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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  November 25, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PST

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so who got the better part of this nuclear deal? of course, on twitter, we have polarized opinions. donald newman, both sides benefit besides bb's rant. key scope is the final edeal. kev kevin pettitte, u.s. rolled like a fat kid down the hill. "morning joe" starts right now. what was concluded in geneva last night is not a historic agreement. it's a historic mistake. it's not made the world a safer place. like the agreement with north korea in 2005, this agreement
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has made the world a much more dangerous place. >> all right. good morning. it's monday, november 25th. a little cold out, everybody. welcome to "morning joe." with us onset we have msnbc contributor mike barnicle. we have the president of the council on foreign relations and author of "foreign policy begins at home: the case for putting america's house in order" richard haass. he also has the lead piece today on iran. and you agree with dad. >> that's one way to put it. >> oh, no. that was yesterday? >> no. recently. >> okay. and in washington -- >> dad mixes it up every day. >> in washington, nbc chief foreign affairs correspondent and host of "andrea mitchell reports," andrea mitchell. perfect day to have you on, andrea. thank you very much. >> a lot to talk about today. let's go through the checklist.
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>> iran. >> the patriots, man. what was that, mike barnicle. >> instant classic. >> they're down 24-0 at halftime. >> 24-0 at half. they come out, take the ball, score three straight times. they go into overtime. patriots win the coin toss in overtime and do not take the ball. >> willie, have you ever heard that happening in nfl game? >> no. the rules are a little different now. if the first team scores a field goal it's not sudden death. still you're risking them scoring a touchdown and beating you. it's incredible. >> it really is incredible. of course, peyton manning one of the best quarterbacks in football if not the best this year. but, mike, you're down 24-0. this could be the matchup for the afc championship game. boy, i just have never seen a comeback like this in a game that's as high stakes between two great teams. >> the clip we just showed, the punt in overtime deflects off of a denver player.
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patriots recover. the denver player the ball deflected off of was wes welker. >> unbelievable. of course, willie, there are three teams people are talking about. the patriots, of course. they're talking about alabama. >> huge game. >> and they're talking about vanderbilt. we beat chattanooga. i still don't know how we did that. on any given saturday, i guess. vanderbilt, man. >> they beat tennessee in an incredible game saturday night. if they win saturday they'll be 8-4 for the second consecutive year. james franklin, our coach, is an incredible miracle worker. this career, think about this. vanderbilt beat tennessee, georgia and florida in the same season. >> unbelievable. >> richard haass, because you run a one world conspiracy and a response for everything including the weather we're going to blame you for snow flurries on saturday. what's that about? and we're going to have snow on thursday. how do you defend yourself? you got snow making machines in the tristate area? >> they work overtime at the
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council on foreign relations. >> can you guys believe that? snow. >> yeah. >> i get blamed for so much else. >> a white thanksgiving. of course, it may be bing crosby's best song that we've never heard of. white thanksgiving. >> is it time to get rid of it. i by mistake looked at you. >> one week from today. put the "x" on the calendar. >> i'm getting comments wherever i go. >> you're getting comments. i'm getting hate mail. >> my pen exploded. >> what did you do? >> i don't know. i was just trying to get the scripts ready. >> thank you. make it harder for people that work around here. thank you. >> i want to get to this story about walmart and sears. >> i do, too. let's lead with that. >> and the children's place. and immigration as well. we'll start, though, with iran. the fallout to president obama's historic nuclear agreement with iran from over the weekend has been practically instantaneous. bloomberg's al hunt calls the plan imperfect, but perhaps the united states' least bad option.
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"the wall street journal" was clear. calling it a triumph for iran. late saturday president obama announced an interim deal with tehran. the product of months of secret meetings. the plan requires that iran phase out its high grade uranium. the country cannot increase lower grade uranium stockpile or add more centrifuges. and it must submit to daily inspections. in return, iran would get modest relief from crippling u.s. sanctions. >> these are substantial limitations which will help prevent iran from building a nuclear weapon. simply put, they cut off iran's most likely paths to a bomb. the broader architecture of sanctions will remain in place and we will continue to enforce them vigorously. and if iran does not fully meet its commitments during this six month phase, we will turn off the relief and ratchet up the pressure. >> but already there is disagreement over the most basic
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of terms. >> this first step does not say that iran has a right to enrichment. no matter what interpretive comments are made, it is not in this document. there is no right to enrich within the four corners of the mpt. and this document does not do that. >> no, it doesn't say in so many words. but it says very clearly that iran will have an enrichment program and it has a right to nuclear technology for peaceful purposes. >> all right. there is deep skepticism from american alies in the region. particularly saudi arabia and israel. and all along congress has been considering deeper sanctions. but has held off to avoid scuttling this deal. many republicans are openly criticizing the afwreemt. even members of the president's own party aren't convinced it can stave off a nuclear armed iran. >> you know, the u.n. security council, at a base level, stated
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that iran would not have the right to enrich. yet it appears that we've already given a tilt -- it looks like we've tacitly agreed that they will be enriching for commercial purposes down the road. you see the reaction in iran right now, they're spiking the football in the end zone. >> i think that this is a marginal improvement. it does freeze some of their activity in place. >> we are very concerned as to whether iran will live up to even these commitments. and this is a first step. >> the concern is that this interim deal becomes the final deal and it leaves iran just short, a few months short, of its breakout ability to dash and create a nuclear weapon. >> that would not be acceptable to the congress, nor the american people. >> we're sending a signal to iran that they can continue to go ahead and by talking and acting like they have goodwill,
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can get away with at least nuclear weapon production capability. >> a lot of different interests at play when you hear different politicians talking about this. richard, you write in the financial times this. "the iran deal does limited things for a limited time. what the interim agreement does not do is dismantle important aspects of iran's nuclear capacity or potential. this is an agreement that does limited things for an interim time, no less. those that are opposing the accord for what it does not do are asking too much. the measure of any diplomatic agreement cannot be the possible versus the ideal, but rather the possible versus the realistic alternatives. in this case either living with an iranian nuclear weapons capability that would lead others in the already unstable middle east to follow suit, or launching a preventative military strike without knowing in advance what it would accomplish or set in motion. this interim pact is far preferable to either alternatives."
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>> richard, why -- why is there already confusion over the enrichment of uranium? i mean, that seems to be at the center of a lot of concern that the president dismissed what the united nations had suggested all along. that there was no deal on sanctions until they gave up enriching uranium. >> well, it's an internal agreement. they're allowed to continue to enrich uranium at lowest levels, but not to expand over the six months the size of that stockpile. >> what was john kerry saying? >> what john kerry was getting into is whether the agreement explicitly gives the iranians a quote, unquote, right to enrich uranium. john kerry is saying -- >> he's suggesting it does not? >> there's no words in it that says you have the explicit right to enrich uranium. >> okay. but you just said and everybody all weekend has been saying they've got a right to enrich uranium. >> they've certainly got the continued ability to enrich uranium in this agreement. >> then what was john kerry saying? >> he was basically saying -- >> was john kerry wrong from your reading of the agreement? >> what he was doing was parsing
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words in a way that i think is trying to slightly oversell. what is still a significant accomplishment. there's no reason to oversell i.t. what there is if you read the last page of this agreement, talk about in the agreement to come after the so-called comprehensive follow on accord, that iran has a conditional right to enrich uranium so long as they reach certain criteria. >> why is this an accomplishment? why did we let them off? for the first time since 1979 the united states actually had leverage over this state that's been the epicenter of international terrorism. >> two reasons. >> why is this a good deal? >> two reasons to quote, unquote, let them off the mat even though sanctions were working remarkably well. one is given what the iranians were prepared to say yes to, it is not at all clear to me we could have kept sanctions in place if it looked like we were not prepared to take yes to a reasonable iranian offer. secondly, if the iranians ultimately -- the alternative would have been very ugly, potentially. a race for nuclear weapons.
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we would then or the israelis would comp template whether to use military force. this doesn't solve the problem once and for all. a lot of the big issues are admittedly kicked town the road for this negotiation that's about to begin. in the narrow sense this agreement leaves us better off than we were. >> i think this is a terrible agreement, but i'm going to be quiet and pass it around after i ask you one other question. the thing that struck me the most this weekend, there are anti-semimites out there there are going to say this is all about the united states and israel. the iranians play the anti-semite card around the clock, their leaders do. what struck me over the weekend was the fact that arab states seem to be angrier than israel right now. i spoke with several people on the phone this weekend. i have never -- you know, they said, we didn't like what george w. bush did. but at least george w. bush was a friend that would call us and tell us what we were going to
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do. we've been betrayed one time after another by this president. >> it's real uneasy. this isn't is isolation. there was real unease. >> it's anger, isn't it? >> there is anger. >> from the arab states. >> from the sunni arab countries. think about it. after the syria uncertainty. a decision at the 11th hour not to use force there. the whole american policy toward syria. now this. one of the big fault lines as you know in this part of the world is the persian/arab fault line. for a lot of the sunni arab countries, the idea we're not doing enough, not just in a nuclear realm but more broadly to stand up to iran in lebanon, with hamas, above all in syria, this adds to the narrative that we are simply not doing enough. >> andrea mitchell, what makes this different? obviously we've been following decades of a relationship with iran that is less than trustworthy. put it that way. i guess what -- what is it about the deal that's positive? that makes it -- give us a sense that they're not doing what they do all the time, which is come
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to the table, sort of play ball, all the while doing what they want to do? >> we don't know. and i don't think we're going to know till the end of this six-month period. and they may end up extending or doing another interim deal. because this next comprehensive deal is going to be so hard to nail down. already as you and joe were pointing out, there were disagreements within hours between john kerry and zarif, the foreign minister, in his interview with ann curry about whether there was an explicit recognition or whether it's implic implicit. each was trying to pocket what they were interpreting as the best -- the best of an ambiguous statement in the deal itself. look, one of the immediate responses was that the iranian currency went up 3% within hours of the deal. which is a signal immediately of, first of all, that the international community and the global traders believe that iran is going to end up getting out of more significant sanctions. because the sanction relief is relatively modest.
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they still have the banking -- they're blocked from international banking. they're blocked from oil exports. but the real impact on their economy and on the struggle of the iranian people, which was pressuring the regime, putting them on the mat, if you will, was not only those banking sanctions. but the fact that their currency was in collapse. and that their money had no value. immediately, it began to regain value. i think that this is going to be good for iran and the question is whether iran is going to live up to its agreement. we'll know pretty quickly, i think, whether the u.n. inspectors have real access. but critics, and they include as you say not justice real, but saudi arabia, principally. the emiratis are saying look at how they hid the reactor in the mountain. they didn't declare it until we found out about it. so there are a lot of serious problems in this. it's better than a alternative. >> willie, i was talking this weekend.
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the president finally -- the nobel peace prize. what your father did in '78 along with jimmy carter. but he's brought the israelis and the arab states together. i'm so glad. it took him five years. but i think he deserves his prize now. it's stunning. that israel and saudi arabia and other arab states are as unified on this issue. shoulder to shoulder. they will work together to stop iran from getting a nuclear weapon. >> and saying so publicly over the weekend. given what you just said, andrea, about frankly the unlikeliness that there is going to be a comprehensive deal agreed upon by iran to dismantle fully some day its nuclear program, they are a source of national pride for that country, obviously, does that mean the west and those who pursue this deal including the united states, of course, were naive to think that this short-term deal would give the space for a comprehensive deal? >> they are betting that there's a very small window. zarif told them, i need this to be done quickly because i don't
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have that -- that long a time before the hard liners move in and close in on me and rouhani. this is a big bet. what's really interesting to me, richard has a lot of insight into this from his own experiences, that we now know thanks to the various smart reporting by the associated press, matt lee and his colleagues at a.p., julie pace and others, that there were secret talks at the highest levels. the deputy secretary of state, bill byrnes and wendy sherman and jake sullivan from the vice president's office for a year. this was before rouhani's election. this was something president obama has been wanting to do. he only told israel, he only told netanyahu about it in september at their meeting right before the u.n. general assembly. that's one of the reasons why netanyahu's speech to the u.n. was as strong and angry as it was. >> mike, one other thing i heard from an arab leader this weekend was, he said you guys cheated on us. you guys went behind our back for six months.
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didn't let us know that you were talking to our enemy. you don't treat us well. then you go behind our back and talk to our enemy. we're going to hear a lot more about this, by the way, publicly from arab states moving forward. mike? >> well, off of that, richard, let me ask you, is that region, saudi arabia, israel, are they safer today now that we are talking with iran than prior to talking to iran? and the second aspect of the question is, with regard to the sanctions, what are the odds that the united states could have held the sanctions together in the wake of talks having been started and perhaps abruptly ending with sanctions being reimposed? >> i think we're so much safer because we've increased the warning time we would have under this interim agreement between -- >> what safer? >> probably bought an extra month or two for warning if iran decides to make a dash for a bomb. doesn't solve the problem, doesn't dismantle things. buys you more warning time.
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like i said before i don't think we could have kept is sanctions together against the backdrop of what iran was prepared to accept here. >> one more story this block. i flagged this over the weekend. a major effort is under way to aid the victims of those factory disasters in bangladesh. remember those? "the new york times" reporting over the weekend that so far american companies are not opening their wallets at all. more than 1,200 bangladeshi workers died in two separate incidents. once last fall when a fire tore through a complex. then in april when a building collapsed on top of hundreds of hundreds of people. while other overseas and european companies are compensating the victims, some of the highest profile american companies are not. walmart says, for example, there was no production for its stores in the factory at the time of the tragedy. really? adding that it has no plans to contribute. really? it says any walmart related production at the site was unauthorized. well, thank you. a sears spokesman says goods for
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their stores at the facility were unauthorized as well. so let's see. they took stuff and had it made there. and sold it and made money. but since it was not authorized, they're not going to help out. and they remain committed, they say, to improving conditions. the children's place won't contribute either, saying it was not being supplied by any factories inside the plaza when the dramatic collapse took place. "the new york times" article says the companies may be hesitant to compensate victims out of concerns it could open the door to legal action or to be interpreted as an admission of guilt. i don't know about you guys, but i'm just wondering, when you help people, is that a -- is that somehow opening yourself up to anything? and if you have a moral responsibility to do so, shouldn't you? i don't know. does anyone want to disagree with this? >> well, i don't. i'm going to stay out of your way. as a lawyer i actually would provide an answer you would not like. >> really? i've got an answer for you on
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that. i wouldn't go there. >> i'm staying out of the way. >> we live in the most litigous culture. >> really? you got clothes from them. do you want to -- i would love someone to take -- to parse apart these statements. they weren't getting the clothing at the time? so therefore they have no responsibility? >> yeah. >> oh, i know. they're too busy getting ready for black friday. they'll make so much money. >> patriots won last night. coming up on "morning joe," michael hayden is going to be. chairman of the house intelligence committee, mike rogers will be here. robin wright and editor of the weekly standard bill kristol. >> can i say one thing? when all the reporters do live shots -- forecast. mika wants her forecast. here, mika, i got it for you.
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as we go throughout the day today into the thanksgiving holiday, this huge storm out west that killed at least a dozen people is going to affect everyone on the eastern seaboard. right now the worst of it is in the dallas/ft. worth area. they've dealt with frozen precipitation, sleet, freezing rain overnight. that continues this morning. that's going to push into arkansas was we go throughout your morning commute. for today your southern travel trouble. heavy rain will develop in louisiana pushing into mississippi later today. maybe a little wintry mix there areas of tn tennessee and arkansas. then on tuesday the storm moves over the top of georgia. drawing up a ton of moisture off the atlantic. a lot of heavy rain up i-95. late in the day up into new england. then as we get into wednesday, the busy travel day, snow on the backside. likely buffalo, syracuse, rochester, pittsburgh. possibly there around cleveland and erie. heavy rain over the top of new york city into new england as we go through wednesday morning. as far as the snow forecast goes, buffalo to pittsburgh the best chance of getting enough to have to shovel out there. as far as the airports go, this
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is for wednesday's travel for the airports. early in the morning, significant delays. d.c., new york, boston into the afternoon. the good news is all those airports, the major airports there, will clear out by the afternoon. at least the weather will. not the travelers and the delays. those will probably pile up right throughout the day. more updates during the week here on this storm that's heading for the east coast. so far, so good, though. a cold, crisp morning. you're watching "morning joe." i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day.
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healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. ♪ by the end of december, we'll be delivering ♪ ♪ through 12 blizzards blowing ♪ 8 front yards blinding ♪ 6 snowballs flying ♪ 5 packages addressed by toddlers ♪ ♪ that's a q ♪ 4 lightning bolts ♪ 3 creepy gnomes ♪ 2 angry geese ♪ and a giant blow-up snowman ♪ that kind of freaks me out [ beep ] [ female announcer ] no one delivers the holidays like the u.s. postal service. priority mail flat rate is more reliable than ever. and with improved tracking up to 11 scans, you can even watch us get it there. ♪
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it's uneven. >> when we're coming back, we're back live. it's going to be on tv. gives you an idea what's happening in the breaks. >> willie, you should talk. >> what are you talking about? >> "wall street journal." >> why? >> that's a shame, actually. >> can't you paint it in or something like that? >> spray? >> you'd look like bert reynolds out of "boogie nights." what's in the paper today, mika? >> "wall street journal," looking to stop the endless cycle of protests egypt's interim president has banned public gatherings of more than ten people without preapproval by the police. >> that's kind of squeezed in tight, isn't it? ten people. >> failure to comply with the new law can result in fines as high as $44,000. >> so much for a college prank of getting kids inside of a
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telephone booth. >> activists have already denounced the law saying we'll allow further repression by the country's military forces. >> glad we get rid of mubarak. >> moving along to democracy. >> how about this arab spring? >> overseas in the telegraph, willie. >> for the first time bone fragments considered to belong to st. peter were made available to the public. pope francis unveiled the nine piece of bone during an open air mass in st. peter's square. the relics were discovered during excavation under st. peter's basilica in 1939. however, some archaeologists dispute the finding. >> from our parade of papers the san francisco chronicle, colonel armhart has stepped down after cautioning the army against using attractive females in promotional pictures. he was a specialist charged with incorporating women into combat roams by the army's 2016 deadline. through an internal memo she said, quote, in general ugly
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women are perceived as competent while pretty women are perceived as having used their looks to get ahead. it might behoove us to select more average looking women for our communication strategy. >> that's phil's strategy on the show for me. he said i want the most average looking man i can find at this show. >> you succeeded beyond your wildest dreams. >> let's just get people that are just, you know. very attractive woman and a bunch of really bland looking guys. barnicle, you and i, boom. phil called us first. >> finished one and two. >> we did. >> generic guys. >> nothing generic about you, willie. the women love you. >> a long island deli owner and his son have been charged with second degree larceny after scamming a customer out of a $1 million lottery ticket. the father/son duo told the winner who spoke limited english he had won a significantly smaller cash prize. they then gave him $1,000 out of the register. when confronted, the deli owner offered the lotto winner $10,000
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to not contact the authorities. an attorney for the two men claims it was a simple mistake. >> it was a simple mistake, willie. >> from the lottery machine. a clerical error, really. >> they're only $999,000 off. >> "usa today." >> it's a couple of zeros. i'm not good with math. it's all they're saying. >> "usa today." after losing more than half of its market value in 2013, jc penney has been dropped from the s&p 500. despite seeing its stock rise 18% this month, the company's trading value is down 55% this year. former ceo ron johnson tried to reinvent the brand, but was fired in april after 17 months on the job. >> "l.a. times." "hunger games: catching fire" took hollywood by storm this beak end becoming the highest grossing opening of all time in the month of november. the film brought in $161 million. >> oh, my goodness. >> pushing "thor" off the top box office spot. >> look at the dropoff between one and everything else.
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>> yeah. down to 14. the only other movie to have had a higher weekend gross in 2013, the may release of "iron man 3." >> we put it out here on this show. throw it middle of the table. talk about it. that's what we do. i got a 10-year-old daughter. right? i didn't -- like, i didn't want anybody to see the first "hunger games." i heard it was okay. i just didn't like the concept. my 10-year-old daughter, she reads. she just loves reading. and she wanted to go see this movie. and, you know, everybody -- i mean, all of her friends were going. so she went to see it. i just -- you know, for a 10-year-old daughter. >> did you go with her? >> no. but somebody -- an adult did. a friend's -- >> a friend of a friend of a friend. >> you know what, actually, there was just a guy on the street. that was walking in front. no. actually, a friend's mom went with her. but it's pretty intense stuff. >> did she see the first one? or this was her first? >> you know, she saw the first
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one a couple of months ago. and i just thought it was -- i thought it was a little intense. but i guess it wasn't. >> i think these movies are getting, like, rated "r" and pg-13, it's like they're worse every year. >> let's get chris dodd on and slap him around about that. >> you know, i am so conservative when it comes to these sort of things. always i'm bringing it up because i just put it out there. i can see $161 million. i think there were a lot of -- a lot of fifth and sixth and seventh graders going to see this. they all read the books. >> they are. >> which are good. >> my kids are too young obviously to see them. they're 6 and 4. the first one, though, was intense. for a young kid. there's death and there's violence. >> the clips are intense. >> it's a good movie. it's intense. >> speaking of intense -- >> but she reads all them. i just -- that's something i never really read a book.
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i did ask her. i asked her when she came in. i debriefed her. i said, how was the movie. >> hot. >> she said it was fine. she said the book was better. >> good for her. smart girl. >> can we get to mike allen? >> she just called mike allen hot. >> no. it's just intense. you know. >> let's check it out, then. >> yep. it is confirmed. >> you've made his monday. >> mike allen here with a look at the playbook. good morning. >> good intense morning to you. >> looking hot, according to mika brzezinski. >> always. >> yes. let's talk about this deal here. after weeks of taking heat for obama care, the healthcare.gov fiasco, politico says it appears president obama is moving on, now focusing on foreign policy. even if his fellow democrats are not. explain that a little bit. >> yeah. so the president is wanting to talk about it. he's out on the west coast talking about the economy. he has a clear foreign policy win. whether or not joe disagrees
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with it. this is something the administration was trying to do and that they accomplished. and so he's able to talk about some other things. we're finding, though, that democrats who are going to be back home for thanksgiving for a week or two are worried that the white house with its let's move along, nothing to see here, approach is going to leave them vulnerable. so this is a surprise. here on the show we've been talking about how in december, republicans are going to have these show trials by these oversight hearings about obama care. what politico is learning is that democrats plan to chime in in those hearings. that we're going to hear democrats calling for more scrutiny of the affordable care act. looking for fraud, waste, abuse, incompetence. we're going to see democrats calling for staff changes. we may see democrats calling for an extension of the deadlines and the mandate. all this to try and separate themselves from it to say, yes, we passed it. yes, it was a good idea. but we don't agree with how it's
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being implemented so don't blame us next year. >> you're also reporting this morning, mike, about democrats saying we're giving the white house this december 1st deadline. they promised us things will be working by then. that's sunday, by the way. that's six days from now. if that date comes and goes and there's still problems implementing this plan what happens with those democrats from there? >> willie, i think that's a good point. they are going to wait until after thanksgiving. so the white house had been looking forward to thanksgiving conversations. we've even seen here on the show how organizing for america had videos out urging people to talk to their loved ones about health care over the holidays. now, it's turning out those conversations might not be quite what they expected. if coming up here at tend of the week we have what the administration has forecast, which is a working website, one that's going to work for the vast majority of people is the catch phrase, then we'll see the heat go down. but if democrats are hearing from people back home, hearing from family members that it's still not working, this is when
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you'll hear them start to turn on the white house. >> politico's mike allen. steamy this morning. >> intense. >> grow a beard. like a big mountain man beard. that would be awesome. >> good god, no. >> over the holidays. >> a political win for the president. you know what somebody told me over the weekend. that no president, like under 40% approval rating, should be allowed to do any, like, deal. >> anything? >> stop. >> they get desperate. they really do. i had somebody in the bush administration say a couple weeks ago. every time things started going bad for bush the foreign policy people would start putting something together. >> like he put it together yesterday. >> he did agree to it over the weekend. disappointing. >> it's been months in the making. go to break, go. >> disappointing. it's a horrible deal. we got nothing out of it. now we've got the french and the united nations a taking a tougher line than the united states of america. >> it's a good deal. >> it's a good deal if you like
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bad deals. go ahead, willie. that's my best line yet. coming up, the epic overtime. >> i may be bland. i may not look good. >> highlights of that game we were telling you about. peyton manning, tom brady, patriots down 24-0 at the half. how did they pull it off? highlights, next. humans. even when we cross our t's and dot our i's, we still run into problems. namely, other humans. which is why, at liberty mutual insurance, auto policies come with new car replacement and accident forgiveness if you qualify. see what else comes standard at libertymutual.com. liberty mutual insurance. responsibility. what's your policy?
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you're doing that on purpose, man. what's wrong with you? >> i think it's attractive. >> time for sports. >> he's trying to prove phil's point about me. i'm sorry, go ahead. >> here are the highlights. broncos/patriots. sunday night on nbc. right to the fourth quarter. it was 24-0, broncos, at halftime. this looked like it was going to be a blowout. back comes new england. 14 yard touchdown pass there from tom brady to julian edelman. 28-24, patriots. later in the quarter broncos down a touchdown. peyton manning hits demaryius thomas. 11 yards out. that ties it at 31. overtime. in ot, neither team able to get on the board in the first possession. new england punting it away. watch this. kick is waved off by wes welker. yes, wes welker, former patriot. hits denver's tony carter on a bad bounce. sets up a short field here. patriots recover. the game winning 31 yard field goal. shocking the broncos with a 34-31 win in overtime up in
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foxboro. we mentioned on the coin toss, belichick won and gave the ball to the denver broncos. let's go to andrea mitchell in washington to explain why. andrea, what do you got? >> the winds. head winds. belichick betting with those new rules. you get a second possession. it's not sudden death at first. he wanted the winds behind him. >> the kicker. the ball spirals differently. aerodynamics. >> felt badly for tony carter. >> how about an nfc east showdown if there could be such a thing? it's a pretty horrible division. giants trailing by eight against the cowboys in the fourth quarter. eli scrambles, hits louis murphy in the corner of the end zone. they convert the two points. now we're tied, 21-21. just under five minutes left in the game. tony romo leads the cowboys down the field on a 67 yard drive that runs out the clock setting up dallas for an easy game winning field goal as time
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expired. 21-24, cowboys. tied with the eagles for first place in the division. giants' winning streak ends at four games. >> giants' season is rest in peace. it's over. >> yeah, it is. it was hanging on by a thread to begin with. arizona, colts trailing cardinals, 17-3. andrew luck in trouble. intercepted by karlos dansby. 22 yards for the pick six. later in the quarter carson palmer going to hit larry fitzgerald. 16 yard gain. and that makes fitzgerald the youngest player in nfl history to reach 11,000 receiving yards. arizona wins, 40-11. both teams now 7-4. how about the cardinals in the playoff hunt? down in miami, the panthers, hottest team in football, down three with less than a minute to play. cam newton finds greg olesen in the back of the end zone. carolina wins the seventh straight game, 24-17. how about the panthers? in kc chiefs trailing chargers by three points. alex smith, dwayne bowe.
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five yards for the touchdown. kansas city looks like it might avoid a scare. on the next possession, just over a minute to go, philip rivers, another huge day throwing the ball, drives his team 78 yards capping the drive with a 26 yard touchdown pass. san diego deals the chiefs its second straight loss. 41-38, the final. >> andrea, quickly, can you chime in here? the shanahan era in washington, d.c. with the redskins. is it over? should it be over? >> well, we've got a game tonight against the niners. >> are you going to be there tonight? >> yes, sir. yes, sir. it doesn't start till 8:40 or something. this is going to be a late night. >> it might end around 9:30. >> hey, guys. i don't want to give up. but the fact is, there are two shanahans here. it's kyle shanahan, the offensive coordinator, his son, who's also on the line. >> absolutely. >> good lord. coming up next, former cia director michael hayden weighs in on the nuclear deal with iran.
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also, dan senor joins the conversation. don't go away. we'll be right back. ♪ ♪
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i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart. here with us now from washington, look at that beautiful shot of capitol hill. >> it's gorgeous. >> blue skies. the sun comes up on a chilly morning. we have with us from washington the former director of the nsa and the cia, general michael hayden. and here onset, former foreign policy adviser to the bush administration, dan senor. richard haass still with us as well along with willie, joe and me. >> dan's here. i'm going to kick back. my job here is done. richard, you want to -- i'm sorry, mika. >> you want to attack? >> you want to viciously attack? >> this is the must-read opinion pages. this is where we read a must read and then comment on it.
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okay. >> a new thing we're trying. >> andrea is with us as well. great. "financial times," you've got the lead piece today. david gardner yesterday. thought it was interesting. it's not just the alternative to a formula to constrain iran's thuk leer ambitions is a war that could spread across the region. it is that an iran with a stake in solving the problems of the middle east rather than incentives to destable it, could be transformative. resocializing iran into mainstream geopolitics would be every bit a historic for president obama as american rapprochement with china was under president richard nixon. in the no holds barred wrestle with mr. netanyahu that will follow any iran deal mr. obama should suggest the israeli premier spend lime time drawing red lines for america's position on i rand and more time drawing green lines --
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>> let me ask general hayden. can you tell me why he's wrong, please? general, what do you make of the deal? >> first of all, i think richard's right about the deal. we shouldn't make too much of this deal. it's important, but it's a limited deal for limited things for a limited period of time. >> there you go. >> but it will set in motion a whole bunch of things, joe, that we need to keep a close eye on. >> dan senor? >> no, no. i think it is a -- is it a pause or is it an actual end -- do we have some vision in sight where this thing's all going to come to closure peacefully and with urgency. it is a pause, i think at best. what you have is you've expanded what they call the dash time. >> yeah. >> which iran can get the nuclear bomb from about one to two months to three to four months. that's not a bad thing if you have tremendous confidence in our intelligence capabilities or other agencies to figure out exactly within that three to four month window when iran may be breaking out, you know. the iaea has said the minimum
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standards they believe were necessary as part of any deal for them to know when that time is were not in this deal. my other big concern here is the impact on the allies. it's not just israel. it's the saudis. the emirates. the jordan administration has been saying repeatedly. we've been consulting with our allies. why are the allies reacting the way they're reacting? susan rice gave a speech before the aspen institute. she was responding to a question about prime minister netanyahu's criticisms of the deal. she said how can he be criticizing the deal? he doesn't know what's in the deal. if they're consulting so close with the israelis and saudis and others how is it the allies have no idea what's in the deal? >> let's take up dan's point, then. if this is a limited plan that's going to get us to a bigger plan, what do you suspect that larger plan is? under what circumstances do you think iran would be willing, then, to dismantle its nuclear program? because obviously they've shown
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no willingness to do that over the course of history. >> yeah. that's a real -- real problem, willie. i don't know what the final plan is. and i do not think it will possibly include iran dismantling their nuclear program. i think one of the by-products of yesterday's agreement was that we did sign up, in fact, to continued nuclear enrichment in iran. i think that's a given. i think foreign minister zarif was correct. the intent of this agreement yesterday was to ensure the iranians that they would, at the end of the day, have some kind of nuclear enrichment program. what we're going to get out of it, as dan seemed to suggest, is how much of a gap can you put between the program they're allowed to retain and their ability to have a weapon? >> right. >> this isn't about stopping it. it's about creating that time. >> andrea mitchell? >> well, i have a question for dan senor, which is, doesn't it, in effect, though, put israel's military option on ice? because in this six-month
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window, certainly, while the rest of the world is watching to see what iran's intentions are, barring some unforeseen event, israel really can't take military action. >> i think it is unlikely israel would take military action in the next few months. i think at this point -- i'll tell you, andrea, i know you travel to the region a lot. i was just there a few weeks ago. spent time in the gulf states. obviously have spent time recently in israel. the degree of panic that i'm hearing, when you hear leaders in the gulf states sounding more hawkish about iran than you hear the prime minister of israel, there's something going on in the region. >> by the way, let's just for our viewers, we've all heard that. i've heard that. richard, you certainly have. andr andrea, you have. that's why i said earlier arab states, the leaders seem angrier this weekend than the israelis. >> i think the turning point, dan, was blinking on syria. i think that labor day weekend changed their calculus of what this president was prepared to do. >> what one gulf arab leader said to me is he said how can we
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trust anything the administration says at this point? we obviously based on the u.s. experience over the last decade have real concerns about the intelligence agencies and their ability both in the u.s. and internationally to regulate and inspect. but also when the administration says they have someone's back. when they'll stand by an ally. how can they rely on that given the whole syria debacle. >> the real question is whether you would have consulted closely with the allies, including saudis and israelis and gotten them on board. no. would you have been able to get this agreement if you consulted closely with them? probably not. when we did the breakthrough with china we didn't bring in japan, other countries. we had to do an interim -- mike, you worked in government as have i. do you think we could have done full consultations and still gotten this agreement? >> no. not full consultations, richard. i think they would have opposed it. at a broader level, our relationship with these states, the sunnis and the israelis was about the isolation of iran. on that, we agreed. now we've moved to a place where iran in the future will not nearly be as isolated.
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we probably should have done some preparation work there. but i want to add to the point that dan made earlier about is it more or less likely about the israelis striking. i think it's right. andrea said, not during these six months. but, richard, if we get to the end of this six months and we get the diplomatic equivalent of a, let's say, continuing resolution, i think there we've got the maximum danger that the israelis will feel legitimated they can do something more. everyone agrees this interim agreement is something that can't hold before. >> the only thing i can say about the china analogy. it's a perfect analogy. nixon went to china. it doesn't cause our closest allies this sort of panic because you didn't have chinese leaders saying they were going to obliterate. it's an existential threat to israel right now. if you don't believe that, just see what the leaders of iran
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have been saying while they've been developing nuclear capabilities. they talk about wiping israel off the face of the map every year. >> more at the top of the hour. general michael hayden, thank you. dan senor, thank you. >> general hayden, you've let us down. you've let us down. please, you know what? do me a favor. save the nuance for another show. >> you've got bill kristol now. >> thank god. >> tag in, tag out. >> batting cleanup. >> i have an update for him on his daughter and mine. deputy snashl security adviser tony blinken joins us. ambassador to the u.n. ron proseu rurks. "morning joe" is back in a moment. ing at my bill, and my fico® credit score's on here. yeah, you've got our discover it card, so you get your fico® score on your monthly statements now, for free! that's nice of you! it's a great way to stay on top of your credit, and make sure things look the way they should. awesomesauce! huh! my twin sister always says that. wait...lisa?
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up next, nbc news political director chuck todd. also, middle east policy expert robert wright. and editor of "the weekly standard," bill kristol. >> is he going to let me down, too? >> here's the deal, bill. >> i have faith in you. i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day.
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toronto mayor rob ford said in an interview this week that he would have admitted to smoking crack sooner if anyone had asked him the question, have you smoked crack, rather than do you smoke crack. and much sooner if anyone had simply asked, would you like some crack? during a toronto city council meeting in which members stripped rob ford of most of his powers, the controversial mayor charged the gallery and ran over a female council member. before he was finally brought down by the third dart. >> welcome back to "morning joe." can you believe this? >> look at that. willie geist, the comcast commerce tree is actually perched -- it's comcastic, willie. >> moths to a flame, the shoppers come. >> the shoppers will come to that and start spending lots of money. i think that's what baby jesus
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wanted 2,000 years ago. >> wow. >> you know, seriously. >> would you like to do a hallmark story? do you want to start with that? >> do you like the ge commerce tree or comcast? >> comcast. >> richard haass is still with us. joining the table, the editor of "the weekly standard" bill kristol. hello. >> hi, mika. >> don't let me down, bill. >> hayden says one thing over the weekend. he comes here and decides he wants to go to cfr buffet. >> richard is back on the set. they want to be invited back to the council on foreign relations. they don't want to tell the truth. they've got to be diplomatic. >> nbc news chief white house correspondent and political director and host of "the daily rundown," chuck todd. hello, chuck. >> hey, chuck. >> also, we have middle east policy expert from the wilson center, robin wright joining us. >> damn, another person coming in to be subtle. i don't need that this morning, robin.
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what do you think? obviously you have been in the middle east for such a long time. one of the things that's so striking to me over the weekend is the fact that you have arab states actually as upset as israel. i don't know that i've ever seen -- i mean, a convergence like this between the interests of saudi arabia and israel and other arab states. what do you make of that? >> what do you think of the deal? >> clearly there's a real fear not only of iran's nuclear program but also of the potential of iran's reemergence in the realignment in the kind of relationships that the united states has had, its priorities in the region. iran was, after all, one of the two pillars of u.s. policy for 34 years until the 1979 revolution. it's been another 34 years where saudi arabia particularly and egypt have taken that place traditionally reserved for iran. there's a real nervousness, i think, in the region. there's also a sectarian component to it. the gulf regimes in saudi arabia and the united arab emirates are sunnis. they're very worried about the
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shiites across the persian gulf. there are a lot of different factors that are going into this deal that may not have anything to do with a nuclear program. >> bill kristol, while we look at the plan, can we agree that if it is carried out and if it's verified it slows down the dash time and it does something to at least stave off the enrichment of nuclear weapons in iran? >> the most optimistic interpreters of the deal say it slows down the dash time, break out time from one to two months to three to four months. really? are we comfortable with iran three or four months away from nuclear weapons? do we have confidence our intelligence services? are we willing to live with that? what people haven't mentioned, i agree with joe, supersophisticated analysis, here's the deal. they keep their nuclear program and don't dismantle a thing. and we relieve sanctions. is that a -- the deal for ten years, the deal has been suspend for suspend. we'll stop increasing sanctions
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if they stop enriching uranium. that was the u.n. security council regulations. this is a huge american walk back from the position of the last decade. >> we keep most of the sanctions in place. they dismantle some parts of their program. we put a ceiling on other parts of their program. it does double some of the time we would have for warning if they did decide to move towards nuclear weapons. plus it is an interim deal. you're asking this to carry more water than it was ever meant to carry. what we should be focusing on is what is going to be the terms of the long-term deal which, by the way, would call for dismantling. >> which calls for them keeping an enrichment capacity. >> the question is how much, of what kind, with what kind of option. >> that has not been the position of the international community for ten years. do you think it's reasonable? >> depending upon the details, sure. >> oh, my god. >> the question is if you have very few centrifuges, very little ability to accumulate low enriched uranium, no heavy water
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reactor so you can't have a second path to nuclear weapons, tight inspections, yeah, that would be a deal. >> if pigs could fly, that would be that. do you think that deal is plausible? >> sure. >> really? >> that's what we have to negotiate. >> you think the iran regime will agree to that deal? >> possibly. the question i ask for you is, do you think getting them down to zero is possible? answer, no. what are you willing to live with? are you willing to live with an unregulated iran or do you want to go to war? that is the real choice. it's not -- the choice is not between this deal and a deal that's perfect. >> the day before this deal -- the day before this deal there was a clear choice that didn't involve immediately going to war which was to increase the sanctions which allegedly were doing a lot of damage, "a." "b," this go to war line is misleading. you can have strikes that set back their programs that aren't, quote, to go to war. >> you don't know how iran would respond to strikes. >> you want to rule out military force? >> not at all. i don't want to do it blithely. >> for years the iranians have
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been cheating and deceiving. >> you can't assume how the iranians are going to respond. >> it's not an either/or. that's what the obama administration has been pushing now over the past month. they've been saying, either agree to this deal, which goes against what the international community has been saying for a decade, or you support war. if you take the united nations' position which has been the center piece of our negotiating strategy, you are a warmonger. that is a false choice. we didn't have to make the decision this weekend. we could have continued negotiating. >> sure we could have continued negotiating. the question is can you keep the sanctions tight and intact? at some point the iranian willingness to sign on to what looks to the french, the english, the russians, the chinese and others as a fair and reasonable compromise for an interim agreement, our refusal to accept that would begin to lead to the collapse of the sanctions. >> if this is, in fact, a limited deal designed to give time and space for a larger deal, what does the obama administration believe that larger deal could be? realistically what can it
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extract from iran? >> i think that's how you got to look at this deal. if you look at it as the final deal, this is a terrible deal. if you look at it as a step in trying to get something tighter, roll back their program even further, get -- force more transparency, well, then it could lead to a good deal. what i don't understand about the criticism on this deal is simply, you had to test them. right? you had to test the iranians at some point. here you have their new elections. here you have this new outreach they're trying. if you're not willing to test them for six months, then what are you willing to do? if you just view it as a six month deal, well, then it's essentially you're testing them. in many ways this could end up expediting a confrontation with iran. because if this doesn't work, well, then what's the alternative? >> okay. in terms of verification, robin wright, does -- is there anything in this deal that allays the concerns of bill kristol or of member of congress
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who feel like iran is just playing with us once again and we're playing into it? >> well, the term -- the interim deal calls for daily inspections of the most controversial sites. as well as any workshop and any mine producing the kind of material needed for an enrichment program. so it's unprecedented inspection and supervision of what iran is doing. very ambitiously. but to bill, i have to say, the republicans could have orchestrated a deal a decade ago when the iranians didn't have 200 centrifuges. today they have 19,000 centrifuges. it's, i think, actually rather naive to think that we could strip them of everything through the use of sanctions. >> there was a deal two years ago -- ten years ago, probably. >> don't interrupt me, bill. they had agreed to suspension. this was -- there was enormous
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potential to restrict them at an earlier stage. now they have knowledge. the challenge is, we cannot bomb knowledge. there's nothing we can do militarily to prevent them from using that knowledge, reconstructing that in the aftermath of a military attack and persevering with a bomb. >> there was a deal ten years ago. richard was in the state department. the interim accord. the iranians agreed to a deal with the international community. they broke it two years later. chuck todd, i agree with one very important point. i'll come back in a second. the notion for five years the obama administration hasn't been trying to cut a deal with iran is a little ridiculous. suddenly we had to become nice to them. i would have no problem with a deal that moved in the right direction. lessening sanctions without dismantling anything in iran is the wrong direction. back to chuck's point which is key. this is a six month deal. expires, what, may 24th? at that point there's a moment of truth on iran's policy.
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now the administration has politically at home elevated iran to the center of graffy for american foreign policy. going into the 2014 congressional elections with a big debate. maybe the administration can pull off a very good affirmative deal. they put a pretty tight schedule on themselves, haven't they? >> another part of the agreement talking about you have one year to negotiate -- >> showing progress, i would say. >> oh, yeah. >> i do think by may, june, you'll have a moment where at the center of american politics, all the talk about foreign policy being irrelevant, you'll have a pretty big debate about the basic structure of american foreign policy. >> you have that going into the 2014 campaign. speaking of capitol hill, the chairman of the house intelligence committee congressman mike rogers. what's your take on the deal? >> boy, i'm very, very concerned about the deal. if you think about it, there are six different u.n. resolutions saying you cannot enrich uranium. the day of the deal, the day the deal is announced, the iranians are already saying this deal guarantees we can continue to
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enrich uranium. it didn't even touch the ballistic missile part of their program. and the other portion, it didn't touch any of the military research facilities where we believe that they're working on triggers and other very key components to a robust nuclear weapons program. so here's -- at the end of the day here's why i -- i listened to the debate here. this notion that it's this deal or war is just absolute nonsense. what we were doing in congress, what we did the first round of sanctions and the president didn't really -- he was opposed to that. the second round of sanctions, was opposed to it. he spent the last three months in congress saying don't do another round of sanctions. in a huge bipartisan vote, the house passed another round of sanctions. because what you want to do is set the table. you want the iranians to come to you and say, i am ready for a deal. what happened was, the administration said, hey, we really want a deal. we're going to even lessen -- they threw sanction -- reducing the pressure of sanctions on the table before they even got there. i just think that's a serious mistake. it's almost really difficult to
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unwind. in addition, nothing was touched on the force that is participating in political assassinations around the world. is engaged in pretty brutal behavior in syria. supported by the iranian regime. tried to kill the saudi ambassador right here in washington, d.c. none of that was touched. again, i think this was a deal for the sake of a deal. i think that's dangerous. it makes the next six months even more difficult to get to a place where we need to be, where we can say we feel comfortable they're not pursuing a nuclear program. >> chuck todd is in washington. he's got a question. chuck? >> congressman, the likelihood that you guys are going to send tougher sanctions bill to the president in the house and the senate, do you think that there is something they could send to his desk in the next, say, six to eight weeks where he's got to make a decision where you force him to potentially veto it, or do you pass something that acknowledges this deal and then the tougher sanctions kick in either if they violate this agreement or at the six month mark? >> i think you're going to
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see -- well, the house already passed this next round of tough sanctions. by the way, we are finally getting to the iranian elite. that's why this thing was pinching so badly in iran. that they were finally starting to feel this pressure and needed to do something about it. that's why i think this is a huge lost opportunity. we passed it in the house. it's sitting in the senate. what i think you're going to do is see a lot of intensive discussions over the next few weeks with our senate counterparts. and i think folks from -- who believe this is not a great deal, our arab league partners, israel, a bipartisan coalition in the house. that, to me, says a lot that you have all of these groups, and you're starting to change the strategic alliances we have in the middle east because of the deal. i think you're going to see a lot of pressure to go another round of sanctions and passed out of the senate. >> all right. >> congressman mike rogers, thank you very much. >> thank you, mike. appreciate it. >> bill, we heard, bill, from prime minister netanyahu yesterday obviously calling it a bad deal. very disappointed with this.
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what do you think happens after the six months? let's call it may 24th. iran has not made good progress in dismantling parts of its program or slowing it down at least. what do you believe really that israel is prepared to do at that point? >> look, i think israel is prepared to act. the prime minister keeps saying. i'm not sure he'll wait the six months if he genuinely thinks there's cheating or a possible breakout. if after the end of the six months they're not making progress, my question, i guess his question to president obama, okay, are all options still on the table? that's been pretty conspicuously retreating from the president's rhetoric in the last couple weeks. maybe understandably if you're negotiating a deal you don't talk too much about military force. andrea made this point earlier where syria matters. i was in japan last week of all places. one of the first things that prime minister, various senior diplomats and other officials, one of the first things they all raised was syria. which i was kind of amazed by. we've sort of forgotten about it here. the degree to which -- whenever you think of our policy there, the degree to which the
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president of the united states saying red line, john kerry gives a churchill like speech. he referred to the munich moment. kerry. pulls back. goes to congress. they don't trust the president. that was really a blow. people in japan were saying does this mean we can't trust your commitment to the defense treaty of japan? can the prime minister of israel trust the president to use force if he has to after the six months? >> robin, i'm sure you're hearing the same thing right now in the middle east, certainly what we've been talking about this morning from some arab leaders very concerned about whether they can trust the united states or not. obviously there's so much chaos going on. this breaking from the a.p. from my iphone. i hope nobody's hacked into my iphone. peace talks between syria's government and opposition will take place in geneva on january 22nd. you've written about this for so long. there are so many moving parts right now in the middle east.
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it is. it's breathtaking and hard to keep up with. >> well, look, one of the most important things about what happened in geneva has very little to do with a nuclear program. that is for the first time the united states and iran talked. i covered the end of the hostage ordeal in 1981 and stood at the foot of the steps of the plane in algiers when the 52 americans embarked. what was striking in geneva this time, you didn't rely on interloculars. the americans and iranians spoke to each other for the first time. they've arguably talked to each other more in the last three months than they have in the last 34 years. that sets the stage for dealing with the kind of issues like syria. that changes the nature of the relationship. their ability to talk about regional issues. and that is as important in many ways as the nuclear program. it took us 30 years to end the tensions with china after its revolution. a and its very deadly intervention
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on behalf of the north vietnamese and one of the most tragic military interventions. it took us 20 years to heel relations with vietnam. it's now been 34 years with iran. there's the side benefit of the geneva deal is that we can talk to the iranians about a lot of these very volatile issues in the region and see if there's a way of finding common ground. i don't think the iranians are wedded to the regime of bashar al assad. i think they've relied on him in part because he's been their only arab ally. when you weigh the benefits of having just little syria with you and engaging with the international community, dealing with the world has many more assets. you know, we talk about this just in terms of this one narrow issue when, in fact, something much bigger is happening here. >> all right. robin wright, bill kristol, thank you very much. chuck, we'll see you coming up on "the daily rundown." up next, small business saturday is right around the corner. >> bill, stick around. >> he'll stay with us. >> richard has a great idea.
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he thinks if we team this proposal to the iranians with a bible and a birthday cake. >> joe, be fair. >> that we'll finally find those moderates in iran. okay. the ceo of american express ken chenault is here. the much needed push for local economies. donny deutsche will join the table. also another check on the severe weather system that's sweeping east just in time for thanksgiving. as your life changes, fidelity is there
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you get your coffee here. you get your haircut here. you find that certain thing you were looking for here. but, actually, you get so much more. when you shop at these small local businesses, you support all the things that make your community great. the money you spend here, stays here. in this place you call your neighborhood. small business saturday is november 30th. get out and shop small. >> that was an ad for small business saturday. isn't the concept so basic?
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>> it's a great concept. >> except it sounds new. because of the way stores are taking over small businesses, big stores. coming up this weekend, an event founded by american express. here with us now chairman and ceo of american express, ken chenault. chairman of deutsche incorporated, donny deutsche. >> deutsche, american express. >> juggernauts. you know, kenny, let's say ten years ago you would have said you guys were like seals barking at the waves. because there was just this tidal wave of the massive stores coming into town. that's not really the case anymore. you've just -- you've seen a lot of small businesses, local owned businesses, you know, starting to really, you know, kind of grow again. >> is main street coming back? >> yeah. is main street coming back? >> i think it's starting to come back. the reality is, as you know, there are 28 million small businesses. and their health is fundamental to the u.s. economy. >> right. >> what a lot of people don't realize is that small businesses
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generate two-thirds of the new jobs over the last two decades. >> wow. >> what's important about small businesses, for every dollar you spend in your local community, 52 cents stays there. >> you've been doing this for a while now, right? how long has this been going on? >> this is our fourth year. very frankly, coming out of the financial crisis, around two months before thanksgiving, we said we want to do something to really spur the economy. and so this is much bigger than our company. because one of the points we make on this day, small business saturday, you can use any card. you can use cash. you can use checks. >> but we do recommend american express. >> just support small businesses. >> i wouldn't mind that at all. that would be great. >> donny is here for the suck up factor. >> there was so much talk in politics about small business and the statistics you mentioned. but it seems that everyone's
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frustrated with what government's done. is this a way to fill that void? because people in the community support small businesses. but the government hasn't the way small businesses want. first of all, are you filling that void? also, speak specifically to how american express is a catalyst for it in this program. specifically, what is happening on saturday? >> here's what's critical. is the role that we serve is we really are the founding sponsor. but as i want to make clear, this is not about american express. this is about small businesses. there are going to be over 1,500 communities across the u.s. that have put together activities and events to support small business. now, this is not going to fill the gap of the problems of small business. but the reality is, last year $5.5 billion was generated on small business saturday. this is not an issue that it's against black friday. black friday is very important.
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cyber monday is very important. but what we want to do is give a day for small businesses and to shop small. >> what ken and american express is doing is a great road map for corporate america overall. as far as something that's right for their core brand. american express has always been about rugged individualism, advancement, whether it's small business, whether it's individuals. that's also for the common good. it's great when you can do something obviously as a ceo, your responsibility is to your shareholders. i do think the major corporations in this country today do have an obligation to do things that do advance the ball beyond their own needs. that's what builds great brands. i think it's a win/win for everybody. >> what's really exciting for us is when we came up with this idea in 2010, we had around 60 days to execute against this idea. and so this idea is one of, frankly, those higher purposes that when you can galvenize a
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company and it becomes bigger than a company, and this is a movement. it's gone global. this is now in canada, australia, israel, south africa, hong kong. we actually had prime minister cameron on shopping small. >> not iran yet. >> not iran yet. there may be a time for that. >> maybe. we'll see how it goes. >> ken chenault, thank you so much. >> i really appreciate you coming back. >> shop small this saturday. >> come back soon. for more information on small business saturday, check out afternoonmojoe.msnbc.com. join the discussion using # mojoe. thanksgiving travelers could be facing serious problems as a big storm system heads east. bill karins has the forecast next on "morning joe."
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a live look at times square on this monday morning. could be an ugly time on the roads and the airports over thanksgiving. mr. karins, of course, selfishly i want to know what it's going to be like going to boston wednesday.
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what about the rest of america? >> bring that big umbrella and the ga loshs. farce the rest of the country, this storm started out west. doing the trek across the country right during the busiest travel period. unfortunately reports of at least 12 killed from the storm over the past weekend. snow in oklahoma. snow in new mexico. now they're dealing with the freezing rain and ice in areas like dallas and also heading up to arkansas. let's take you into the radar first. dallas area, you've actually dodged a little bit of a bullet here because the temperatures were just above freeze ing. we're at 34 degrees. i've heard public schools are in session today in dallas. i know a lot of kids there were counting on a day off. you're not going to get it. we're watching areas around ft. smith and little rock. little rock holding at 34. that's good. travel trouble spot over the next three days, through today heavy rain spreads to houston. also louisiana. we can deal with heavy rain. it's the icy stuff we get problems. later this evening after the sun sets, watch out in tennessee heading up into the mountains there. especially eastern portions of tennessee in the smokies.
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on tuesday the storm makes it to the east coast. heavy rain spreads up the eastern seaboard during the day. start out dry in areas like north carolina, then it will move northward, the rain shield. reach areas like new york city late in the day. as far as the snow goes, the heaviest snow will be as we go through tuesday night into wednesday morning. up into areas like pittsburgh, possibly, buffalo, syracuse, and also northern new england. as far as snow totals go, possibility of maybe three to six. a few spots getting up there around six inches. enough, brian, the snowy travel will only be an issue there really buffalo to pittsburgh. maybe northern new england. other areas, i-95, including your trip on wednesday, all heavy rain early wednesday. gone by early afternoon. >> hopefully it will speed up more and be gone. up next, the white house reacts to the criticism of the nuclear deal with iran. deputy national security adviser tony blinken joins us. "morning joe" coming right back.
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i think everybody has a right to be skeptical. we did arms control agreements with the great enemy the soviet union. we've done arms control agreements in other parts of the world. you don't trust. it's not based on trust. it's based on verification. it's based on your ability to know what is happening. >> okay. joining us now from the white house, deputy national security adviser tony blinken. tony, good to have you on the show this morning. want to talk to you about the iran deal. just looking at this jon cornyn tweet, i think it's a low blow. amazing what white house will do to distract attention from obama care. i don't think that's what you guys are trying to do. i think you're trying not to go to war. that could be one thing. what is different about this deal? in terms of our relationship with iran, that makes it
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unprecedented. that makes it something worth banking on? >> for the first time in a decade, we're halting iran's program. we're rolling it back in certain key respects. and we're getting the kind of access for international inspectors that we've never had before. and it gives us time over the next six months to see if we can come up with a comprehensive resolution to this problem. and to do it in a way that doesn't allow iran to talk and talk and talk and advance its program at the same time. this interim deal is a good deal in and of itself. it makes us more secure and gives us a chance to see if we can resolve this once and for all diplomatically. >> bill kristol? >> are all options on the table? if at the end of six months iran is cheating does the u.s. maintain the ability to use military force to stop iran's nuclear program? >> yes. >> there you go. bill kristol, do you have any more concerns now? >> yes. >> why wouldn't you want to see
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this through? >> they've dismantled nothing and they're getting sanctions relief. the administration will say, tony will say, he'll make the case right now i'm sure they can get the sanctions going back up again. there's no history of that. so this is like north korea. north korea broke their deal with us. did we ever really get back to stopping them from getting nuclear weapons? >> is it a big step back that you've dismantled nothing? is that a disappointment? >> two things. first, to bill's point about the sanctions, it's really important to understand that the sanctions will continue to be implemented throughout this period. indeed, the pressure on iran will grow. the amount of money that they won't have access to will get larger and larger. we're not taking apart any of the architecture of the sanctions. the oil sanctions continue. the banking sanctions continue. the financial sanctions continue. that's point one. second, there are basically three pathways to a bomb. 20% enriched uranium. combination of 3.5% and advanced centrifuges and the iraq plutonium factor. we cut off each of those paths. that will make us more secure.
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it makes our partners more secure as well. >> so tell me, just a little clarification here, the iranians believe they have a right to continue to enrich uranium. john kerry could not have been more explicit saying they have no right over the next six months to enrich uranium. who's right? >> secretary kerry is right. we've been very clear. they do not have a right to enrich. they will not have a right to enrich. the question is whether at the end of the day there can be as part of a comprehensive solution a very limited, very carefully monitored nuclear program for peaceful purposes in iran that involves some indigenous inrichment. we don't know if we can get there. we don't know if they can satisfy us, satisfy our partners. but the kind of limitations that would be necessary to give us confidence the program can only be used for peaceful purposes is possible. that's what the next six months is about. >> mika, i want to go back to the tweet you opened the segment with. i don't think it was such a low blow. to me putting on my cap for for
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a second, we know i'm on the blue side of the aisle, why now? in 90 minutes we haven't mentioned the word obama care once. you have a 38% approval rating going south. the country with just a cloud over it. all the sudden, unless you read the fine print, it seems like good news for the president. the cynic in me says the timing is interesting because there was no reason to do it this weekend. >> okay. they've been working on this for months. >> months. that's my point, though. there was no reason on friday to take them off the mats. >> tony, why don't you -- because mika actually started out by saying she disagreed with what john cornyn said. senator from texas, actually. there are a lot of arab leaders saying the same thing this weekend. break down the timing for us. for those of us that haven't -- haven't been knowingly, including our allies, exactly what's been going on. how did we reach the deal we reached this weekend timing wise? >> we have been working on this for weeks and indeed for months. we've been working closely with our partners in europe, with the
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russians, with the chinese. and there's urgency to this. iran was progressing down these different paths to a bomb. the 20% enriched uranium. the advanced centrifuges. the iraq reactor. if fuel gets put it in and gets turned on it will be difficult to deal with. there was urgency in trying to stop the program in its tracks, see if we could roll it back and buy time to negotiate a comprehensive solution. there was urgency to that. we've been working on it. we got to the point where we had a deal. >> tony, thank you so much for being with us. we really do appreciate it. >> deputy national security adviser, tony blinken, thank you. here at the table we have the israeli ambassador to the united nations, ron proseur. it's very, very, very fwogood t have you. >> mr. ambassador, do you feel betrayed? i had one leader this weekend from the middle east tell me, an arab leader, say you feel like you all cheated on us. do you feel like the obama administration betrayed israel? >> no. this is not really an emotional
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issue. it's something i think deals with peace and war. where do we come from? why this angle? it's not just from israel. it's basically saying, look, the iranians have used the time to cheat and deceit and create an industrial base for what i would call a bomb machine. this deal is a bad deal because it leaves the machine intact. meaning, hey, you guys have the machine. not one centrifuge is dismantled. not one enriched uranium is out. >> what do you make of the white house agreeing with john kerry that the iranians don't have a right to continue enriching uranium over the next six months? i'm very confused by this. >> we're all confused. i'd like to say the follow ing. the iranians are not just carpet makers. they're carpet weavers. they take every red line. they divide it into ten pink lines. they pass every pink line before
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you say jack robinson, they're way beyond the red line. that's a merited response because it's the pink line. >> can we be clear, bill kristol. while we're talking about red lines i remember reading a "wall street journal" editorial during the bush administration, just so people know that we're not just talking about barack obama here, and "the wall street journal" editorial was eviscerating george w. bush for allowing the iranians to step over one line after another line after another line. it happened also with north korea. so let's be very explicit here. we're not just talking about the obama administration. this is well over a decade of failing on iran policy. >> right. there's an accord in 2003 which they violated two years later. they were cheating during the accord. they went ahead with the nuclear program. north korea, famously accords in both the clinton and bush administrations which they then turned around after taking the time to build up their program more. we know what a successful agreement looks like. think of libya. they took the nuclear weapons, material to make the nuclear
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weapons, the nuclear material, and the bomb making machine, as the ambassador puts it, out of libya. we destroyed it in kentucky. even syria -- i don't trust them to be complying with this deal. to the degree they are we have destroyed actual stuff in syria and we're taking weapons out of syria. none of that is happening in iran. >> right. then since both of you have absolutely no trust in this deal, what would you suggest we do at this point? >> what we're saying is, look, the sanctions are the best tool that we have. because the iranians are coming here not because they love us. because they feel pressure. the whole idea is, hey, let's use this tool in a way to get a better deal out of the iranians. that's basically the discussion. so that's why we feel the sanctions are very, very important. and we're losing this tool. which is very, very significant in the behavior patterns also in tehran. so my point is we are leaving them with the industrial base.
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while we look into the enriched and centrifuges part, they will keep on doing the weaponization delivery systems. then in six weeks, they breakthrough and we can't do anything. >> if the president is right, if john kerry is right, and we're all wrong, and this actually leads to engagement with iran for the first time since 1979, that's historic. and extraordinary benefits will flow to the entire region. >> and if you're wrong. >> but if he's wrong, what's the worst case scenario? >> look, i mean this goes beyond -- this is the strategic environment. those are the potential oil reserves of western world. this is a shiite sunnite divide. a change in the harmonious position of iran vis-a-vis saudi arabia, sunnite, shiites. huge effects way beyond the middle east. in a sense this is a crucial issue and we're looking at very, very, i think crucial times.
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from our point of view, look, this is leaving the industrial base and this, you know, nuclear machine intact. and we have to dismantle it for the safety of everyone. >> final word, bill. >> nuclear proliferation. i mean, if the saudis look at this, the egyptians look at this, the turks look at this, incidentally people in east asia look at this and say, really? you get to keep your whole nuclear machine in place and get some sanctions relieved? you know, i don't really know if this deal is going to work. maybe i should just get my nuclear weapons machines going, buy some from pakistan. i think the degree to which this could become a moment historians look back on when we ended the real serious attempt to constrain nuclear proliferation, i think that's a danger. >> amy corder was right. in 1980 i made another reference. amy carter was right. nuclear proliferation. the greatest concern. where is amy carter these days? >> i don't know. jimmy said that in the debate in
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1980. >> living a good life. helping her father on his efforts. she was great. >> she really was. the family is doing great. it was very interesting to see what -- if we have another carter in politics. >> oh, right. i know. >> it's a possibility. somebody saw him on the campaign trail. said he was really good and energetic. >> i think jimmy carter was great in "argo," by the way. >> mr. ambassador, thank you so much. up next, you're being watched at work. the new issue of "the atlantic" explains how big data -- >> very sad news for donny deutsche. >> -- is changing the way workers are hired and fired. you're watching "morning joe." we'll be right back. (vo) you are a business pro.
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i will always want you ♪ ♪ i came in like a wrecking ball ♪ >> that's funny. >> maybe some day let the music stand by. >> she's got some good songs. why is she so insecure? >> i got it. you put a big cat up there and put you in a little cat leotard. >> we understand. >> was that a double -- >> the thing is, she has some good songs. she has some good songs. look at the cat. it's all about cats. >> what's the kitty cat? >> never mind. coming on next. let's leave it alone. >> let arches flow over you.
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>> president obama both the saudis and the israelis had the cat claws. i will have a cat behind me. the latest on the iran deal and more pictures of cats. >> don't you dare put emma. >> plus a picture of a massive storm headed east just in time for thanksgiving. >> that was a beautiful kitty. >> let's look at the kitty. i love kitties. look at this cat. helicopthierhis hibuzzing, andk engine humming. sfx: birds chirping sfx: birds chirping would you like apple or cherry? cherry.
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>> what was concluded in geneva last night is not the historic agreement. it's a historic mistake. it has not made the world a safer place. like the agreement with north korea in 2002005, this made the world a much more dangerous place. >> good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast and 5:00 a.m. on the west coast as we look at new york city. we have mike barnacle, richard haas and in washington andrea mitchell. the fallout to president obama's nuclear agreement with iran over the weekend has been practically
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instant. bloomberg's al hunt calls the plan imperfect, but the least bad option. they call it a triumph for iran. the product of months of secret meetings. they phase out uranium or add more centrofuges and must submit to daily infectispectioninspect. they have crippling sanctions. >> these are substantial limitations to help prevent iran from building a nuclear weapon. they cutoff the most likely paths. they will remain in place and continue to enforce them vigorously. if iran does not meet the commitments, we will turn off the relief and ratchet up the
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pressure. >> there is disagreement over the most basic of terms. >> this first step does not say iran has a right to enrichment. no matter what interpretive comments are made, it is not in this document. there is no right to enrich within the four corners of the mpt and this document does no do that. >> it doesn't say in so many words, but it says clearly that iran will have an enrichment program. >> there is deep skepticism from american allies in the region, particularly saudi arabia and israel. all along congress has been considering deeper sanctions, but held off to avoid scuttling this deal. republicans are openly criticizing the agreement and members of the president's own party are convinced it can stave
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off a nuclear armed iran. >> the un security councils at a base level stated iran would not have the right to enrich and yet it appears that we have already given a tilt. it looks like we agreed that they will be enriching for commercial purposes down the road. the reaction in iran right now, they are spiking the football in the end zone. >> i thing this is a marginal improvement. it frees some of their activity in place. >> we are very concerned as to whether iran will live up to these commitments. >> the concern is that this interim deal becomes the final deal and leaves iran just a few months short of a break out ability to dash and create a nuclear weapon. >> that would not be acceptable to the congress or american people. >> we are sending a signal that they can go ahead and by talking
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and acting like they have good will and get away with the reduction capability much. >> a lot of different interests at play. right in the financial times, this iran deal does limited things for a limited time. what the agreement does not do is dismantle aspects of the nuclear capacity or potential. this does limited things for limited time and no more or no less. those who oppose for what it does not do is asking too much. this cannot be the possible versus the ideal, but rather than the possible versus the realistic alternatives. in this case living within a weapons capability that would let others in the unstable mideast to follow suit or launching a military strike without knowing in advance what it would accomplish or set in
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motion. this pact is far preferable to either alternatives. >> why is there already concern that the president dismissed what they suggested all along. >> they are allowed to continue with enriched uranium and not to expand over the six months. >> what would john kerry say? >> he was getting into whether the agreement gives the iranians a right to enrich u rape yum. there words that don't say you have the right to enrich uranium. >> you have got the continued ability in this agreement. >> what was john kerry saying?
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>> he was saying that -- >> was john kerry wrong? >> what he was doing is parching words to oversell. i think it's still a significant accomplishment, but there is no reason to oversell it. talk about in the agreement to come after the comprehensive follow. iran has a conditional right to meet certain criteria. >> why is this an accomplishment. why did we let them off? for the first time since 1979, the united states had leverage over this state that has been the epicenter of international terrorism. why is this a good deal? >> two reasons even though sanctions were working well. given what the iranians were prepared to say yes to, it is not chlorthat we could have kept sanctions in place if we were not prepared to take them to a reasonable iranian offer. if the iranians bought, the
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alternative would have been something ugly. a race for nuclear weapons and they would have to contemplate whether to use military force. this doesn't solve the problem. a lot of big issues are kicked down the road for this negotiation that is about to begin. in the narrow sense, this agreement leaves us better off than we were. >> i think this is a terrible agreement, but i will be quiet and pass it around after i ask one other question. the anti-semits are going to say this is all about israel and they play that card around the clock. what struck me over the weekend was the fact that arab states seem to be angrier than israel right now. i spoke with several people on the phone and i have never --
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they said we didn't like what did, but he was afraid they would calls and you tell us whatty we would do. we have been betrayed one time after another with this president. >> this is not an isolation. >> it's anger, isn't it? >> from the arab states. >> from the sunni arab countries. after syria and the decision at the 11th hour not to use force. now this. when the fault lines as you know, the persian arab fault line. for a lot of the sunni arab countries, the idea that we are not doing enough, but broader to stand up to iran in lebanon with hamas, this adds to the narrative that we are not doing enough. >> what are make this is different. obviously we have been decades that is less than trustworthy. put it that way. i guess what is it about the
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deal that is positive that makes it give us a sense that they are not doing what they do all the time? come to the table and sort of play ball all the while doing what they want to do. >> they may end up extending or doing another deal because this will be so hard to nail down. as you and joe pointed out, there were disagreements within hours. about whether there was a recognition or whether it is implicit. each was trying to pocket what they were interpreting as the best of an ambiguous statement. one of the immediate statements is the currency went up 3% within hours which is a signal immediately of first of all that the international community and
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the global traders believe that iran is going to end up getting out of more significant sanctions. it's relatively modest. they are blocked from international banking and exports. the real impact on the economy and the struggle of the people that is pressuring the regime and putting them on the map is not only the banking sanctions, but the fact that the currency was in collapse and the money had no value and it began to regain value. i think this is going to be good for iran and the question is whether they will live up to the agreement. we will know pretty quickly whether the un inspectors have access. critics are not just israel, but saudi arabia principally and they are saying look at how they hid the reactor in the mountain. they didn't declare it until we found out about it. there a lot of serious problems.
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it's better than the alternative. >> i was struck this weekend. the president earned his nobel peace prize. what your father did in 78 with jimmy carter. he brought the israelis and the arab states together. i'm glad. it took five years, but he deserves his prize now. it's stunning that israel and saudi arabia and other arab states are as unified on this issue. shoulder to shoulder they will work together they will stop iran from getting a nuclear weapon. >> given what andrea said about the unlikeliness that there will be a comprehensive deal, they have a source of national pride. does that mean the west including the united states were naive to think that this short-term deal would give the
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space for a comprehensive deal? >> they are betting is a small window. i need this to be done quick low. they close in on me. this is a big bet. what's interesting to me and richard has a lot of insight is that we know thanks to the smart reporting by the associated press, matt and his colleagues and others that there were secret talks at the highest levels. the deputy secretary of state from jake sullivan from the vice president's office, for a year, at least five meetings in omaha and before the election. this is something that president obama has been wanting to do and only told israel and netanyahu about it in september at the meeting right before the un general assembly and one reason why netanyahu was as strong as angry as he was. >> one thing i heard from an
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arab leader who said you guys cheated on us and went behind our back for six months and didn't let us know that you were talking to our enemy. you don't treat us well and you go behind our back and talk to our enemy. we will hear more about this moving forward. >> off of that, let me ask you. are saudi arabia and israel safer today now that we are talking to iran than prior to talking to iran? >> the second aspect is what are the odds that the united states could have held the sanctions together in the wake of talks having been started and abruptly ending with sanctions being reimposed. >> they are so much safer because we increased the warning time. someone bought an extra month or two of warning.
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this doesn't solve the problem or dismantle anything, but buys you warning time. it doesn't keep it together against what iran had. >> we will check in with politico's mike allen and an army colonel comments on the impact of ugly women in the military. the internal e-mail that kicked off the controversy. a dummy worker tried to scam a customer over a lotto ticket. how the thief's luck ran out. >> here's bill with the weather. >> bill? >> a long time ago. good morning. there is a big storm moving across the country that will cause millions headaches at the airports. i will try to time it out for you. this morning the worst was around dallas ft. worth.
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the temperatures were above freezing and the kid his to go to school. we hate that. the blue line is the freezing line. right through little rock. north of the little rock and up towards ft. smith, we have sleet and freezing rain and that will be the travel trouble spot. memphis is above freezing. the cold rain for and you later today, north of memphis and areas of tennessee, icy weather and rain moving across the deep south. as we go into tuesday, this is when the storm will be on the move. we could have early icing problems. looks like areas south of pittsburgh and a lot of mountainous areas. if we have bad travel trouble, western new york and western pennsylvania and eastern ohio. the storm will be heading out rapidly. they will have lake effect snow that will be ending early. snow totals, three to six and near the lake a little bit more. the big cities will be all rain.
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it's very important. as far as airports go, d.c., new york, and boston. early wednesday and late thursday will be the worst travel impacts out there. otherwise we should be looking okay. washington, d.c. after a frigid windy weekend, rain is on the wi coming your way heavy and hard through tuesday night. you are watching "morning joe." [ imitating engine revving ]
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>> i don't get it. it's uneasy. >> willie, you should talk. >> what are you talking about? >> the "wall street journal." >> uneven what? >> that's a shame actually. >> isn't it painted in or something? >> ron? >> yes, yes. >> you look like it and burt reynolds out of boogie nights. what's in the newspaper? looking to stop egypt and banned public gatherings of ten people without preapproval from police. failure to comply can result in fines of $44,000 and prison
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terms as almost seven years. we will allow further repression by the military forces. that is correct. >> glad we got rid of mubarak. >> overseas. >> for the fertile time bone fragments made available. pope francis revealed the nine pieces of bone mass. the relics were discovered in excavation under st. peter's in 1939, but some dispute the findings. >> the "san francisco chronicle," colonel around hard stepped down after cautioning the army against using attractive females in promotional pictures. he was a specialist charmed with incorporating women into combat roles through an internal memo he said in general ugly women are perceived as competent and
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pretty woman are perceived as having used looks to get ahead. it might behoove us to use more average looking women. >> he said i want the most average looking man i can find at this show. >> let's get a very attractive woman and bland looking guys. he will call us first. >> one and two. >> more generic guys. >> nothing generic about you. >> a deli owner and his son are charged with scamming a customer out of a lottery ticket. they told the winner who spoke limited english that he won a smaller cash prize. they gave him $1,000 out of the register. the deli owner offered him $10,000 to not contact the
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authorities. they claim it was a simple mistake from the lottery machine. >> they were only $999,000 off. it's a couple of zeros. i'm not good with math. >> after losing half the market value in 2013, jcpenney's has been dropped from the s&p 500. the company's trading value is down 55% this year. the former ceo ron johnson tried to reinvent the brand and was fired. >> they didn't go well. >> 17 months on the job. >> l.a. times, "the hunger games" catching fire and becoming the highest grossing opening of all time in the month of november. the film brought in $161 million, pushing thor off the top box office spot. >> look at the drop off.
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>> the the only other move tow have had a higher weekend gross is the may release of iron man 3. >> we put it out there and throw it in the middle of the table and talk about it. that's what we do. i have a 10-year-old daughter. i didn't want anybody to see the first hunger games. i heard it was okay. i didn't like the concept. my 10-year-old daughter reads. she loves reading and wanted to see this movie. you know, all of her friends were going. she went to see it. for a 10-year-old daughter. >> did you go with her? >> no, but an adult did. >> a friend of a friend of a friend. >> there was a guy on the street that was walking in front. no, a friend's mom went with her. it's pretty intense stuff. i am so conservative when it
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comes to these sort of things. i see $161 million, i think there were a lot of 6th and seventh graders seeing it. >> they are. >> my kids are too young. they are 6 and 4, but it was intense. there is death and violence and all kinds of stuff. >> the clips are intense. >> so she -- >> speaking of intense. >> but she reads all the time. i never read a book. >> i know. you can feel it. >> i did ask her when she came in and i said how was the movie? >> hot. >> she said it was fine. she said the book was better. >> good for her. smart girl. >> she called mike allen hot. >> it's just intense. >> let's check him out then. >> it is confirmed. >> mike allen has a look at the
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playbook. this morning. >> good intense morning to you. >> looking hot according to mika. >> always. >> after week of taking heat for obama care and healthcare.gov fiasco, politico said it appears president obama is moving on focusing on foreign policy even if this fellow democrats are not. explain that. >> the president is talking about the economy and has a clearer foreign policy win. whether or not joe disagrees, this was something the administration was trying to do and they accomplished. he is able to talk about other things and we are finding that the democrats who are going to be back home for thanksgiving for a week or two are worried that the white house with let's move along. that will leave them vulnerable. this is a surprise. we have been talking about how in december republicans are
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going to have the show trials. the oversight hearings about obama care. politico is learning that democrats planned to in and democrats are calling for more scrutiny looking for fraud and ways to view incompetence. when you say democrats calling for staff changes, democrats call for an extension of the deadline and mandate. this is to try to separate themselves and say yes, we passed it. yes, it was a good idea. we don't agree with how it's being implemented. >> we report about democrats who say we give the white house the december 1st deadline. that is six days from now. if that day comes and goes and there were problems, that's a good point. >> they are going to wait until after thanksgiving. the white house had been looking
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forward to thanksgiving conversations. we have even seen here on the show, organizing for america had videos out are urging people to talk to their loved ones and it's turning out the conversations may not be quite what they expected. if coming up here at the end of the week we have with the administration a working website that will work for the vast majority of people we will see the heat go down. if democrats are hearing from people back home, hearing from family members that it's still not working, you will hear them start to turn on the white house. >> mike, thanks. why the new issue of the atlantic warns they are watching you at work. how big data and new technology are impacting your chances are getting ahead. we'll be right back with more "morning joe."
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i started part-time, now i'm a manager.n. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time. where i work, over 400 people are promoted every day. healthcare starting under $40 a month. i got education benefits. i work at walmart. i'm a pharmacist. sales associate. i manage produce. i work in logistics. there's more to walmart than you think. vo: opportunity. that's the real walmart.
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>> you take care now. all right. >> how am i supposed to work with this guy? >> what do you mean?
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he is the most brilliant moiindf our generation. >> i know, but i wasn't expecting this. >> hey, craig. you can hand me those third quarter reports on the coffee table over there. >> yes, sir. what do they look like? >> maybe it will be faster if i come to you? you sure? >> absolutely. >> the first day. i know all this paperwork can be a little confusing. but you learn to get the hang of it.
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>> so cute even as an adult. >> is that the same guy? >> it's not sprint, it's at&t. >> that was a skit featuring the body of a baby and the mind of an adult. mike barnacle is with us still and donny deutsch and brian shackman is back with us. joining us from washington, the deputy editor of the atlantic magazine who wrote the cover story about the future of work and how they are changing the way people get hired, fired and ahead at the office. don writes in part this. the application of predicted an lytics to people's careers and emerging fields called people an lytic serks normously challenging not to mention ethically flawed. it touches on the deepest of human mysteries. how we grow and what we have become. most companies are just beginning to explore the
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possibilities, but make no mistake. during the next to ten years, new models will be created and new experiments run on a very large scale. will this be a good development or a bad one for the economy for the shapes of our careers and spirit and self worth. tell us how this is being carried out. the changes and evolutions. >> sure, mick a. thanks if are having me on. i don't know if you saw money ball, but it's the same phenomenon. billy bean turned away from his scouts and trusted the decisions to young statistical wizards who correlated characteristics with team success. it's that phenom noon is spreading more widely. over the past few years, each of us has generated more and more
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data about ourselves & our characteristics through surfing on the web and e-mails that we might with the language we use. there was an incredible amount of data there. >> i am glad i have been hired before. >> how much fantasy sport time they had. it is based with what they did on the field, but even though, is it effective and drawing the right people into the right jobs? >> it's very new and we only have early evidence. there fight a few examples of clear effectiveness. this is most advanced in hourly work. call center work with a ton of standardized jobs and people leave those jobs frequently so
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data scientists can see what characteristics matter for retention and job performance in those jobs and yes, companies that are using an lytics to hire in the roles are doing better and the workers are more productive and being promoted more frequently and stay longer. yes, this is quite effective. >> i hired thousands of people over the years. i have a chapter called the hungry eye theory. i see it in people's eyes. they need something to prove. they want to make them more. you can't see it on a resume and i don't want to sound like a dinosaur and maybe for call center employees, but to me if you are hiring people that in any way will be using talent and passion and brains on a daily basis, i would like to compete.
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>> you have both human judgment and an lytics to support the judgment. if you look at the degree of bias, it's surprising. one thing that distinguishes ceos from non-ceos is that they simply look more competent than other people visually. yet management professors have gone to great pains to show that merely looking competent has nothing to do with the performance of a ceo's company financially. tall men get promoted more frequently than short men and beautiful women do better and so on. a lot of hidden biases affect all of us and skew both hiring and promotion. i think this new field has the potential to check some of those biases and help us understand
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our blind spots. >> it's dealing in one specific industry and set of talent tools. baseball. with this new stuff, what happens to young people who have just graduated from college in the tough market. how does this apply to people who were untested? >> in some i ways it's encouraging and will big signal people have used is the college degree. did you go to college and how did you do and what was your gpa. it's a good signal, but it excludes a lot of people. this enables a lot of companies to say okay, this particular person may be dropped out of
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college, but they have been doing work as a programmer on a crowd sourced basis. they have a lot of followers who listen to them as to graphic design. it really improves the range of opportunities both early in their careers and later as well. up next, orlando bloom brings romeo to broadway. what inspired the actor to tackle one of shakespeare's most iconic characters. we'll be right back.
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>> two households, both alike and aware of where we lay our scene. to the break to new mutiny where civil blood makes civil hands unclean. the fatal loins of these two take their life and pity is overthrown and bury their parents strife. the passage of their love and continuance of their parents's rage is now the two hours traffic of us. the witch, if you with patient ears attend what here shall miss. our toil shall strive to make.
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>> here with us now and actor orlando bloom. good to have ow the show. >> we will get through this. >> you were offered a place. >> i haven't. >> i was in drama school and i was leaving school and said so you know know, they were interested in me and under studying. >> what a great opportunity. >> what do do i? let's go. i'm ready to go. that's the way you would go about it. >> all life changed. >> i want to get back to peter jack and the hobit. talk about every night. we go as audience members, how do they do that every night? >> it's exhausting.
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>> before you jumped in, what's it been like? >> i loved every minute of it to be honest. this is my broadway debut. speaking the language of shakespeare, that verse and we talked about the talent and it sounds wordy. it's actually a beautiful way to communicate. it is poetry. people are listening to us and sharing and speak poetry at one another. i think we have taken this remarkable play that has been seen a million times before which is one of the challenges of doing romeo and juliette. we made it accessible and we had 12,000 students from the doors so far. it's amazing. 2013. >> shakespeare or orlando. >> poor orlando.
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>> one of the two. >> you were talking about the language. 2013, shakespeare all of these centuries later. the cadence and the art of his work. was it difficult for to you adapt yourself to the language in this play given the fact that no one speaks like that? >> considering it was my first time, it was a challenge. i have of course worked in drama school before. it's really -- it's interesting. i grew up in kapter bury. i like having t canterbury. walking into the cathedral is this big space with a slight sense of awe. when you are communicating the language, it can be intimidating.
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the idea of having to stand on stage and communicate this. he did write with a struthure that almo structure, if you trust that it's like a safety net. it drives you forward in a big way. the director is remarkable. he does shakespeare day in and day out all day long. he said when i sit down to watch shakespeare, it takes me a while to understand. for somebody who is coming to watch it, they go oh, they are intimidated by it. the way we stage this production is really made it much more accessible. we had kids come in. it's that second language. >> it's fascinating about the kids. you would think that more than
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ever this is pushing generations away from shakespeare. even if you were classically trained in language and using syllables and verbs, it is still challenging. now we are going further and further away from the way we communicate. i'm curious the interaction you have with young people. they got it? >> as young as 9 or 10. they loved it. that's why we pick up the phone and it seems to me more vital than ever. we go back and look at the takes at least. if they are accessible to an audience. absolutely. they seem to be loving it. we have a lot of kids outside at night and they seem to really have connected with the language. that's so important. 2013 to have william shakespeare on broadway. >> we have the hobit coming up.
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were you surprised? it's not like it was supposed to be. i'm sure toll kin purists are weeping somewhere. the purists are probably upset, but how long did it take you to say yes to peter jack when he called some are. >> it was a heartbeat. he gave me my start in life. it's like if he said jump, i said how high. he gave me the opportunity with the reason. obviously i thought about him and i considered that idea of the purists are going to. i said to him, i had that conversation with pete initially. i think pete has one eye on the story and he really does think about the fans of the media and has one eye on the books and has that covered. he's a great entertainer. >> what's the tattoo? >> the tattoo is actually from
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lord of the rings. it says nine. nine of us from the fellowship of the ring got that tattoo. >> sorry that permanent some. >> yes. >> don't ask him about his hair. >> your hair looks very good. >> every time there is a good-looking young actor, i don't understand what you do with your hair. >> i don't get that look with the spikes. it's strange to me. >> on a high level. i could talk to you. shakespeare or toll kin. >> playing at the richard rogers theater. >> two weeks left. by the way -- >> it is the first time in like 35, 40 years that romeo and juliette has been on broadway. 36 years. two weeks left. avo: the volkswagen "sign then drive" sales event is back. which means it's never been easier to get a new 2014 jetta. it gets an impressive 34 highway mpg
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. >> coming up next, what did we learn today? i have a 401k retirement plan. i started part-time, now i'm a manager. my employer matches my charitable giving. really. i get bonuses even working part-time.
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>> so donny's theory.
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>> i never knew that. >> yes. >> it's great. what did you learn some. >> i learned it's encouraging that romeo and juliette are thinking twitter is a novel. >> what did you learn? >> i learned how to -- >> chuck todd. >> straight ahead and thank you for your patience. seriously. i apologize. >> an historic deal to temporary stop iran's nuclear program. many questions are unanswered. we will hear from the white house about what's next and their reaction by israel and

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