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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  August 12, 2022 3:12am-4:30am PDT

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americans who will continue to be under pressure until we see that inflation rate come down. >> reporter: and to jill's point, a third of americans are now spending their savings to cover all of these increased costs, according to one survey. and while the price of regular gas has come back down to earth recently, diesel, which is the lifeblood of transporting goods all across the country, is 54% more expensive, margaret, than one year ago. >> errol barnett, thank you. well, on the pandemic front today the cdc updated its covid guidance to loosen a number of its health recommendations. cbs news chief medical correspondent dr. john lapook is here now with the details. good evening to you, doctor. so what is the biggest change? >> margaret, the cdc is trying to consolidate and simplify its guidance and remind us the pandemic is not over. and a lot more people still need to get boosted. one important change has to do with shortening mask wearing
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after being infected with covid. you still need to isolate for five days. but instead of then having to wear a mask around others for five more days you can do a home test on day 6 and day 8. if they're negative and you have no symptoms or if symptoms are improving and you have no fever without fever-reducing medication, then you can stop wearing a mask around others. >> and there are also some changes, i understand, about how someone who is exposed to covid should behave? >> right, margaret, i just confirmed this with the cdc a few minutes ago, that if you are exposed to somebody with covid you no longer have to quarantine, whether you are vaccinated or not. however, you do need to wear a mask for ten days around others and get tested at day five after exposure or sooner if you have symptoms. and margaret, this should lessen disruptions in schools and elsewhere. >> dr. jon lapook. thank you for breaking it down for us. well, tonight firefighters
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in southwestern france are battling raging wildfires fueled by one of europe's drought -- worst droughts in centuries. it has been a brutal summer. historic heat waves across western europe have killed thousands. cbs's roxana saberi has more from london. >> reporter: in a region of france renowned for its wine, wildfires are raging. over 1,000 firefighters are struggling to contain the blaze near bordeaux that's forced thousands to flee their homes. countrywide, roughly 220 square miles have gone up in flames so far this year. nearly six times the annual average. blazes are also breaking out in spain and portugal, fanned by consecutive heat waves and little to no rainfall. with more than 60% of the european union and the urk now under a drought alert or warning, reservoirs and rivers are receding. on germany's rhine river, a
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crucial commercial route, some ships have cut cargo to avoid running aground. here in england the first six months of this year were the driest in nearly five decades. coupled with the recent record high temperatures, that's left the ground at farms like this one parched. smark swerling has had to buy costly supplements and dip into winter feed because the grass his sheep normally graze on is too dry to eat. >> this is the driest i've ever known the farm. people are going to have to realize soon that it takes stable weather for us to produce food, not just in the uk but globally. >> so this should be a wake-up call. >> it should be a wake-up call. definitely. >> reporter: parts of england and europe are expecting rain in the coming days, but scientists warn climate change is make droughts and heat waves more frequent and intense. margaret? >> roxana saberi in london, thank you. a farm just outside kansas city is growing more than just crops in its fields. cbs's janet shamlian has more in
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tonight's "eye on america." >> reporter: there's more than food growing on this patch of farmland. a crop of boys becoming men. >> one! >> reporter: it's a two-year agriculture-focused free entrepreneurship class called boys grow, offering mentoring to 14, 15, and 16-year-olds, many lacking important life skills. >> the soft skills we teach are skills that they're going to be able to continue on, but they have an opportunity to learn them out here. >> reporter: after working in the juvenile justice system founder john gordon was looking for a way to inspire kids, like kendrell kirkwood. >> he told me to go to college, college is worth it, do everything that i probably wouldn't want to da because next thing you know i might want to do it. >> reporter: there's a need in the kansas city metro area where data indicates there are nearly double the number of youth homicides compared to the national average. and in missouri black students are half as likely as white students to graduate college.
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three days a week in summer the ten-acre farm is worked by four dozen teens, tasked with everything like planting and harvesting crops. to auto mechanic work. even culinary training. all for which the boys a paycheck. how do you think this will help you? >> i feel like it will teach us a whole bunch of stuff, like as we were talking about the social skills. >> does it help that you get a paycheck? >> oh, yeah, it does help very much. >> 22-year-old somo oo was part of the 2016 class, now working as an auto mechanic. what part of your experience here still sticks with you today? >> i think just tenacity and going for what you want. and the entrepreneurship part of it too. >> reporter: with marketable skills and the ability to work as part of a team, graduates have gone down to ivy league colleges and well-paying jobs. >> i see the evolution of these kids every year. and that's one thing about my
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job that never gets old. >> reporter: a unique initiative planting the seeds of possibility and harvesting young talent. for "eye on america," janet shamlian, cbs news, kansas city. up next, an oil spill forces major pipelines to shut down in the gulf of mexico. and an emotional night for serena williams. thank you for taking care of lorenzo. (♪ ♪)
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thank you so much! one prilosec otc in the morning blocks excess acid production for a full 24 hours. unlike pepcid, which stops working after 9. 24 hour protection. prilosec otc one pill, 24 hours, zero heartburn. tonight, production is paused at six oil rigs in the gulf of mexico. a leak at an onshore facility in louisiana forced shell to shut down two pipelines that can move as much as a half million barrels a day from the gulf to the coast. officials at the facility say about two barrels of oil spilled and there was no impact to the gulf. shell says the pipelines are expected to reopen friday. serena williams lost her
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first match since revealing this week that she is getting ready to leave professional tennis. the 23-time grand slam champion was emotional after losing in the second round of the national bank open wednesday night. it was a tune-up for what's expected to be her final u.s. open in a few weeks. >> i'm terrible at good-byes, but good-bye. toronto! [ cheers ] >> thank you, serena. >> up next for williams, the western and southern open, which starts on saturday in cincinnati. still ahead, the post office raises its holiday shipping rates. how much more will you have to pay?
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ay yo! check this axe with 48-hour protection! ♪♪ ♪press the button right there♪ ♪to let the doors in♪ ♪go hard all year,♪ smell fresh as fresh, no matter what. the u.s. postal service is increasing rates for holiday shipping beginning in october. first class packages will get a surcharge between 30 cents and $5.85 depending on the weight and distance. tonight, an nba first. all 30 teams are retiring the number 6 in honor of the legendary boston celtics center bill russell, who died last month. players who currently wear 6 on their jersey, including lebron james, will be allowed to keep
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doing so, but the number will not be issued again. we'll be right back with the nationwide effort to help these adorable rescue beag
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we end tonight with what volunteers hope will be a new beginning for 4,000 rescued beagles. here's cbs's manuel bojorquez. >> here we go. >> reporter: they arrive here nervous, sometimes sick, often hungry, and always into new experiences. >> having their feet on the grass for the first time ever. >> the first time ever? >> the first time ever. these dogs have not touched a surface that hasn't been rubber since they were born. you're seeing them getting to run and hop. they've never done that before. >> reporter: sue bell is executive director of homeward trails adoption center in fairfax station, virginia. a code tattooed inside the dogs' ears a sad reminder of their recent past. >> the puppies that were born, they would stay to a certain age and then be put in plastic
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crates and sent either by truck or by airplane to research facilities, where they would then spend their life in a cage undergoing any number of medical or scientific research projects. >> reporter: but the research company breeding them shut this operation down. now an army of workers and volunteers is helping the humane society move the dogs to shelters across the country. 4,000 beagles. as they arrive at sue bell's adoption center, so did the dog lovers like andrea justice. >> we don't need more dogs. you know, we have two. but we have plenty of room in our hearts and our house. >> reporter: another new experience. being part of a loving home. manuel bojorquez, cbs news, fairfax station, virginia. >> and that is the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for "cbs mornings." and follow us online anytime at cbsnews.com.
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reporting from the nation's capital, i'm margaret brennan. this is "cbs news flash." i'm matt pieper in new york. fbi agents in part were looking for documents relating to nuclear weapons when they searched former president trump's mar-a-lago estate this week. that according to the "washington post," though it's not yet clear if such documents were recovered as part of the search. in a statement trump said he encourages the immediate release of those documents. house lawmakers are set to return to washington to vote on a landmark climate, health care and tax bill. the inflation reduction act has riled up democrats behind it and republicans who are not for it. and mcdonald's says it's planning to reopen some of its 109 restaurants in ukraine. they've been closed since russia's invasion in february, but the workers are still
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getting paid. for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm matt pieper, cbs news, new york. ♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening and thank you for joining us. i'm margaret brennan, in for norah. tonight, the department of justice is asking a federal court to unseal the warrant that the fbi used to search the florida home of former president donald trump. agents were looking for classified documents that may have illegally been taken from the white house. we learned today that investigators first subpoenaed those records this spring. 15 boxes of presidential records were removed by federal
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authorities earlier this year and returned to the national archives. attorney general merrick garland said today a federal court found probable cause to justify the warrant and called on a judge to make those details now public. garland, the nation's top law enforcement official, said that unusual disclosure would be appropriate because the former president is talking publicly about the search. we have a lot of news to get to tonight, and cbs's robert costa is here to start us off. good evening to you, margaret. >> good evening, margaret. it was an extraordinary moment. an attorney general who rarely goes before the camera speaking out about the justice department's probe of a former president and an fbi search that has jolted the nation's political scene. attorney general merrick garland took ownership of the decision to search former president trump's florida residence this week. >> i personally approved the decision to seek a search warrant in this matter. >> reporter: he also announced
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that the justice department has asked a judge to unseal the search warrant, hand it over to the former president's legal team earlier this week, when federal agents arrived at trump's home. and the attorney general asserted it was trump who publicized the search. >> the department did not make any public statements on the day of the search. the former presidential publicly confirmed the search that evening, as is his right. >> reporter: garland's move to unseal the warrant punk twaipted a politically and legally charged week. as supporters rallied behind the former president, who declared the fbi search part of a witch hunt against him. left unsaid, why exactly fbi agents were authorized to go in and which documents they took from the residence. >> since i became attorney general, i have made clear that the department of justice will speak through its court filings and its work. >> the search was part of an ongoing federal investigation into documents trump took with him when he left the white house
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last year. cbs news has learned that former trump advisers have been questioned in recent months about how the former president dealt with sensitive materials and classified national security documents during and after his presidency. cbs news confirmed today that this week's fbi search was preceded by a grand jury subpoena this spring, which led to a june meeting between investigators and trump's lawyers to discuss exactly how documents were taken from the trump white house. >> and robert costa is here now. how has the former president's team responded? >> just minutes ago the former president issued a statement saying he and his lawyers have been fully cooperating with the probe. but they have a deadline. 3:00 p.m. friday. to oppose the justice department's decision to unseal this search warrant. >> questions still about what sensitive information may be in those documents. >> exactly right. >> robert, thank you. after monday's search at
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mar-a-lago, anti-law enforcement rhetoric online is growing even loulder. today an armed man in ohio allegedly attempted to breach an fbi field office, leading to a shootout where the suspect was killed. here's cbs's jeff pegues. >> reporter: police say the heavily armed gunman drove up to the fbi building in cincinnati around 9:15 this morning with a nail gun and an ar-15 style rifle. when armed agents confronted him, he fled and led police on a high-speed chase down interstate 71, which ended in a gun battle in a field near wilmington, ohio. >> the gunfire was exchanged between officers on scene and the suspect. >> reporter: the attack comes after the fbi's search at mar-a-lago prompted calls for civil war and violence on social media. democratic congressman eric swalwell received this threat. >> swalwell's a worthless piece of [ bleep ]. >> we've never seen a moment greenla a the league.
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>> a soon as the news bro tidal wave of anger and animus. >> reporter: with threats increasing doj officials removed information about the judge who signed the trump search warrant. today the attorney general defended the agents and prosecutors. >> i will not stand by silently when their integrity is unfairly attacked. the men and women of the fbi and the justice department are dedicated, patriotic public servants. >> reporter: here in washington city officials have been monitoring for potential threats. in fact, across the country law enforcement has been following threads online, and some of the chatter that they are seeing is similar to what they saw leading up to january 6th. late today here at the fbi the
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fbi director christopher wray released a statement saying that unfounded attacks against the fbi erode the rule of law. margaret. >> jeff pegues, i know you'll continue to track this story. well, tonight firefighters in southwestern france are battling raging wildfires fueled by one of europe's drought -- worst droughts? centuries. it has been a brutal summer. historic heat waves across western europe have killed thousands. cbs's roxana saberi has more from london. >> reporter: in a region of france renowned for its wine, wildfires are raging. over 1,000 firefighters are struggling to contain the blaze near bordeaux. that's forced thousands to flee their homes. countrywide, roughly 220 square miles have gone up in flames so far this year. nearly six times the annual average. blazes are also breaking out in spain and portugal, fanned by
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consecutive heat waves and little to no rainfall. with more than 60% of the european union and the uk now under a drought alert or warning. reservoirs and rivers are receded. on germany's rhine river, a commercial and shpg route, some ships have cut cargo to avoid running aground. here in england the first six months of this year were the driest in nearly five decades, coupled with the recent high temperatures that's left the ground at farms like this one parched. mike swerling has had to buy costly supplements and dip into winter feed because the grass his sheep normally graze on is too dry to eat. >> this is the driest i've ever known the farm. people are going to have to realize soon that it takes stable weather for us to produce food, not just in the uk but globally. >> so this should be a wake-up call. >> it should be a wake-up call. definitely. >> reporter: parts of england and europe are expecting rain in the coming days, but scientists
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♪ >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." i'm jan crawford in washington. thanks for staying with us. ukraine's military still has no comment on the devastating strike on a russian military airfield in the occupied peninsula of crimea. the region previously has been spared any major attacks during the war, but this strike destroyed more than a half dozen warplanes and sent civilians scrambling for cover. charlie d'agata reports from the front line. >> reporter: the massive series of explosions at the air base in crimea has sent shock waves far beyond the russian occupied
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peninsula. new satellite images appear to show deep craters and scorched earth with the ukrainian government claiming at least eight russian warplanes destroyed. the blasts sent stunned beachgoers well over 100 miles from the closest front line fleeing for safety. a deep strike for ukrainian forces, says retired u.s. marine intelligence officer hal kempfer. >> frankly, that changes the front across the board. and if they can continue the momentum, if they can continue to do deep strikes, if they can continue to make gains, they might be able to push all the way across that southern flank. >> reporter: as a direct response to the assault on that air base, russians retaliated, increased shelling attacks on towns and villages like this one according to local commander roman kulyk. with an american flag on his uniform he told us how western-supplied weapons saved
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his soldiers. so you were running out of weapons? >> yes. yes. >> reporter: until the howitzers arrived. >> yes. >> reporter: hows about was it? >> really bad. catastrophic situation. >> catastrophic. >> yes. >> reporter: but it has been a brutal back and forth along a battered front line in the south. this children's playground bears the scars of fighting in a virtually abandoned village trapped in a no man's land, between the furthest point that the russians have been able to advance and ukrainian forced determined to hold on to this territory. 76-year-old anna shepel is one of few residents left. >> oh, my gosh. the wall. what did you think when you came back to this? "i thought i would have a stroke," she said. "i paz was paralyzed. i wish that the russians felt what i felt at that moment, every minute, every hour."
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charlie d'agata near mykolaiv, ukraine. the iranian government is dismissing charges that it put a bounty on the head of former national skurpt adviser john bolton. the justice department says bolton, a long-time critic of iran, was targeted by iran's revolutionary guards after the u.s. assassinated a top iranian general in 2020. senior investigative correspondent catherine herridge spoke with bolton about the case. >> reporter: multiple sources tell cbs news this was a serious plot. the iranian defendant was not a rogue actor. and the threat extends to other former government officials. investigators say the alleged murder for hire plot began to take shape after this drone strike in iraq assassinated top iranian general qassam soleimani over two years ago. former national security adviser john bolton quickly tweeted "congratulations to all involved." iran vowed retaliation. the justice department is now charging shahram powers phi, a
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member of iran's revolutionary guard, with offering $300,000 to murder bolton. >> what did the fbi say about the serious nature of the threat? >> they were able to confirm that it was potentially an effort either to kidnap me or assassinate me. >> reporter: according to newly released records powers phi, working from iran, hired operatives to surveil and eliminate bolton even providing pictures of cash. separately sources told cbs news another target of the iranian plot included former secretary of state mike pompeo. what poursafi didn't know is that he was dealing with an fbi confidential source. >> a lot of this is done with the secrecy. >> reporter: bill evenina ran counterintelligence operations during the trump administration. >> the threat does not go away at all to ambassador bolt okay or any other official that iran has their targets on. >> with talks to revive the 2015 nurng deal with iran, bolton warned the white house against engaged. >> i think there's no doubt that
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there are other plots and not just again former government officials, against innocent american civilians. it tells you the very nature of the regime in tehran, that this is the kind of terrorist regime they are. >> reporter: bolton now has the same level of secret service protection he had while working at the white house. iran denies any involvement. >> that's catherine herridge reporting. texas governor greg abbott is promising to send more bus convoys of immigrants to democrat-run cities in the battle over president biden's immigration policies. this busload arrived in washington, d.c. yesterday. buses have also dropped thousands of migrants off in new york city, where mayor eric adams is promising to fight back. nancy chen reports. >> reporter: as three buses arrived in new york city from texas wednesday, they carried nearly 100 people in search of a home including this 38-year-old man from venezuela. saying "i was very tired and
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stressed during the trip." volunteers like john torres and his wife tala rivera were there to greet them. >> we're going to give him money so he can at least eat breakfast or lunch or buy formula for the babies or pampers, something to at least help. >> reporter: governor greg abbott's office says texas has sent more than 6600 asylum seekers who've already been processed and released by the department of homeland security to washington, d.c. and new york since april. he says to alleviate stress on border cities. >> they cannot handle the overwhelming number of illegal immigrants coming across the re ssng t isy lleg immigrants to washington, d.c. or new york. >> reporter: but new york mayor eric adams calls it horrific as the city opens 11 additional shelters to meet the demand. >> if his ancestors were treated the way he's treated these
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asylum seekers and migrant, then he would not be where he is right now. >> reporter: asiel uchl speakers like yoana who fled venezuela with her children earlier this year. they spent many long hours on a bus from texas to d.c. last month. yuwana says the sacrifice was worth it. >> what governor abbott is doing is using our clients as pawns. >> reporter: catherine cliff, a staff attorney at the legal aid society, says abbott's plan is creating a dire situation. >> i think it's traumatizing. it's one thing for family to come to new york city because they that's where they want to be. but to send families and individuals who don't want to be here and then to figure out where they want to go is dehumanizing. >> reporter: nancy chen, new york.
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are coming into contact with marine animals. and some of the creatures are sick or injured. if you bump into one, enstseave tm alone, call a rescue center. the federal government works with more than 100 organizations across the country to respond to these calls for help. michael george saw firsthand how the rescue process works. >> reporter: so often beachgoers walk right up to seals, sea lions and turtles with what he this think are harmless intentions. maybe they want that perfect picture or maybe they think the animal's injured and they can help. but their actions cause more harm than they realize. during a recent trip to a wildlife rehab center on new york's long island, we met willow, a seven-month-old gray seal pup. >> she's adorable. i see her looking right at us and she's got these puppy dog eyes. >> yeah. seals are really like dogs. we call these guys kind of like the german shepherd. they have that longer snout. >> reporter: but willow hasn't had an easy life. in may she was struck by a boat, leaving her with a fractured
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shoulder and deep cuts on her back. >> we don't want anything to happen to these guys. >> reporter: maxine montello and her team at the new york marine rescue center have spent weeks rehabilitating willow. along with cedar. a male seal who was found with a badly infected flipper. >> these guys can be a handful. >> very much so. >> yes. >> reporter: volunteers lenore mcguinn and lorraine shagno are helping will sxoe cedar back to health. >> cedar is a chunky monkey. he's cute, he comes up, looks at you. he wants more food constantly. willow is kind of quiet. the seals all definitely have their own personalities. >> reporter: unfortunately more animals are ending up at the rescue center, and too often we're to blame. boats, abandoned fishing gear and pollution are leading to injuries for seals and sea turtles. one of the biggest threats, the garbage we leave when we go to the beach. >> we see the entanglements, you know, with the plastic bags and the plastic in the waters. >> they wind up in the ocean and then the animals unfortunately suffer because they eat them,
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thinking they're food. >> reporter: another growing problem, harassment. last week a viral video in san diego caught beachgoers fleeing from two sea aren co for territory. experts say people got too close to the animals. back in april a group of people in texas reportedly took selfies with and even rode a dolphin. the dolphin died. >> people want to get close. they want to get that selfie. they want to touch that animal. if you do see them, enjoy from afar. >> reporter: and even well-intentioned people who think they're helping can make things worse. after willow was injured a good samaritan picked her up and put her in his truck to drive her to a vet. >> he wasn't trying to hurt this animal, but picking these animals up is illegal. they're federally protected under the marine mammal protection act. >> reporter: it's easy to forget willow and cedar are still wild animals. if you're at the beach and you see a beached or injured animal, marine wildlife experts suggest calling the nearest rescue center. >> i will let you know when i'm ten minutes away.
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>> reporter: as we were shooting our interview a bystander did just that, calling to report a badly injured sea turtle. thanks to that call the team was able to save it. >> this is a cumps ridley sea turtle. they're they're one of the most critically endangered sea turtles. so we appreciate you calling. >> willow and cedar are healing nicely. they've both put on 30 pounds. now maxine says it's time for them to go home. >> wunl, two, three. >> reporter: the pair had their final checkup. they got weighed. swabbed to check for diseases. and had their blood drawn. after starting the summer in a rehab facility it was time to return to the wild. cedar went first and seemed all too grateful to be back in the water. [ cheers and applause ] but willow was nervous. for a moment it seemed like she wouldn't go. but eventually. that moment, when they went back
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into the water, is that what this is all about for you? >> yeah. this is the best part of the job. all our hard work paid off. it's our goal to put them back into the wild to retur them (male) there are many voices in today's world. everyone is voicing their opinions about everything, and jesus is no exception to that. what if there was a clear voice telling you exactly who jesus is? (male announcer) join dr. david jeremiah as he teaches who jesus is and what that means for your life. tune in to dr. jeremiah's new series, "christ above all", on the next "turning point", right here on this station.
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did you ever wonder if spiders dream? yeah, me either. well, believe it or not, there are scientists in germany studying this. ian lee has the story. >> reporter: they may be creepy and crawly, but spiders are more like us than we realize. a new study out of germany finds arachnids, specifically jumping spiders, can doze in a dream-like state with rapid eye movement, rem sleep, that deepest stage that helps us feel rested and stay healthy. >> we actually see twitching and uncontrolled leg movements coupled with actual retinal movements. >> reporter: scientists can't scan a spider's brain, and obviously can't quiz them about their dreams. so the next best thing is
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observing them at night. >> so i personally do think that they're experiencing visual dreams, but it will be very difficult to prove that scientifically. >> reporter: using nightvision, researchers watch jumping spiders attach themselves to silk anchors before getting some zs. >> they have little bursts of activity throughout the night that reoccur pretty regularly. and the durations are also very regular. >> reporter: but after catching a fly then getting some shuteye, what possibly could spiders dream about? ask a zookeeper. >> i would imagine they're going to be dreaming about flies probably. >> reporter: so whether you have eight legs or two, everyone needs their beauty sleep. ian lee, cbs news, london. >> and that's the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for "cbs mornings." and follow us online anytime at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's
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capital, i'm jan crawford. this is cbs news flash. i'm matt pieper in new york. fbi agents in part were looking for documents relating to nuclear weapons when they searched former president trump's mar-a-lago estate this week. that according to the "washington post," though it's not yet clear if such documents were recovered as part of the search. in a statement trump says he encourages the immediateiate ree of those documents. house lawmakers are set to return to washington to vote on a landmark climate, health care and tax bill. the inflation reduction act has riled up democrats behind it and republicans who are not for it. and mcdonald's says it's planning to reopen some of its 109 restaurants in ukraine. they've been closed since russia's invasion in february, but their workers are still getting paid.
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for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm matt pieper, cbs news," new york. we're learning more about the extraordinary federal investigation into former prsident donald trump and the legal basis for the unprecedented fbi search of his florida home. the attorney general spoke publicly for the first time about the justice department probe into whether the 45th president illegally removed classified white house records. >> i personally approved the decision to seek a search warrant in this matter. >> cbs's robert costa tonight has new reporting. threats against the fbi on the rise. cbs's jeff pegues reports on the suspect who allegedly tried to breach the agency's ohio field office with an ar-15 style rifle and a nail gun. the hours-long standoff that followed. >> gunfire was exchanged.
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gas prices fall to the lowest point in five months. cbs's errol barnett talks to drivers who are still feeling the pain. >> so you're encouraged by this but still -- >> i'm looking for more improvement. the cdc's new covid guidelines. more than 2 1/2 years since the virus first hit, the u.s. loosens restrictions. our dr. jon lapook is here to make sense of it all. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening and thank you for joining us. i'm margaret brennan in for norah. tonight the department of justice is asking a federal court to unseal the warrant that the fbi used to search the florida home of former president donald trump. agents were looking for classified documents that may have illegally been taken from
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the white house. we learned today that investigators first subpoenaed those records this spring. 15 boxes of presidential records were removed by federal authorities earlier this year and returned to the national archives. attorney general merrick garland said today a federal court found probable cause to justify the warrant and called on a judge to make those details now public. garland, the nation's top law enforcement official, said that unusual disclosure would be appropriate because the former president is talking publicly about the search. we have a lot of news to get to tonight, and cbs's robert costa is here to start us off. good evening to you, robert. >> good evening, margaret. it was an extraordinary moment. an attorney general who rarely goes before the camera speaking out about the justice department's probe of a former president and an fbi search that
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has jolted the nation's political scene. attorney general merrick garland took ownership of the decision to search former president trump's florida residence this week. >> i personally approved the decision to seek a search warrant in this matter. >> reporter: he also announced that the justice department has asked a judge to unseal the search warrant, handed over to the former president's legal team earlier in week when federal agents arrived at trump's home, and the attorney general asserted it was trump who publicized the search. >> the department did not make any public statements on the day of the search. the former president publicly confirmed the search that evening, as is his right. >> reporter: garland's move to unseal the warrant punctuated a politically and legally charged week, as supporters rallied behind the former president, who declared the fbi search part of a witch hunt against him. left unsaid, why exactly fbi agents were authorized to go in and which documents they took from the residence. >> since i became attorney
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general, i have made clear that the department of justice will speak through its court filings and its work. >> reporter: the search was part of an ongoing federal investigation into documents trump took with him when he left the white house last year. cbs news has learned that former trump advisers have been questioned in recent months about how the former president dealt with sensitive materials and classified national security documents during and after his presidency. cbs news confirmed today that this week's fbi search was preceded by a grand jury subpoena this spring, which led to a june meeting between investigators and trump's lawyers to discuss exactly how documents were taken from the trump white house. >> and robert costa is here now. how has the former president's
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team responded? >> just minutes ago the former president issued a statement saying he and his lawyers have been fully cooperating with the probe. but they have a deadline. 3:00 p.m. friday. to oppose the justice department's decision to unseal this search warrant. >> questions still about what sensitive information may be in those documents. >> exactly right. >> robert, thank you. after monday's search at mar-a-lago, anti-law enforcement rhetoric online is growing even louder. today an armed man in ohio allegedly attempted to breach an fbi field office, leading to a shootout where the suspect was killed. here's cbs's jeff pegues. >> reporter: police say the heavily armed gunman drove up to the fbi building in cincinnati around 9:15 this morning with a nail gun and an ar-15 style rifle. when armed agents confronted him, he fled and led police on a high-speed chase down interstate 71, which ended in a gun battle in a field near wilmington, ohio. >> gunfire was exchanged between officers on scene and the suspect. >> reporter: the attack comes after the fbi's search in
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mar-a-lago prompted calls for civil war and violence on social media. democratic congressman eric swalwell received this threat. wave of anger and animus that came from radical supporters of president trump and a wide range of extremists across the sort of maga movement. >> reporter: with threats increasing, doj officials removed information about the judge who signed the trump search warrant. today the attorney general defended the agents and prosecutors. >> i will not stand by silently when their integrity is unfairly attacked. the men and women of the fbi and
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the justice department are dedicated, patriotic public servants. >> reporter: here in washington city officials have been monitoring for potential threats. in fact, across the country law enforcement has been following threats online, and some of the chatter that they are seeing is similar to what they saw leading up to january 6. late today here at the fbi the fbi director christopher wray released a statement saying that unfounded attacks against the fbi erode the rule of law. margaret. >> jeff pegues. i know you'll continue to track this story. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." we do have some good news for drivers. aaa says the average price for a gallon of regular gas dipped below $4 for the first time in five months. here's cbs's errol barnett. >> today, 3.99! it's good. >> reporter: it is a rare glimmer of financial hope for what does it feel like to get at least this sma >> it felt good. you know, i got a little extra money. >> reporter: the national average for gas dipping below $4 today, almost two months after hitting a record high.
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relief stemming from an increase in global oil supply and decrease in fuel demand, helping to lower the rate of inflation. how encouraging is that news to you? >> well, it's great. the trend is good. the trend is your friend. but we are not out of the woods yet. >> reporter: cbs news business analyst jill schlesinger warns the bigger economic picture remains perilous. >> the problem that we see in almost every category is that you can look at a given month and say phew, we're down from the peak. and yet when you look back a year it's still stunning. >> reporter: while lowering in the past month, compared to 2021 gas prices are up 44% and airfare is 28% more expensive. >> you're still paying more than you were, you know, two to three years ago. >> reporter: average rent costs have jumped 14%. it's twice as high in places like cincinnati, seattle, austin, and nashville. >> there are millions of who on
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und pressure until we see at inflation rate come down. >> reporter: and to jill's point, a third of americans are now spending their savings to cover all of these increased costs, according to one survey. and while the price of regular gas has come back down to earth recently, diesel, which is the lifeblood of transporting goods all across the country, is 54% more expensive, margaret, than one year ago. >> errol barnett, thank you. well, on the pandemic front today the cdc updated its covid guidance to loosen a number of its health recommendations. cbs news chief medical correspondent dr. john lapook is here now with the details. good evening to you, doctor. so what is the biggest change? >> margaret, the cdc is trying to consolidate and simplify its guidance and remind us the pandemic is not over. and a lot more people still need to get boosted. one important change has to do with shortening mask wearing after being infected with covid.
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you still need to isolate for five days. but instead of then having to wear a mask around others for five more days you can do a home test on day 6 and day 8. if they're negative and you have no symptoms or if symptoms are improving and you have no fever without fever-reducing medication, then you can stop wearing a mask around others. >> and there are also some changes, i understand, about how someone who is exposed to covid should behave? >> right, margaret, i just confirmed this with the cdc a few minutes ago, that if you are exposed to somebody with covid you no longer have to quarantine, whether you are vaccinated or not. however, you do need to wear a mask for ten days around others and get tested at day five after exposure or sooner if you have symptoms. and margaret, this should lessen disruptions in schools and elsewhere. >> dr. jon lapook. thank you for breaking it down for us. well, tonight firefighters in southwestern france are
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battling raging wildfires fueled by one of europe's drought -- worst droughts in centuries. it has been a brutal summer. historic heat waves across western europe have killed thousands. cbs's roxana saberi has more from london. >> reporter: in a region of france renowned for its wine, wildfires are raging. over 1,000 firefighters are struggling to contain the blaze near bordeaux that's forced thousands to flee their homes. countrywide, roughly 220 square miles have gone up in flames so far this year. nearly six times the annual average. blazes are also breaking out in spain and portugal, fanned by consecutive heat waves and little to no rainfall. with more than 60% of the european union and the uk now under a drought alert or warning, reservoirs and rivers are receding. on germany's rhine river, a crucial commercial route, some
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ships have cut cargo to avoid running aground. here in england the first six months of this year were the driest in nearly five decades. coupled with the recent record high temperatures, that's left the ground at farms like this one parched. mike swerling has had to buy costly supplements and dip into winter feed because the grass his sheep normally graze on is too dry to eat. >> this is the driest i've ever known the farm. people are going to have to realize soon that it takes stable weather for us to produce food, not just in the uk but globally. >> so this should be a wake-up call. >> it should be a wake-up call. definitely. >> reporter: parts of england and europe are expecting rain in the coming days, but scientists warn climate change is make droughts and heat waves more frequent and intense. margaret? >> roxana saberi in london, thank you. a farm just outside kansas city is growing more than just crops in its fields. cbs's janet shamlian has more in tonight's "eye on america."
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>> reporter: there's more than food growing on this patch of farmland. a crop of boys becoming men. >> one! >> reporter: it's a two-year agriculture-focused free entrepreneurship class called boys grow, offering mentoring to 14, 15, and 16-year-olds, many lacking important life skills. >> the soft skills we teach are skills that they're going to be able to continue on, but they have an opportunity to learn them out here. >> reporter: after working in the juvenile justice system founder john gordon was looking for a way to inspire kids, like kendrell kirkwood. >> he told me to go to college, college is worth it, do everything that i probably wouldn't want to do because next thing you know i might want to do it. >> reporter: there's a need in the kansas city metro area where data indicates there are nearly double the number of youth homicides compared to the national average. and in missouri black students are half as likely as white students to graduate college.
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three days a week in summer the ten-acre farm is worked by four dozen teens, tasked with everything like planting and harvesting crops. is. >> this is your cylinder head. >> reporter: to auto mechanic work. even culinary training. >> put a couple peppers on this one. >> reporter: all for which the boys earn a paycheck. how do you think this will help you? >> i feel like it will teach us a whole bunch of stuff, like as we were talking about the social skills. >> does it help that you get a paycheck? >> oh, yeah, it does help very much. >> 22-year-old somo oo was in the 2016 class, now working as an auto mechanic. what part of your experience here still sticks with you today? >> i think just tenacity and going for what you want. and the entrepreneurship part of it too. >> reporter: with marketable skills and the ability to work as part of a team, graduates have gone down to ivy league colleges and well-paying jobs. >> i see the evolution of these kids every year. and that's one thing about my job that never gets old.
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>> reporter: a unique initiative planting the seeds of possibility and harvesting young talent. for "eye on america," janet shamlian, cbs news, kansas city. up next, an oil spill forces major pipelines to shut down in the gulf of mexico. >> and an emotional night for serena williams.
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week that she is getting ready to leave professional tennis. the 23-time grand slam champion was emotional after losing in the second round of the national bank open wednesday night. it was a tune-up for what's expected to be her final u.s. open in a few weeks. >> i'm terrible at good-byes, but good-bye. toronto! [ cheers ] >> thank you, serena. >> up next for williams, the western and southern open, which starts on saturday in cincinnati. still ahead, the post office raises its holiday shipping rates. how much more will you have to pay? ay yo! check this axe with 48-hour protection! ♪♪ ♪press the button right there♪
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the u.s. postal service is increasing rates for holiday shipping beginning in october. first class packages will get a surcharge between 30 cents and $5.85 depending on the weight and distance. tonight, an nba first. all 30 teams are retiring the number 6 in honor of the legendary boston celtics center bill russell, who died last month. players who currently wear 6 on their jersey, including lebron james, will be allowed to keep
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doing so, but the number will not be issued again. we'll be right back with the nationwide effort to help these adorable rescue beagles find a home. it's time for the biggest sale of the year, on the sleep number 360 smart bed. why choose proven quality sleep from sleep number? because proven quality sleep is vital to our health and wellness, only the sleep number 360 smart bed keeps you cool, then senses and effortlessly adjusts for your best sleep. and tells you exactly how well you slept. your sleepiq score. our smart sleepers get 28 minutes more relp per n. so, you cadospecl. all smart beds are on sale. 5e sleeer 360 limited edition smbey.
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we end tonight with what volunteers hope will be a new beginning for 4,000 rescued beagles. here's cbs's manuel bojorquez. >> here we go. >> reporter: they arrive here nervous, sometimes sick, often hungry, and always into new experiences. >> having their feet on the grass for the first time ever. >> the first time ever? >> the first time ever. these dogs have not touched a surface that hasn't been rubber since they were born. you're seeing them getting to run and hop. they've never done that before. >> reporter: sue bell is executive director of homeward trails adoption center in fairfax station, virginia. a code tattooed inside the dogs' theuppies that they wou stay ta
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and then be put in plastic crates and sent either by truck or by airplane to research facilities, where they would then spend their life in a cage undergoing any number of medical or scientific research projects. >> reporter: but the research company breeding them shut this operation down. now an army of workers and volunteers is helping the humane society move the dogs to shelters across the country. 4,000 beagles. as they arrive at sue bell's adoption center, so did the dog lovers like andrea justice. >> we don't need more dogs. you know, we have two. but we have plenty of room in our hearts and our house. >> reporter: another new experience. being part of a loving home. manuel bojorquez, cbs news, fairfax station, virginia. >> and that is the overnight news for this friday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for "cbs mornings." and follow us online anytime at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm margaret brennan.
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this is "cbs news flash." i'm matt pieper in new york. fbi agents in part were looking for documents relating to nuclear weapons when they searched former president trump's mar-a-lago estate this week. that according to the "washington post," though it's not yet clear if such documents were recovered as part of the search. in a statement trump said he encourages the immediate release of those documents. house lawmakers arers are s return to washington to vote on a landmark climate, health care and tax bill. the inflation reduction act has riled up democrats behind it and republicans who are not for it. and mcdonald's says it's planning to reopen some of its 109 restaurants in ukraine. they've been closed since russia's invasion in february,
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but the workers are still getting paid. for more news download the cbs it's friday, august 12th, 2022. this is the "cbs morning news." breaking overnight, nuclear documents. bombshell details emerge about the fbi search of former president trump's home in florida. security scare. authorities confront an armed man who allegedly tried to breach an fbi building. how it led to a deadly six-hour standoff. new pandemic phase. the cdc relaxes covid guidelines. we'll break down the biggest changes. well, good morning, and good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. we begin with breaking developments in the feud between the justice department and former president trump. overnight trump called for the

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