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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  January 22, 2018 3:05am-3:59am EST

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but a political resolution remains out of reach. legislative affairs director mark short. >> let's find a daily to make sure again, our troops and our border patrol agents are not denied payment. but that, the democrats seem unwilling to accept that offer. >> reporter: a white house spokesperson said president trump spent a good part of the day on the phone. spoke with republican leader in the house as well as senate majority whip. while the president has the yet to address the nation, he did record a statement, that was shown to guests at a gala held last night at his mar a lago resort to celebrate his first year in office. elaine. >> margaret brennan, thank you. the national women's march held its main event today in las vegas with the goal of getting women to march off to the polls in november's midterm elections. in a cbs news poll out this weekend, 54% of women and 39% of men, say it is very important to them that more women are elected to office. 48% say the country would be better off.
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42% say it wouldn't change much. here's mireya villarreal. >> reporter: from football stadium to swing state battleground. [ applause ] thousand filled the stands of san boyd stadium in las vegas sunday morning. >> equality for all! >> one year ago millions marched around the country for women's rights marking the largest single day demonstration in u.s. history. today's rally is about pushing people to the polls. activist jene ingram. >> we want to take all the momentum from the course of the last year and really turn that into the electoral power. >> organizers chose nevada for
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the anniversary event with the hope of reshaping congress in 201. >> our goal for voter registration is a million voters. what happens in nevada, will launch a national initiative, that will focus on -- many of the battleground states. >> all around the world. >> major crowds turned up this weekend for marches around the world with support in london, d.c. and chicago. los angeles estimates 600,000 men and women in attendance. with me too and times up movements taking center stage. >> when i raise my hand i am aware of all of the women who are still in silence. >> there were tense moments at a march in portland, most focused on president trump's time in office. >> i object to the issues and the changes that he's made but mostly i on jkt to the way he talks about people. it actually -- it hurts me. >> events were held in all 50 states this weekend. but this year the women's march truly became a global movement. landing on six conned nents and popping of in columbia, nigeria, china and iraq. elaine. >> mireya villarreal, thank you. the cbs "overnight news" will be right back.
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missouri governor eric greitens kept a low profile since the cbs affiliate in st. louis report heed had an extramarital affair. greitens spoke to reporters this weekend. meg oliver has details. >> in his first interview since admitting to an extramarital affair, missouri governor, eric greitens, denied allegations of blackmail. >> there was no threat of blackmail. no threat of a photograph and blackmail. those things are false. >> greitens admits he had an affair with his hairdresser before he became governor in 2017. but he says it was consensual. >> there was no hush money there was no violence. >> news broke last week.
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audio recordings obtained by the cbs affiliate, which has not been independently verified by cbs news appear to show an unnamed woman the governor's alleged mistress admitting to the affair to her then husband. >> she went on to describe the alleged blackmail. he stepped back and i saw a flash through the mind fold and he said, you're never going to mention my name. otherwise these pictures will be everywhere. >> at 43, greiten is the second youngest governor in the country. democrat turned republican proudly painted himself as a family man during his campaign. >> i am a navy seal. i am a businessman. native missourian.
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but most importantly i am a very proud husband and father. >> reporter: once considered a rising star in the republican party, the governor now faces an investigation by the st. louis prosecutor. and mounting pressure to resign. elaine. >> meg oliver, thank you. vice president mike pence visited egypt and jordan before arriving in israel. the trump administration controversial decision to move the u.s. embassy from tel aviv to jerusalem is dominating pence's mideast trip. seth doane is in jerusalem. >> good evening, vice president mike pence's visit here is prompting very different reactions from israelis and palestinians following the trump
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administration announcement the u.s. would recognize jerusalem as the the capital of israel. posters are up around town. welcoming mr. pence as a true friend of israel and be meeting with israel's top leadership. but there will be no meeting with the palestinian president who is furious with the u.s., for in his view taking sides. in neighboring jordan today, king abdullah told mr. pence that moving the u.s. embassy to jerusalem thus recognizing it as the capital of israel could destabilize the region. jordan supports east jerusalem as the the capital of independent palestinian state. the u.s. would support a two state solution if israelis and palestinians agreed to that. palestinians are also concerned and worried about reports that the u.s. is accelerating its time line to move that embassy here to jerusalem. and the announcement it is withholding $65 million in aid to a u.n. agency that provides humanitarian relief to palestinian refugees. elaine. >> seth doane, seth, thank you. the u.s. hockey team will play with heavy hearts at next month's winter olympics. the team's general manager, jim johannsen died in his sleep this morning. his death a shock to the organization. the rochester, minnesota native won a national championship as
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freshman at the university of wisconsin. he played for the u.s. in the 1988 and 1992 olympics. jim johannsen was 53 years old. >> now some other stories we are following in the cbs "weekend news feed." at least 19 people killed saturday when taliban gunmen attacked the intercontinental hotel in afghanistan's capital. nearly a dozen victims, worked for an afghan airline. more than 150 people escaped as part of the hotel burned. last of the militants killed after a 13-hour standoff and gun battle. >> death toll from the mudslides in montecito, california climbed to 21. search dogs located the body of 38-year-old faviola calderon, her son was also killed. two victims missing. torrential rain two weeks ago destroyed 130 homes. a key stretch of the 101 freeway reopened today.
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>> near port saint joe in the florida panhandle hundreds of rescued sea turtles released into the water this weekend. more than 850 turtles went into shock earlier this month when a cold snap forced water temperatures to plunge. most were released saturday. a small number are still being treated at the gulf world marine institute. ♪ ♪ >> coming up next -- drastic measures in a major city on the verge of running out of water. and later, it's national hugging day. which is pretty much every day for this celebrity dog. ♪ ♪ two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together.
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light rain in the forecast for capetown, south africa. it is just a drop in the bucket for a global tourist destination, on the verge of running out of water. reservoirs that supply the city of nearly half a million people are drying up. what's being called day zero is three months from today. debora patta is there. >> reporter: surround by beautiful stretches of ocean, it its hard to believe capetown could become the first major city in the world, to run out of water. only use the daily allocated amount per person per day. >> named day zero, april 21st when the taps will be turned off. three years of successive drought have devastated city's water supplies. the local government has brought in severe restrictions, forcing
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people to look for alternative supplies, like this, natural spring, tapped for public use. they have already been scuffles here, security guards, now monitor the site. to prevent violence from breaking out. >> no water. how will it be? chaos. it is going to be careful. and we are not looking for ward to that time. >> residents are only allowed 23 gallons of water per person a day. next month, that goes down to 13 gallons, enough for a 90-second shower, quick toilet flush and one large bottle of drinking water. americans use around 100 gallons daily. outside the city center, the effects of water crisis are more obvious. farmer, has been able to plant a quarter of his crop. if the taps are turned off. he is facing financial ruin.
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>> difficult situation for us. >> water for brushing your teeth. >> peter johnston says that even if there is a good rainfall this year, the crisis will not be over. capetown is getting hotter. >> we are very, very confident the temperatures are going to increase. they have been doing so. they're still going to do so. their increase temperature is going to increase evaporation. increase evaporation will mean less water available for our use. >> day zero may be fast approaching. deborah patta, cbs news, capetown, south africa. still ahead -- families are starting to move into what is being called america's first solar powered town. i switched to geico and got more. more savings on car insurance? a-ha. and an award-winning mobile app. that is more. oh, there's more. mobile id cards, emergency roadside service... more technology.
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what's build as america's first solar powered town has first residents and first neighbors moving in this week. babcock ranch, half mile northeast of fort myers, florida. the community of homes is powered by 440 acres of solar panels. manuel bojorquez paid a visit. >> give us a spin? >> give it a try. >> reporter: in the city of the future people leave their car in the garage. and take ride in self driving shuttle buses. this autonomous vehicle, hailed with an app zero emissions powered by electricity generated from the sun like the street lamps, the buildings and the lights we used for the interview. >> we want to be the most
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sustainable new town in the united states. >> reporter: kitson, a developer, wouldn't want it any other way. babcock ranch his passion project of 2005. >> we had the advantage of a green field. a blank sheet of paper. when you have a blank sheet of paper like this. you really can do it right from the beginning. >> is it more expensive to build this way. more expensive for the consumers? >> you know, it it not. not more expensive. >> it's not. people here pay the exact same amount that everybody else pays in florida power and light network. >> reporter: the town doesn't run on solar power all the time. at night when the sun is down it has to draw from the traditional electrical grid. the technology for storing all that surplus energy, some lar cells generate during the day is too costly. another problem too many overcast days.
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>> clearly if you have a number of cloudy days in a row it will impact efficiency and available electricity from the solar field. >> this month richard and robin kinley became the first residents to move in. the lake next to their house is named after them. lake kinley. >> i thought, the air is nice and clean here. i think these communities are the future. >> felt very much like when i, bought a tesla in 2013. and, i said this is, this is, definitely going to make it. and i felt the same way about babcock ranch. >> reporter: 80% of the land, kitson purchased will not be developed. sold it back to florida which turned it into a wilderness preserve. manuel bojorquez, cbs news, florida. >> a day to hug it out with the world famous hugging dog.
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♪ finally tonight. national hugging day. what better way to celebrate than hugging it out with the social media sensation known as the hugging dog. paula reid fully embraced this assignment. >> yea! not everyone is comfortable getting a hug from a stranger.
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but even hardened new yorkers were willing to m brace national hugging day. >> tough times right now. nice to get a hug from some body even a stranger. >> we have another visitor for national hug day. >> at this nursing home in savannah, georgia, residents reached out to celebrate with seniors. the only thing better than being embraced with two big arms is embraced by two little paws. >> oh. >> 6-year-old is known around the world as the the hugging dog. with nearly 200,000 followers on instagram, she has become a social media sensation. one of her biggest fans ins barbara. >> when she is hugging me. i feel my heart and her heart are one heart. >> to fully wrap her arms around the assignment, we invited them
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to the newsroom for a little pet therapy. >> oh. is there anything sweeter than hugs from a dog. >> all day. >> she makes you feel at peace, you know? >> absolutely. >> just feeling this and sensational with her. >> psychiatrist robbie shaw professor at columbia. >> people who hug have lower heart rates and blood pressure than people who don't. that kind of contact with another being, even a pet, can be profound in some one's life. >> luckily for new yorkers -- she thinks every day is national hugging day. paula reid, cbs news, new york. that's the "overnight news" for this monday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, ief'm elaine quijano.
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this is the "overnight news," i'm elaine quijano. a weekend of dysfunctional drama in washington. >> it started fry friday night when the senate failed to pass a temporary spending bill. first minutes saturday the federal government ran out of money for the fiscal year and grinded to a partial shutdown. since then a lot of talk from president trump and key members in congress but no deal to end the deadlock. errol barnett has the latest. >> reporter: pressure is mounting in the halls of congress for a bipartisan solution to end the government shutdown. >> the president must take yes for an answer. >> democratic leader, chuck schumer who negotiated for an
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agreement friday. implored him to revisit those terms. >> president trump walked away from not one but two bipartisan deals. if he had been willing to accept any one of these deals, we wouldn't be where we are today. >> but majority leader mitch mcconnell says it is democrat whose need to budge. >> recent survey majority said keeping government open is a higher priority than shutting down the government over the issue of illegal immigration. >> reporter: the shuttledown began early saturday when senate republicans were left without enough votes from democrats to pass a bill that would fund the government for four weeks. senator schumer led his party's charge to block government funding until republicans compromise on daca, soon to expire program which protects young people brought to the country illegally as children. >> republican house speaker paul ryan announced to day he is backing senator mcconnell's latest proposal. >> he is going to bring up a bill keeping things running until february 8. we agreed we would accept that in the house. >> democratic whip, senator dick durbin what he wants is firm commitment from the top.
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>> president donald trump has to step up and lead us at this point. he can do it. >> despite public blame game, private bipartisan discussions are ongoing. democrats might agree to a three-week funding bill if republicans agree to address immigration concerns in that time. the fact that tomorrow is a week day provide motivation for compromise as well since the shutdown's impact will be heightened for everyone. elaine. >> errol, thank you. the shut down forced president trump to cancel a trip to florida this weekend to celebrate his one year anniversary in office. on twitter sunday the president suggested that senate republicans resort to the so-called nuclear option. changing senate rules to pass their own budget. margaret brennan is at the white house. >> we do not want the shutdown. >> budget director accused democrats of staging a shutdown of the president. >> the left wing is disappointed how the first year has gone, the president had successes.
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>> president trump tweeted, dems just want illegal immigrants to pour in unchecked. reference to democrats demand that protections for daca recipients, be included in any funding deal. >> we are going to demand they reopen the government. >> vice president mike pence blasted democrats during a visit to u.s. troops nearby the syrian border. >> we're not going to reopen negotiations on illegal immigration until they reopen the government and give you, our soldiers and your families the benefits and wages you've earned. ♪ >> he said u.s. troops are paying the price for the shutdown. since 1.3 million military men and women will not receive pay checks until a new funding bill its passed. the white house is trying to minimize the impact. to show that national parks remain open, interior secretary
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ryan zinke visited the national mall. the pentagon turned tv and radiobroadcasts back on at military bases after declaring them essential activities. the troops will be able to watch sunday football. but a political resolution remains out of reach. legislative affairs director mark short. >> let's find a daily to make sure again, our troops and our border patrol agents are not denied payment. but that, the democrats seem unwilling to accept that offer. >> reporter: a white house spokesperson said president trump spent a good part of the day on the phone. spoke with republican leader in the house as well as senate majority whip. while the president has the yet to address the nation, he did record a statement, that was shown to guests at a gala held last night at his mar a lago resort to celebrate his first year in office. elaine. >> margaret brennan, thank you. the national women's march held its main event today in las vegas with the goal of getting women to march off to the polls in november's midterm elections. in a cbs news poll out this weekend, 54% of women and 39% of men, say it is very important to
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them that more women are elected to office. 48% say the country would be better off. 42% say it wouldn't change much. here's mireya villarreal. >> reporter: from football stadium to swing state battleground. [ applause ] thousand filled the stands of san boyd stadium in las vegas sunday morning. >> equality for all! >> one year ago millions marched around the country for women's rights marking the largest single day demonstration in u.s. history. today's rally is about pushing people to the polls. activist jene ingram. >> we want to take all the momentum from the course of the last year and really turn that into the electoral power. >> organizers chose nevada for the anniversary event with the hope of reshaping congress in 201. >> our goal for voter registration is a million
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voters. what happens in nevada, will launch a national initiative, that will focus on -- many of the battleground states. >> all around the world. >> major crowds turned up this weekend for marches around the world with support in london, d.c. and chicago. los angeles estimates 600,000 men and women in attendance. with me too and times up movements taking center stage. >> when i raise my hand i am aware of all of the women who are still in silence. >> there were tense moments at a march in portland, most focused on president trump's time in office. >> i object to the issues and the changes that he's made but mostly i object to the way he talks about people. it actually -- it hurts me. >> events were held in all 50 states this weekend. but this year the women's march truly became a global movement. landing on six continents and popping of in columbia, nigeria, china and iraq. elaine. >> mireya villarreal, thank you.
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>> now some other stories we are following in the cbs "weekend news feed." at least 19 people killed saturday when taliban gunmen attacked the intercontinental hotel in afghanistan's capital. nearly a dozen victims, worked for an afghan airline. more than 150 people escaped as part of the hotel burned. last of the militants killed after a 13-hour standoff and gun battle. >> death toll from the mudslides in montecito, california climbed to 21. search dogs located the body of 38-year-old faviola calderon, her son was also killed. two victims missing. torrential rain two weeks ago destroyed 130 homes. a key stretch of the 101 freeway reopened today. >> near port saint joe in the florida panhandle hundreds of rescued sea turtles reap leased into the water this weekend. more than 850 turtles went into
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shock earlier this month when a cold snap forced water temperatures to plunge. most were released saturday. a small number are still being treated at the gulf world marine institute. make every day valentine's day with k-y yours and mine. blue for him. purple for her. two sensations. one great way to discover new feelings together. i'start at the new carfax.comar. show me minivans with no reported accidents. boom. love it. [struggles] show me the carfax.
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taliban gunman stormed the intercontinental hotel in kabul, killed two dozen and wounded many more. after a 13 hour standoff with security forces. the last of the terrorists was killed. it is the latest example of how little things have changed in that country. in the 16 years since american forces first landed. despite a trillion dollars spent in afghanistan, the capital its so dangerous american soldiers are not allowed to use the roads. laura logan has the the story for 60 minutes.
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>> reporter: this is rush hour at kabul international airport. a swarm of helicopters that earned the nickname embassy air. it is how americans and their allies, working at the u.s. embassy in military headquarters, travel back and forth, from the airport. it is just a five-minute flight. the chopper we boarded was making its tenth trip of the day. a few years ago american convoys regularly drove on the airport road below. now, the view from the helicopter window is almost on board will see of cabul. they'll stay behind, glass walls for the rest of the time in afghanistan. we wanted to know what it says about where we are in this war. if american troops can't drive two miles down a road in kabul. >> it is a country at war. a capital that is under attack by a determined enemy the no
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u.s. general has spent more time here than john nicholson, the commander of american forces in afghanistan. >> we do everything possible to protect our forces. so, protecting. >> not using the roads? >> protecting the lives of the troops. itch we can fly instead of drive, that offers a greater degree of safety it is true dent and right thing. off awe that's called surrendering the terrain? >> i disagree. answering a moral imperative to protect the lives of soldiers and civilians that's what we do. >> reporter: but this isn't some remote outpost, it its the capital. when the u.s. first came here, the population was 500,000. now, it is more than 5 million. refugees, people desperate for work, and terrorists, have flooded kabul. general nicholson showed us how vulnerable the city has become. >> suicide bomber is going to go in here.
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kill himself. he doesnt care about his future. vastly easier than what the afghan security forces have to do. >> he does not have an exit strategy. >> exactly. >> how easy to in till trait the city. one this big. >> right now. easier than we would like. >> general nicholson took command in 2016. shortly after the u.s. troop levels, cut to fewer than 10,000. the enemy -- filled the vacuum. suicide bombers have terrorized kabul ever since. shattering police stations, mosques and foreign embassies. this truck bomb killed 150 people. it was the deadliest attack in the capital since the start of the war. the level of brutality, the
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level of, of heartlessness is unbelievable. we have to muster all of our resources, to be able to, deal with this. >> afghan president rules from the presidential palace that occupied the city center for more than a century. we notice the walls around him and the rest of city have expanded and grown taller sense our last visit three years ago. some of the streets we traveled turned into tight corridors of 20 foot high concrete barriers. it made it hard to tell where we were. parts of the city, now, are, are, unrecognizable. what happened here? >> the war is changing from a war against armies to a war against people. >> more civilians are dying. in kabul every year. and, and, your response is more walls. >> 21 international terrorist groups are operating in the country. dozens of suicide bombers are being sent. factories are producing suicide bombers. we are under siege.
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>> by terrorizing the people. the taliban have sown deep doubts about the government. the result. angry protesters in the capital, chanting death to him. >> if you can't secure the capital how are you going to secure the rest of the country. >> you tell me can you prevent that attack. can you prevent that attack on london. not talking about one attack. a series of attacks right here. on your doorstep. a bomb that blew out the windows >> absolutely. turned this city into something of a prison. >> what is your alternative, ma'am? >> what is the alternative? >> the alternative is resolve. >> resolve has come at a heavy cost. in just four months last year. more than 4,000 afghan soldiers and police were wounded. another 2 1/2 thousand killed. since then, he refused to reveal casualty figures. as you will see it is a
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sensitive subject. >> your soldiers and your policemen are dying in unprecedented numbers. off awe indeed. >> how long can that be sustained? >> until we secure it. >> how long is that? >> as long as it takes. generations if need be. >> the u.s. isn't going to be here for generations. >> we will be here for generations. we do not need others to fight our fights. we do not need others to the foot our fights. >> people in this country say that if the u.s. pulled out, your government would, would collapse in three days. >> from the resource perspective they're absolutely right. >> we would not be able to support our army. for six months without, without, u.s. support. and u.s. capabilities. >> did you just say, that without the u.s. support, your army couldn't last six months? >> yes, because we don't have the money. >> american taxpayers bankroll 90% of afghanistan's defense
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budget. more than $4 billion a year. another $30 billion has been spent rebuilding this country. a bustling city has risen from the ruins. but in all of the years, we have been coming here, it's never been this dangerous. check points choke the traffic all over kabul. it was as difficult to film as the it was to move. terrorists can strike at any time. nobody knows that better than the men of the elite counterterrorism unit. they rush to the scene of every attack. such as this one at a kabul mosque. where a suicide bomber blew himself up just steps away. they took us beyond the barbs wire to the main military hospital. the site of a chilling attack last march by the islamic state one of many terror groups with a
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foothold in kabul. >> the terrorists they wore the white coats. like a doctor. >> yeah, yeah. >> we were told by commanders who were here, that five terrorists, disguised as doctors, got past the hospital's heavy security. they were armed with assault rifles, and a weapon that allowed them to quietly move from room to room. >> well had the knives. and the, and the, we killed a lot of people with that knife. so they were stabbing people in their bed. stabbing patients. >> stabbing patients in their bed. yeah, and opening their stomachs. >> this former lieutenant, led the assault force that stormed the building. we agreed to conceal his identity. to protect him from reprisals. >> they are very clever. they can do, anything, inside. they get into the buildings. and they start shooting around. and show the weakness of the government. >> reinforcements landed on the roof. on the ledges below, you can see hospital workers hiding. when cornered -- the terrorists detonate the grenades strapped to their
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chests. they murdered more than 50 people that day. afghans normally bury their dead in a simple cloth shroud. that's not possible when bodies are obliterated by suicide kabul's carpenters have turned to something new, making coffins. >> there is also greater demand. for prosthetic limbs. this, orthopedic clinic is run by the international committee of the red cross. you said the security situation is not getting any better. >> definitely not. we cannot say, i don't see any improvement. >> dr. alberto cairo has worked at the clinic for 27 years. he told us, he is treating more
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and more victims of terror attacks. >> so you know, many people, far away from here think this war is over. >> what? the war is over. please. please. how can they thing of anything like this. >> the wore is going on. >> people are desperate. people are, they have lost the hope. >> why do you say people have lost hope. >> if you kid that the life span, of, of the people in afghanistan is around, around, 60 yeerksz it means that at least, 2/3 of them have seen war, war, war. >> you can see laura's full report on our web site. cbs news.com. the "overnight news" will be right back. i'm late, sir. i had a doctor's appointment. when you said you were at the doctor, but your shirt says you were at a steakhouse... that's when you know it's half-washed. now from downy fabric conditioner comes downy odor protect with 24-hour odor protection. downy's powerful formula conditions fibers to lock out odors all day. hey, your shirt's making me hungry. ha ha, derek. downy and it's done.
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the latest star wars movie, last jedi topped $600 million in ticket sales in the u.s. overseas, not so much. in china for instance, the film was such a flop it was pulled from theaters after two weeks. carter evans reports. >> reporter: with lightsaberers fired up, the force seemed unstoppable. disney held a premiere in shanghai, when the film opened response was, lukewarm. you are audience to have that, twij of recognition and familiarity. china. it doesn't exist back when the into theaters.
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china was emerging from a decad. >> in 1977 when a new hope came out. country. you weren't getting the sort of massive cultural exchange that you see now. it was literally a world away. >> if you only knew the power of the dark side. >> the stories are steeped in mythology, that leans heavily on the original films. >> great shot, kid, one in a million. emotional connection. last jedi earned $28 million. by the second weeke the last jedi was down 91 mers. >> if you didn't grow up with it, it is yet another fantastic, which there are many. with you. always.ess the force awakens in china, the ninth and final
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film due out ensure success. carter e
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story of undying love. told by steve hartman on the road. >> reporter: six days a week for years, retired mechanic clarence wife at this restaurant in reidsville, georgia.reere today still does. although caroline died four years ago she remains his lunch date. >> they were unbelievable. i mean you could tell that they adored each other. >> reporter: that's why restaurant owner joyce james says she wasn't surprised in the least when clarence started showing up with the picture. which is really just a small part of his all day devotion each morning begins with a trip to the cemetery. where at the ripe old age of 93, clarence gets down on bended
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knee. to give his wife her morning kiss. >> i wish you could go home with me. i would trade places with you, lord willing, wouldn't we.t lear more times. >> i'll ber. bk. >> in between he basks.love. of sorts. ain't never been turned off. on. never will be. >> outside of the taj mahal, yog testament to true love than this me outside of a shakespeare sndore poem than her picture on her pillow. can't figure out if this is a really sad story or happy story. >> it is a happy story. >> tell me why? >> how many people in this w
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you know? >> she was sweet. still sweet. >> he is happiest when talking . >> i will give you something. >> reporter: iyo he will bring the shrine to you. >> it never been turned off since my wif keep that, okay. there is not a resident in reidville who hasn't been tombstone. not a passer-by who doesn't know what they missed. >> ain't no other girl for me but her. >> obviously no one ever wants to suffer a loss like his. but clarence pervis does offer us something to strive for. the ability to love. this deeply. steve hartman, on the road, in reidsville, georgia. >> that's the "overnight news" for monday. for some the news continues. for others check back with us a little later for the morning news and cbs this morning. from the broadcast center in new york city, i'm elaine quijano. ♪
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captioning funded by cbs it's monday, january 22nd, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." the government shutdown enters day three. >> we have yet to reach an agreement on a path forward that would be acceptable for both sides. highway 101 reopens nearly two weeks after the deadly california mudslide. and the philadelphia eagles blow out the minnesota vikings, claiming a spot in the super bowl against the new england patriots.

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