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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  June 11, 2013 3:00am-6:01am PDT

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earlier in the show we asked who's more overrated than tim tebow. john tower has responses. >> little bit of partisanship. ted cruz, sarah palin. lebron james. >> he's not overrated. >> not at all. we got some random ones. home made burritos are overrated. >> depends if you make them poorly, i guess. >> i guess. >> laura writes, most overrighted mine and your congressman and nerf sharks. >> i don't know they were in play for being overrated. we had random ones this morning. thanks, john. not overrated, "morning joe," starts right now. ♪
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>> edward snowden, that sounds like a "game of thrones" character. >> any analyst at any time can target anyone. i sitting at my desk certainly have the authorities to wiretap anyone from you or your accountant to a federal judge to even the president if i had a personal e-mail. >> how hard is that? during the election, i got e-mails from him five times a day. >> okay. edward, you can hack into the president's e-mail account. in the meantime can you just get my [ bleep ] excel to work? >> he said he doesn't want to live in a society where the society monitors its people and then he fled to china. >> oh, good morning. it is tuesday, june 11th. welcome to "morning joe." with us on set we have washington anchor for bbc world news america catty kay.
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donny deutsch. when i think of the stories we're covering today i'm not sure. >> worried. >> in washington pulitzer prize editorial writer for the "washington post," jonathan cape hart. >> the former governor of vermont, former chairman of the dnc howard dean with us. very good. good group. want to go around the table. we're going to get to, obviously, the latest on the fbi and the nsa, but one of the big headlines this morning is, a major reversal by the department of the -- department of justi justice's position over the so-called morning after pill. you guys know what that is, right? the government now plans to drop its appeal of an april ruling that will allow girls access to emergency contraception without a prescription or any age restriction? am i like already dating myself and looking like a moral -- i don't know. katie you have daughters. >> i would daughters, i have a
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17-year-old and a 7-year-old. i have to say if the skypes cie true what the morning after pill does this is conception for 72 hours, then i think it should be available. i think the fewer teen pregnancies in this country the better. america has a high rate of teen pregnancies than any other country in the world. we know the problems associated with that the young women and the babies they go on to have. if this is another way to get contraception to teenager. we've tried saying, don't do it. >> it addresses a crisis in our world but does it create a crisis in smaller worlds within our own families. >> i have three daughters, and two little ones, and i think the lax age restriction is the best part of it. it's the younger women, 14, 15, 16 who would be afraid to tell their parents, might not know what to do about it. >> might be taking contraception in the first place. >> and it's not going to
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cause -- i don't know the sta it testically more women to have sex. i think as katty pointed out it's only good. going to prevent teenage unwanted pregnancy. >> willie, you have little kids. >> i'm not there. i have kindergarten graduation today. >> congratulations. >> but critics make the same point as criticism. they say this allows young women to bypass parents and allows women to bypass doctors appointments so they can go in and do this and it's quick. >> that scares me. >> that's the one thing. >> a reversal for the obama administration. howard dean, you're a doctor, probably should have asked you first. what's your take on is on this? >> obey the science first of all. there is no provision in the fda law to make moral judgments about what you ought to do and what you ought not to do. so the problem with the obama administration they were making a judgment and the president says he was making it as a parent, that's fine and good but not what the fda is supposed to do. the fda is supposed to pass on the science. the science is fine.
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there's no problem scientifically with this, so now we're going to have a moral judgment. i think that's -- that place for that is congress or courts and so forth and so on. so the court did exactly the right thing. they followed the law. and i was disappointed in the obama administration for appealing and i think this is a wise move on their part. they don't want the supreme court to deal with this and that was the next step. jonathan capehart, want to chime in. >> i agree with what everyone said. this is science trumping politics which is what should have happened in the first place. >> i worry we're losing our kids. they have everything, the internet, the whole world is available on the internet, their iphones, all their conversations are -- they can go -- >> mika, the kids -- kids are smarter than they think. there are some dumb kids who do dumb things. the fact of the matter is most of these kids ought to be talked to by their parents and if their parents aren't doing their job there are going to be things
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that happen. >> even when you do your job. >> nice to have a backup. >> yeah. >> and sometimes, unfortunately n horrifically it's parents who are doing horrible things to their kids. >> i know. >> which make, you know, having no age restriction and being able to bypass parents kind of vital. >> it's complicated as a mother, when i saw the headline, i thought oh. okay. on to our other headlines now. today members of the house will hear directly from the fbi, justice department and nsa about the leak of classified information that revealed a vast government program to monitor americans' phone and internet data. there are growing calls on capitol hill for the self-identified leaker, 29-year-old edward snowden, we're learning a lot more about now, to face criminal charges for his actions. some including senators dine feinstein and bill nelson, have called his actions treasonness. saxby chambliss said if it's not
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treason, quote, it's pretty dam close. snowden's whereabouts are unclear and he may have left hong kong where he had been staying in a hotel for weeks. lawmakers and federal officials want to know how a private contractor with limited experience and an apparent lack of formal education had access to such sensitive material. it's shining a spotlight on the government's use of outside companies to deal with national secrets. 1.4 million people hold top secret clarntss, one third private contractors. new polling shows the american people are generally in favor of the clandestine programs. according to a "washington post"/pew poll, 62% investigating threats a the expense of privacy and 52% say the nsa's phone tracking program is acceptable. more than half of those surveyed believe the government should not monitor e-mail to prevent terror attacks. it plays into the part of this conversation which is a little bit unspoken and that is that people want to be protected,
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they want to be safe, they want the government to do the right thing. they almost want to trust them too, but then when they hear about potential civil liberties being broken we can't help open up the discussion and discuss whether or not the government should have this kind of power. i want to focus on snowden himself. i think he's raising a lot of questions and has opened up a huge can of worms for this administration. richard cohen writes in "the washington post" this, nsa is doing what google does. everything about edward snowden is ridiculously cinematic. he is not paranowic. he is narcissistic. he jettisoned a girlfriend, a career and undoubtedly his personal freedom to expose programs that were known to our elect the officials and could have been deduced by anyone who has ever googled anything. history will not record him as one of america's most consequential whistleblowers.
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history is more likely to forget him. soon you can google that. do you agree with what richard has to say? >> i try to avoid getting into all that stuff. i mean so here's the deal. i actually am one of the 56% who doesn't have a problem with having the government look around, make sure that there aren't any al qaeda cables, but i do not think -- a, i think it's ridiculous to say this guy committed treason. he didn't. what he did was something that somebody else should have done, ie, perhaps the president of the united states. if this guy was spying -- if we were doing all this with al qaeda and edward snowden revealed what's going on, that is treason. if he -- if the government is spying on 35 million american people, somebody ought to tell the people that and the valuable piece of all this is, we are now going to have a national discussion about whether this is okay or not. i personally don't have a big problem because i think security matter. but i have a problem with the government spying on the american people without telling us they're spying on us. that i think is wrong.
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>> governor dean, i want to just -- >> are they spying? what's the word? >> is the government really spying on 35 million americans or is the government taking a large swath across e-mails, telephone calls, for country to country, for specific situations, versus they are not -- last night when i e-mailed my girlfriend and told her how pretty i thought she was they were not eavesdropping or looking at that. >> you don't know. >> i do know. that's not the way it works. no incentive or motive. >> that's not what's been revealed either. >> maybe if there's -- if they're tracking something and something going from yemen to over here and -- >> donny, that's not what the program has been described as. what the program has been described as, they take huge chunks of diet ta and see who's calling who. >> not domestic. no domestic to domestic. it's only numbers. it's not conversations. it's not content.
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>> that's true. that is correct. >> that is a big misunderstanding. >> they're establishing big patterns of who's calling who and these are american citizens and i think we have -- or americans need to have a right to know what their government is doing. as i said before, i don't object to the program but i object to the fact that we didn't know about it and it is not okay to tell our elected representatives about this. this is a national issue that american people ought to debate publicly and now we're going to do that and that's what the good thing here is. >> why would the american people know about it? maybe we ought to know about it but it's a classified program. >> i mean, for all of the people who say that snowden shouldn't have revealed this, but it's great we're having this conversation. >> yes. >> he had to reveal this for us to have this conversation by virtue of the fact that the program was secret. we would never have been in the position we are this morning discussing surveillance and what it means for the war on terror and for our particular individual freedoms if we hadn't been having the conversation thanks to the fact that sfoedno leaked this. the problem with the argument
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that the government -- we trust the government, is the government is benign at the moment. what happens if we have the same legislations in place. >> i think it's -- so you're relying on the good graces and goodwill of the government rather than it being clearly lem lated what can and can't happen in the way the american people have been part of the decision. >> going on a democracy. >> very quickly, jonathan, is he a hero or traitor? that's the question we're addressing right now. >> i don't think he's a hero. i have to agree with governor dean. he's not a traitor. he hasn't revealed anything that the american government is doing is illegal. these are things that are legal, fisa court was involved,
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warrants involved you have mike rogers and what he's done has been larmful, that the program is fine and legal and the other thing i find most curious about snowden, he left a girlfriend, career, home, and flees to hong kong? basically goes to china? i mean this is -- this is a part of the story that i find interesting and fascinating as the days go along. i wonder if we'll find out more curious things about mr. snowden. >> two other big stories to get to, but i'll get to donny, let me show you something, the website buzzfeed put together a matchup of president obama's evolution on the matters of surveillance and national security. take a look. >> when we come to the wiretap provisions, for example, if those laws start encroaching too much on people's privacy, the average person, me, joe,
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everybody starts griping and complaining. >> giving law enforcement the tools they need to investigate suspicious activities is one thing and the right thing. but doing it without any real oversight seriously jeopardizes the rights of all americans and the ideals americans stand for. americans fought a revolution in part over the right to be free from unreasonable searches, to ensure that our government couldn't come knocking in the middle of the night for no reason. we need to find a way forward to make sure that we can stop terrorists while protecting privacy and liberty of innocent americans. we have to find a way to give the president the power he needs to protect us, while making sure that he doesn't abuse that power. it is possible to do that. we've done it before. we can do it again. >> you can't have 100% security and also then have 100% privacy and zero inconvenience.
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you know, we're going to have to make some choices. >> you know what that's a transition of a guy before he's in a job and when he's in a job and understands the responsibility of that job. i do think this man is a traitor. maybe there was a conversation that was going to take place tomorrow he between terrorists that's not going to take place now and it could cause a horrific event and i'm disgust. >> when we get to must reads they're all over the map. other news developing overnight, violence is boiling over in turkey which is a key u.s. ally and traditionally one of the most stable democracies in a region that has been lately torn apart by unrest. we're looking at live pictures right now. police are storming barricades in istanbul's square. protesters can be seen throwing rocks and molotov cocktails and police apparently using tear gas in response. demonstrators have occupied the square for more than a week. the riots began after a peaceful environmental protest was met with a tough police crackdown.
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we're going to go now, there is somewhat of a delay in our communications, but we're going to nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel he joins us live from the scene of those protests. take it away. >> as you mentioned, there is certainly a great deal of tear gas. there are ongoing clashes right now as riot police are using water cannons and tear gas. you can see some of that behind me to push away the demonstrators who have been in this square for almost two weeks now. the -- it began this morning at around 7:30 when several hundred riot police carrying shields, wearing gas masks, stormed into this square. there were only a few hundred demonstrators here at the time. quickly this entire part of istanbul filled with tear gas. we were seeing people in the surrounding hotels fleeing, covering their noses trying to cover their eyes, some of them
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carrying their bags as they were going to other parts of the city that aren't seeing these clashes right now. the prime minister has spoken today and was taking a very tough line. he says, the demonstrators here are from marginal groups, that they are traitors, saboteurs, they don't represent turkey and he says these operations to clear out this square and continue developing an urban project in this area will continue. as you mentioned, this began very different from this. it was a small, peaceful protest by environmentalists who were opposed to yet one more urban planning project, but when the police moved in, as they -- and took these same kind of harsh tactics we are seeing right now, the protest movement grew and now it is definitely a protest against prime minister ear da wan and these police tactics. >> richard engel live on the scene, watching these live pictures in the main square,
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the -- they're using water to try to push back the protesters. katty you've been covering the story for bbc. this started about a week ago? >> it's been a couple weeks we've seen these people out in the center of istanbul and other cities in turkey. you look at scenes like this and it reminds all of us who were covering the egyptian revolution of those scenes in tahrir square, but there are important differences. this is not so much a sectarian islamic split that's happening in turkey at the moment. it seems to be a moderately collection of people in the square. you've got communists, environmentalists, gay rights people, everybody coming together and really this is a demonstration about democracy and about the rights that democratic people -- it's ironic we're having this conversation about democracy about surveillance. in turkey what they're saying we haven't got our democratic freedom which is the right it to protest about this environmental part. the police handled that heavily. there have been 3,000 or 4,000 people arrested during these
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demonstrations and they're wanting to make sure that rights that come with democracy are enshrined and protected and enacted and that's the common theme of what you've been seeing from the demonstrators in turkey. >> we'll be following these live pictures and dip back in when necessary covering the story. coming up on "morning joe," former governor tim pawlenty will be on the set. editor of the national review rich lowry and later dr. emily senay joins the conversation. a lot of big medical news including the debate we've been having on the access to the morning after pill and renewed skepticism over whether we should be taking our vitamins. see i think they're kind of a rip off. >> never taken them. >> never? >> nope. >> i know. >> never go a day without the flintstones. >> up next the top stories in the politico playbook. bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> hopefully sunshine in the forecast. we need it in the east after the rainy deluge on friday from the
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tropical storm. yesterday was a soaker. even dealt with a lot of severe weather too around the baltimore area, washington, d.c., with scary hours. thankfully we didn't have injury or fatalities with the weak tornados that went through. here's what we did yesterday. we had about seven tornado reports. a bunch were right around baltimore. one over the inner harbor and one out here in kentucky was an f 2, ef-2 with 135-mile-per-hour winds. there is cleanup to be done. what's left of that system is now going up through northern new england, just a little bit of rain left over there in connecticut and rhode island and will end shortly there. another hour or two in mass and then rain until you about the noon hour in maine, vermont, upstate new york. after sunshine we may spark off another round of showers and storms. it won't be severe, won't be dealing with tornadoes. d.c., how warm you get, 86 degrees today. later tonight, new storms in the central plains. few tornadoes.
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maybe a wind damaged threat overnight into areas like chicago and the other story out there is the heat. yesterday was 99 in denver. record high. today 96. dallas, st. louis, oklahoma, city, little rock, you are all in mid summer heat. enjoy it if you like that sort of thing. washington, d.c., lot better today than yesterday. what a rough day it was. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. the verizon share everything plan for small business
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cents. it's even less, by the way, if you're an african-american or a latina. so i guess that's progress, but does anybody here think that's good enough? >> no. >> i assume everybody thinks we can do better? >> yes. >> yes, we can. >> yes, we can. >> when more women are bringing home the bacon, they shouldn't be just getting a little bit of bacon. >> different ways of putting it, but yes, 50 years after the equal pay act take a look at the morning papers and stay on the topic. "usa today" new reports indicate that women are finding jobs at a much higher rate than men this year. since 2010 the employment rate for women has dropped rapidly since december from 7.8% compared to men at 7.9%. while this is good news for
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women, it should be noted half of the growth has been in low wage occupations. i don't actually think it's necessarily good news. because we also have other studies that show one in four women are the breadwinners but still make less than their male counterparts. >> what's that going to do from families, that's going to grow from one in four and in a decade about half, that means the net income of that family is down as well because the main breadwinner of the family isn't making as much as the man would have been making. >> can't just look at the stark numbers. >> i think as young people are more gender blind that 77 is going to grow fast. i believe that. >> i agree with you. >> i think the free market meritocracy system, more women college graduates right now and i think we're going to be very pleasantly surprised how fast the numbers are. >> all predictions are we'll be at parody, more degrees, more
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post-graduate degrees and the skills in our new economy. >> but in the present economy right now, you have men being rooted out and not having an easy job being rehired. women getting hired because they'll take less and do more, that's the concept. >> that's not good for -- >> we know when men are losing jobs they're sitting at home, their egos are fragle. >> their families are falling apart. >> women are catching up but most of the gains in low wage jobs. cashiers, waitresses. it's still a tough slog. >> i was glad to hear president obama put it in that context. when president kennedy signed that 50 years ago, you would be surprised to know 50 years later it was only at 77%. he would have thought we were at full and equal pay. a long way to go. back to the papers," dan berry news times" schools in connecticut were placed on lockdown as somebody made a threatening phone call to an elementary school there. the school threatened is located two miles from sandy hook where
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26 people were killed in december. after an investigation no threats were found at any of the schools in the district. "wall street journal" big changes on the way for apple users. yesterday the company announced its biggest redesign in iphone software since 2007 when the iphone was introduced. apple unveiled new plaque books and a streaming radio service called itunes radio. is this iphone going to be better, willie? >> i think it's the same. >> what's the deal? i don't get it. >> one of the reasons that apple stock has taken a beating is that most people look down the pipeline, see new product, but do not see that much of a differentiation, that it's going to drive sales. at some point consumers get smart and say this nook change is not worth spending -- >> not worth $800. >> and android is eating up the market. "huffington post" a study indicates foot foods such as nuts and olive oil may be good
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for men's prostate health. those replaced that 10% of their diet with healthy vegetable fats showed a lower risk of developing the lethal form of the cancer. former first lady and secretary of state hillary clinton officially joined twitter yesterday. while her account gave an impressive 1,000 followers per minute, that's cool, a lot of followers right away her bio is what people are talking about. interesting, she cites herself as a hair icon, pants suit aficionado and glass ceiling cracker, indicating that more may be in store for her ending the bio with the three letters, tbd. if that's not a tease -- >> tantalizing. >> please. >> come on now. time now for politico, willie. >> take a look at politico. the playbook with mike allen, the chief white house correspondent down there. mike, good morning. >> good morning, guys. >> i can't believe we're saying this, but you're reporting that there is another fiscal cliff looming. get ready for this slog.
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this time being driven by the senate. what's the time frame on this one, mike? >> well, this is coming up september 3rd when the government's budget year ends. but what's fascinating here, is that there are very different players before. before the mars and venus with president obama, speaker boehner, this time the other end of capitol hill, senate republicans are the ones who are the key to making a deal. these are some of the senators that went to that dinner with president obama that sort of crack in the separation between the two, and a new player in the white house, now chief of staff, dennis mcdonna, been there since day one, but now the new chief of staff, he's spending a lot more time on capitol hill, just up there yesterday or just up there within the last week, met with senate republicans who said you're looking at what's happening in the budget over the next ten years. look at what happens over the next 30 years. look at how much worse it is.
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so that's the conversation that's going on. the leverage that republicans have, once again they have to raise the debt ceiling. the question is what are they going to get for it? republicans want to tie it to tax reform. believe it or not, a new kind of sequester. sequester for tax reform. say that if tax reform doesn't happen, other things will automatically kick in. that's a debate going on over the next few months and willie, more time for congress to take, we thought that the debt ceiling would become an emergency in october, now because of the fiscal help, the country is a little better, could be november, december, so theses guys have up until september 30th on the budget but all year on the debt ceiling to ring their hands. >> any reason for people to be more hopeful this time, maybe based on the new players involved you laid out, there could be a budget deal, this won't be like the last fiscal cliff and the one before that? >> the argument for a bigger deal is that president obama is
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going to want to say that his second term was product different, accomplish things. immigration is not a sure thing as we've talked about on the show. it's looking better. if the president was able it to say he had done something big to affect the next ten years, 30 years, that's the kind of legacy building a second-term president wants to do and that his white house staff is going to want to put their mark on that. >> we'll see. mike allen, a look at the playbook, thanks so much. >> have great week. >> up next in sports, chad johnson, former ochocinco going to jail a single moment in the courtroom that has the former star player doing time. sports is next. ♪ i' 'm a hard, hard ♪ worker every day. ♪ i' ♪ i'm a hard, hard worker and i'm working every day. ♪ ♪ i'm a hard, hard worker and i'm saving all my pay. ♪ ♪ if i ever get some money put away, ♪ ♪ i'm going to take it all out and celebrate. ♪ ♪ i'm a hard, hard worker... ♪
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time for sports. a lot of people thought tim tebow might be done with football after basically no one in the nfl showed any interest over the last several months. that may have changed. according to espn the former jets an broncos quarterback signed a deal with the new england patriots. tebow expected to participate in the team's mini camp today. in new england tebow will be reunited with josh mcdaniels who was his head coach with the broncos. some are speculating tebow may not be used as a quarterback, may not. tom brady there is. he will not be used as a quarterback.
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mike freeman at cbssports.com cites a source that says he will, quote, study a great deal at tight end. espn sources dispute that claim. this is bill belichick taking a chance on a guy. josh mcdaniels the offensive coordinator in new england who had tebow in denver vouches for him, bring him in, give him a shot. >> to me the surprise about it is the downside, he comes in all of a sudden focuses on him. i'm a veteran on the team, star on the team, i'm mad and that's what happened with the jets. even if he does have the talent as a team chemistry thing i find it odd. >> there's no chance of a quarterback controversy in new england. they know who the big dog is. they have to find a place to put him in. in new york, should he start, put him in. >> day one of camp the camera crews are around him. if i'm brady or anybody else on the team i'm going, what is this? >> yeah. belichick can handle them. the handshake heard around the golf world, tiger woods and sergio garcia showing a brief moment on the driving range ahead of the u.s. open. first time the two golfers have talked, here it is, one
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mississippi, two mississippi, they're talking. that's a good -- oh. that's getting long. tiger is like beat it, dude. >> nine seconds. >> garcia made a comment about woods after the players championship that many viewed as racist. sergio garcia apologized profusely. this was, though, their first face-to-face meeting. neither player addressed the handshake yesterday. both scheduled to address the media today and we may hear more about this. garcia and woods always had an icy relationship. these two guys don't like each other. >> may have been racist? >> it was. >> yes. >> he's from spain and didn't understand the context he claimed, but it was. to baseball now, rays hosting the red sox. tempers flair in the sixth inning. john lackey drills matt joys in the bat. salty in the face of joyce, telling him to go to first base. not long before benches clear. little pushing, shoving, no punches thrown. just kind of a scrum along the
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first base line. back to the game, top of the 14th, still tied, daniel nava with a bloop single, that scores the go-ahead run. no answer from the rays and the bottom of the frame, boston wins, 10-8. former nfl star chad johnson will spend the next 30 days in jail. >> this is an amazing story. >> formerly known as ochocinco because of his 85 which does not chance late to ocho cinco but that's a different story, he was set to serve probation in a plea deal for a domestic violence case. in a hearing in fort lauderdale yesterday, the judge asking johnson if he is happy with his reputation and that's when johnson playfully smacked his attorney on the rear end. the judge not amused. >> mr. johnson i don't know that you're taking this whole thing seriously. i saw you slap your attorney on the backside. this isn't a joke. >> i didn't do it as a joke. >> everybody in the courtroom was laughing. i'm not accepting these plea negotiations. >> the judge threw out the plea
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deal and gave johnson 30 days in lockup on the spot. >> what happened was the judge -- his was incredible. the judge said to johnson, you should be very happy with your attorney. he's done a great job. johnson went yeah man. >> no one saw it. >> and she freaked. mine that is unacceptable. that is not the law. >> this is what we -- >> unbalanced woman. >> a locker room -- >> in response to something she said. >> i was just reading it and i thought how horrible because he slapped his attorney, thinking it was a woman. >> it was a woman. >> it with you a man. >> a sports guy. >> she -- the judge felt he was disrespecting the court and he was -- because everyone else started giggling in the courtroom and felt he was not taking this seriously. >> you could see his face. you didn't show the part of the clip where he turned around -- i mean that's not what this judicial system is about. >> wow. >> it's a domestic abuse case, a serious case. she thought he was not taking it serious, gave him 30 days for
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the butt slap. >> mika's must-read opinion pages. you're watching "morning joe" brude by starbucks. >> tough judge. ewed by starbuck. >> tough judge. if we don't double the number of kids graduating from high school in the next 8 years, our country won't be able to compete globally. what uncle sam needs now are more good teachers. are you up for it? you can help kids graduate. the more you know.
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your business is more reliable - secure - agile. and with responsive, dedicated support, we help you shine every day of the week. here's a little thing. i think it will prove helpful to you. what the nsa, the national security agency, what they have been up to. i think this is very enlightening. take a look. >> july 6th, 2012. benjamin anderson of albany, new york, makes a call at 2:36 p.m. to a residential call in malaysia while sitting on his phone. >> hello?
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hello? hello? hello? hello? >> okay. the opinion pages are going wild on this topic. we'll get to them in just a second. first of all, getting a lot of text messages about the last story. the butt slap. and they agree with you. believe it or not. >> rare occurrence the public speaks out on my side. >> i don't want to go into the case because that's serious, but he didn't slap a woman's butt. >> yeah. >> it was his male attorney. let's -- i mean, makes no sense. i'm just going to point out -- here we go. the ruling comes down, she's talking, she's talking. he gets good news. right? look. >> she on her own, she said look how great a job your attorney did. it wasn't like -- >> that was it. you missed it if you didn't see it. >> if he slapped him on the should wear it have been different. >> the judge freaked out. >> it's interesting. there's a -- people with the whole nsa story as far as being brother, this is kind of scary
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in a different kind of way. >> that was a loose cannon. >> the judge has the latitude to be in a bad mood and not something and put someone in the cage. >> also because someone in the courtroom laughed. she felt she was shown up in her room. >> it was a tiny giggle. >> smiling. she thought she lost control. >> that's somebody who doesn't feel in control in the first place. >> okay. that was scary. >> willie, i'm sorry. >> i didn't know about it this. >> i can't believe this. this is amazing. that is a sloppy joe in between a krispy kreme doughnut. >> wow. >> they sold like 1,000 in a day. >> wow. >> they had a chef that createsed this. >> let me tell you why they did that. because it's on the front page of the "wall street journal" now. that's the sad part. >> whatever. >> we go yuck. >> disgusting. >> and they get all this great press as a result of it. it's disgusting. >> it's $8. >> anyone who spend $8 on that should just flush $8 down the toilet, better use.
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>> because the cost on their health is going to cost them more. >> joe is not here to defend that. >> he's probably at krispy kreme right now and there's one on his stomach and the other is going down his throat. okay. all right. back to serious news here. "wall street journal" this is rand paul and what we're going to see happening, given the nsa story and what snowden has done. big brother is really watching us. no one objects to balancing security against liberty. no one objects to seeking warrants for targeted monitoring based on probable cause. we've always done this. what is object shunble is a system in which government has unlimited and privileged access to the details of our private affairs and citizens are simply supposed to trust that there won't be any abuse of power. this is an absurd expectation. americans should trust the national security agency as much as they do the irs and the
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justice department. monitoring the records of as many as a billion phone calls as some news reports have suggested, is no modest invasion of privacy. it's an xroerd invasion of privacy. i'll start with jonathan capehart. >> i'm sorry. i mean, i know senator paul is being true to his libertarian roots but i feel like there's a whole lot of hyperbole in what he's saying. it's not as if the -- that the nsa and the government is doing anything illegal and that if people have a problem with what's -- with what's happening, then senator paul and other members of congress have to debate and come up with new rules, laws, regulations to ensure that what he fears, he's paranoid will happen doesn't happen. i think the way you introduce this segment was great. you say here we gop. here's how this debate is going. i wish we could strip away the hyperbole and focus on what is happening, how did we get here. it's not as if we woke up over
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the weekend and found out that the government was doing this and no one knew about it. that isn't the case. >> howard dean, 98 senators originally voted for the patriot act. >> there is that. >> which has been endorsed time and time again in congress. do you thing that changes now? there's always been a small handful of senators, people like ron wyden who have come out publicly against the provisions, but do you feel like publicly because of the release of all this information, some people in congress will be liberated in a way to protest against it? >> i don't think it's going to go that far. i think jonathan's point was well taken. i was with senator paul in the first paragraph and the second one sort of went -- became this overwrought propaganda basically, nonsense. this is a serious issue. we need to have a serious american discussion about this and everybody needs to be involved in it because it is a big deal. i don't think we want to compromise our security but we do want know what the hell the government is rooting through
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our private stuff for. if we have that discussion, i think most people are going to come down as they have in the poll you showed earlier today, saying okay, this is reasonable. but i think we have to know. don't think it's right to do this behind closed doors. >> so how do we know without, obviously, you know, that big umbrella conversation ender without threatening national security? should there be a bipartisan committee, donny, or katty, where they know everything and it's a small group from both sides of the aisle? >> you know -- >> take a look at -- >> do we think as a democracy we as 300 million americans are entitled to know every security measure the government is doing? that's number one. number two, i want to know, does anybody at this table genuinely think they're reaching out to verizon to find out anything other than some targeted issues having to do with terrorism? do we genuinely think -- >> we don't know. >> do you think there was any
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other objective. >> it's possible. we don't know. >> i'm asking an opinion. >> are you sitting here worried about it at night? >> no, i'm not, but i'm worried about the possibility that when they have these new parameters they could. >> there are questions. >> whether there would be somebody to use it for nefarious reasons. >> up next, john oliver, we'll ask a question about him. takes over hosting duties at "the daily show." highlights from his first day at the anchor desk next in news you can't use. [ ice freezing ] [ wind howling ] [ engine revving ] ♪ [ electricity crackling ] [ engine revving ]
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all right. >> time for news you can't use. >> yesterday day one, jon stewart off directing a film. correspondent john oliver sitting in, said he was nervous, excited. let's see how he did. >> intelligence agencies are secretly collecting millions of americans' phone records on a daily basis. >> are you [ bleep ] kidding me? jon's been gone one day. one day. we have such a fun, gentle first show planned for you as well. a few harmless british jokes like, oh, this is a football, not a soccer ball. we call it a football. halfway through the show we were going to break and have a little
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tea time. not only is the government tracking everyone's phone calls, that's just the tip of the [ bleep ] iceberg. >> now we're hearing it goes way beyond phone records to our internet habits and who we e-mail with. >> i bet the amish are feeling pretty [ bleep ] smart right now. >> he did well. that is a big, big seat to fill. he did a good job. >> that was funny. that amish line is genius. >> he has several weeks to work it out. >> he's adorable. >> a strange way to get served papers. ciara was singing at a concert on saturday night, everything going well on stage, when handed a stack of papers from someone in the crowd. probably a fan. those are legal papers. she backs away. she's being sued by an l.a. night club for failing to show up to a concert so she was served the papers right there on stage. >> this is a great country. >> performed at l.a.'s gay pride fest instead of showing up to
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that night club. her team says it canceled the show well in advance. >> that's a bad day. >> hope she doesn't go in front of the chad ochocinco judge. >> coming up next be, eugene robinson and tim pawlenty. great to have him back with us. "morning joe" back in a moment. uh, i'm in a timeout because apparently riding the dog like it's a small horse is frowned upon in this establishment! luckily though, ya know, i conceal this bad boy underneath my blanket just so i can get on e-trade. check my investment portfolio, research stocks... wait, why are you taking... oh, i see...solitary. just a man and his thoughts.
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giant computer that basically records every facet of our daily lives. what is this sinister program called? tyrannatran. radio foreshadow blade. the human snoopede. >> the internet program is called prism. >> prism? that's the best you've got? with a logo that looks like a chinese boot leg of a pink floyd album. >> welcome back to "morning joe." it's the top of the hour. katty kay with us along with howard dean in washington and joining us now former minnesota governor and republican presidential candidate tim pawlenty and in washington, pulitzer-prize winning columnist and associate editor of the "washington post" eugene robinson. later in this block i'm going to ask our newer guests at the table to ask about the -- do i call it the butt slap. >> chad johnson. >> i'm curious what they think
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of that. we'll get to that later. put it in the proper perspective. we'll cover the nsa, read part of your piece in the "washington post," eugene, but first, i think this is a fascinating and possibly really, really important story. girls of any age will soon gain access to emergency contraception without prescriptions or age restrictions. it's a major reversal for the department of justice over the so-called morning after pill. the government now plans to drop its appeal of an april ruling. in 2011 the fda was preparing unrestricted sales when health and human services secretary kathleen sebelius overruled her own scientists in an unprecedented move. women's rights advocates say the decision could be a move forward for reproductive justice. opponents argue the drugs availability takes away the rights of parents and there we start the conversation. katty, we talked last hour, tim, you want to weigh in.
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>> each family situation is different, mika, it's hard to say one size fits all. for me, i've got two daughters, one in high school. >> me too. >> one in college. 15, 14, 13. >> that's so young. >> awfully young to say we're going to detach that from parents and parent involvement. i understand everybody saying look, each situation is different. that's too young in my book to be pulling kids away from parents. >> i'm with you. just, you know, first look, kind of a broad thought as a mother of daughters, this makes me nervous. >> i would say in an ideal situation, obviously girls are having conversations with their parents and they're not getting into situations that they haven't fully discussed with their moms or with their dads. they're not having sex with people when they're 14, 15. we don't live in an ideal world. we have a situation where girls are getting pregnant when they are 13, 14, 15, when they're too young to have children, and this is a form of contraception that is available to them and often they are children, young girls in situations where they don't
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have a good relationship with their parents. they don't necessarily have that family support network that would make -- help them make the decisions beforehand. >> i think there's one other -- >> the fewer teen pregnancies in this country the better. >> there is one other piece to this, when you move it from prescription to over the counter you remove the link where say a 14-year-old who doesn't have a fully development judgment doesn't need to see a health care professional who might be able to counsel the young person or get them some other help. >> again, that's the ideal scenario. you've been to your doctor, got the right kind of contraception if you want it. often cases these girls haven't been to a doctor before hand and what do you say to the 14 or 15-year-old girl who does get pregnant? this gives them some option. >> as a general rule, not to belabor it, we want to do things to encourage parental involvement and not discourage and disconnect. >> it's a tough one. this for me as a mother, it feels like everything is out there and available to them. i mean from -- when we were growing up you couldn't buy
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something with racy pictures in it. let alone the morning after pill. it just seems like it's the wild west out there for our kids in some ways. >> mika. >> yeah. >> this seems like one of the things, though, that at first glance it strikes a lot of us, especially those of us at a certain age, as that's too young, you know, hold on here just a minute. you know, the more i think about it the more i come down on the other side and the more i think that, you know, teenagers, even young teenagers, are going to do what they're going to do and to -- this sort of affects their behavior after the fact, rather than before the fact. i don't think that allowing this over-the-counter access makes it more likely, for example, that young girls are going to engage in sexual activity that their parents would certainly
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disapprove of. i think if they're going to do that, they're probably going to do that anyway. this gives them option after the fact. >> i think two points to be made here. first, the point we talked about before, this decision is the right decision, not because this debate isn't a good debate, it's the right decision because it's the law. the secretary of hhs doesn't get to override the fda scientists and that's the law. the second decision which is where i also disagree with the way this conversation is going, we're trying to reduce the abortion rate. >> yeah. >> kids have abortions, if they get pregnant, a lot of times and sometimes they can do that even in states that have parental consent laws. i think to go and get a pill that is the fda has said is benign in terms of the physiological affects, is better than having to decide whether your 14-year-old should have an abortion or not. i'm completely with this decision both on a scientific and moral grounds. i think it's the better of two
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ev evils. we don't want 14-year-olds having sex but it's far better than that, than have to confront the issue of abortion. >> go ahead, tim. >> all that can be said has been said, but i'll say, it's not about whether a young person is going to have sex or not. once they do and if they become pregnant, do you want to encourage them to consult their doctor or health care professional and parents before they make a decision and i think we want public policies that try to connect, not disconnect parents. >> someone calling my name? >> especially for younger people obviously. >> all right. it's funny, as we discuss this and i'm guilty too, we're only discussing girls. >> yeah. >> kind of interesting. >> boys in this conversation -- >> they have a right too. >> always the girls that get the burden of this. >> this is a bigger -- i think it's fascinating on a societal level but also clearly we have some issues of socioeconomic layers, of problems we couldn't get to in even a three-hour show. other news, today members of the house will hear directly
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from the fbi, justice department and the nsa about the leak of classified information that revealed a vast government program to monitor america's phone and internet data. there are growing calls on capitol hill for the self-identified leaker, 29-year-old edward snowden, to face criminal charges for his actions. some, including senators dianne feinstein and bill nelson, have called his actions treasonous. saxby chambliss, the top republican on the intelligence committee said if it's not treason it's close. snowden's whereabouts are unclear and may have left hong kong where he had been staying in a hotel for weeks. lawmakers want to know how a private contractor with limited experience and an apparent lack of formal education, had access to such sensitive material. it's shining a spotlight on the government's use of outside companies to deal with national secrets. 1.4 million people hold top
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secret clearances. one third of them private contractors. still, new polling shows the american people are generally in favor of the clandestine programs. according to a "washington post"/pew poll, 62% favor investigating threats at the expense of privacy and 56% say the nsa's phone tracking program is acceptable. but more than half of those surveyed believe the government should not monitor e-mail to prevent terror attacks. eugene robinson, you wrote about this in your latest piece. i want to read a part of that and ask you a question, but first, we do need to make clear exactly what they're looking at. >> yeah, right. >> we are clear on that. when you read the headlines you get the sense all your e-mails are being read and phone calls being listened to and chats being read. is that the case? >> apparently not. what we know this week that we didn't know last week, is two things that the nsa is doing. one, compiling a huge,
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unimaginebly vast data base of all of our phone calls, but this is what they call metadata, the number calling from, the number to, how long it lasts. there's location data in there like what cell phone tower the call is bouncing off of. you can use this once you associate -- once you look back and associate a number with a person to, for example, track a person's movements. and certainly look at a person's phone calls or whatever. but that's the data base. it's not listening to the conversations. the other thing we know they're doing which they say they're doing overseas is with the cooperation of the big internet providers, they are looking at e-mails and other electronic communications of foreign targets. it's unclear how much information they're sweeping up. but my sense is quite a lot.
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and that's happening overseas. that doesn't -- apparently doesn't affect you or me. it does affect constituents of people like david cameron and angela merckcle and francois hollande, not too thrilled about this. >> governor pawlenty we heard this morning and the last several days in a bipartisan way, that mr. snowden is a traitor, he's committed treason from people -- from members of congress have said this over and over the last several days. what's your feeling about him personally, whether he is a whistleblower or traitor, but also about the public's right to know? that poll was telling. we've been wondering when will the numbers come out and what will the public think? 62% say they take protecting us from terrorism over privacy. >> first of all snowden, to be a whistleblower you have to report illegal activity. there's no indication that anything was illegal. he's not a whistleblower, he's a
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traitor and should be prosecuted as such. number two, what the heck was a 29-year-old high school dropout doing with this kind of access to the highest, most sensitive information the country has and by the way, even if he had a top secret security clearance, within that, there are compartmentalizations. if you're top secret you don't get access to everything on north korea. you have to be read into that compartment. an interesting question is, was he snooping around in the compartments he wasn't authorized to be in and that by itself may be a violation. look at the elements, positive elements. number one, bipartisan, under both president bush and president obama. number two, congressional notification. number three, court oversight. within the court oversight layers. this is an important point, at the first layer you don't give people's contents of their phone calls. you get to see whether willie geist was having a batch of calls to yemen and then they have to get a warrant to figure out if they have probable cause -- >> they don't know if willie was having a sloppy joe krispy kreme doughnut.
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>> based on what we know today that's right. >> if you're going to have a program like this, bipartisan support, congressional notification, court oversight, differentiation of the layers -- >> i tried to say this to glenn greenwald yesterday and he bit my head off. >> do you think that we are as americans are better off knowing that we're being watched? >> everybody -- >> in some way, whatever the degree to which we're being watched, better that we know. >> in this world of facebook and yahoo! and metadata you're being watched at some level anyhow. all they see today is pattern of contents. if they want to see the context they have to get a warrant. balancing privacy and security, but we need to make sure 62% of the poll reflects this on the balance point we need to have these programs in place. >> do you agree we should be having this conversation at all? i mean do you agree we should know what the government -- >> which is the point. >> watching what they're able to collect, not able to collect, because if you think that this is a valuable conversation, the only way we can have this
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conversation is because snowden released some of this information. >> snowed didn't not become a whistleblower. this is a legal program. >> i appreciate that. >> i don't think there's any doubt that a program like this existed in some manner. >> howard dean. >> general -- >> i think a lot of people were surprised at the degree and the size. >> hold on. >> i agree with tim that we're going to give up some privacy in order to make ourselves safe, but we need to have this public conversation. i had no idea they had this size of this program existed. i don't mind being -- having my phone calls monitored if that's what it takes to keep al qaeda out of the united states, fine. the american people need to know that. that cannot be confined to 435 policymakers and the president and the administration. this is where i don't often agree with rand paul on anything, but i do believe that government -- you cannot consider the government as always benign. from a democratic point of view put yourself in the position of george bush running all this stuff and dick cheney. that would make me nervous.
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the best disinfectant is publicly shining the spotlight on this program. my guess is the american people, as we've seen this morning in the polling, would support this program. but we have a right to know when we're being listened to and what this program is. >> at least the context. >> and some of the parameters too, i think because how long is this data being kept? there are also questions as i understand from legal scholars, some people say this is an extraordinarily broad interpretation of the relevant section of the patriot act, that it gives this much authority to collect this much data on domestic communications. clearly two administrations have come down on the other side of that question, but i'm told it is a question. >> so -- >> and i just -- you know, the -- why didn't we know this and talk about it and if we want to do it we should go forward with it. >> a lot of these laws were put in place and then technology started to happen. i mean we now have a life in
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which katty, you and i could search for a certain dress and then all of a sudden get e-mails for that, for all those dresses. do you know what i'm saying? we're being watched on every level for marketing purposes, data collection, and now the government has to figure out what to do with these abilities as well. i mean, i'm not trying -- >> not making any excuses but we are always changing in this rapidly changing technological age. >> this is a story about big data and what it allows governments to do and how much information it allows them to have. because certainly when the patriot act was conceived in 2001, that was the dark ages compared to where we are now in terms of technology and the people who drew up the patriot act couldn't have conceived this level of surveillance. that's why it's important to keep having the conversation. >> why we should review. >> as the technology changes and only going to carry on changing, we still need to discuss -- and i think we have to have the broader conversation about this in the context of the war on terrorism, how much are we
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prepared to pay, how much freedom are we prepared to give up, for prosecuting the war on terrorism? >> totally agree. >> may decide absolutely. >> but can you imagine the press conference where, you know, we say we have to have the discussion and know about the program and snowden the traitor allowed us to have the discussion. imagine the press conference where the president says i'm announcing a new program, want you to know about it, prism, we watch patterns of calls and e-mails and if you hit a certain threshold of calls to yemen or iraq or afghanistan, we monitor your e-mails. let's have that discussion. >> exactly. >> how preposterous would that be? >> embarrass the umbrella, perfect conversation ender. the umbrella of national security. we'll get back to it. but you bring up the ultimate point where you can't give them our playbook. before we go to break, willie, this is just as important, i don't know what happened here. i thought he slapped a woman's butt. >> i don't know if it's just as important but we'll talk --
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>> sarcasm. >> gene, get your take on this one. >> not. >> in our last hour, former nfl star chad johnson going to spend the next 30 days in jail. why, you ask? formerly known as ochocinco, you may know that, all set, he was, to serve probation in a plea deal. serve probation for domestic violence case. in a hearing yesterday, you saw it there, he smacked his attorney on the rear end, the judge didn't like it. the judge thought he was not taking the case seriously. it's a domestic violence case. and she did this. >> mr. johnson, i don't know that you're taking this whole thing seriously. i saw you slap your attorney on the backside. this isn't a joke. >> i didn't do it as a joke. >> everybody in the courtroom was laughing. i'm not accepting these plea negotiations. >> the deal was he was supposed to get community service and counseling as part of this plea deal. he slaps his attorney on the rear end on the spot.
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she gives chad johnson 30 days in jail. she is prepared to give him probation but you saw the slap. 30 days in jail, gene. >> i'm outraged, willie. i'm considering wearing an 88 jersey all day in solidarity. >> 85. >> ochocinco, come on. >> you know, he -- ocho cinco, he's -- he's -- all he did was pat his attorney on the backside. one can imagine he was pleased with the deal. i don't think that's some sort of enormous sign of disrespect to the court. and i don't know why the judge went off like that. >> somebody was a little -- i don't know. >> she came out and said it. she was embarrassed. everyone laughed in the courtroom. she didn't have control of the moment so she gave him 30 days in jail. >> we started with the morning after pill, nsa, would you like to weigh in on -- >> sure. >> ocho cinco is a goof ball and loser that's inappropriate conduct, it's demeaning to women, disrespectful to the court and i'm glad the judge threw him in jail.
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this guy has been a goof ball for years and it was disrespectful. >> i think -- >> that's what i wanted to ask. we don't know what his demeanor had been like during the course of the trial, what the evidence was during the course of the trial. it may be the judge came to the conclusion to give him probation but was on the fence and thought this guy is not -- >> you're right. she did say it had been a pattern. >> you don't get to slap women in the courtroom on a butt. >> it was a man. >> or a man. it's disrespectful. >> okay. former governor tim pawlenty, i like it. he doesn't i quiv cate. that's what i like about him. thanks very much. howard dean, thank you as well. eugene robinson, stay with us if you can. up next, what you're really meant to do. forget the traditional definition of success. we've been talking about that a lot around here. author rob caplan says the best way to reach your potential is to recognize our own unique capabilities and how to do that next on "morning joe."
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we're trying to get a feel for how people spend their day at work. so if you would, would you walk us through a typical day for you? >> yeah. >> great. >> well, i generally come in at least 15 minutes late. i use the side door. that way lumber can't see me. and after that i just sort of space out for about an hour. >> space out? >> yeah. i just stare at my desk but it looks like i'm working. i do that for probably another hour after lunch too. i would say in a given week, probably only do about 15 min of real, actual work. >> oh, my. that was a scene from the 1999 movie "office space." remember that? with its classic look at employees not living up to their potentials. joining us now -- anyone kind of relate with that person?
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>> it's interesting, what the trick now is, you can't tell whether people are working or not because they have a computer. >> and they're on facebook. >> i used to walk through my agency and tell who was working. you can't. everybody is like that. >> i love it. joining us senior associate dean and professor at harvard business school, rob kaplan, the author of the book "what you're really meant to do, a road map for reaching your unique potential." you found out what you were really meant to do, is it fair to say when you left goldman? >> yeah. >> you took leave? >> i took a leave but i had a great career and loved it. i've been watching the stock market every day since i was 10. that was a great career for me but time do something else. >> you weren't going to leave. you took a little time off to -- >> i was thinking about it. >> yeah. >> i did a half step taking a leave of absence to teach for a semester and i loved it and i stayed. >> is this what you're meant to do. >> i think right now, where i can have the most impact on the world. >> what's the motivation behind
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the book? do you think there are a lot of people missing the boat on their true calling? >> i joke around, harvard is a little like switzerland, if people are having trouble and tried everything else, they eventually will come to somebody like me and so yeah, i talked to people from 25 to 85, who are struggling with this at every stage in their career. surprisingly successful people. but i've learned this is a lifelong struggle that all of us go through and it never ends. you go through it your entire life. >> it's okay to feel this way at 46. >> absolutely. it's typical to feel this way at 46 and most 46-year-olds out there know that and they feel better knowing they're not the only one. >> rob, it's interesting, i do a lot of coaching on stuff like this and spoke to so many entrepreneurs in my life. so many go through growing up and get socialized to be taught you're supposed to be a lawyer or doctor, what their parents want or the hot job in your book and i always say to people if you're struggling, think back to when you were a child what you
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loved. if you liked to fish open an aquarium store. and we let that fire get diluted to what we're supposed to do and is there an interesting theory in looking back to what was your raw passion from the beginning? >> yes. the saying goes, most people die with the music still inside them. and this book is about you got to try to let it out and to your point, think about a time you shined when you were -- you loved what you did, what were you doing? a lot of people once they get in the job start suppressing that or think time for thinking about that is over and the time for thinking about that is never over because being a great performer there's a high correlation between that and loving many aspects of what you're doing. >> i'm interested in what you said about people in their mid 40s, often having this kind of crisis of should i be doing something else. is it because they change and they want to be doing something different from that time on in their life than they did perhaps in their 20s and 30s, or is it just the inevitable process of thinking i've only got another 10 or 15 years of working life,
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20 years. >> last chance. >> my last chance and the kind of options are narrowing. >> all of the above. the world is changing constantly. businesses are changing. industries are changing. if you want to become a doctor 30 years ago look how different it is to be a practicing doctor today than 30 years ago with all the bureaucracy and issues and challenges. what happens is, you change, the world changes, your job changes, your firm changes and you realize, so this is it? and i still want to do more or maybe you've already done it and want to do the next thing. everyone is going through that. >> all right. eugene robinson is with us from washington. he has a question for you. >> yeah. my question really, rob, do you run into cases where, you know, searching for the music is overrated and it's not the thing to do. so, you know, somebody who's making a very good living, in his or her family an accountant but has this inner fire to be a
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great chef, not nessry in training or anything. >> who wants development, who wants to be an actor. >> do you tell them maybe you find that fulfillment and that satisfaction from what you're doing, from the fact that you're -- you're supporting your family and raising your children and participating in your community. do you ever find that situation? >> well, what i tell people is, everything you get out of life and your satisfaction doesn't come from just your job. this is why i encouraged a lot of people in that situation, if they're in a stable career and don't feel they can leave, do something in the community in addition. your nights, your weekends, things you love to do. a lot of the big contributions most of us make in the world may be after work. there are other things you're doing and so i say to people, don't hold it in. there are ways you can contribute to the world and don't be afraid of it. maybe pursue it. >> a lot of your advice about being self-aware about what your
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strengths and weaknesses are and how they match with your passions. how does the message of this book which is, you know, what you're really meant to do, a road map for reaching your unique potential, how does that measure up or play into the economy that we live in? >> one frpts things you've got to do -- first of all i say a road map. this is like getting in shape or losing weight or all the things we go through every day. it's a multistep process and it never ends and you never get there. and so when the economy with all the uchs aps and downs and you to face reality. there are periods i've got to just be practical and make ends meet and do what i need to do. the only advice i have for people is, totally agree. we've all been there. don't make it a way of life where you use it constantly for your entire life as a excuse. crisis management shouldn't become a way of life and get you to avoid thinking who you are and what you love. >> i love gene's point about our generation is so much about
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fulfillment and -- >> now, now, now. >> that was a brilliant point. >> those that are -- look at successful people out there. i challenge you to find one performing at a high level who doesn't love aspect. it's hard to do it for a long time without passion. >> that is so true. the book is "what you're really meant to do, a rope road map for reaching your unique potential." come back. >> thanks for having me on the show. >> a startling new report shows the secret service wasn't the only agency dealing with prostitution scandals. "morning joe" is back in a moment. [ male announcer ] i've seen incredible things.
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35 past the hour. the state department is likely bracing for a lot of new questions today after recently uncovered documents raise allegations of sexual assault, drug use and prostitution by federal employees overseas. what's worse, the report suggests that behavior was covered up by senior staffers to
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avoid scandal. cbs news obtained an internal state department inspector general's memo that shows several investigations were called off after coming to the attention of high-ranking officials. among the allegations, that a state department security official in beirut sexually assaulted foreign nationals hired as embassy guards. that member -- former secretary of state hillary clinton security detail, quote, engaged prostitutes while on official trips in foreign countries. a problem, the report says, was endemic. there was a 2011 investigation into an ambassador who, quote, routinely ditched his protective security detail in order to solicit sexual favors from prostitutes. that ambassador was reportedly allowed to stay on the job. and in baghdad, there are accusations an underground drug ring with you supplying state department security contractors with drugs near the u.s. emba y
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embassy. this is stunning. one of the employees on the diplomatic security service who prepared the report only to see the investigations called off, is now taking her concerns to congress. we'll be hearing more about that. >> good for her. >> scary stuff. >> up next, he has over 15 million books in print. best-selling author steve berry is here with his latest thriller.
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40 past the hour. joining us now international best-selling author steve berry, out with his newest thriller "the king's deception" and he wants to get right into it. let's go there. go ahead. >> came across an interesting
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theory a few years ago in england there's a little village there and every day on a date certain they took a boy, dressed him in an elizabeth costume and paraded him through the streets and did that for centuries. why would they do that sort of thing. >> i do that every fleet week. >> i don't want to hear about your personal life. >> we found out why they do that. perhaps at age 13 elizabeth the first a young princess was living outside the village and she decided dyed. when she died her guardians were terrified of her father. they got henry viii's illegitimate grandson, dressed him up and made him up as an imposter. worked so well they had to keep it going. the cool part, no one at the time thought she would be queen. 12 years later she did and it kept on and on. you might say that's crazy, why would that happen? elizabeth, all her life she wore
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wigs, heavy makeup and clothes that didn't flatter her body. refused to let doctors examine her. when she died no autopsy. her number one duty to have an heir and refused to marry, refused to have a child and called herself the virgin queen and when she dies, they bury her and her sister in the same grave so the bones will mingle together. >> wow. >> we've been talking about treason on this program but i think this is borderline sacrilegious. >> katty. >> queen elizabeth was a man. >> how do you explain all those things. >> the monarch history you're saying she's a man. >> you'd never know what he's saying. >> it does add up. >> why does the village take the boy and parade him through the street for centuries on the same day. an interesting theory. i'm not the only one that noticed this bram stoker came across this in the early part of the 20th century and in a book called "famous imposters" and raid that book and put it together. this is a modern day thriller with my hero and it deals with
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the historical hook. the americans want the brits to do something the brits don't want do so using this as leverage against them. if this were true, it changes everything in northern ireland. because elizabeth seized all the land in northern ireland. she's the one that took the land away from the catholics, gave it to the protestants. if her reign is a fraud all those land titles are a fraud. every one of them are a fraud. >> can we get a close-up of her again. >> to get the close-up of katty. >> i want to see a close-up. get in on the face. >> zoom in. fine. i think i saw that character on the westside highway. >> the fact, that was the fashion of the time what she was wearing. not she was wearing particularly unflattering clothes to hide hers masculinity. >> wasn't it, though? >> she was an extraordinary, powerful woman. not a man. >> why are you getting upset about it? i'm not saying it's true. >> elizabeth i is our heroin. the idea she was a guy i don't
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buy it. >> this is a novel where we can have fun with it. >> they have room in the tower of london. >> do you ever get writer's block? >> sure. we all get stuck every once in a while. >> wow. look at that. >> yeah. >> a picture of feminine beauty. >> there you go. right there. drag queen. >> that is kinky boots. >> that photograph, those images, we have no idea what elizabeth looks like. no images of her prior to the age of 25. after she became queen she controlled her image. she was called the mask of youth and dictated how she would appear in every one of her paintings. we have no clue. >> bad look. >> no clue what this woman looks like. >> you crazy brits. you are wacky. >> not as crazy as something suggesting queen elizabeth was a man. >> it's an interesting idea for a novel, fun, entertaining thing to look at. >> i'm reading it on the train home and get back to you. >> get back to me and let me know. >> you never know. it could well have truth to it.
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>> by the way, if we put up a shot of george washington, with the wig, you can look at things all which ways, right. i don't want patriots giving me nasty letters. >> today has range. that's all i'm going to say. >> a show of range. >> thank you so much. >> glad to have you. >> the novel "the king's deception" and read an expert at our blog mojo @msnbc.com. come back. >> i would love to. >> katty will be nice. >> i've never seen her -- >> she got bent out of shape. >> frothing at the mouth. >> i just got back to england. they were similar over there. it's an interesting idea. >> with that. coming up, apple -- >> always too far. >> a major redesign. is it enough to counter the competition? what is it? what's new?
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bloomberg business week joins us on the show. when we made our commitment to the gulf, bp had two big goals:
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it was a big day for apple yesterday. the company announced its biggest redesign in iphone
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software since 2007 when the phone was first introduced. apple also unveiled new mac books and a streaming radio service called itunes radio. joining us now senior writer for bloomberg business. also withgrobart and the host of "way too early" brian shactman. brian, you are business expertise. >> let's not get crazy. >> he covers -- >> i was employed by a business network. >> no expertise. >> he is here because he's kind of an expert and yet reading about the new apple stuff and you yawn. >> that was a purposeful yawn. listen. i covered the launch of the iphone. i was at the 5th avenue store at 2:00 a.m. with the crazies and yesterday is a big day for developers but my point in the yawn is consumers. i'm not sure how big a deal it is. i think it's significant symbolically starting streaming when everybody else does it and
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cleaned up the graphics to look like everybody else and they're following and they're not leading. >> i think you're absolutely right. there's been a perception out there and maybe a bit of a reality that apple has fallen behind the pace a little bit. when you look at android or even microsoft with its mobile operations, the look and feel of things is definitely moved on from the old-fashioned ios interface and changing it an they're not the first ones to get there. >> is this an early precursor? >> or just a precursor? >> thank you. >> you can't take a visionary owner/operator, a guy like steve jobs out of a company and expect it to be the same. i think this is the beginning of what i'll call a nonwave of the level of excitement we had with apple. >> i think there are two things of that. we are approaching a time of
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products coming out of apple steve jobs did not sign off on. moving forward, though, that's not the case. second of all, if you think about the fact, the iphone's been out for five years and they put out the ipad and the ipad mini. that's an extraordinary pace of innovation. and it may not be sustainable. >> i agree with that. i think we keep saying before steve jobs, after steve jobs and without him, nothing can -- i mean, how many more innovations can you come up with in the course of two years to get beyond this? it does everything. maybe the infrastructure could be improved. >> the ipod around for five years before the iphone -- >> exactly. >> sometimes things take a little bit longer. >> they transformed the musical industry, killed the pc industry and transformed the phone industry. maybe next it's a television thing but they'll cannibalize some of their own products
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looking at the fusion of all of them in to one problem. >> cannibalizing is the concern of ipad mini. people are interested more in that than the more expensive ipad. >> when a car is invented, they -- obviously, all of a sudden people make more cars and a situation where they were ahead of the curve, invented cat xwoirs and n gories. >> you can show, brian, but can't we work on making these devices less expensive? >> well, apple needs to do that -- >> the next one, tell me the new iphone, coming up with, half the price? >> probably not. >> see? >> there's a rumor to build a cheaper iphone. in the rest of the world, people don't buy their phones subsidized. in the u.s., that's $650. so gets back to what actually happened yesterday -- >> sorry.
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>> what developments should people who are watching actually pay attention to? >> what's going to happen is in the fall buying a new iphone or upgrade, it looks completely different. a different look and feel and new features. you were mentioning the kill switch and calling operation lock and mean that if your phone is stolen, you can turn it in to a paperweight that no one can reactivate except for you. >> basically, people are steal them and trying to stop that? >> yes. gone up 40% in new york alone. chicago and d.c. is half of all robberies and robbers get about $500 for a stolen phone. if you make them bricks, that might be a deterrent to people taking your phone. >> look different. a kill switch. are they less breakable? >> well, that remains to be seen. the hardware side of things, they never give any indication about. they're complicated, sophisticated little computers.
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>> mika's test is she doesn't download tests, she drops it. >> they show an apple user, an old lady. they're very nature of their hipness is become a victim of the you bick wousness. you're so big you're an establishment. >> you are the establishment. that's both right. >> the expectations are so high because they've done so much and donnie's right, too. they could not sustain it. how do they react and are they going to become palm? like an hp? >> let's hope not. >> it's crazy to think about. what they do from here tick tats the company. >> they have to watch their back. look at samsung and did that ad making fun of the old ladies using the iphone. that is a serious, serious competitor with a lot of capability and not to be trifled with it. >> how's that device?
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>> larger screen. >> i like that. >> a lot of people really like that. apple was resistant to increasing the screen of the iphone. people seem to be moving past that and say why not 5 inches? >> my ad introduced samsung in united states in 1988 with microwave ovens. >> that's right! >> samsung was a third-rate television manufacturer not that long ago. they're the largest electronics company in the world. >> i'm going to have both and i just have them on my desk and try the samsung. >> see how it feels. see what you like about it. >> i want more. >> next to the christie cream sloppy joe. >> great to have you on. come back. >> thank you, brian. >> you're welcome. >> you're an expert. >> you can only make fun of somebody if they really are. >> that was a compliment. >> coming from someone that gets made fun of a lot. >> that's a different category.
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donnie calls my teenage daughters thoroughbreds. what says that? >> ultimate compliment. you know it. >> who says that? in 2013. >> athletes. beautiful. wonderful. you know what i -- >> we'll ask donnie going to break. riot police push back against demonstrators. richard engel is there. we'll talk to him next on morning joe. can acne cleansers be tough on breakouts
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♪ good morning. it's 8:00 on the east coast. 5:00 a.m. on the west coast. it's time to wake up. if you take a live look at new york city, back with us on set, we have katie kay, donnie deutsche and in washington, jonathan capehart and howard dean. around the table, we'll get to obviously the latest on the fbi and the nsa. but one of the big headlines this morning is a major reversal by the department of the -- department of justice's position over the so-called morning-after pill. you guys know what that is, right? the government plans to drop the appeal of an april ruling that will allow girls access to emergency contraception without a prescription or any age restriction? am i like already dating myself and looking like moral scold --
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i don't know. you have daughters. >> i have daughters. a 17-year-old whom this would have applied with an age restriction and a 7-year-old. and i have to say, if it's -- if the science is true that what the morning-after pill does, this one is conception form 72 hours and then i think it should be available. i think the fewer teen pregnancies we have in this country the better. america has a higher teen pregnancy numbers. we know the problems for the young women and babies they then go on to have and another way to get contra sipceptiotraception - >> is it a crisis in smaller worlds within our own families? >> i have three daughters, grown and two little ones and i think the lax age restriction is the best part of it. it's the younger women, 14, 15, 16 afraid to tell their parents,
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might not know what to do about it. >> might not be taking contraception. >> it won't cause -- i don't know the statistics, more women to have sex. i think as katty's point, it is only good and prevent unwanted teenage. >> you have little, little kids. >> i have kindergarten graduation today. >> oh. >> critics say this allows young women to bypass parents and young women to bypass doctor's appointments to do this and it's a quick fix. >> that scares me. >> that's the one thing. and this is a reversal for the obama administration. howard dean, you're a doctor. what's your take on this? >> my take is to obey the science. there is no provision in fda law to make moral judgments about what you ought to do and ought not to do so the problem of the obama administration is they were making a judgment and the president said he was making it as a parent. that's fine and good but that's
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not what the fda is supposed to do. it's supposed top pass on the science. so now we have a moral judgment. i think that's a -- that plays for that is congress or courts and so forth and so on. the court followed the law. and i was disappointed in the obama administration for appealing and i think this is a wise move on their part because they know what the supreme court to deal with this. that's the next step. >> other headlines now. today members of the house will hear directly from the fbi, justice department and nsa about the leak of classified information that revealed a vast government program to monitor americans' phone and internet data. there are growing calls on capitol hill for the self identified leaker 29-year-old edward snowden and learning more about now to face criminal chargeless for his actions. some including senators dianne
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feinstein and bill nelson called his actions treasonous. sax chambliss says if it's not treason, it's pretty damn close. snowden may have left hong kong where he was staying in a hotel for weeks. officials want to know how a contractor with limited access and lack of formal education had access to such sensitive material and shining a spotlight on the government's use of outside companies to deal with national secrets. 1.4 million people hold top secret clearances. still new polling shows the american people generally in favor of the programs. according to a "the washington post"/pew poll, 62% favor investigating threats at the expense of privacy. and 52% say the nsa's phone tracking program is acceptable. more than half of those surveyed believe the government should not monitor e-mail to prevent
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terror attacks. it plays in to the part of the conversation which is unspoken and that is that people want to be protected than safe and want the government to do the right thing. they almost want to trust them to but then hearing about potential civil liberties broken, we can't help but to discuss whether or not the government should have this kind of power. but i want to focus on snowden himself because i think he's raising a lot of questions and has opened up a huge can of worms for this administration. richard cohen writes in "the washington post" this -- the nsa is doing what google does. everything about edward snowden is ridiculously cinematic. he is merely narcissistic. he jetsonned a girlfriend, a career and undoubtedly his personal freedom to expose programs that were known to our elected officials and could have been deduced by anyone who has googled anything.
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history will not record him as one of america's most consequential whistle-blowers. soon you can google that. howard dean, would you agree with a little bit of what richard has to say? >> i don't know. i mean, i try to avoid getting into all of that stuff. here's the deal. i actually am one of the 56% that doesn't have a problem with having the government look around and make sure that there aren't any al qaeda cables but i think it's ridiculous to say he committed treason. we didn't. what he did is something that somebody else should have done, perhaps the president of the united states. if this guy -- if we were doing this with al qaeda and revealed what's going on, that is treason. if the government is spying on 35 million american people, somebody ought to tell the people that. the valuable piece of all of this is is we will have a national discussion about whether this is okay or not. i personally don't have a big
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problem. i do have a big problem with the government spying on american people without them telling us. that i think is wrong. >> are they spying or what's the word? >> government really spying on 35 million americans or is the government taking a large swath across e-mails, across telephone calls for country to country, specific situations versus -- they're not last night e-mailing my girlfriend and told her how pretty i thought she was, they're not looking at that. >> you don't know. >> i do know. i do know. there's no motive. if there's maybe a call from yemen -- >> hasn't been revealed either. >> i mean, maybe if they're tracking something and something going from yemen to over here and -- come on. use common sense. >> that's what the program is described as. they take huge chunks of data and see who's calling who -- >> not domestic -- there's no
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domestic to dmix. they're not -- only numbers. not conversations. it is not content. >> that's true. that is correct. >> that's a big misunderstanding. >> they're establishing big patterns of who's calling who and american citizens. i think we have -- americans need to have a right to know what their government is doing. as i said before, i don't object to the program but the fact we didn't know about it. that's not okay simply to tell the elect eed representatives about this. this is an issue to debate publicly and now we're going to do that and that's the good thing here. >> why would the american people know about it? maybe we ought to but it's a classified program. >> for all of the people who say that knowden shouldn't have revealed this and great to have the conversation, he had to reveal this in order to have the conversation by virtue of the fact that the program was secret. we would never have been in the position we are discussing surveillance and the war on terror, for our particular
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individual freedoms if we hadn't been having the conversation thanks to the fact that snowden leaked this. the problem with the argument that the government -- we trust the government is the government is benign. at the moment. what happens if we have the same legislations in place and then a government that's starting to listen to the fact that you're having an e-mail conversation with your girlfriend or whatever it is. >> i don't think i want to see that. >> you need to have the -- >> i don't either. >> no thank you. >> you're relying on the good graces and the goodwill of the government rather than clearly legislated what can and can't happen in the way that the people have been part of the decision. >> that's a democracy. >> other news, developing overnight, violence boiling over in turkey which is a key u.s. ally and traditionally one of the most stable democracies in a region lately torn apart by unrest. police are storming barricades in istanbul's square. protesters can be seen throwing rocks and police apparently
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using teargas in response. demonstrators have occupied the square for more than a week. the riots began after a peaceful environmental protest was met with a tough police crackdown. we're going to go now. there's a delay in the communications but we're going to go to nbc's chief foreign correspondent richard engel joining us live from the scene of the protests. richard, take it away. >> reporter: as you mentioned, there is certainly a great deal of teargas. there are ongoing clashes right now as riot police are using water cannons and teargas. you can see some of that behind me. to push away the dmon stray or thes in the square almost two weeks now. 7:30 this morning, several hundred riot police with shields, wearing gas masks stormed in to the square. only a few hundred demonstrators here at the time. quickly this entire part of
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istanbul filled with teargas. we were seeing people in the surrounding hotels fleeing, covering noses, trying to cover their eyes. some of them carrying bags going to other parts of the city that aren't seeing the clashes right now. the prime minister has spoken today and taking a very tough line saying the demonstrators of marginal groups, traitors, saboteurs. they don't represent turkey and he says these operations to clear out this square and continue developing an urban project in this area will continue. as you mentioned, this began very different. it was a small, peaceful protest by environmentalists who were opposed to yet one more urban planning project but when the police moved in, as they -- and took the same kind of harsh tactics we are seeing right now, the movement grew and now definitely a protest against
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prime minister erdogan and the police tactics. >> richard engel live on the scene there. watching the live pictures and the main square. they're using even water to try to push back the protesters. katty, you have been covering this skoir, bbc. started a week ago? >> almost two weeks in the center of istanbul and other cities in turkey and look at these scenes and reminds us covering the egyptian revolution of those scenes but there's important differences. this is not so much a sectarian islamic split in turkey. it's a motley collection of people in the square down there. communists, environmentalists, gay rights people. everybody kind of coming together and really this is a demonstration about democracy and about the rights that democratic -- ironic to have this conversation about surveillance in turkey what they're saying is we haven't got
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the democratic freedom, the right to protest about this environmental park. the police handled that very heavily. 3,000 or 4,000 people arrested in the demonstrators and wanting to make sure that the rights that come with democracy are enshrined and protected and enacted and that's the common theme of what you have been seeing from these demonstrators in cur. still ahead, he says the lessons of lincoln can still be used today. but first, the doctors are in. physician emily senay here with big stories of health stories of concerns of cat scans to whether taking vitamins is even worth it. which i don't. to that major change in the government's position on emergency contraception for girls. but first, a check on the forecast. bill? >> morning to you. i think we have driven i-95 through the baltimore area.
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this is the view yesterday. over the interharbor. yes, that's a tornado right over the top of baltimore, maryland. this is the ground view of that same tornado. it was weak. only did a little bit of damage to one warehouse but a rare sight there within the city limits and a lot of nasty weather yesterday. seven tornadoes, a lot of wind damage especially south carolina and north carolina. and the rainfall, unbelievable. we have had almost eight inches of rain in the first 11 days of june in new york city and all of the i-95 cities right behind that. the rain moving out during the day today. we'll get another batch of showers and storms this afternoon in to this evening but not lasting that long and the rest of the country, the heat continues. yesterday in the 90s. we're easily going to be 95 to 100 from denver to st. louis all the way down through texas. summer has arrived in the midwest and it's going to beat down on you. i guess this is better than dealing with tornadoes, though. you are watching michael
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♪ okay. joining us now, medical correspondent for pbs's "need to know" dr. emily senay. we brought you here to straighten out the stories. i'm never been a vitamin person. i think it's an industry -- can i say this? i think an industry that's made up. is that -- that makes money on making people feel they need something that they don't need. emily? what say you? >> very controversial. very hard to study vitamins in isolation. there have been large population studies that i think people are not aware of where they find
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that vitamins and this is all sorts of different vitamins do more harm than good and particularly in people who are taking high doses of certain types of anti-oxidants. looked at them in smokers and people at risk for lounge cancer and leads to more cancers, not fewer. >> you know -- you were saying this article came out in the picture of this singer katy perry. holding like a huge amount of vit mans and five-pack of vitamins and every vitamin. >> i think i took them a couple days in a row and felt nauseous every time. >> oh my gosh. >> that's her. her tweet. >> katy perry. we know she likes candy. her customs -- >> exactly. edible. >> there has to be something wrong with that. doesn't look healthy holding up that many pills every day. is it all -- >> i can't imagine -- >> froouits and vegetables.
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>> some people need supplements. pregnant women, older people at risk for eye problems. they can benefit of very specific vitamins. should everybody be taking a multi-vitamin? the research says, no. i think most people are unaware of body of research suggesting answer is no. a lot of doctors still recommend a multivitamin. >> there are some publicly traded companies that -- gnc, multibillion dollar business built on the opposite and from a global perspective, i'm curious. japan eating a western diet, they're dying younger. are we the only country that stuffs our faces with these pills? >> no. countries do this. certain european countries more than we do, in fact. i'm not sure about high lowe's do ess of vitamins or multivitamins orcaty perry but
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not uncommon to do this. there's lots of people who have true vitamin deficiencies to benefit from things like vitamin a but here it's rare to be deficient in a clinical way. >> this you have the option to eat better in this country at a certain level. >> trying to isolate vitamins out of the context in which you find them in nature is very, very difficult. and trying to create those studies to do that are also very difficult so the information out there isn't great. again, most people i think are unaware of the stud dis done. >> what about you -- i'll have you come back. protein shakes and these things, like my daughter's an athlete. i don't believe them. >> like an excuse. >> my instinct is that's a replacement and can't be as good as real food. >> what is she taking them for? >> track. the protein -- some sort of --
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it's like a white powder. don't -- if the other guys were here they'd make a joke. but like a protein supplement you put in milk and some dairies. >> i don't know a lot about them in terms of the studies or affect the body or whether they have a benefit at all. the thing is that there's no requirement to study this because vitamins and minerals are not regulated by the food and drug administration. so even though they can be very powerful and very potent and have serious side effects they're not studied, unless they're brand new compounds on the market. that dates back to the '70s when a law was passed that sort of exempted these compounds and supplements and everything from being regulated. >> other headlines this morning we have been talking about this every hour. it is very interesting because i noticed in -- we were guilty, too, katty.
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we talked about morning-after pill and always talked about our daughters. but this is big news. i mean, now this latest move, the morning-after pill is available to anyone and any age without a prescription. what's just your -- i'd like you to -- i know you reported at cbs. >> sure. >> but you were an expert. you're a doctor, mother. what is your reaction? your gut reaction. >> i'm okay with it. i am okay with it. i really think that women are capable of making these types of decisions. i guess, the problem is in the younger age group, the parents have trouble sort of sorting that out. and i can understand that. but girls in those age groups that can get pregnant are allowed to their own privacy. that is -- that is their right to privacy. be better if they, you know, worked it out with parents and physicians but we have to accept that this is the age group most at risk. >> be honest. with the way the bodies
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developed with -- i feel awkward. >> no, no. >> beautiful women to say this. menstruation cycles beginning at the ages they do now, that conversation is different when it's -- you hear it's 9, 10, 11 years old and emotionally and mentally nowhere near developed enough. >> this is dealing with something that's already happened and assumes somebody's had sex at whatever age. >> correct. >> it's too young and then the question is, what's the least bad option. >> well -- >> it seems to me the morning-after pill is least -- >> ways tomasing sexual assaults if they don't go to the hospital. as a socially pretty liberal person, it opens -- it is just like the surveillance question where it's not a partisan or left-right issue. it's much more subjective than that, it seems. >> we are talking about a medical issue. and we're putting a lot of sort of social judgments on it. >> right. >> and i sort of think it's okay and that as we -- you know,
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become more educated and that's part of putting something like this on the market is also educating about who should use it, when it's appropriate, when they need to seek medical care and extremes young girls not seeing a doctor when they should see a doctor before or after some type of problem. so -- but i think we can't make those judgments about this type of product, putting an ethical or a moral judgment on top of it. it's -- it's out there. >> you raised a good point about keep talking about girls and i think -- isn't there an ad campaign that's kind of controversial showing a young guy lying on a skateboard with a pregnant belly and we need to start to talk to teenage boys about this. we talk about young, single mothers. there's a young single dad out there, too, who's not responsible for this. >> he might not be young. >> might not be young, you're
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right. >> but yeah. >> teenage boys, we don't bring them in to the conversation enough. >> we don't at all. that's true. >> i think we need to talk about the conversations that you were talking about ideal situations versus nonideal and we still want to try to create that conversation with our children and i feel like it's being taken away from us as information and medication is being made available to kids without having to talk to us. >> you know, i'm not so sure about that. kids in homes where there's that type of open communication -- >> less at risk. >> exactly. and so i think, you know, girl who is might find themselves with no one to talk to are girl who is are going to seek those options probably more often and i would hate to take the options away from them, especially in difficult or, you know, troubling circumstances where those types of decisions get made. >> it's funny, though. you get to -- when you take the science and the morality, that's thorny. i think even in good families
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people make mistakes and not want to face up to them or deal with them the way they should. these are subjective opinions and apart from the product on the market. >> we had governor pawlenty on last hour and his opinion is morally based and can be a part of this conversation, as well. and tough as a doctor -- i had one child and the doctor recently while i was traveling and she said to me hanging up the phone and i was getting on a plane, you know, when your doctor comes in the office, she's emancipated. you be the mother, i'll be the doctor. good-bye. really? okay. thank you. thank you, dr. senay. thank you. 150 years later, we can learn a lot from lincoln. author rich lowry is here with some perspective on modern-day challenges. keep it right here on "morning joe." i'm the next american success story. working for a company
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♪ euclid's first notion is this, things equal to the same thing are equal to each other. that's a rule of mathematical reasoning. it's true because it works. has done and always will do.
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in his book, hmm, euclid says this is self evident. you see there it is? even in that 2,000-year-old book of mechanical law, it is a self evident truth that things which are equal to the same thing are equal to each other. >> hmm. last year's steven spielberg and daniel-day lewis brought lincoln to life and the author is here, joining the table, rich lowry, editor of "national review" and of "lincoln unbound." we were already talking about the book before the segment started, and brian, you said it best. it's amazing the comeback abraham lincoln has made in our
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national consciousness. and you now bring to the table a concept that maybe perhaps we draw from lincoln as we look to rebuild the gop and the way it needs to be. fair enough? >> well, i portray lincoln as the foremost apostle of opportunity and american history. which he was. and i trace that through his personal life rising from literally nothing. obscure, backwoods and how opportunity undergirded the policies, politics, explains the opposition to slavery in large part and then asks what we can learn about that today because i do think we have a crisis of opportunity in this country. >> and is there a crisis of opportunity in the gop, as well that you look at and a way that it can be -- i don't know -- go back to its foundation to an extent? >> i think the republican party to succeed always has to be in some significant respect the party of lincoln.
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has to be the party of opportunity. has to be the party of aspiration and has to have an economic agenda to connect with one of those things and one of my criticisms of the party the last couple of years is just become so debt obsessed. debt is a serious problem, it is something we have to deal with. it's more of a long-term problem and more people, that's not what they're sitting around the table discussing trying to pay the bills. so every time house republican gets up there and talking about the debt, i want to also hear him talk about health care, hear him talk about the cost of college and talk about these things that are really impacting the middle clsz and things making it hard for the working class to get ahead. i'm not so concerned about inequality in the society. i'm concerned of lack of mobility especially from the bottom. >> when i would say when you want to hear about the
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republican talking and health care or something else, we do but we hear them talking about how it doesn't work. >> correct. and this is "national review" been on a kick for a while. not enough to say you're opposed to obama care. i think you should be but what will you replace it with? congressman price has a bill now that speaks to this but most house republicans have just been scared to be out there on some clear alternative because they think it's a target on their backs and it's easier just to make the critique and true. always easier just to make the critique and you make the positive, as well. >> you talk about lincoln was interested in transport and infrastructure and something that the gop should focus on today but no one in washington says, let's invest and make the internet speeds faster, make sure that the bridges and railroads are working as
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efficiently as they should for a global power. >> one, you're absolutely right. transportation is one of lincoln's passions and it goes to, again, his upbringing and personal experience. because when lincoln was a boy, and if you lived more in the couple miles from a significant waterway, you couldn't get goods anywhere. they were impossible to transport. even if you were close to a river, say the mississippi, you could float it down on a raft but you couldn't get it back up. his father went down to new orleans a couple of times and apparently walked all the way back home. so you can't have a market economy when you're limited in that sort of way. so he loved steam boats. he loved canals. he loved railroads. because you couldn't have a functioning market without them. and people's opportunities to rise were blighted without them. in the context of that time, we didn't have sophisticated financial markets and industrialists so you had to have government support on some
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level. >> part of me is still wanting to get back to lincoln and the book and since we're on this theme it's obvious that lincoln, solution focused. >> yeah. >> when you talk about offering up alternatives, i guess i get back to the point is that there's nothing that's solution focused. in congress they want to keep the jobs and maybe obama's looking at legacy. people read a book and when's going to change the overall culture. >> in washington? >> yeah. >> and within the gop. >> you point out the problem and it is the right problem to point out, they aren't necessarily countering with option that is are viable, that can work. so what's going to change it so we get back to solution focused debates? >> well, i think two separate things there. i think one the problem in washington and in terms of gridlock is you have two parties with very different conceptions. >> we have always had some degree of gridlock and always been a problem. >> you have a big disagreement.
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president obama and republicans don't agree on what the solution to entitlements is. you have a big stalemate and an election last year and people are just beginning to kind of clue in to this. basically ratified the stalemate. right? you saw how house republicans and president obama worked together which is not at all well and the public sent them both back. so i think on some of these big questions the public hasn't decided. in terms of the republican party, i think the big figures in the republican party realize this is a problem. if you listen to marco rubio, if you listen to paul ryan, they know the party needs to go in this lincolnian direction. what's not there is the policy meat on the bones and takes time to work out. >> it looks great. "lincoln unbound." read an excerpt on our blog. rich lowry, thank you so much.
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it's great to have you on the show. >> thank you. >> good luck with the book. >> thanks a lot. >> get on amazon and buy it. up next, the market is posing to be a triple threat and not a good thing for business. business before the bell with cnbc's kelly evans next on "morning joe."
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it appears it's an agent of good. ♪ [ agent smith ] ge software connects patients to nurses to the right machines while dramatically reducing waiting time. [ telephone ringing ] now a waiting room is just a room. [ static warbles ] in florida, jury selection is under way in the trial of george zimmerman who is charged with second-degree murder in last year's shooting death of an unarmed teenager, trayvon martin. the incident led to large protests before police eventually arrested zimmerman who pleaded not guilty and claims he acted in self defense. ron motte has the latest developments from the courtroom. >> i felt his arm going down to my side and i grabbed it and i just grabbed my firearm and shot him. one time.
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>> reporter: more than 15 months after telling police his side of the story about the night he shot and killed unarmed 17-year-old trayvon martin, 29-year-old george zimmerman is now officially on trial for murder. >> i can tell you as a family we're very confident in the outcome of the case and very confident that the state will not be able to meet its burden. >> reporter: six panelists will be chosen to serve on the jury. >> the defense wants white jurors who love their guns and maybe a victim of the crime. the prosecution wants people that don't like the idea of vigila vigilantes. >> reporter: zimmerman pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder. his attorney says he acted in self defense after being attacked by martin. >> we are trayvon. >> reporter: but the six-week period between the shooting and the arrest sparked protests here and around the country. with critics charging race was a factor in the case. arguing police would have been
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quicker to make an arrest had the victim been white. >> all of these issues kind of snowballed in to a larger narrative about race that i don't think was really part of the story when trayvon martin died. >> reporter: martin was killed less than an hour after he was seen buying candy and iced tea from a convenience store. the encounter between martin and martin can be heard on a 911 call. >> so you think he's yelling help? >> yes. >> all right. what is your -- >> just -- there's gunshots. >> you just heard gunshots? >> yes. >> how many? >> just one. >> reporter: martin's family asked for peace and justice. >> we are relieved that the start of the trial is here with the jury selection as we seek justice for our son, trayvon, and we also seek a fair and impartial trial. >> it should be noted that george zimmerman has sued nbc universal the parent company of
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msnbc for defamation in civil court, the company strongly d y denied his allegations. let's go to business before the bell with cnbc's kelly evans now. what do you got? >> good morning. i wish i had better news but overnight we have seen a global selloff in markets that started in japan when the prime minister, bank of japan didn't deliver. continued across europe and locks like it comes home here in markets today. dow futures off about 130 at the moment. to think about what's going on, i would want to leave people with this message. this isn't necessarily the kind of mood we saw the last couple of years hitting a weak summer spot. we are seeing investors, guys on wall street, trying to come to term with the fact that the u.s. economy is good enough for the federal reserve to back auflt stimulus and goes back to friday and wasn't a disaster, wasn't blockbuster either and continues
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with a theme. ten-year interest rate is moving higher. low by historical standards but if you want a mortgage, any time soon, now, guys, might be the time to act. >> now's the time. okay. we have got dole in the news and apple. choose one, kelly. >> yeah. so let's talk a little bit about strawberries and bananas for a second. dole, the food company, pointed to weather conditions in the first part of the year for the fact it didn't get the strawberry crop or prices it wanted. shares hit. been through a little bit of a tough period for the first half of the year. the chairman and ceo coming out saying that these lower prices he wants to buy up the rest of the company shares to take it private. second time we have seen it happen for dpoole. last time it was $33 a share. ten years later, private. may go public again. point being, people looking at whether it's an opportunistic play and whether it's about weak
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strawberries or weak management. and not hearing about apple. this is a company that yesterday may have had a little bit of excitement for developers or power users but by and large, you know, shares sold off by almost 1%. this is not the media event that apple used to have in days passed. >> thanks very much. >> thank you. up next, john olver takes over hosting duties at "the daily show." wonder how he did. next in "news you can't use." i want to make things more secure. [ whirring ] [ dog barks ] i want to treat more dogs. ♪ our business needs more cases. [ male announcer ] where do you want to take your business?
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how'd he do? >> yesterday, day one, last night jon stewart is off directing a film. correspondent john oliver sitting in. he said he was nervous, excited. let's see how he did. >> intelligence agencies are secretly collecting millions of americans' phone records on a daily basis. >> are you [ bleep ] kidding me? jon's been gone one day! one day! we had such a fun, gentle first show planned for you, as well.
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a few harmless i'm british jokes like, this is a football. not a soccer ball. we call it a football. halfway through the show, we were going to break and have a little tea time. not only is the government tracking everyone's phone calls, but that's just the tip of the [ bleep ] berg. >> it goes beyond to our internet habits and who we e-mail with. >> i bet the amish are feeling pretty [ bleep ] smug right now. >> did well. that is a big, big seat to fill. he did a good job. >> that was funny. that amish line is genius. >> got several weeks to work it out. going to be good. >> he is adorable. here's a strange way to get served papers. going well up on stage and handed a stack of papers -- >> a love note. a love note. >> probably a fan. no. those are legal papers. >> she backs away. >> she is being sued by an l.a.
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nightclub for failing to show up to a concert so she was served the papers right there on stage. >> a great country. >> oh my lord! >> performed at l.a.'s gay pride fest and instead of showing up at the nightclub, the team said it canceled the show well in add vns. >> that's a bad day. i do a lot of research on angie's list
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and the money i save goes to important things. braces for my daughter. a little something for my son's college fund. when people look at me, i hope they see someone building a better life. vo: living better: that's the real walmart. i don't know that you're taking this whole thing seriously. i just saw you slap your attorney on the backside. this isn't a joke. >> i didn't do it as a joke. >> everybody in the courtroom is laughing. i'm not accepting these issues. >> okay. for the record, he patted the butt of the male attorney. i guess it's controversial. brian shactman. what did you learn today? >> you know, that is a perfect example, the debate on that. not everything is black or white, left or right. with nsa, we have a debate. coming to plan "b" a debate. ochocinco appropriate --
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>> a reenactment. >> moving awe. >> awkward. >> i will not sue. you will not go to jail. he wasn't going to -- only one that -- >> you know, just wrong. >> stay over here. >> what did you learn today? >> john oliver is going to do just fine and steve barry may have written a great book but queen elizabeth i was a woman and suggesting otherwise is treez nous. >> krispy kreme sloppy joe. >> doesn't sound like it tastes good. >> personal trainer. >> i'm not going to say what i think about what happened in that courtroom. >> why not? >> it's -- i have a filter unlike joe who will be here tomorrow. >> joe will agree with me. >> it's time for "morning joe" but now it's time for chuck todd with "the daily rundown." have a great day everyone. the search is on.
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federal officials are on the hunt for the man who leaked secret nsa documents. edward snowden last reported to be in hong kong but where he is and what faces him is unclear. we'll get reaction to it from former congressman ron paul. and in today's "deep dive," a fight on the right over education. find out what's pushing some conservatives to confront sitting governors and party leaders like jeb bush all across the country. >> and clashes continue in turkey today as demonstrators and police square off in the streets of istanbul. the latest on what's fueling this fight. good morning from washington. tuesday, june 11th, 2013. i'm chuck todd. another busy tuesday here in the nation's capital. we're also monitoring the news overseas in south africa where former president mandela is spending a fourth day in a hospital being treated for recuring lung infection. country's current president says

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