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tv   Morning Joe  MSNBC  April 5, 2013 3:00am-6:00am PDT

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for clear healthy skin. naturally clear skin has never felt so beautiful. [ female announcer ] new acne cream cleanser. only from neutrogena® naturals. for your opinion. does the president need to apologize today to harris? what are the reactions, john. >> tom on twitter writes no he scientist need to apologize. >> mixed pretty much around the building and see what "morning joe" has to stay about it. that starts right now.
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♪ >> kim jong-un here he what he had to do monday is threaten to destroy america. first thing in the office, today is the day. when he does that, you say, oh, i hope he don't do that. the more you think about it, they are not going to -- north korea is like a carnival cruise, for the love of god. you know? they are not going to destroy anything. they got no electricity and no plumb is and no food and no fresh water and don't know where they are going. good morning. it's friday, april 5th. welcome to "morning joe." we are so glad it's friday. with us on set, we have senior political editor and white house correspondent for the huffington post, sam stein. and msnbc political analyst and vice president and executive editor of msnbc.com, richard wolf.
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senior national correspondent from bloomberg "businessweek," josh rain. good to have you on board this morning. >> sam is complaining because he doesn't have sam stein. >> why not? >> he thinks he should be important enough to have sam stein on his twitter account. he was talking about the sweetest handle on twitter. >> the breaking news your father is on twitter. >> he is on twitter. >> that's big. >> that's big. >> that's pretty awesome. >> he turned 85 last week. he joined twitter this week. >> z. big! >> try z. big/sam stein. >> just jump on that train. >> you know he is tweeting what the president said yesterday about the attorney general of california. >> yes, there is that. we will start there then. president obama's is facing online backlash over comments he
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made about california's attorney general. a d.c. luncheon outside of san francisco saying she is, quote, brilliant and dedicated and tough. she also happens to be by far the best looking attorney general. it's true. come on! the audience reportedly reacted with a mix of surprise and laughter. you can imagine the response on twitter where people like to sort of unleash was swift. many people calling the comments sexist. others asking what is the big deal? presumably sarcastic tweet from an rnc twitter account said, quote, not awkward and perfectly fine for him to say. on salon.com saying the following. >> others saying it was outrageous and shocked and other bloggers on the left. what did you see online yesterday?
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>> i saw all that. i've got to say he was dumb to make that comment. dumb. >> why was he dumb? >> well, look. kamala harris has had this before. her previous race people always said she is too good looking to be in politics or she got there because of relationships. it's nonsense. she has more than proved hearses and for the president -- the president has been in his job quite a long time now. he should know -- >> you think he is being stupid? >> it was just -- >> eric sniderman is clearly a better looking attorney general than kamala harris and why obama missed that is going to befuddle me for years. >> do you think stupid? >> it's stupid but it's so minor. >> no big deal? >> stupid. imagine if president hillary clinton said that about a male attorney general? what could of a hub bub there could be. >> you can't have a double standard here, right? >> you think the president was objectiving? >> of course, he was objectiving
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women. did you ever hear him say to a male office holder you're the best looking guy? >> we have mika. i wanted to set this up for you. >> exactly. >> sam doesn't really care. so you tell me. what do you think? >> i think both are right. i'm sure he meant to pay her a compliment. >> i'm glad i waited for that answer! >> i'm sure he meant to pay a compliment to her and meant to be nice but, quite frankly, it divides women and up and divides them up to separate them by looks and probably was a little hand-fisted. i think the whole dynamic about women and their looks puts women under a lot of stress that they don't need and they should be sort of talked about by their qualities at work, especially when he is introducing someone because she is the attorney general. i actually think, you know, he meant to do -- say something nice. i think he made a mistake. do you not like that opinion? >> i think that's the best opinion i've heard all week.
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>> that's pretty good. >> it's friday. you know he? i thought it was a great opinion. >> let's just end the show there. >> i think it was great. i don't mean to objective your opinion but i don't know. >> he meant to be nice. do you think he meant anything else? >> if she is offended by it, then i've got an issue. if she not, then i don't. the guy was joking! i mean, come on! the guy was joking! if she has an issue with it and if people are going to treat her less seriously today than they did yesterday, then yes, then there is a problem. >> are they going to treat him less seriously today than yesterday? >> do you think they are going to? do you think boehner say i get him to raise the rertirement ag to 75.
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>> i think playing women's issues, he should be much more careful about what he said. >> kept getting women's votes after some things came out. >> yeah. >> i'm serious. you know why? because he fought for them on abortion issues and that mattered more to them than what he did in his private life. we got a guy making a silly off-handed comment. listen. i'm not saying i would ever -- it was dumb. i don't know if it objectifies women, though. >> a good word. >> really? thanks. >> what is that? >> i just think hearing that comment, other women would be really? thanks a lot. that's all. it's not that big a deal. he meant to be nice but i didn't like it at all. >> you didn't like it at all? >> no. >> then i didn't like it at all. what else is going on? >> the white house is putting pen to paper for a fiscal compromise and now talk about something here. he is set to unveil his budget
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blew print blueprint on wednesday. when it comes to proposed cuts to social security. a call for new taxes on the wealthy and flninfrastructure. tli he'll propose higher income beneficiaries pay for more medicare coverage prekindergarten education made available across the nation and tobacco products tax to pay for it. those reductions would top 4.3 trillion once other reductions already agreed to by congress take effect. the president will propose more than 600 billion in new
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revenues. nearly 80% of the savings would come through spending cuts. >> now, this is a real budget. >> that's a real story. >> i don't agree with everything in there. i think he needs to go further in some areas. i don't like the new tax increases but that's a real budget, josh, to start negotiations are w. that's exciting. >> this is reviving the last offer he made to john boehner last year minus some of the tax savings we had from the fiscal cliff deal. what is significant about it it's not the kind of lefty wish list to compete with the righty wish list. it's at least some effort to move toward the middle and off up these things. the democrats on the left will be upset not just change cpi but the medicare cuts as a way of saying, look, i'm serious about negotiating, are you republicans serious about negotiating? >> richard, so many places for republicans to come back and say we don't like this but over here
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is fascinating. i read -- >> do you think he is going to do that? >> republicans are? >> right. and get down to negotiation or say it's not serious enough and we want two times, three times? >> i think it depends on -- i don't know what is going on behind closed doors right now because this story at least caught me by surprise yesterday. i'll tell you three weeks ago, very conservative republicans that were saying on air no, we will never raise another penny of taxes. if the deal is big enough, we will do it. >> well, look. i think it's smart politics to say, hey, we put in titlements on the table and put out a budget so the whole thing we don't put out budgets and don't deal with entitlements is out. we have seen the white house do this before. they are negotiating against themselves. republicans will say thank you very much and now let's move on to the next phase and always the problem for this white house. >> sam, what what do you think?
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>> i think richard is probably right. have you reestablished a different middle ground, right? and it might work in terms of the public relations. keep in mind, budgets are mostly symbolic documents but if you start from the middle ground as your base on negotiation it only means you can move one way. that said, having read "the new york times" piece which has the details on this, you know, he has offered all of this stuff before so i don't know how mad the left will be. he has offered cpi before and the extent of the medicare cuts 400 billion as detailed in the pieces is probably higher than i thought the white house had gone before, but this is the general framework of every offer that they have been at the end. >> ordinarily the president introduces his budget first and got flipped around this year. you have the right wing budget from the house. you've had slightly left wing budget from the senate. now obama comes last and what he
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proposes looks like a compromise. they have at least positioned themselves between the two polls and look nor reasonable and not giving away the farm in the first. >> it replaces sequestration with different cuts which i think might get some political traction. i think you're starting to see sequestration take a hit in the communities and congress talking to local press are getting concerned about it so there might be some desire to think about a replacement going forward and this might be the document to latch on to. >> all right. for the first time more americans believe marijuana should be legal than illegal. majority of americans support in making it legal. approval for decriminalizing marijuana has jumped 11% in just
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three years. >> sam, you became of age at the right time! >> wait. this is so obvious. >> what is so obvious? >> why we should, obviously, decriminalize pot. >> why should we? >> because everyone uses it. >> maybe everyone in your circle. >> is that why you're so slow this morning? >> everyone uses it and why decriminalize -- >> guess what? decriminalize it and tax it and help out the deficit situation. >> everyone uses it. >> no, they don't. >> joe eats it in his brownies. >> everybody in your neighborhood? >> either has or will use it. >> i can tell you it's not the case in any of the neighbors i grew up in. >> you're hiding. >> there is a big, great land out there, you know. >> called america! >> to the west of the hudson. >> wait, hold on. >> and east of las vegas. >> land to the left of the asella track i ride on? >> you're in the smoking car.
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>> clearly more people are using pot and more comfortable using pot. >> i'm not comfortable. whether it's my 25-year-old son or, you know, a high school student. >> what about someone who -- >> i'm not comfortable with somebody using pot. >> what about someone who is extremely ill. >> sure, that's fine. do you want your daughters -- would you like your daughter when she goes off to college to smoke pot? >> no. >> why? >> i'm with you on that. i don't think it should be legalized and decriminalized but i think it should be much more embraced as a medical use which i know is a different issue. >> but look. you could put the chart up by same-sex marriage about this. this country is becoming more progressive and more libertarian if you might prefer that phrase but more of a live and let live attitude and what these polls -- >> i was going to ask what this was all about. josh, certainly the case with marijuana. i think a lot of this just has to do with the fact now you have
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people who are 60, 65 who were smoking pot in college dorm rooms in the 1960s. >> the boomers fault. >> everything is the boomers fault. >> not this one. >> can i say it? in the '70s they gave us disco and polyester. 90s, gave us bill clinton and now turning us into pot heads and bankrupt us. >> a lot of people are comparing this to marriage equality. i think it's different. a constituency is trying to legalize marriage equality and i don't think a big one legalizing pot. you don't see obama who is a big smoker, at least in his youth, coming out and saying -- >> when he was 49? >> no. >> pot smoker. >> a pot smoker? >> terrible. that's interesting. can we get to guns?
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>> in a second. progressives are more libertarian on marijuana and same-sex marriage but not so on abortion. it's interesting how there's a cross current going there. it just shows, you know, americans are not ideas lodideo >> i do think abortion, there's a lot of a lot how you frame abortion, right? is it pro life, pro choice? seen that played out many years. most americans are both if you dig into their attitudes. clinton attitude was safe, legal and rare. what is that? is that pro choice or pro life? >> you look at the numbers.
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you look at what legislatures are doing across the country. it has to do with viability and 3d imaging that 1973 appearance. i hate to sound like marijuana. this is something where people in washington can yell at each other all they want but when a parent goes in and they see their unborn child in 3d imagery suddenly -- you repeat that thousands and thousands and thousands and thousands of times every day across america, that has as much of an impact as, you know, a 65-year-old hearing somebody say, don't smoke pot, your alarm will fall off. the 65-year-old said, i smoke pot and i'm still -- >> attached. >> borings is more serious generally than marijuana legalization. maybe if you have cancer and need it for pain and a serious issue in your life. >> right. >> i think most people, abortion is a more important, more
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immediately, more significant issue than -- >> the underlying issue as it played out in this last election around abortion issues who is in the best place to choose and control these decisions? and i think we saw a number of republican candidates stumble very, very badly in trying to make decisions and frame decisions for women when it's their decision. >> i can say pro life without talking about rape. i mean, please, do not tie all -- clearly can't! and some of them are still trying to talk about medical miracles of a female's body. >> or forcing ultrasounds. >> but let me say that was a good job trying to tie richard murdoch and to do aiken to the rest of us who are pro life. >> and the virginia state. >> oh, yes. >> politics. >> oh, yes.
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come on. frank once had one of those focus groups on force transvaginal probes. i think it might be a 50/50 run. >> stick with it. >> maybe not. we hope republicans will stay away from that issue moving forward and talking about rape. >> good for them. right. senator dianne feinstein a leading voice for gun reform laws yesterday spoke of a need to change the way -- this is interesting in the conversation we had with campbell brown yesterday -- violence is depicted in popular culture. she suggested video game makers should have changes on their own and referencing adam lanza said if sandy hook doesn't do it, if the knowledge of these video games this young man played doesn't, then maybe we have to proceed. and i think that was the heart of the controversy yesterday when we were having a really great conversation about the piece she wrote in the "the wall
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street journal" yesterday. do you want the government to get involved? if you're so against big government in a nanny state then people have to act more responsible and not have these games available to young children who might have some sort of mental illness issues and they play is over and over and over again and you see it every time with every high school massacre or mass killing, these video games are a part of these people's culture. their daily life. how do we do something about it if the government doesn't get involved? >> i remember the columbine people saying they watched the matrix. it is a toxic mix and toxic brew. i go back and i think about joe manchin who came on this show out of newtown saying, listen, we need more background checks and we need to be responsible. have responsible, reasonable gun
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limitations in some areas. but he said this is going to fail. you look at the tape. he said it. he said it. and they didn't listen to him in washington and i'll just say right here, joe and i were burning up the phones talking to a lot of people in the white house and in the senate saying, okay, listen if you're going to do this you have to be smart about this. if you make this just about guns you're going to get nowhere. nobody listened to joe. they just didn't listen to him. they said we are going to make this about guns and not cross hollywood and not going to cross the video game makers. i'm really encouraged by what dianne feinstein yesterday and i wish she had said it three months ago. but it is a mix of things and i think we actually have sam, an opportunity mehere. >> yeah. >> to start this debate new. we have to talk about guns and mental health and we got to talk
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about violent american culture. >> we have only done two or three. the mental health component has been there. limited but it has been there. and i've been surprised at how little the culture component has been part of this debate. because traditionally that has been the counterpoint guns and culture. >> mika and i sat down and really powerful democratic leaders in america. and we talked about guns. said, if this is going to work, because they were saying how does it work? i said you have to talk about mental health and they said, great, we will do that. then you have to talk about this violent culture. i said got a 25-year-old and 22-year-old. i've seen their friends. i see the effect and you know what they did? their eyes glazed over and they didn't listen. >> i agree with their point when they say every society plays the same video games. >> every society doesn't have a
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hundred million guns. >> from a political standpoint putting that in the package would have made sense from the beginning and would have made it seem more rounded and made it more politically palatable in congress. hopefully, they can talk about it in a way that brings it to the table. >> what i find it concerning is liberals who have been championing this bill and talk about the nra, the nra, the nra, the nra, the nra. who has gotten on the floor and talked about quentin tarantino? you talk about -- the violence. where he uses -- go see his latest movie. he uses blood and guts and gore as punch lines and then he is praised in hollywood. >> because it's art. >> by a lot of these people. >> it's pornography is what it is. >> creative license. >> so if -- people say that the gun regulation is dead, that we are not going to get universal
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background checks. i think we saw something important yesterday. i need to hear the president of the united states come out and go after his own base. right? i've gone after the nra. i've talked talked about background checks. joe manchin is going after the nra talking about the need for background checks. >> call chris dodd. >> a lot of people have done it. the president of the united states need to it and joe biden needs to do it and talk about the violent video game. i'm sorry to repeat it but somebody just seeing the show for the first time, the second mika and i heard the news there was a shooting in connecticut, i said, you watch. this kid is going to have a certain condition. i won't say it here on the air because people will kill me for saying it. he locked himself in his room, he played violent video games probably five hours a day and he is probably 21, 22, 23. he is very angry and frustrated right now. said it before we knew the first child had been killed.
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now if that's the case and it's that obvious and there is this toxic mix, i'm not saying ban all violent video games. my son would never talk to me again if i did but this has to be part of the conversation and liberals won't talk about it! >> they need to step up. not just the president but like chris dodd and movie makers need to step up. video game makers even more so because the ones you take home into your basement and play and kill people with it and blirlt literally most realistic way. what kids do now. it's crazy. crazy. why are we the only ones? >> the same hold actors are out saying a lot of the same things i'm saying as far as background checks and high capacity magazines. they are very violent movies and we know who they are because there have been images of them with assault weapons killing people. let's have this as part of the conversation. i know it's a lot of fun kicking around the nra and kicking around second amendment
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supporters as a bunch of rednecks and people love doing that and make them feel morally superior. it does. why don't they do that to hollywood? dianne feinstein, i really salute the senator. that's a great first step. i got to ask quickly. how much do you all disagree with me? richard? do you? >> i don't think you can legislate about it but i think culture should change. glorified. >> richard speaks for you two. >> i need to know when the culture has changed, when the government hasn't legislated. i need to know. name something. it's not cigarettes. >> if "the new york times" would have, instead of profiling quentin tarantino and praising him as much as they did and glorifying him and every actor and actress that stood up at the golden globes and the hollywood is a very close circle out
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there. you can get on the outside of that bubble quickly. >> great point. coming up on "morning joe," republican congressman peter king will be here on set. also the moderator of "meet the press" david gregory and "the washington post" eugene robinson and rev jim wallis will also join us. you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. ♪ ♪
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the morning papers at 30 past the hour. wow. we went long on the first block. >> we did. >> could be a problem. >> alex, when we go, can we go to alex for a second here. when we go over if you could
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talk in our ear and let us know we go over? >> i'm still trying to figure out what button it is. >> it's not the delay button. alex started about 12 minutes ago, go to break, you're killing us, go to break. >> i'm off my game. didn't know how to wrap you up. "the boston globe." 25 middle school students in massachusetts have been denied lunch after cafeteria workers realized the students prepaid food accounts were overbrawn drawn. several parents filed complaints with the school after their kids returned home in tieears at the end of the day. the principle said he is outraged and his students will never be denied lunch ever again. los angeles times. technology advances they hope to use a breakthrough to deliver drugs to the body and replace damaged tissue in the living
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organs. >> condemning a court by the court in saudi arabia after a man was forcibly paralyzed. the man is on trial for stabbing and paralyzing another man the uk called the eye for an eye punishment grotesque. >> a high school criticized bus stop cost $1 million. so-called super stop features a state-of-the-art electronic monitor and heated flooring and it typically costs 10 to 20,000 dollars. officials hoping to cut costs before beginning construction of shelter at additional stops. >> this is huge. >> aarrested development. i watch this show. coming to netflix. it was canceled after three
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seasons and the show's return had been rumored for years and debut on may 26th online. >> we were just debating house of cards and what it did for netflix is extraordinary. their business model collapsed. it was in a free-fall and house of cards saved them. >> literally only two shows. really enjoyment and "arrested development" is hysterical and i don't see why people didn't see the humor. they cancelled. jeffrey tambor, i love him. he is hysterical! from the chicago sun times roger ebert who for decades offered his take on the cinema sadly lost his battle with cancer. he began reviewing movies for the paper in 1967 and will continue up until this past tuesday.
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his last written word, i'll see you at the movies. he was 70 years old. >> you guys are too young, i guess. so depressing. but siskel and ebert in the 1980s. >> we are not too young. >> i remember them. they were fantastic. roger ebert was amazing. it's devastating. he was a fantastic person and he was so good on twitter too even when he lost use of his invoices he was fantastic and always engaging. it's a really sad loss. >> my goodness. >> yeah. >> i'll see you at the movies. we will have more on that. >> a quick sound bite. let's hear this. >> the question was do you like or hate each other? and i said both. and roger said? >> neither. >> for 24 years we were on television together for more than 30 years we fought it out. on our newspaper jobs, there was a lot of competition, a lot of
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rivalry but also respect and friendship. >> they were great. they were absolutely great. yeah. >> up next, mike allen joins us with the morning playbook. why politico says spring training is over forist istiisir elizabeth colbert busch. we will be right back. -- for elizabeth colbert busch. we will be right back. for eliza colbert busch. we will be right back. [ male announcer ] at charles schwab, we've committed to setting the bar high
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♪ ♪ sometimes you win sometimes you lose ♪ ♪ and sometimes the blues get a hold of you ♪ ♪ >> with us is white house chief correspondent for politico, mike allen. >> i bet there are hot people inside that hot house. am i objectifying the house? >> objectifying the house. >> it's a shame i don't look at my mentions any more on twitter because this morning would be fun. republicans would be killing me why are you doing that? and democrats say why are you objectifying women? it's a joke! i wish somebody would joke about me being good looking! >> that's a joke. >> i know! would somebody objectify me? >> happened with the doughnut hole. >> see? it hurts! i get kicked in the face!
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i get knocked down! can't get up again. >> mike, help us. you have a new piece this morning in politico saying spring training is over for elizabeth colbert busch. what is going on? rutro! >> somebody pointed out online this is the week that elizabeth colbert busch got a name and stopped being stephen colbert's sister and was focused on in this race until tuesday. the republican primary is where the action was and see is the candidates go head-to-head. this is in a district in south carolina mitt romney won by 18 points. it's tough territory for a democrat. elizabeth colbert busch is selling hearses as an independent businesswoman, someone who would bring south carolina common sense to washington. on the other side, mark sanford, the former governor, is trying to divert attention from his personal problems and just paint her as a democratic liberal. she is for standard democratic
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policy positions but she makes exceptions on obama care said they should make changes to root out waistful spending. she is calling hearses an independent businesswoman and emphasis on the woman. >> i would not want to be her. i would not want to be a democrat in the deep south in a minus 18 district in a special election. in a special election you get the most conservative and the most liberal people out. your hard chargers. everything about this favors the republican. a conservative republican. i've got to say honestly i don't see how any democrat would win this race at this time. it's the reason scott brown got elected to the senate. it was a special election. >> i think this will be a test of whether regular voters,
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people who are not in the republican primary can really take mark sanford, come backer. you got to be kidding me factor about this and see it play out the next couple of weeks. with the republicans in the primary he and did the redemption tour and see if this will work a little more broadly and she calling hearses an independent making a clear play for republicans who are turning up their nose at sanford. >> mike and, should i say it or should you? >> i think you should. you're off your game. were you upset we were objectifying you, mike? you don't remember what you have said every friday since 1961? >> my thoughts for today, one, i love being objectifyed and i hate it and two, party with sam stein i want to do that and third, upcoming guest peter ring is 69 today, a birthday boy. last but not least, happy
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friday! >> there we go. boom! >> wow! that was a lot of work. mike allen, thank you very much. have a great weekend. coming up next, chelsea clinton steps into the spotlight with new work for the clinton initiative and is she ready to embrace the political life? maggie murphy joins us next. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. ♪ how much there is to know with the spark cash card
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chelsea clint speaks about embracing in the family life. how did it go with chelsea? how is she doing? i. it's really interesting. chelsea i think this weekend is at university in st. louis and her leg junior college students coming together to solve problems. and i think for chelsea, it's a little bit of taking over the family business after living in her 20s, i think, as she hearses says, a life that was removed from her public life really just sort of stepping in and saying, okay i want to make a difference and i'm going to try to find a way to do it in her own way. it was really interesting to get a chance to see her do that. lynn cher who did the interview visited the cgiu offices. the cgi offices and she ran an amazing meeting. she is her mother's daughter. >> really? >> is she really? >> lynn was like this is like this woman knows how to run a meeting. i think that for people we have
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known chelsea our entire lives in way since the clinton came on to the scene. she was born in the governor's mansion in arkansas and we really are looking to know a little more about her. >> we have known her but not known her which i think makes this so compelling. they did such a good job, they did a great job with her, no matter -- wherever you come from. she is a lovely person. at the same time, she was so shielded and protected in a good way. everyone sort of gave her her space, i think. >> absolutely. you're absolutely right. they should write a parenting manual. i think what is interesting which comes out is how influential hillary mother dorothy rodham was on chelsea's life. she is saying you're not doing enough with the birth right of being chelsea chont. you ne clinton and she nudged her about getting married. >> nobody is perfect. >> i think you get a great sense of what a grandmother she was and what a great influence she
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was on her granddaughter's life and chelsea speaking about what her grandmother gave her. >> i think it's powerful that tradition. the question of the sort of legacy even before her mother, obviously, was finished with public life is a real challenge, right? i mean, i wonder maybe channeling the grandmother whether you think she has done enough. cgiu sounds great and they are college kids but the clinton name is still very powerful. she could do a lot, lot more. >> she is pretty young. she is 33. she has got a lot of time. young to me. i think that -- i think that she very purposely in her 20s figure out what she wanted to do. she said she wasn't driven by a desire like her father who was a governor at 33 and lynn cher asked her about that. she jokes, i didn't have this
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drive. i think she is trying to find it. i think bigger than that she is saying like many people of her generation is sort of trying to find, i want to make a difference in some way. it may not be specifically traditionally the way her parents did. you talked about service this week. i think that is part of this generation in some way, shape, or form. you don't have to be a politician just to be involved. >> i was going to say. >> also, sam, she has got a feeling. we have seen one kennedy after another being pushed too early into the limelight, terrible things happening. caroline kennedy, a remarkable woman. everybody suddenly was pushing her. you need to run for -- she didn't really know she wanted to be a senator. she is going to be a great ambassador to japan but i think when chelsea clinton is ready to be in public office, then let her run for public office, but -- >> i totally agree. >> why do we assume they should
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run for public office? just because of her last name doesn't mean she will be a good lawmaker or candidate for that matter. as she goes through this process by a public draw to public service for the fact of her last name, has she said i don't want to do public service and i want to be a hobbit and go off and make nls? millions? >> she did work at mckenzie in her 20s and now asking that point. don't do it because you have the name and do it something deep internally inside of you pushing you forward. what she says very candidly, she is searching for what that is and knows no time to waste and her entire generation feels that way. i need to do something and not sure what that will be. as the clinton cgiu university ideas you have to go with the problem and concrete ways to
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solve it and i do think that is one of the ways we are going to see. i don't think we have seen even the beginning. >> a hobbit liking distance? >> sure. why not? >> hobbit? >> hermit. >> hermit. >> hobbit works. sues shoes? >> i can see that and smokes weed. >> the new cover story for "parade" magazine, chelsea leans in. still ahead on "morning joe" -- >> i had to! >> i got it! >> three men who never held public office became the most powerful men in the world during the financial crisis of 2007. how about chelsea know her values? more "morning joe" when we come back. ♪ all i want is to see you smile ♪ ♪ if it takes just a little while ♪ [ male announcer] surprise -- you're having triplets.
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sam, sam, sam. >> time for a quick sports update. manny ramirez has found a home in the chinese professional baseball league and signing last week with the taiwanese team ega rhine
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rhinos and fans were excited and last night, manny hit his first home run. [ speaking in foreign language ] [ screaming ] manny ramirez, two-run home run! >> what a call. 450 feet to straightaway center field. slightly different hair style and running slower but manny still has got it. >> are you watching the sox and yankees series? we lost. >> can't win them all. >> you can't. >> but this is a much more likeable team and much better team than last year and i'm excited for the season. >> the yankees have very little to cheer for, but great pitching last night from two vets. >> we got to go. >> this is -- we get this from spin. >> i thought sam messed up the
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sports cast. >> spin downtown. incredible place. they think they are in l.a. and they are going to be in dubai. the best idea of the month is? >> ping-pong table right here. >> set up a ping-pong table. seriously. we are going to have a tournament in breaks. >> bracket style! >> the best idea i've heard in a long time. >> bracket tournament like the ncaa. put it on the website. >> okay. do it. >> i love it. coming up next, a man from at the fror front of the american innovation, cofounder of aol, steve kase is here with ideas to jump-start the economy. he joins us next on "morning joe." we went out and asked people a simple question: how old is the oldest person you've known? we gave people a sticker and had them show us. we learned a lot of us have known someone who's lived well into their 90s. and that's a great thing. but even though we're living longer, one thing that hasn't changed: the official retirement age.
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thoughts going through kevin ware's mind at this moment right here. paul, number ten. here we go. >> what was that loud cracking sound? >> number eight! >> hey, look. my tibia! >> that's right. six. >> did it go in? >> uh-huh. number four. >> tape it up, coach, i'm staying in. >> yeah. number three. >> they fire leno? >> and the number one thought going through kevin ware's mind
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at the moment of the broken leg. >> at least my back is not busted. >> that was a good one. welcome back to "morning joe." the top the of the hour. richard wolf and josh green still bus and joining the table the chairman of the coe of revolution, steve kase. here are revolutionary ideas about the economy? i've done my part. >> that's good. that's good. we will start with the headlines here this morning. the white house is putting pen to paper when it comes to president obama's ideas for a fiscal compromise. he is set to unveil his budget blueprint on wednesday. a plan that could put members of his own party on edge when it comes to proposed cuts to medicare and social security. administration officials say the president will echo the themes laid out in last year's negotiations with house speaker john boehner. among them, a call for new taxes on the wealthy and fresh investments in the nation's infrastructure. in exchange for added revenue
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the president is purportedly open to cost of living payments for social security benefits and something known as change cpi and he'll also propose higher income beneficiaries pay for medicare coverage and prekindergarten education made across the nation and tobacco products would be taxed more to pay to. it. over a decade annual deficits reduced by 1.8 trillion and reductions top 3.4 trillion when other reductions agreed to by the congress take effect. nearly 80% of the savings would come through spending cuts. >> steve, you work for a venture capital firm. you have to look at what firms seem to be ready to be taken over and made more profitable. like "the boston globe," one of the problems with "the boston globe", obviously, is their liabilities from retirement benefits so massive, nobody wants to assume that. it was gm's problem and why they
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went under, one of the reasons they went under. you look what the president is talking about here and you certainly what congress counterproposal on the other side. do we look like we are a massive business that's finally figuring out we need to take serious steps for our long-term retirement problems? >> an important issue and not just about heady cut spending or how to raise taxes or feel out how to raise revenues but to drive growth. i think the core is getting the economy growing faster. all of the growth comes from entrepreneurs. the kaufman data foundation said 34 million jobs created the last decade from high growth companies. having the focus on high entrepreneur is the key. >> when you started aol and we
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saw what happened in the early 1990s with intel's explosive growth, microsoft's explosive growth. mid '90s, net scape, google and yahoo come later. more guys took lunch buckets into gm factory in 1955 in one factory than worked for all of these companies combined in america. don't we have to look for growth outside of silicon valley as well? >> not just outside of silicon vale but technology. silicon valley will continue to be the brightest ecosystem in terms of entrepreneurs in the nation and probably in the world but many other parts of this country that are now starting to build up their own entrepreneur ecosystems and that will be fueled by the things done a year ago where the job like crowd
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funding and entrepreneurs in a city and have a way to get access to capital they wouldn't 10 to 20 years ago and get that idea on to the playing field and give it a shot. it's supporting entrepreneurship broadly across all section and not just focused on technology and silicon valley. most companies even if they are not tech companies are big users of technology like retail are huge users of technology. in some ways every company is a technology company and getting our stem education better and more people focused on engineering, math, those sorts of skills are critical for the jobs of the future. >> what component does immigration reform play in all of this? because a lot of tech ceos said we want to open the door and bring in foreign entrepreneurs and that could help build the
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u.s. technology. >> it's huge. last year the congress and white house worked together on -- that was very important. this year, the focus is on immigration. hopefully, next week, gang of eight lay out their principles and more specificity around the specific aspects of that and result in a debate in the congress. i'm hopeful the next three months or so that we will pass comprehensive immigration reform and i think only pass if it's a comprehensive solution and i don't think the political will to deal with parts of it but a robust package around high school immigration and start upvisa and raising the cap on h-1-vs. the start up visa act this legislation exists and need to be knit together in a package and linked with broader comprehensive solution but if we
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don't use that we lose a global battle for talent. other countries are figuring out the secret sauce powered our economy is interma frentreprene. other countries are stepping up their game here and are trying to attract talent entrepreneurs and talented investors and engineers to their countries and we don't want to shift away and bemoan we lost our edge in what is the key that has driven our economy which is entreprene entrepreneursh entrepreneurship. >> i couldn't agree with you more about the visa. one thing the president talked to steve jobs about what about these -- the sort of mid level engineers and not talking about the high tech entrepreneurs that you've been talking about but the guys who make things that the actual technology where all of these jobs are going into
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saying could we do that here? what about having a plan we could get the engineers to make these phones that we are all playing with and bring some of that production here? anyone got a credible plan for that? >> educating our own and getting more investment in the subject is one key. even the high school visa is not just for the intera practice neuros but larger companies. we need a start-up visa for the start-up sector but getting engineers focused on process engineering which is the meat of how these things are built is very important. the good news a wave of interest in manufacturing in the united states. one thing called added manufacturing 3d printing is quite exciting and sal galvanizing a lot of interest. the good news back to what joe was saying earlier the gm plants were full of workers and not now
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because they are losing jobs. the silver lining if you can manufacture here with fewer people than suddenly manufacturing is more affordable and more economical here and people thought had to be in china ten or 20 years ago and now reassessing that and opportunity to start regaining momentum in manufacturing but got to get the talent piece, right? which is why high-skilled immigration -- >> a down side to having less people here. one person could do the job five people did before but a lot of people are and it's a revolution and people are saying outsourcing itself something we all assumed made sense tense years ago is that a mistake after you look at the shipping charges and everything else? you can only call it an energy revolution. 2002 told we were out of natural gas the next 15 years and now an endless supply. they say 75 years but as newt gingrich likes to say no technology is status and 75 years today means forever and
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2020 we will be the number one exporter of oil in the world. this means not only can we produce things cheaper in america because of labor and because we're so productive here, but energy costs are going to be negligible. we actually have a lot of advantages -- >> key cost of manufacturing -- it depends on the product but the key cost of manufacturing 20 years ago was labor cost and energy cost and distribution cost and things like that and all coming down and reopens the debate around outsourcing and many large companies moving jobs back here because raealize if it's a close call rather to do it mere. some want to have more jobs in america but some keep the process engineering you were talking about within america. over time as the products get refined the expertise essentially moves offshore not just build it but the next
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version design of it. we got to get this right and a lot of aspects it. capital like the jobs act was a key first step. now the focus has to be on immigration and getting the right policy to support this entrepreneurial act. education and health care huge parts of our economy and very important parts of our everyday life is enormous innovation taking the internet to those sectors so could be a great moment for entrepreneurship. >> you're talking about it in the latest bloomberg "businessweek." silicon valley want to be obama and you write khanna 36 is campaigning to represent california's 17th district. he the first generation indian american an ivy league technology lawyer and veteran of the obama administration having
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done a stint as computdeputy ast secretary at the u.s. department of commerce. the people who are running his campaign are many of the same ones who just got barack obama re-elected. it's as if bill belichick and the staff of the new england patriots decided to coach a high school football team. >> this is a great story. one of the big questions in politics since the election was everybody recognized how advanced the obama re-election team was compared to anything we had seen before in american politics. so one of the questions who are they working for next? hillary clinton? or some embattled democratic senator in 2014. they have signed on with a technology lawyer nobody heard of in silicon valley and run his campaign for congress. basically, what they are trying to do is to see if you can take the obama campaign magic and
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repackage it at the house level. almost kind of franchise it and give becomes that same advantage in congress that we saw that they had in the presidential race. >> that will be fascinating. he seems like a viable candidate. he's got a very good resume. >> the other striking thing about this is you take the obama re-election team you would think go after a tea party republican. instead khanna is running against a seven-term democratic. a lot of tech leaders see him as someone who can represent their interests in washington. i think some of them see honda as a old school democrats so you have the same challenges of obama with hillary clinton back in the presidential primaries in 2007. >> we were talking about phones before. mika has, i would say, love/hate relationship with apple but it's nor of a hate/hate relationship with apple. so we are trying out some new phones here just to see how it
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goes. i know you've seen this. this new microsoft system which visually is great. you see it around. it's really impressive. the question is -- you're talking about the ecosystem. the question is microsoft so far behind the 8 ball? you know, for most of us all roads lead to itunes. >> right. >> how do they make that leap? how does microsoft get back in the game? this is visually better than the iphone and does a a lot of good things but is it too big of a leap? >> it's a challenge. these things tend to go in cycles. i've been doing this about 30 years. 30 years ago apple and microsoft just coming into their own area apple kind of lost its way a little bit and microsoft took that vacuum and created windows and enormous company and many people kind of went -- steve jobs came back.
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i remember he called me at at that point only 3% of the market was apple and company worth about a billion dollars and many gave the company up for dead. he doubled down and came out with beautiful products that inspired people's imagination and came reorganize back and now the most valuable technology company. it is possible to do that but much hard. microsoft is in a better position than apple was at that time. it is still a profitable company but in the consumer space they have always struggled a little bit and -- >> why? >> i think their psychology, they are mentality and culture is enterprise focused and developer focussed and creative signs are more difficult. x-box has been successful but they are generally an enterprise company and kind of core technology company and something around apple and sort of the merger in steve's mind what was happening in hollywood and silicon valley. he did a better job building
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bridges between those worlds and created a product to link those two worilds. >> you snow is it sam stein was here what he would be saying? >> what. >> echoing steve jobs job saying bill gates would have been a better ceo if he had dopropped assit. >> oh, my lord. >> they both dropped out of college. >> only one dropped acid! >> oh, by the way, zuckerberg doesn't seem to think that may sound good. >> steve case, thank you so much. ahead, peter king opens the door to a preemptive strike against north korea? we will ask him about the situation there. >> no thank you. >> later in the show. up next, moderator of "meet the press" david gregory and the "the washington post" eugene robinson join the company. you're watching "morning joe," brewed by starbucks. ♪
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bus from washington moderator of "meet the press" david gregory and pull witnesseser prize winning columnist and of the "the washington post" is eugene robinson. david, we start with you. is there hope here in terms of a budget? what do you make of the blueprint? >> everybody that i've talked to the past few months have said the window is between now and july if they are going to get anything meaningful done on some kind of grand compromise. i think, you know, the president is trying to do something as the times points out this morning to exploit some of these cracks in the republican coalition that is can he get more revenue through some kind of revenue increases if he is giving some on entitlements and put something
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down on paper and everybody on the republican side saying let's have regular order and have the legislature legislate and have something on paper now they can work with some of the things he is willing to do on entitlement programs, particularly social security. >> i think what the president is trying to do is find a way to confuse the opposition a little bit and put together something that they haven't done within a budget framework. as you all have talked about early this morning coming when they are in the order of what has been proposed so that they can position themselves compromising on some issues and able to pick off republican support in the senate instead of coming at this frontally you have to raise revenues as a part of this and saying this is what we are going to do entitlement.
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>> i want to pick up on that and ask you, do you think republicans are going to embrace some of these proposal from the president especially on entitlement cuts and especially knowing they have a debt ceiling, bumping up against its limit in a couple of months? exactly. i'm not sure they are going to jump at this. you know, the debt ceiling question gets all mixed in with this, i think. so we go up, i don't know if it's going to be another brink like the brinks we have had, but i think it all becomes part of this larger negotiation. i'm not tremendously optimistic a grand bargain but an interesting approach by the president and maybe it will find some resonance. we can hope they start talking to each other in some way. >> sam stein? >> i'm curious to see what the republican reaction to this
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budget will be. they are asking for this thing and criticizing the white house and now put it out there and say it doesn't go far enough because clearly have said it will state the middle ground. i've talked to an official administration off set and they say congress will be upset about their tactic here and know they have done this before by not staking out the progressive wing and negotiating to the middle they will get criticized and made it clear they are not signing off on any proposal that changes cpi or means testing for medicare. >> who told you that? >> senior administration official. >> who will not sign off on that? >> president obama will not sign off on any proposal 'cha thant c
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will change cpi. >> why say put a progressive budget out there? >> if you're a republican the past four months you have slashed defense spending and you've already agreed to the first tax increase in a quarter century. i would say this has been decidedly on our side and we have been giving the past four months. i think this is the first gesture from the left. >> if you were a democrat you'd say the past two years, we have been decidingly giving because we did the duting control act and cut 2.5 million and -- 600 billion which was revenue. you can argue it based on the calendar each way. the question is tactics. did they make a mistake by saying -- >> did they -- i mean, david gregory, did they make a mistake putting out a real budget? because they haven't put out a budget before. the white house budget gets zero votes every year and they know they are not getting a trillion dollar of new taxes. i salute the president of the united states and it shows courage. it shows courage. he has put out a real budget but it's a starting point. i'm sorry. as a conservative, i don't see this as a safe middle ground and
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paul ryan's budget is a right wing nut job. i see we now have a republican proposal and a democratic proposal and it's a real proposal from the president. i think we need to salute him this morning. now let's start negotiating. >> that is the point you actually have a framework to negotiate from 'cha ask a much more public framework. you talk to democrats who have been so frustrated with this process of negotiation because you have republican leaders with the white house. instead of rank and file democrats in the senate being able to weigh in on this. now you do have a framework. you commit to some things on entitlements so i agree with you, joe. i think it does mean something. but, look. some of this is the white house just trying something because it hasn't been working. they haven't been able to get big agreement on these issues by dealing directly with republican leaders and so this is the opportunity. and, you know, this is also the tension between -- you've seen it this week. the president talking about wanting to work with the republican side on some of these
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issues, sending signals that he'll compromise on immigration and guns and the budget when a lot of democrats want to see him dig in particularly as we get closer to 2014. >> final word to you, gene robinson. >> look. progressives will have questions about this approach. i've talked to a lot of people recently who have looked back at the fiscal cliff negotiation and said, you know, the president really didn't get enough revenue. he should have held out for more. he held all of the cards in that negotiation and he kind of settled in the middle. so there will be a lot of questioning about what -- progressive look like starting more in the middle than on the progressive wing. and if -- if what sam said -- i'm sure it is true -- if they are not going to do the entitle many reform or go for that, unless they get a substantial amount of new revenue, then the question becomes how far is anybody really moving here if the republicans are going take the position that there can't
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any new revenue. >> thank you both. who is on sunday's "meet the press"? >> we will talk about north korea and whether this threat is real. senator lindsey graham joins us and bill richardson with perspective on what we are dealing with. >> eugene robinson, we will read your column in "the washington pos post". the king of provide jordan roth will be here to preview a new musical by harvey firestein and cyndi lauper. that and more when "morning joe" comes right back. ♪ it's not what you think. it's a phoenix with 4 wheels. it's a hawk with night vision goggles. it's marching to the beat of a different drum.
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up next, the reign of the central banker. how ben bernanke came one of the most powerful in 2007.
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columnist and economics editor for the post wonk blog. that's pretty good. neil irwin. author of e the -- "the alchamitss." >> together they shape our economic destiny. together they chart this path for the global economy in a way most of us aren't aware of. >> sounds like a conspiracy theory to me. they are unelected. i got three peoples that are unelected and three of the most powerful people in the world. >> it is troubling. you have these unelected officials and meet in secret. it's not ideal from a democratic perspective. >> who are they?
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>> ben bernanke we know the chairman of the u.s. federal reserve. jean-claude in charge of 17 countries in western europe. murray the governor of the bank of england. take canada and switzerland in the club too. >> how did they do? david stockman says not well. >> i think david is mostly wrong. >> why is that? >> wow. >> why do you think david is wrong? >> i think he has a view of that anything you do to try to corral what can go wrong in an economy you're laying the groundwork. it's the policy to see what went wrong in the past and learn from history and try to fix it and do better. that's what ben bernanke and these other guys have been doing the last few years. >> how have they done since 2007? >> no depress.
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last time we saw the depression led to terrible events. this time around europe in a bad shape economically. u.s. get a jobs report in an hour or so. that said we avoided the terrible outcomes. a win but not as bad a loss we could have experienced. >> doesn't the question come down do you think t.a.r.p. worked? did we do the right thing hoping the financial system would be on more financial footing? fir of all i'm wondering what your answer to that is. secondly can you answer that? we don't know what could have been if we had structured it differently and attached reforms to the banking system to it. i'm curious about your thoughts on that. >> i think we would be in far worst shape if we had not rescued the banking system in 2008. if you look at history when that has happened the results are horrendous and nobody likes the t.a.r.p. the bank bailouts were awful. 700 billion and hundreds more of
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different fed lending and it's not ideal and not. ideal in determines of good market incentives but compared to the alternatives i think it left us in a much better place. >> old saying about the central banks. the job of the fed is take the punch bowl away as the party is getting going. is the party already getting started? is it time for the fed to start taking the punch bowl away? >> i don't think so. if you think this is a party in the u.s. economy you're living in a different economy than i am. 7.7% unemployment that's still very high. we still don't have significant inflation. there comes a day when that is what they have to do. ben bernanke or whoever his successor is says enough is enough and economy is back on track and raise interest rates and stop flooding the banking system with these hundreds of billions of dollars they are doing right now. today isn't that day. good news if in a economy fed
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said our risk is inflation and not unemployment is too high but the risk remember doing too much. >> neil, how much money, has how many dollars a is this unelected guy, benning bernanke, pumped into our economy since 2008 with a single vote of a member of congress? >> with a member of congress? >> how many trillions has he pumped into our economy? >> the fed balance about $3 trillion. that was up from 800 billion before the crisis. 2 trillion increase. >> he decided on his own? >> with a committee but, yeah, pretty much. >> politicians don't do a great job of managing the economy and never have. >> says the man from a monarch state. >> no. but it's true. the bank of england used to have its interest rate decisions decided by an elected official and they were always done surprisingly around the time of election. they would cut interest rates at the time of election. not a good idea.
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>> neil irwin, thank you. the book is "the alchemists." thank you very much. great to have you on. >> it's an important book. >> good way at looking at things. up next, cyndi lauper makes her broadway debut in one of the most talked about musicals of the season. jordan roth joins us to preview the new show. listen to his name. kinky boots! you're watching "morning joe" brewed by starbucks. [ male announcer ] if you have yet to master the quiet sneeze... [ sneezes ] [ male announcer ] you may be an allergy muddler. try zyrtec®. it gives you powerful allergy relief. and zyrtec® is different than claritin® because zyrtec® starts working at hour 1 on the first day you take it. claritin® doesn't start working until hour 3. [ sneezes ] [ male announcer ] zyrtec®. love the air.
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[ male announcer ] see what's happening behind the scenes
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♪ they spent the last century making a range of shoes for men. we will begin this century making a range of shoes for a range of men. ♪ ♪ everybody say yea >> the broadway musical kinky boots made his debut last night. jordan roth is behind the scenes. take a look. >> team "morning joe," we are here at the kinky boots broadway
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opening. we are going on the red carpet. we are going back stage. this is how broadway opens a show. and there is liza minelli. ♪ >> hi, "morning joe." >> you have been a writer and how does it feel making your broadway debut tonight? >> i'm glad i don't have to sing and perform. i'd have a heart attack. i'm excited. >> why is opening of a new musical uniquely special to you? >> i'm so cognizant what went into it. of the journey that led up to this moment and the excitement and the hard work. it's a beautiful thing and it's unique and it's live. >> and it's live! >> it's live! >> nothing like live. >> nothing like it! >> it was just something about
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this show that is kind of magical. the show has an effect on me. it's just phenomenal. >> opening night kinky boots is about to begin. i'm going to take my seat. thanks for coming and see you at the theater. >> that is usa how you did that. what is that? >> this is what we are talking about. >> donnie deutch, try to top that! >> got from that donnie's closet. >> can i see that, please? what size? >> that is not for the faint of heart. >> what size? >> it's your size. >> impressive, jordan. i love it. joining us now the president and i should put your intro in there and principal owner of jenson theaters, jordan roth. >> thank you. >> what is the best time? >> the plot is charlie inherits a shoe factory of his family shoe factory and it's down on his luck. he figures out, he meets this
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fabulous drag queen low la and figures out the way to save his family's factory is to make kinky boots but what it's really about, in its heart, is accepting other people is something we talk a lot about, but accepting yourself is the hardest part and that is what kinky boots is. >> it looks like a lot of fun. >> it is the most fun. really nothing like a broadway musical can make you laugh in your belly and feel in your heart and think in your head and kinky boots is a great broadway musical. >> can you bring your children? >> yes. >> are you sure? >> i am sure. >> cyndi lauper? >> cyndi lauper has made the most astounding broadway debut as a composer and brought her unique voice and celebrated her self and pored poured it into
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this fabulous score. harvey through all of his productions, he has been exploring culture and gender an really the culmination of that. >> so, what else do we have to look at this spring? >> it's a big season. >> let's start with bette midler. >> "i'll eat you last." that's the title. >> premieres tonight, hot off. she is playing the sort of legendary super agent sue mangers in a woman show. this is the first time bette midler has been on broadway, other than her concerts, since she debuted in "fiddler on the roof" she played one of the daughters. >> tom hanks in "lucky guy." >> that opened just last week. nora ephron right before she died she finished this
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magnificent piece. a love letter to tabloid journalism and love letter to new york and a love letter to life and tom hanks is making his broadway debut with a really beautiful company of actors courtney vance and a beautiful company. >> and you have, also, coming out, the testament of mary. >> so "the testament of mary" is epic. fiona shaw. one-woman show. she is playing mary. mother of jesus mary telling her side of the story. and it is theater as only theater can do it. you sit in this house for 90 minutes and you know you are watching something you have never, ever experienced before. >> i love that. i don't know which one i want to see first. if i had to choose one -- >> "kinky boots" just opened so i would say come get your kinky
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on. >> oh, my. okay. >> and safe for your kids. okay. >> do you not believe me about the safety of the kids? feelings of mistrust. just because you brought your 7-year-old to mormon. >> i brought my kids to "book of mormon." they did love it, but the only young people in the room. >> making you the coolest mother in history. >> everybody was looking at me. it was fun. >> how is the business of broadway doing? >> it is doing great. really robust time. our business does well when our shows are great. and right now, this spring, we are popping. there are a lot of plays, a lot of musicals, new work, revivals. it's a great time to be a broadway audience and that makes it a great time to be a broadway business. >> this is, the shows you're talking about, some big names. tom honks, fiona shaw. does that mean, is that a reflection that maybe hollywood isn't doing so well, or these actors are looking for the
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challenge of live? >> it's an interesting question. i think probably both. as -- >> i mean, tom hanks is doing this as a favor to nora, right? >> i don't know. >> or a tribute. >> a tribute. and experience. i mean, this is a piece that belongs on stage and he's so wonderful in the part, so, it's really a great marriage. but i think to the hollywood question, as, as actors continue to search for challenging story telling and really unique ways of connecting to audiences, there is nothing like being on the live stage and being on broadway, the actors on stage, the audience in the house. you share that energy. there's nothing like it. >> and totally, totally off topic. but liza minnellminnelli, did y to her? >> we had a little chat. she was excited about the show. i think she had a fantastic time. >> have you seen her on
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"arrested development." >> yeah. >> she's amazing. >> jordan roth, also amazing. thank you so much. "kinky boots" playing at the hirs hirschfeld theater in new york. i don't know how donnie is going to top this. he has given me shoes on the air a few times. jordan, thank you so much. coming up, with hopes of sweeping gun reform fading in the senate, a leading voice on the issue sets her sights on violent video games. plus, congressman peter king of new york joins us here on set. what the north korean crisis means for american foreign policy in the pacific. "morning joe" is back in just a moment. >> kim jung-un monday threaten america. he gets to the office monday, oh, yeah, today is the day. when you hear that, gosh, i hope he doesn't do that.
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but then the more you think about it, they're not going to, i mean, north korea is like a carnival cruise for the love of god. you know, they're not going to destroy anybody. they have no electricity, no plumbing, they don't have enough food, no fresh water, they don't know where they're going. when you have diabetes... your doctor will say get smart about your weight. i tried weight loss plans... but their shakes aren't always made for people with diabetes. that's why there's glucerna hunger smart shakes. they have carb steady, with carbs that digest slowly to help minimize blood sugar spikes. and they have six grams of sugars. with fifteen grams of protein to help manage hunger... look who's getting smart about her weight. [ male announcer ] glucerna hunger smart. a smart way to help manage hunger and diabetes. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money.
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5:00 a.m. on the west coast as you take a live look at new york city and back with us on set, we have richard wolffe, sam stein and josh green. the white house is putting pen to paper when it comes to president obama's ideas for a fiscal compromise. he's set to unveil his budget blueprint on wednesday, a plan that could put members of his own party on edge when it comes to proposed cuts to medicare and social security. administration officials say the president will echo the themes laid out in last year's negotiations with house speaker john boehner. among them, call for new taxes on the wealthy and fresh investments in the nation's inf infrastructure. in exchange for added revenue, the president is reportedly open to reducing cost of living payments for social security benefits, something known as change cpi. prekindergarten education would be made available across the nation and tobacco products would be taxed more to pay for it.
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over a decade annual deficits would be reduced by $1.8 trillion. those reductions would top $4.3 trillion once other reductions already agreed to by congress takes effect. the president will propose more than $600 billion in new revenues. nearly 80% of the savings would come through spending cuts. >> now, this is a real budget. >> that's a real story, too. >> i don't agree with everything in there. i think he needs to go further in some areas. doesn't like the new tax increases. that's a real judgbudget, josh, start negotiations with. we have a prlace to start now. >> this is basically reviving the last off aer he made to john boehner last year, minus some of the tax savings we had from the fiscal cliff deal. what is significant about it, not the wish list to compete with the righty wish list, some effort to move towards the middle and off aer up these things. the democrats on the left are
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very upset about not just cpi but some medicare cuts. as a way of saying, look, i'm serious about negotiating. are you republicans serious about negotiating? >> there are, richard, so many places for republicans to come back and we don't like this, but over here is fascinating. again, i read it. you think republicans are? >> you think they're going to say this is a good starting point and let's go down to negotiation or say it's not serious enough and we want two times, three times? >> i think it depends on, i mean i don't know what is going on behind closed doors because this story caught me by surprise yesterday. i tell you three weeks ago, very conservative republicans that were saying on there, no, we will never raise another penny of taxes said, if the deal is big enough, we'll do it. >> look, i think it's smart politics to say, hey, put entitlements on the table. we put out a budget. we don't put out budgets and
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deal with entitlements, it's out. a negotiating strategy, we saw the white house do this before and they're negotiating against themselves. republicans do what you said which is, thank you very much, now, let's move on to the next phase and that's always been the problem for this white house. >> we'll see, sam, what do you think? >> i think richard is probably right here. where you end up having reestablished a middle ground, right? and it might work in terms of the public relations. keep in mind, budgets are mostly symbolic documents. but, if you start from the middle ground as you're based on it for negotiation, that only means you can move one way and that's closer to the republican side. that said, having read "new york times" piece which has the details on this. you know, he offered all this stuff before. we don't know how bad the left is going to be. the extent of the medicare cuts, $400 billion as it's detailed in the pieces is probably a little bit higher than i thought the white house had gone before. this is the general framework of every offer that obama and
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boehner have been at at the end. >> something different about this negotiation, too. the president introduces his budget first and then the two parties in congress. that got flipped around this year. you had the right wing budget from the house and slightly left-wing budget from the senate and now obama comes last and what he proposes looks like a compromise. they positioned themselves between the two poles and, therefore, look more reasonable. not giving away the farm in the first, in the first round. >> josh and i were talking about this, replaces sequesteration with different cuts which may get some political traction. and congressmen talking to local press are getting concerned about it. so, there might be some desire to actually think about a replacement going forward and this might be the document to latch on to. >> all right. for the first time more americans believe marijuana should be legal than illegal and a new pew poll shows americans
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support legalizing the drug. 52% to 45%. see how much public opinion has changed. just 12% of americans supported decriminalizing pot in a 1969 gallup poll and approval has jumped 11% in just three years. >> sam, you came of age at the right time. >> wait, this is so obvious. why, i -- >> what is so obvious? >> why we should obviously decriminalize pot? >> why? >> because everyone uses it. >> maybe everyone in your circle. >> no, everyone uses it, why don't we decriminalize. we're so worried about budget deficits, decriminalize it and we'll help out the deficit. >> not everyone uses it. >> maybe everybody in your neighborhood uses it. >> has or will use it. >> i can tell you, that's not the case in any of the neighborhood i grew up in. >> you're hiding it from me.
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>> there's a big, great land out there. >> called america. >> to the west of the hudson -- >> wait, hold on. there's land to the left of the acela track that i ride on. >> you're in the smoking car. >> clearly, more people are using pot and more people are comfortable using pot. >> i'm not comfortable. whether it's my 25-year-old son or, you know, a high school student -- >> what about someone who is -- >> i'm not necessarily comfortable with someone using pot. >> what about someone who is ill? >> that's fine. but do you want your daughters, would you like your daughter when she goes off to college to smoke pot? >> no. >> why? >> i'm with you on that. i don't think it should be legalized and decriminalized. but i think it should be a much more embraced as a medical use, which i know is a different issue. >> but, look, you could put the chart about same-sex marriage
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against this. this country is becoming more progressive and more libertarian, if you might prefer that phrase. but more of a live and let live attitude and that's what these polls. >> i was going to ask what this is all about. josh, certainly that is the case about marijuana. a lot has to do with the fact that you have people who are 60, 65 years old who was smoking pot in college dorm rooms. everything is the boomer's fault. they're going to, can i say it? in the '70s they gave us disco and polyester. >> destroying the fabric of this country. >> '80s wall street greed and '90s bill clinton and now pot heads and they're going to bankrupt us. >> well, they may. >> but a lot of people are comparing this to marriage equality. i think it is different. >> can we get to guns? senator dianne feinstein a
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leading voice for gun reform laws spoke of a need to change the way and, this is interesting with the conversation we had with campbell brown yesterday. violence is depicted in popular culture. video game makers should make changes to their, on their own to avoid glorifying assault weapons. referencing adam lanza, the shooter in newtown, connecticut, the massacre there. she said in part, if sandy hook doesn't do it, it's a knowledge of these video games this young man played doesn't, then maybe we have to proceed." i think that was the heart of the controversy yesterday when we were having a really great conversation about the piece she wrote "wall street" yesterday. if you want the government to get involved. so against big government then people have to act more responsibly and not have the games available to young children who might have some sort of mental illness issues and they play it over and over and over again and you see it every time with every high school massacre or mass killing.
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these video games are a part of these people's culture. their daily life. how do we do something if the government doesn't get involved? >> i remember after columbine people saying, oh, these kids watch the materics. well, my boys watched the matrix and i did and we loved it. but it is a toxic mix and a toxic brew and i go back and i think about joe manchin who came on this show, west virginia, very courageously right out of newtown and said, listen, we need new, we need more background checks and we need to be responsible and have responsible, reasonably gun limitations in some areas. but, this is going to fail. you look at the tape and he said it, he said it and they didn't listen to him in washington and, i'll just say right here, joe and i were burning up the phones talking to a lot of people in the white house and in the senate and said, okay, listen, if you do this, you have to be smart about it. if you make this just about
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guns, you'll get no where. i'll just say it. nobody listened to joe. they just didn't listen to him. they said we'll make this about guns and we're not going to cross hollywood and not going to cross the video game makers. i'm really encouraged by what dianne feinstein said yesterday. i wish she had said it three months ago. but it is, it is a mix of things and i think we actually have, sam, an opportunity here, to start this debate new because what i said and what joe manchin said, look, we have to talk about guns. we have to talk about mental health and we have to talk about violent american culture. >> yeah. >> we've only done two of three. the mental health component has been there, limited, but it has been there and i've been surprised at how little the cultural component has been part of this debate. traditionally, that has been the counterpart. guns and culture. >> mika and i sat down with
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powerful, democratic leaders in america and we talked about guns. said, okay, listen, if this is going to work, because they're saying, how does this work? you're going to have to talk about mental health and then you're going to have to talk about this violent culture. >> yeah. >> i said it. 25-year-old, 22-year-old, i've seen their friends. i see the effects and, you know what they did? their eyes glazed over. >> the thing is, i agree with their point when they say, well, you know, every society plays the same video games and watched -- >> every society doesn't have 200 guns. >> but from a political standpoint, putting that in the package would have made sense from the beginning. and made it seem more rounded and made it more politically palatable in congress and maybe it's too late now but hopefully they can attach it or bring it to the table. >> what i find concerning is liberals that have been champ n championing this bill.
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we'll talk about the nra, the nra, the nra. who has gotten on the floor and talked about quentin tarantino. you talking about objectment, the violence where he uses, go see his latest movie. he uses blood and guts and gloer as headlines and then praised in hollywood by a lot of these people. it's pornography is what it is. >> it's creative license. >> so, if people say that the gun regulation is dead, that we're not going to get universal background checks. i think we saw something important yesterday. i need to hear the president of the united states come out and go after his own base. right? i've gone after the nra. i've talked about background checks. joe manchin has gone after the nra. talking about the need for background checks. >> for criminals. a lot of people have done it. the president of the united states needs to do it. joe biden needs to do it.
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they need to talk about the violent video game. i will say it, again, i'm sorry to repeat it. for somebody just seeing the show for the first time. the second mika and i heard the news that there was a shooting in connecticut, i said, and i'm -- i said, you watch. this kid is going to have a certain condition, i won't say it here on the air because people will kill me for saying it. he locked himself in his room, played violent video games, probably five hours a day and he's probably 21, 22, 23 and he's very angry, frustrated right now. said it before we knew the first child had been killed. now, if that's the case, and it's that obvious and there's this toxic mix. i'm not saying ban all violent video games. my sons would never talk to me, again, if i did. but this has to be part of the conversation and liberals won't talk about it. >> they need to step up. not just the president, but like chris dodd and moviemakers, they all need to step up. video gamemakers, even more so.
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those are the ones that take home into your basement and play and kill people with it. literally, the most realistic way, a simulated assault weapon. that's what kids do now. it's crazy. it's crazy. why are we the only ones. >> the same hollywood actors who are out saying a lot of the same things i'm saying as far as background checks and high-capacity magazines. they're very violent movies and we know who they are because images of them with assault weapons killing people. let's have this part of the conversation. a lot of fun kicking around the nra and kicking around second amendment supporters. people love doing that. here it makes them feel morally superior. it makes them feel morally superior. why do they do that to hollywood? dianne feinstein saying i salute the senator. that's a great first step. i just have to ask really quickly. how much do you all disagree with me? do you agree? >> i don't think you can legislate about it.
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but they're glorified. still ahead on "new york times" reverend jim wallace will be here with his new book "on god's side." a lesson on how politicians can serve the common good. up next, he says that the united states could make a preemptive strike against north korea if there was "solid evidence of a planned attack against america or our allies." peter king joins the set. but, first, bill karins with a check on the torcast. bill? >> i promise, peter, it would no longer rain on long island and clear up for a beautiful weekend. finally in areas of the northeast, the mid-atlantic after a rainy morning, you'll like your forecast from here on out. we'll take the rain and exiting the jersey shore this morning. d.c., baltimore, cleared out. boston looks like the rain should stay south of the cape just for a couple more hours. the thunderstorm threat today down in the deep south and saw storms rolling off of savannah and outside of jacksonville. but we will see additional
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storms through central florida today and also miami. you had one batch last night and i think you'll get another round of showers and storms later. let me take you through your reward forecast for a miserable march. finally starting to look and feel like spring. notice today, 68 in kansas city. 62 in atlanta and denver at 71. beautiful, warm air that is going to slowly spread to the east. on saturday, probably one of the warmer forecasts we've given this year. not saying much, but temperatures in the 70s from kansas city to st. louis. d.c. sneaking up towards 60 and even new england ever so slowly starting to get warmer and warmer as the snow melts off. by the time we get to sunday, that warming trend continues. 63 in new york city finally. the warmest temperature so far this year. chicago at 51. little cooler for you on sunday. looks like saturday is your better day there in chicago. one other area is going to enjoy a gorgeous weekend, think it was only two weeks ago you had a foot of snow. talking low 70s this weekend. big smiles, st. louis.
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live look at the white house. beautiful day in washington. time to wake up. i'm sure you're up. you should be up by now. joining us now, republican congressman of new york, representative peter king. >> hey, peter, so we have a lot to talk about. >> want to start with north korea. >> he always insalts me.
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>> he was just insulting you off air. >> we got in a big fight when he was in congress. said something about me walking bare foot in tent revivals and it was fun and it has been friendship since then. >> we love each other. >> let's start, senator feinstein yesterday was really pleased. we talked about guns. you're concerned about, obviously, post sandy hook about the need for us to have background checks on criminals and background checks on rapest s people who committed crime. but liberals have only been talking about the gun part of the equation. joe manchin said they need to talk about violence and mental health and dianne feinstein finally talking about we need to examine the violent culture. this is a big step forward. >> absolutely. to me, a key component of the violence in the country. i'm with you, i support
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abandoned assault weapons. remember those days? that was in the preenlightenment joe scarborough area. >> hold on a second, alex, why do we let this guy on the show? >> he has institutional memory. >> to really make progress in the debate, you can't be demonizing one side. i believe that this cultural violence does make an impact, especially when people spending, especially young kids spending more time on the computer and in their rooms, in the basement and leads to that. >> democrats love challenging the nra and i guess you would probably agree with the nra 90% of the time, but on some of these issues, you don't. but an obsessive focus on the nra in this debate and not that focus on hollywood because that makes democrats and liberals uncomfortable. >> always bad when they try to
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make an moral issue on both sides. i think that clearly the culture of violence whether it's hollywood, video games or television or whatever should be addressed and people who raise it, not be called -- tipper gore or joe lieberman when they raised the issue in the 1990s. >> joe manchin is being totally ignored right now. the guy has been a hero. >> absolutely solid guy. >> absolutely. let's talk about syria really quickly. over a million refugees and 75,000 people killed so far in this war. we get involved in bosnia and kosovo for a lot more than this. do we in the international community continue to stand on the sidelines as we have this, this crisis of epic proportions in syria? >> joe, on a lot of these issues, i would be more focused on you. in syria, let me tell you the concern i have. i don't know who will take over if we want him to go but the rebel forces, my concern is al
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qaeda and the islamists are in a position to take over that movement. getting behind people and supporting. >> no good alternative? >> no. as far as the forces that we have to look for. i'm concerned about getting in on one side and we should be more aggressive in finding elements we can support than a movement but more and more the islamists gaining the movement and the worst thing would be when batista went in and communists took over. i have a concern with that in syria that the islamists in a position to take over. now, again, no easy answer. we should be doing more as far as intelligence, as far as working with and trying to get people over to the other side, whatever it takes to buy them off and get them and threaten them and whatever you have to do. i am concerned about the al qaeda influence. >> let's talk about north korea. you talking about a possible attack against north korea under certain circumstances. >> i was asked the question, do we have to wait until we're
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atta attacked? no. int under international law, only in response, do we have to wait until missiles land before we take action? i think sending the b-22s and the b-52s and susan rice has done an excellent job on this issue in the united nations and they're doing everything that can be done. very serious what's happening in north korea. >> go ahead, richard rowolffe. >> is it just a game or do you think it's something more serious going on? >> one area of the world where we have very little intelligence because it is such a closed society. not even a country, like i described it as an organized crime family running a
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territory. so inswithdrawn. is he putting himself so far out that he can't get out. an added element is this time in south korea, the new president of south korea, she will retaliate if there is any action at all taken against south korea. this is one where we have to watch it extremely carefully. the fact that the administration is moving so many resources and assets to that area of the world. >> need to send back dennis rodman. >> probably the greatest, you know -- this is what happened to the world. dennis rodman taking the place of henry kissinger. >> i'll switch topics here and talk about what's going on here at home specifically in your community and we're at six-month almost after sandy and we are doing a special show. april 29th as the six-month anniversary. >> we'd love to have you. >> you going to be in rockaway? >> as a kid, i spent so many summers in rockaway. >> i mean, just looking at the
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wreckage here, still so unbelievable and so many people are still hurting. >> my relationship with congress will never be the same, again. they made us wait 90 to 100 days to give the most basic human aid. absolutely disgraceful. republicans slap each uth oothe the back, hey, we're great friends. that's not something we will forget. we gave the money ten days after katrina. you go back to all the disasters and the money was always there. >> that's kind of hard. i mean, i'm with you, i agree with you. they should move more quickly but a lot of conservatives will say the bill was loaded with -- >> that is the phoniest argument. first of all, 99% of that bill was directed to sandy victims. secondly, the bill in the house was drawn by the house leadership. we had nothing to do with that. the bill was drafted by rogers at their request to only include
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sandy victims. when i went on the house floor the night of january 1 and i said if there is one dollar here, take it out. that was a game they were playing. go home and say, we're keeping the goys in new york and new jersey from setting up slush funds. chris christie, how many use inventory money for themselves and accusing him of setting up a slush fund. assuming that 1% or 2% of the money was misguided. do you let all these other people stay on the verge of death because the money is going to, you know, buy some extra fbi vehicles or something? >> so, you're not going to forgive and forget? >> no. >> how is the recovery effort going? do you need more funds or more attention? what's going on? >> it is moving along. the problem is, always a delay. that initial 100 days we had, money was added on to the delay. a lot of these projects and rightly so, the governor has to submit them to washington to get approval. i understand that. you don't want money wasted. that's a 45, 50-day process.
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let's add it on top of the 100 days we had to wait in the beginning. as far as the fema money, i mean, they're doing a pretty good job. easy to be critical of fema. a limit of $31,000 for each home that is coming in. we still have hospitals that are shut down and roadways that are shut down and we have people who are out of their homes and people living up in the second story of their homes and no heat in the house. it's a bad situation. but, you know, we're fighters and nobody wants to whine and a be a perpetual victim. all we wanted was to be treated the same way that we treated the victims in mississippi and alabama and florida. by the way, guys like marco rubio in florida and all the money your people got in florida over the years and this guy has the nerve to vote against money from new york and they come up here and try to raise money. you can forget it. >> have you talked to him about it? >> not on this. i made it clear any people who voted against money coming to new york and new jersey and come up here and take money out of our pockets, forget it, stay
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home. >> that sounds like a fair argument. >> totally a. >> i have to say. that doesn't make a lot of sense. >> i don't see rubio/king. >> has a good ring king/rudeibi. >> king/rubio. what a ticket. it sounds actually like a cake you would have in new orleans during mardi gras. >> can i ask a quick question about the president's budget? >> what are we supposed to say now? alex is telling you we're out of time. >> quick reaction to the president's budget. he offered it up, it's in the "new york times" what do you think? >> enough on the table to negotiate. i know the president met with republicans and he said he would be willing to agree to reduction in tax rates which is a victory for us. gives both sides to claim a victory.
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how it will work out? i'm not part of the inner circle negotiating. but if both sides want a deal and the president is acting in good faith and we're acting in good faith, we could act out the type of thing that newt gingrich and joe scarborough did back in 1996. >> marco rubio just texted and he wants you to call him. he says you don't call out members of your own party. wait, you just did. >> joe and i never did that to each other. >> no, never. >> joe, have your shoes on? there you go. >> shoes, but no socks. don't wear socks, even in 30 degree weather. all right congressman peter king, thank you so much. coming up, live coverage of the monthly jobs report. brian shactman joins us next. keep it right here on "morning joe." i know what you're thinking...
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> i have no idea what i was looking at there. >> it is a red boot. >> the job numbers are and so is cnbc's brian shactman. he is coming out of his cave and telling us if he sees his
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shadow. >> i don't see shadows, just the huge bags under my eyes. this is not a good number. dow futures down 150,000. let me go through the numbers slowly because there is a lot of them. the government number is 88,000 jobs gained for the month of march. the expectation consensus was right around 200,000. if you go to the private sector, it was a plus 95,000. now, for comparison, i do want to point out last month was 254. we did have some upward revisions to january and february, but it does not offset this huge disparity and the huge expectation in the number. a few wrinkles before i go inside the numbers. the unemployment rate is down to 7.6% from 7.7%. there was a reduction in the participation rate. so, basically, that means more people left the labor force than necessarily got jobs. >> wait, okay, so, that really is the big news here. that the participation rate, the number of people looking for jobs was already at its lowest in, what?
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30 years. if you're telling me it has dropped so much that unemployment has dropped to 7.6%, despite the fact we had this terrible job report, more and more americans are getting discourag discouraged, at historic levels. >> giving up officially. the funny thing, politically, joe, is that 7.6% is the lowest since, i believe, december of 2008. so, you can spin it. i mean, no way to really spin this report as anything positive, but 7.6% is one of two headlines. let me give you the internals and then you guys can debate away. in terms of building, professional services up 51,000 and construction up 18,000 and usually the last few months only negative the government and trade and transportation lost 27,000 jobs and government and postal services, kind of mixed up the numbers, but looks like the postal service lost 12,000, but the number they gave me was
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7,000. we're down about 150 in the dow futures. >> richard wolffe, mika and i were at the white house when the good news/bad news report came out and gene spurling and those there took no comfort in a lower perce perce percentage. they looked at the drop of the participation rate. you always want to be careful responding too quickly to these numbers because there will be another trend that comes later. but, i'll guarantee you inside the white house right now, they're really disturbed. >> look, if it was election year, you'd say 7.6 lower than before. the lowest before since you took office. the politics you can spin, as brian said. a lot of people hurting out there. you got three, four years ahead of you and you have to get the economy on a better track. the question is, you know, we were talking about the fed before and take the punch bowl away and it will stay in the party for a long time to come. >> is this seasonal or related
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to the sequester and will it continue to get worse because of that? i can't tell if there is a good answer yet. >> i don't think the sequester has hit yet. >> that's the thing. >> adding in the next month or two. if any policy has been passed that has caused this, you've got to look at the tax increases, specifically the payroll tax increase which -- >> really hurt people. this is now the fourth straight spring where it looks like we'll have a slow down. so, i guess it is a seasonal thing. >> we'll see what happens. boy, such horrible news, brian, for people out in america who are hurting. you have people in their late 40s and their 50s that are out of work that have been out of work for one, two, three years. and at this point, a lot of people are just thinking, i'm not going to get back into the labor force. they need a reason to believe. there needs to be hopeful. >> it sounds so simplistic, but when we have jobs and it's so lucky. you guys travel the country enough.
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when you go to the internal part of the country, so different than many parts of the northeast. people come on and say, oh, people are hurting, hard for people to understand that because they have jobs and you hit the nail on the head. i want to point out two quick in thes. to joe's point, the lowest participation rate since 1979 and we know what the confidence was in 1979. >> good point. >> so, the lowest less people in the workforce looking for jobs since jimmy carter's next to last year in office. >> that's not good. >> 1979. >> brian shactman, thanks, we think. >> i'm sorry i couldn't deliver better news. >> terrible news. really so many people hurting out there. you know, like i said, i remember my dad was out of work for 18 months. >> a long time. >> and there is an economic downside of it, but the emotional impact. the human toll is just devastating. and it's happening all over
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america right now. all right, coming up on god's side, boy, do we need this right now. how we can transcend partisan politics to reclaim a greater good. he'll explain next on "morning joe." [ male announcer] surprise -- you're having triplets. [ babies crying ] surprise -- your house was built on an ancient burial ground. [ ghosts moaning ] surprise -- your car needs a new transmission. [ coyote howls ] how about no more surprises? now you can get all the online trading tools you need without any surprise fees. ♪ it's not rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. ♪
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here with us now jim wallace who is the other of "on god side what religion forgets and politics hasn't learn ed." he works out and lost 35 pounds. >> i watch you guys and work out. >> i start talking and he gets angry and the pulse goes up. >> not three hours.
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>> but you say you eat differently, too. >> i listen to the show, what can i say? >> i love it. congratulations. >> mika -- >> so, before we get to your book "on god's side" which is a great, great story about how we can transcend politics. let's talk about hope. we just had a terrible jobs report and there's so many people in america that have lost hope. that, you know, they have their children looking at them as they're in middle school or high school and fathers and mothers sitting at home not able to get a job. where do they find that hope? what do they do to keep pressing forward and keep fighting forward like my dad did so many years ago? >> a lot of people are really hurting, really hurting in this country. we're not focusing on that the way we should. when i began to write this book i took a sabbatical and getting up early and exercising and then
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having quiet every day. and then reading and writing and, at night, i watched the news cycle. my discipline was not to engage, not to write, not to speak during those three months. i watched the new cycle and the narrative and there's no hope in there at all. it was polarizing and paralyzing and depressing and vitriol and anger and fear and the more i listened and reflected and not engaging it. more i realized we lost something very important. this ancient idea that's called the common good. and it's so timely right now. means you just can't take care of ourselves and our group and our party and you have to take care, we do that, we're in trouble. taking care of each other is foundational and for people in the faith community, we have a moral foundation. called loving your neighbor as yourself. we have been taught that for years. it's also in our secular democratic. how do we treat our neighbors as
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ourselves. >> we have lost something. i definitely think there is a vacancy in our society and every conversation we have we sort of try to bridge it here and there is something missing. we brought up something incredible this week. you talked about it before, but it just seemed all too perfect in terms of timing. how do we fix this problem because one of the points that joe made earlier this week, we have no national service, we have no community service, what about some sort of collective action that forces the country to come together for the common good or is this something that has to stay in the religious sector? >> because we're so culturally balkanized. how do we uitnite? >> if you listen to your -- we clearly lost the common good. but then same politicians, same city, same time arguing immigration reform. and i think we're going to get that done by the august recess.
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now, i'm talking to the same people in washington about this issue. so, on that issue, we're finding the common good because there's pressure from outside washington. you know, we brought, we brought bibles, badges and business to washington. and they were listening to us from the outside. and we're actually almost, feels like, joe, we're enabling politicians to do the right thing on immigration reform. so, it's possible. how do we reflect on the differences there? i think what i tried to to in the book apply the ethic of the common good to the economy, the purpose and role of government to who is our neighbor. i would say anybody who has helped make cell phones now globally is our neighbor. how do we talk about turning supply chains into value chains? you know, how do we do a different conversation about who is my neighbor? >> i love your quote, talking about us finding a common good and not being so partisan. i love the quote you have on the
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front cover. one of my favorite quotes. abraham lincoln saying that his concern wasn't that god was on their side, his greater concern was being on the side of god. >> and, you know, people say what does it mean to be on god's side or what is the common good? i have no easy answers to those questions. lincoln flipped the question and that calls for humility. how do we ask, are we on god's side and let's have a debate about the common good. let's, in fact, do that. i used to go to the lincoln memorial. my favorite monument tutoring inner city kids. i would have them read the second inaugural. we wanted them to learn lincoln's words with malice towards none, charity towards all. >> nice passage in there looking at amazing grace, the movie, how it was focused on one man. but abolition took the whole movement to regular people to go out and push for this thing. young people today staring at
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this kind of hope and maybe seeing the pain their parent are going through. what should they do? >> we're doing a common good tour across the country. 18 cities so far. they're planning common good forums. and what i'm saying to them about your question is, you think you can't change washington or wall street, but, actually, movements can. as abolition did. it wasn't just force, it was a whole movement. so, how do you make different decisions about how we treat our neighbors? what if they're poor neighbors? do wee even know our neighbors? what if they're muslims, how do we treat them? treating our enemies, real or imagine, how do we surprise them. how we treat people. how we live as moms and dads. i am a little league baseball coach. i'm a dad and a coach, that's reflected all through the book. our decisions will really change a culture and that's what changes washington. washington will change last.
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never first. >> well, and in william wilbur life it doesn't happen overnight. his story, one of the most remarkable stories. about a man who dedicated himself at a young age to end slivery in england and he saw it not long before he died. >> he was laughed at at first. and then in the end he was applauded, but it took 30 years to end slivery and then he died three days later because his work was done. >> isn't that amazing? >> joe, i'm a minister. i want to office my service. in this thing between you and steven colbert, i am happy, because you're both critical to the common goods. you're both -- >> we may -- >> we need you both, joe. >> he said game on. i think it's on. >> that's what they do in buzz. we're saying game on, but let's have some reconciliation here. we need you guys for the common good. let me help.
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>> may not be able to turn the other cheek. >> the book is "on god's side." you can read an excerpt in our blog. reverend jim wallis, thank you. we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] when you take shortcuts,
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>> in the early '90s when dads across america discovered they could clip phones to a belt loop outside their pants. the flip phone, which made everyone feel super cool, like they were in the matrix. with its revolutionary thin design, it became easier than ever to take selfies in the bathroom mirror and easier than ever to drop in the toilet. but the cell phone has connected us like never before. it has changed the way we photograph food. it has defined our modern world. >> what? oh. i'm sorry, i'm playing words with friends. >> the cell phone. >> this week, of course, mika, as you were saying in the break, the 40th anniversary of the cell phone. >> 40 years. >> the first wall street gordon gecko is on the beach. >> or zack morris from

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