't shoot him dead. >> he was just kind of slowly -- slowly going away.
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>> the officer's background is not clean either. faced two complaints in the past including one in 2013 in that case, a man claimed the officer shot him with a taser without justification. cleared of using excessive force but the suspect not arrested. >> mike, if you go in, if you -- you've been hearing for years that, about excessive force by members of the police force. i mean this is just -- the result of having video cameras out there. and, gep,again, i would say one more argument for cameras on cops everywhere. because this guy looked like he thought he was in a closed off area where nobody would see him. >> and get away with moving this evidence around. >> get away with moving the evidence around. he would never do that. >> see? this guy's filming over the fence. he would never do this. he had a camera on him and knew if somebody was shot and killed when he -- and he turned his
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camera off he would be presumed guilty. >> what about the courage of the fellow, whoever it is with the cam -- >> stunning. look at him walk. >> walking up to the scene, a man is more likely than not dead there on the ground. the police officer who just shot him. you've got to wonder how many bullets left in his gun? >> yeah. >> and still shooting. >> he doesn't back off, either. walks up gets closer as other officers arrive. keeps the camera rolling and moves in. >> we should make an effort actually, to find out what about officer slager? is he held on bail? is he incarcerated today? is there a bail hearing for him? is he going to be released on bail? >> being charged with murder. >> i don't think so. >> to your point about cameras, if neb, north charleston was given $300,000 for body cameras. they're probably not in -- probably in the process of implementation at this point. >> i wonder how this officer thought he would get away with it even without a camera?
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because presumably an autopsy would show this man was shot eight times in the back. >> well maybe the planted taser or whatever -- >> outreaches. >> answer your question denied bail at a hearing last night. you know how he thought he'd get away with it? the people who choked and killed eric gardener on staten island. thet get away with it they just do. and that's got to change. >> push politics in the next block. a worthy conversation which we'll revisit as well. >> a stunning stunning video. >> we're all in kind of shock after what we've seen. still ahead, rand paul officially jumps into the ring for 2016. the big name who was missing from this presidential announcement and why senator paul says republicans share the blame for washington's problems. did you hear that? we'll be right back.
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ted cruz has company in the field of 2016 republican presidential candidates. kentucky senator rand paul made it official on tuesday launching his campaign in front of a ballroom full of supporters in louisville. he began by laying out what he believes is wrong with washington today. arguing that both parties are to blame. >> i have a message -- a message that is loud and clear and does not mince words. we've come to take our country back. [ cheers and applause ] the washington machine that
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gobbles up our freedoms and invades every nook and cranny of our lives must be stopped. [ cheers ] as i watch our once great economy collapse under mounting spending and debt i think, what kind of america will our grandchildren see? it seems to me that both parties and the entire political system are to blame. >> yeah! [ applause ] >>if we nominate a candidate who is simply democrat-light, what's the point? why bother? >> i envision an america with a national defense unparalleled undefeatable and unencumbered by overseas nation building. [ cheers and applause ] i see an america strong enough to deter foreign aggression, yet wise enough to avoid unnecessary intervention. i see an america where criminal justice is applied equally, and
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any law that disproportionally incarcerates people of color is repealed. >> okay. independent independent. i'm sorry. i called him republican independent. my bad. >> ooh. >> rand paul. some would say conservative independent. what do you think of rand paul? >> a libertarian. watching in the window. >> how is rand paul going to do in a republican primary? better than his father? >> certainly better than his father. we know that these policetas are active passionate, doing leg work, going to new hampshire, iowa and nevada this week and trying to broaden his appeal beyond libertarianism where his father didn't. >> his biggest problem, the right of the conservative base doesn't like him and that's the question on foreign policy. is that a killer in the republican party? >> i don't know if it's a deal killer. he still is pivoting on that issue. i hate to say it but the rise
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of the islamic state has actually given him a reason to become more interventionist. >> right. okay. >> this ding lindsey graham gave him on the sunday morning shows, already poking at him. rand paul traveled to new hampshire today and we find the "new york times" correspondent jeremy peters. former chairmanning's the democratic national committee, howard dean. good to have you both. >> howard, done it before did it pretty darn successfully. you know what it feels like. what do you think? how do you think rand paul's criticism of both parties, of the two-party system is going to play? >> i think it plays very well except in the iowa caucuses and the new hampshire primary, less so. new hampshire actually has a strong libertarian streak. iowa does not on the republican side. i think it's going to be a fascinating candidacy. the problem is when are we we going to see the real rand paul?
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he is all over the map on issues. not interventionist, then wants to do something about isis. he's got these multiple positions on really important issues, and he's going to get pushed very hard if he starts to take off. right now he's in single digits. we'll see what happens. >> all right. >> did you see what the, sort of the strange stage craft with rand paul? >> the stage craft in the first two presidential announcements we've seen have been way too grandiose, but, okay and then the father on the sidelines. >> you want -- mts i want want you want. just a rediscussion. >> a barbecue? something like that. >> no. just talk to me. and tell me why, where do you go from here? down. one former presidential candidate in the audience at rand paul's announcement yesterday, his dad. you're talking about this leaving many to wonder what if any role the former congressman and libertarian icon will play in his son's campaign but ron
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paul didn't speak at the event and expected to maintain a "silent role in his son's quest for the white house moving forward. here is senator paul speaking to politico about his father after yesterday's announcement. >> you know, my dad is a great guy. i have a great deal of respect for my dad. my dad is probably one of the most honest genuine characters in american political history. we don't agree on everything, but not everybody agrees with their dad on everything. i think that anyone's dad gives them a sense of reference and there are a lot of people who actually became involved in politics because of him. and i think what my job is is to take what he started and make it bigger. >> you know he didn't mention his father by name. is that curious? because -- find that curious? >> no. i call my father -- >> he didn't say my dad, rand paul. a lot of republicans, i was one, voted for him in a presidential primary. >> it's his dad. >> you call him dad.
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you would do the same thing. >> you would call him dad. >> ron paul though. >> i do like ron. that's what i said. i just wonder if one of his advisers said don't mention your father by name. don't look at him, pretend he's not there. >> calling him dad is humanizing, right? >> he talked about his parents. he did not reference a guy that launched his career that has put him where he is. i'm not knocking him. i'm just saying there is some weasely advisor, i guarantee you, listen your father is real and your father on 9/11 -- you don't want to -- just pretend he's not there. talk about your "parents." i mean no. i'm serious. like, ron paul is like like a huge force on libertarian politics. >> let's get to what we're saying here. 2008 in st. paul minnesota, for the republican convention i went to the parallel ron paul convention. huge crowds. incredibly passionate, big
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supporter, but there be fringy people there, and i think -- >> weird people. >> i think that's what you're getting at. an advisor saying your dad on some of the issues not all, some of the issues nbc a place we don't we don't want to go. >> are you calling ron paul fringe? >> no. some of the people there it some beliefs. stale ahead reporting from the front lines in syria and then this. the story of a sports star turned rebel leader and the realities of a country torn apart by war. [ speaking in foreign language ] [ chanting ] >> we'll talk to the director of
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the award-winning documentary just ahead on "morning joe." plus former senator tom coburn joins the table. >> great. have his beard or not? >> i do not know but he will not mince words. we know that. we'll be right back. i'm the protector of my patio. killing weeds where they grow. a barrier forms so weeds can't appear - serious weed prevention up to a year. [chorus singing:] ♪ roundup max control 365 ♪
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we all enter this world with a shout and we see no reason to stop. so cvs health is creating industry-leading programs and tools that help people stay on medicines as their doctors prescribed. it could help save tens of thousands of lives every year. and that w ould be something worth shouting about. cvs health, because health is everything. 29 past the hour. we continue to follow breaking news out of afghanistan this morning where one american
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soldier is dead two others wounded after an afghan soldier opened fire on a nato security team. let's bring in nbc news chief pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski with details. what happened? >> reporter: mika this deadly incident occurred early today in eastern afghanistan, jalalabad, following a meeting, we're told between a high u.s. government official there in afghanistan and afghan officials. when suddenly without warning an afghan soldier supposedly one of the friendly forces opened fire on the american security forces. one american soldier has been shot dead. at least two injured. not clear to the extent of their injuries, but there was no indication that the u.s. official, unidentified for now but apparently no the u.s. ambassador, was apparently not targeted in this attack. the condition of the two americans, perhaps more who were wounded is unknown at this time. no motive except one can only
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wonder if they were sympathetic to the taliban or others who want to see the americans out, but this is really is grim reminder. you know as the u.s. is drawing down pulling forces out of afghanistan, american forces not involved in any direct combat. however, they're still in harm's way every day that they're there on the ground. >> mik, still in harm's way, but isn't this the first casualty first death if afghanistan in quite some time? >> reporter: for american forces. back in january, another similar friendly fire incident, except those shooters took out three american contractors who were working with and on behalf of the u.s. military. so and quite frankly, the americans consider themselves pretty lucky so far, given the kind of atmosphere that has prevailed in afghanistan so far, that they expected initially more of these kinds of friendly fire attacks, but apparently for
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whatever reason those numbers have been kept pretty low. unfortunately, until today. >> all right. jim miklaszewski, thank you very much. >> thank you, mik. >> keep us posted on this breaking news. joining us now given the news timing i guess. former senator tom coburn recently joined post program. >> always a grim reminder when we get news out of afghanistan or iraq and have a lot of foreign policy people in d.c. talking about need tone gauge in syria, in rock a need to engage more across the world, but americans are exhausted, and every time something like this happens, don't you hear that from constituents and former constituents? >> yeah. i think they do. i think out in the heartland most people would like to see it all go away. it's not going to go away. this is a real problem, in the future. not just now. and this is one of the side effects of radical islam.
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you know here you're on a team trying to protect somebody and all of a sudden one of the team decides you're the enemy. >> yeah. >> it's -- you know, it is a difficult nest. >> very good to have you back on the show after -- >> good to be here. >> -- how's it feel after leaving for a while? >> no withdrawal whatsoever. >> no withdrawal? >> my wife is having trouble having me used to being home but i'm not having trouble. it's enjoyable to actually have some freedom of your own time set your oh priorities. and so it's been great. >> a lot of people do you feel more freedom to speak? i don't apply that to you, because you never minced words. tell us about the convention states project? >> one of the reasons i left the senate is i didn't think you can fix what's wrong with our country in the senate. that's a pretty negative statement but i actually believe that, and our founder were really wise. they put an article into the
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constitution, article 5 that said, when everything's going the way most republics go we're going to give awe tool with which you can bring us back from the edge and if you poll the american people most people are disgusted with washington. like some of the bepnefits that come out of washington but most don't like the rhetoric or tone or what going on and i personally don't like the loss of freedom i've noticed over the last 30, 40 years. >> are there any candidates on the horizon you think could impact the problem you're talking about right now? >> i guess i'm not sure i'm good enough to judge that and i shouldn't prejudge them. i think we lack real leadership in our country to talk about the real problems. i mean every new show talks about the presidential race. but you know what? we added 5.6 trillion dollars in unfunded liabilities last year to our kids' backs. $5.6 trillion. that's what we increased their debt last year. and what they're going to --
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own. >> how much are you talking about polarization in senate not able to get anything done. better to work outside the senate to get something done rather than inside the senate. how much is rooted in the enormous amounts of money that have to be raised to run for the united states senate and what can you done than? >> you know i'm not sure it's money related. i think it's career related. i mean when you talk to senators privately and say, you know, this is the fact. here's what we need -- they'll say, yeah i though, but i can't do that because i can't get re-elect fundamental i do that. it really is not a matter of money, mike. it's a matter of whether or not anybody has any calcium in their spine, and most of them don't. most of -- they're not going to fix what's wrong with our country. they're not going to address -- mine the perfect chance for president obama starting the second tomorrow say we're going to fix medicare and social security. take republicans and democrats and not going to listen to all of this pointing fingers.
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let's actually solve the real problem. we have 160 trillion dollars worth of unfunded liabilities right now. that's a half a million dollars per man, woman and child in this country. >> anything any presidential candidate can say now about the problem you've just identified that will resonate with voters? i mean should candidates be saying, i'm the one who can work across the aisle, i'm the one who can do what you suggested? >> feel like we've hurdled that before and it hasn't worked. >> yeah and the candidates actually do the opposite right now in large measure. certainly hillary clinton is saying she's running again the republican congress, and a lot of the republicans themselves seem to be criticizing partisanship and sort of ossification in washington. i wonder is that something voters will expect of them to come out and start saying what they would do to solve that problem? >> gosh, you know i have a lot of confidence in the american people. if you had a candidate that stood up and said look here's what's getting ready to happen
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to us. here's our unfunded liabilities, here's our debt. we need to be addressing these issues if we want our children to have a great future. you know the federal reserve isn't going to be in control of interest rates. the bond buyers are in control of interest rates. that's not far off. when the bid to cover ratio on a ten-year bond starts shrinking, all of a sudden interest rates are going to be out of the control of the federal reserve and the consequences of our proflicate spending causing raise in interest costs. >> is in tl a republican that says maybe he or she can carry that message? >> i haven't thought tab because i hate presidential politics until three, four months before it starts. >> it's one thing to say what the country need. we have to pick someone who can do this fix this. >> i haven't heard anybody voice that. >> nobody stands out to you? oh, god. that's not gmplgts we talk about it time and time again.
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you've heard unfortunately, you've heard in speeches we've said it a zillion times. medicare and medicaid is the story. cut funding for pbs. cut this -- it just doesn't matter anymore. when tom and i were there you could cut transportation cut this that mika it mattered there. it doesn't matter when every dime that comes into washington, d.c. in five years is going to medicare and medicaid and interest on the debt. >> yeah. >> that's right. >> everything else, guess what? everything else is a footnote and yet no presidential -- no person runs will talk about really going and reforming and saving medicare and medicaid. how do you nation? the way you fix that convention of the states that says we're going to balance our budget. >> there we go. >> one. the states get to decide this. not the federal government. >> right. >> we're going to balance our budget. we're going to limit the power and reach and scope of the federal government and restore the sovereign they was intended for states. you know i'd remind you that
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the states created the federal government. the federal government did not create the states. and our founders, if you read through their documents and their states and read through the constitution their definition and intentions were far away from what they intended for this republic to survive. so we can cheat history. i believe we have a great future, but we need leadership to do that and i've not seen that yet. >> ending on a hopeful note and good news on you're feel going? >> doing well thank you very much. >> all right. tom coburn great to you have back on the show. please, come back soon. >> god bless you. >> god bless you, too. good to see you again. a soccer star's battle for life or death. a new documentary following his struggle to survive during the height of the civil war in syria. we'll be right back.
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♪ [ gunfire ] that was portion of the new film "return to homs." joining us the director winner of the first-ever george polk documentary film award. this looks incredible on many levels. first of all, tell us and welcome to the show tell us how this concept came up. >> good morning. >> how you started on this project? >> we started in the early 2011 with editing everything should
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almost work work of three year the work of the team. three year we worked day and night, until we you see this final result of 90 minutes. >> you were inspired by this 19-year-old goalkeeper abdul abdelbasit sarout. >> the revolution start, so it was the aim to find a hero. somebody who can give how to say it make stories happen. >> tell the story. >> make dramatic thing happen during the what even of what happened in syria. >> the film is extraordinary, "variety" a culls it a remarkable achievement, immense conflict zone filmmaking fearlessly taking us to the front lines of the syrian civil war. remarkably dangerous project.
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i have a feeling, though for you it had a lot more to do than just putting together a documentary. it really was more a video of your country falling apart. right? >> yes. >> talk about it. talk about how -- how dangerous this was for you? >> it's dangerous from the moment you just start to think that you are going to film. you should hide your camera. you should go people will know your face. you should meet those peoples, those people who put themselves in danger and you should -- you know, until you become there and until you have the decision to know in which street in which building you are film it's all the time dangerous to take the material outside to your family or your parents. we are all become targets. >> how did you know who was on what side while you were filming? >> you need to ask. you need to ask. it's a matter of patience. you should wait. you should be sure. we learned from experience of
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those people who get killed the four of us. we know there are sniper there snd you should hurry right now. there is a second between life and death. so it's a matter of -- concentration and asking and trust people. in the end, you should trust people. >> what do you hope people will take away from this incredible work you've done? >> it's how you start, it's the civil war, start of a revolution. it has target. it have principles. without this principle think it wasn't a dramatic think as we return to homs it's a start for war pap start for democracy and freedom and dignity. or all the sacrifice. >> "variety" amnesty calls it timely, unflinching and human. "return to homs" debuts on pbs american documentary pov. thank you so much. congratulations on this incredible work, if i can say that. >> thank you, thank you. >> it's deeply important. much more "morning joe" in
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joining us now at 50 past the hour the editor and chief of "essence" vanessa deluca here to reveal finding of the study "black women ant work." first, what were you aiming to accomplish in this study? what were you looking for? >> we really wanted to find out
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why more black women weren't getting ahead at the level of executive and management positions and what we found out is that in many cases we're playing it safe. and we're playing it safe because we're afraid that if we're too ambitious if we reveal too much desire to have that power, that it may be seen as being stereotypically you know aggressive. >> yep. >> or overly assertive. >> almost as if african-american women face the challenges that women face but even more. does that make sense? >> absolutely. there is systemic challenge, absolutely. many things that we face that you know are, you know, based on beliefs -- >> stereo types. >> and stereotypes but even with that, our study shows that black women have no problem with power. that they embrace the idea of power. more so than the general population. >> but the question is getting them there. and amy, let's go through some
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of the questions that were asked and concepts put forward and results as well. >> something that really struck me is the am fwhags black women have in the workplace, again defining a lot of stereotypes that non-blacks have about us i would say, that they feel that they are developing skills that will help them get to the next level, 44% for black women. 23% for non-hispanic white women. how do you explain this sort of racial divide here or discrepancy? >> well, if you look at how many black women are heads of household, how they're relying on a job not necessarily just to further their career also to take care of their families. so the idea of having a position where you are making a good salary and that you are a great example to your family is very important to african-american women, and so that kind of is the driving force. that propels us you know to seek higher greater executive management positions.
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but the challenge not wanting to be perceived at not having the, being an angry black woman, or feeding into stereotypes that would, you know hold us back. so therefore, we play it safe when we should be actually being our authentic selves in the workplace. >> mika, that's why i -- >> i was waiting for you to contribute. >> oh, gee. >> so much what we're talk about in philadelphia on friday and "know your value," but it really is exactly the concept of trying to find your authentic self and your ability to communicate effectively despite the stereotypes people might thinkened you do have to get that out of your head able to feel that freedom. >> a screaming headline here is this number we've already talked about, which is a sense of optimism among black women in the workplace that white women in the workplace don't seem to have. 44% to 23% feeling that they're developing skills needed to get
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ahead. that's a pretty surprising number. >> i mean, if you think about it, this is -- being an accomplished woman is not something that's -- you know an odd and uncharacteristic thing to think of for black women. it's just that stereotypically people don't believe that. when you see that -- >> the ratio, black women according to your study seem more optimistic than non-hispanic white women? >> yes, that's despite a slew of obstacles standing in hoare way. >> surprising that only says, think about the resilience that black women have. all of the things they're facing in terms of stereotypes and in terms of pay scale. you know even with all of that, we still see a reason to have hope and to succeed. >> and the wanting to move forward. >> talk about the pressure point you just mentioned, and this question here want to stay in their country position. only 20% want to stay in their
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current position as opposed to 44% of non-hispanic women and there are reasons that they're not -- >> is that a negative or positive number? as in i want a job promotion and get ahead? >> that's absolutely positive. whatever is in the way, obstacles in the way, the fact black women still say i'm going to push forward, i'm going to move ahead. i see myself in a position of power. i see nice a position of growth. that just says that all we need is the lane the pathway to get there. what we sneed the support of the corporations. we need the support of the people who can get help elevate us to those positions and we need the flexibility and the permission to be our authentic selves in the workplace and not get the kinds of questions you might get about hair or this and that. you know? >> vanessa, thank you. you are, i'm telling you, this is great. i really appreciate the work you've done here. i'd like to invite you to
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philadelphia on friday if not too short notice. we'd love to have you ot our "know your value" event. it's everything we're talking about here. up next, it's what we learned today. we come by almost every day to deliver your mail so if you have any packages you want toeturn you should just give them to us since we're going to be here anyway it's kind of a no brainer [chorus singings:] ♪ roundup ♪ i'm the protector of my patio. killing weeds where they grow. a barrier forms so weeds can't appear
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we come by almost every day to deliver your mail so if you have any packages you want to return you should just give them to us since we're going to be here anyway it's kind of a no brainer welcome back to "morning joe." time to talk about what we learned today. mika? >> i think we're still finding out what's happening in afghanistan with this breaking news. stay with msnbc for the latest on that from the pentagon. >> amy? >> i learned two things. i learned that black women are
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more likely than non-hispanic white women to become a manager. you really don't like campaign consultant, i also learned. >> not a lot. breaking news out of the middle east. >> one american dead. >> and iran has ships steaming towards yemen. after saudi attacks. one bit of advice for iran i wouldn't screw around with saudi arabia right now. not a good time. you're over your skis you might want to back up. >> if it's way too early. >> it's "morning joe." >> what's next mika? >> "the rundown." have a good day. good morning, i'm jose diaz-balart. first on "the rundown" this morning, developing news out of north charleston a police officer charged with murder after a deadly shooting of apparently an unarmed black man. a demonstrati

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