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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  August 10, 2022 3:12am-4:30am PDT

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tight-knit community, but police say the investigation continues. >> there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. there is still a lot of evidence that needs to be verified. this case is not resolved until we have a successful prosecution and people are held accountable. >> reporter: police credit the muslim community for sending in hundreds of tips that led to an arrest. and even though a suspect is in custody, they don't plan on stopping those increased patrols around mosques and islamic centers. jericka? >> omar villafranca in albuquerque. thank you. we turn now to the end of an era. tennis great serena williams says she is evolving away from the sport she has redefined for the last 23 years. williams tells "vogue" magazine that this month's u.s. open will likely be her last. here's cbs's jamie yuccas. >> phenomenal! >> incredible. >> reporter: she's one of the greatest tennis players ever. but yesterday's win was serena
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williams' first in over a year. post-match, williams seemed playful. >> i guess there's just a light at the end of the tunnel. >> i know you're joking, but can you -- >> i'm not joking. >> reporter: then, just hours later, came this bombshell essay in "vogue," where williams writes, "i've been reluctant to admit that i have to move on from playing tennis. it comes up and i start to cry." next month williams will turn 41. >> her mind and spirit would love to keep playing, but she realizes her body is just saying i'm done. i don't think the benevolence was like first and foremost in her mind, oh, let's let the younger generation -- she would love to crush them. >> reporter: having grown up before our eyes, williams has won 23 grand slams, including six u.s. open titles and seven wimbledon championships. on the court williams is a superstar. off the court she's a brand. "forbes" puts her net worth at $260 million. and she's used her influence to
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speak out. on civil rights and motherhood. and just how it feels to miss a major milestone. "she took her first steps. i was training and missed it. i cried." her daughter olympia greeted serena after monday's match. moving toward the end of her storied career, she boils it down to just one word. >> freedom. >> reporter: the news bringing lots of reaction. tennis great billie jean king credits williams with inspiring a new generation of players and fans, raising the global profile of the sport. williams' husband posted late today that "serena's story is just starting." jericka? >> yeah, jamie, a lot of people wishing her the best and looking forward to seeing that next chapter. thanks. back here in washington president biden signed the bipartisan $280 billion chips act to boost the manufacturing of semiconductors in the united states. a severe chip shortage has added to the supply chain slowdown and
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helped fuel inflation. cbs's meg oliver takes an in-depth look at fixing the chip crisis. >> reporter: tonight u.s. chipmakers got a boost to their assembly lines. >> we need to make these chips here in america, to bring down everyday costs and create jobs. >> reporter: the legislation will provide $52 billion in subsidies and tax credits for chip manufacturing in the u.s. and more than $200 billion for scientific research. global foundries is one of the largest chip makers in the country. how big is this facility? >> give or take, about seven football fields. >> reporter: at this high-tech facility everything looks yellow. special lighting is used to protect the delicate production of microchips. christopher belfi is equipment engineering manager. how complex is it to make these microchips? they're in everything we use. phones, tvs, cars. >> it is extremely complex. and as the demand on capability increases, so does the complexity. >> reporter: the chip shortage
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is a growing crisis. they help power everything from appliances like refrigerators to gaming consoles and weapons. the u.s. relies heavily on east asia for chips. >> we don't want to rely on foreign entities to be able to give us the brains and the guts of what drive our everyday vehicles, devices, our cell phones. >> reporter: experts warn the lack of production in the u.s. poses a national security risk. tom caulfield is the ceo of global foundries. what stage are we at in this chip shortage? >> it takes years to put capacity on. and i think for the better part of the next five to ten years we'll be chasing supply in this industry, not demand. >> reporter: the u.s. only produces about 12% of the world's chip supply, and it will take years to ramp up production here, which means for now americans will still have to pay higher prices on everything from appliances to cars. jericka? >> got to start somewhere. thanks, meg.
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as the summer driving season winds down, americans are finally seeing relief at the pump. the average price of gas has fallen for more than 50 straight days. the national average is on the verge of going below $4 a gallon for the first time since march. here's cbs's errol barnett. >> it's a miracle. i was really stressed out. >> reporter: around the nation -- >> i'm thrilled. >> a lot better. >> reporter: -- relief has finally arrived. >> it means i put more money away in the bank. >> reporter: tonight nearly half of the country, mostly in the south and midwest, is seeing gas below $4 a gallon. partly due to increased oil supply and fears over a global recession. but american drivers can also
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thank each other. when inflation hit 9.1% in june, its highest level since 1981, gas prices were a major component, with fuel making up nearly half of the increased costs. aaa found most americans changed their driving behavior as a result. >> we know that 75% of people said they would change their lifestyle when it hit $5. and our survey, our follow-on survey seems to mirror that. you know, 65% of the people said i made a change in my lifestyle. >> reporter: since june energy demand, measured through gasoline deliveries, has been dropping steadily. it's now at lower levels than in june of 2020, can during pandemic lockdowns. however, weather events could reverse this trend. >> we are entering the heart now of hurricane season, and a hurricane barreling through the gulf coast, hitting all the areas where there's oil production as well as oil refining capacity, that can
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cause problems. >> reporter: now, the big question is how long will this last? well, the good news is gas prices are forecast to hover at or below $4 a gallon for the rest of the summer. but the bad news here is that the energy markets are volatile. in fact, crude oil prices jumped up more than a percent today. so jericka, if you do have a fuel tank, fill them as much as you can. >> absolutely. thank you, errol. there's a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news."
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open talenti and raise the jar. to gelato made from scratch. raise the jar to all five layers. raise the jar to the best gelato... you've ever tasted. talenti. raise the jar. tonight, dramatic video of a small plane making a crash landing on a southern california freeway. watch as the plane narrowly avoids hitting cars on the 91 freeway in the city of corona just southeast of los angeles. the plane caught fire after slamming down. luckily, there were no serious injuries. well, motown hitmaker lamont dozier has died. ♪ stop in the name of love ♪ the detroit native was part of the legendary songwriting team behind dozens of classics including "stop in the name of love," "you can't hurry love," "heatwave," and "baby love,"
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just to name a few. dozier was inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame and songwriters hall of fame. he was 81.
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finally tonight, a sports program in chicago is going to the mat for kids from underserved communities, teaching them how to be champions in competition and in life. here's cbs's charlie demar with tonight's "unifying america." >> reporter: where roy phelps lives wrestling has a bit of an image problem. >> there aren't many black people or people of color. >> reporter: he's from chicago's south side. >> two of my best friends were killed due to gun violence. >> reporter: but everything changed for him when the 15-year-old found wrestling through a group called beat the streets. >> i want to be better than i was at the beginning of the day, and i thought wrestling was a way to help. >> reporter: the program uses one of the world's oldest sports to teach lessons kids can use on
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and off the mat. mike powell runs the chicago chapter. what is a success for you? >> creating life champions. a life champion to us is somebody who has changed their lives, the way they function, their futures, right? >> reporter: when it comes to diversity, wrestling lags badly behind other college sports. a recent survey found about 7% of division one wrestlers are black. compared to 48% of players in football and 56% in basketball. >> being a minority in any sport's very different. you kind of don't know your place. >> reporter: ed ruth won three ncaa championships at penn state. now he shows young wrestlers of color what's possible. >> what i'm doing is actually making a difference. >> that's got to make it worth it for you. >> that makes it worth it. >> reporter: roy phelps is already seeing the results. charlie demar, cbs news, chicago. and that is the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news
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continues. for others check back later for "cbs mornings." and of course follow us online anytime at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm jericka duncan. this is "thbs news flash." i'm matt piper in new york. president biden is set to sign the pact act. the long awaited bill will expand access to v.a. care for veterans who were exposed to toxins during war. but there are concerns about how the v.a. will go about implementing the legislation amid its existing backlogs and quite i apoor track record. republican congressman scott perry says the fbi seized his cell phone while he was traveling with his family. it was not immediately clear what investigation prompted the search warrant. but perry has been a figure in the congressional investigation into the capitol insurrection. and the emmys will be posted by kenan thompson. the "snl" actor says it's ridiculously exciting to be part of the show which airs next month. for more news download the
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cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm matt pieper, cbs news, new york. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening and thank you for joining us. i'm jericka duncan in for norah. tonight there are new details about the unprecedented fbi search of former president donald trump's florida home. what we're learning about the investigation that's focused on his potential mishandling of what could be classified material. sources tell cbs news that the fbi was met by trump's attorneys along with the secret service. it is the first time in american history that a search warrant has been issued on a former president. and given the political implications, approval came from the very highest levels of the
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department of justice. white house officials say president biden had no prior knowledge of the search, and current fbi director christopher wray was appointed by trump five years ago. cbs's robert costa is here in studio, but we begin tonight with cbs's major garrett with details from palm beach, florida. good major. >> reporter: jericka, good evening. a trump lawyer who was at mar-a-lago yesterday told us the fbi pretty much arrived in full force with agents and personnel numbering more than 30. they brought a box truck for document removal. the search this lawyer told us targeted three rooms -- the former president's bedroom, his office and a storage room. the fbi executed a search of mar-a-lago, former president trump's primary residence, around 10:00 a.m. monday. two sources told cbs news investigators seized boxes and paper documents but no electronics. the secret service maintains a constant presence at the former
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president's home and facilitated the fbi's entry. authorities also opened trump's safe. at least two of trump's attorneys were present during the search. >> that's right. another day in paradise. this was a strange day. you've probably already read about it. >> reporter: the documents are believed to contain classified information. trump and federal investigators had been in negotiations over the records, and the fbi visited mar-a-lago in june. mishandling classified materials is potentially criminal. federal law requires presidential records to be turned over to the national archives. it is not known what documents were taken by federal authorities monday. the justice department has so far declined to comment. ♪ as night fell monday, pro-trump protesters gathered outside mar-a-lago. more assembled there today. what do you think will be the practical political reaction for people who favor or support former president trump after yesterday? >> i think he will win in a landslide in 2024. >> reporter: trump was not home
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but released a statement alleging that he was a victim of a politicized justice department, a sentiment echoed by former vice president mike pence who said "the appearance of continued partisanship by the justice department must be addressed." congressional republicans rushed to trump's defense. house minority leader kevin mccarthy said republicans would investigate attorney general merrick garland's role in the fbi's search. >> what the hell are these people doing? >> reporter: south carolina republican lindsey graham spoke to trump today and called the search of mar-a-lago suspicious and dangerous, yet helpful to the president's political fortunes. >> one thing i can tell you is that i believed he was going to run before. i'm stronger in my belief now. >> reporter: trump eager to portray himself the victim sent out two fund-raising texts to supporters. speaking of money, in a separate development a federal appeals court ruled democrats on the house ways and means committee can obtain former president trump's personal and business tax returns, something trump
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argued unsuccessfully congress had no legitimate right to pursue. later tonight at his golf club in bedminster, new jersey trump will huddle over dinner with more than a dozen conservative house republicans. je jericka? >> major garrett for us in west palm beach tonight. thank you. for more on the possible criminal and political implications of this fbi search let's bring in cbs's robert costa. robert, good evening to you. what sort of implications does this have for a potential run for the former president, which is looking at a possible bid in 2024? >> it could speed up his decision on 2024. cbs news has learned tonight that many top republicans on the trump side of the party are calling him saying get in now, consolidate the base around you, block out rivals from running and complicate life for the justice department. become a federal candidate even while you might be under federal investigation. others are saying hold off, wait, see how this develops. >> and donald trump has endorsed nearly 200 candidates already
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since he left office. what are republicans saying in reference to him being the sort of de facto leader by some? some would say that that's what he is in the party. >> he is the leader of a wing of the party. but the party isn't universally behind him. as major said, about a dozen house republicans are going to be in new jersey tonight rallying at his side. but senate republican leader mitch mcconnell today, quiet. silent. didn't want to weigh in. wants to see how this all develops. that's the mood inside the senate gop in some quarters, wait to see how this plays out. because they know that trump is still a risk for the party in many ways. but at the same time so many in the party are ready to aggressively go after the justice department in 2023 should republicans win the house majority this fall house republicans, jim jordan and others, preparing investigations. political war on the horizon. >> all right. robert costa for us tonight. thank you. now to some breaking news. the manhunt in albuquerque, new
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mexico is over. police say they have made an arrest in the killings of four muslim men whose deaths sparked fear in muslim communities nationwide. cbs's omar villafranca is there. >> reporter: tonight the manhunt in albuquerque is over. >> this crime felt -- made our community feel like it was under attack. >> reporter: authorities announcing they have arrested muhammed syed, 51, after finding efld that ties him to the murders of two muslim immigrants. >> this is the kind of work, this collaboration, that will yield results. this is law enforcement and all partners at their best. >> reporter: investigators are charging syed with two counts of homicide and are investigating other charges related to the other two murders. authorities say they matched gun casings from the crime scenes with the gun found in syed's home. police say the suspect may have known the victims to some extent and described an interpersonal political that may have led to the murders. >> as we know, over the last few days our community has been
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rocked to its core by the loss of members from our muslim community. >> reporter: the break in the case comes after four men were shot in ambush-style attacks, three in the last two weeks and one in november. 25-year-old naeem hussain was shot friday just hours after attending funeral services for muhammad afzaal hussain and aftab hussein who were killed in similar attacks. last year 62-year-old mohammed zaher ahmadi was killed in a similar style attack. tonight's arrest ends the cloud of fear that gripped this tight-knit community, but police say the investigation continues. >> there's still a lot of work that needs to be done. there's still a lot of evidence that needs to be verified. this case is not resolved until we have a successful prosecution and people are held accountable. >> reporter: police credit the muslim community for sending in hundreds of texts that led to an arrest. and even though a suspect is in custody, they don't plan on stopping those increased patrols
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around moss sxkz islamic centers. jericka? >> omar villafranca in albuquerque, thank you. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back. ay yo! check this axe with 48-hour protection! ♪♪ ♪press the button right there♪ ♪to let the doors in♪ ♪go hard all year,♪ smell fresh as fresh, no matter what. some migraine attacks catch you off guard. but for me a stressful day can trigger migraine attacks, too. that's why my go-to is nurtec odt...
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." i'm kaitlyn huey burns in washington. thanks for staying with us. moscow is insisting that a series of explosions at a military base in crimea was not the result of a ukrainian attack. huge explosions rocked the saki air field in early afternoon. russia saying only that they were caused by the detonation of aviation ammunition. so far the annexed peninsula has not been attacked in the war. inside ukraine russian forces stepped up their attacks in the south and east of the country. charlie d'agata is in mykolaiv, a frontline city of ukraine's
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south coast. >> reporter: that is the trauma ward of a hospital, bombed just over a week ago. amazingly, nobody was hurt. weapons, weapons, weapons, and more weapons. that's the message we got from the top general here ahead of a massive counteroffensive in a showdown for this port city. we spokeromarchenko in the rubb of the regional government headquarters. no one here needs reminding that russia still holds the upper hand in heavy weapons. the general told us that for every 100 shells the russians fire at the city his forces can respond with only 10. but the kremlin's forces are running out of precision-guided missiles like the one that destroyed this building in the early days of the war. general marchenko gave us a long list of weapons being unleashed on this city from long-range missiles to soviet-era rockets from the '60s, even firing anti-aircraft munitions at buildings. >> and they're using cluster
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bombs here too? >> the general credited american-supplied himars for striking weapons depot and several supply lines deep behind russian front lines. what difference has the himars system made for the war effort? >> translator: it's one of the main factors why we kept our ground, he said. and started taking advantage on the field. but the russian onslaught has been relentless. the frontline town of bakmut has suffered ferocious bombardment. the shelling of the eastern donbas region's main water supply has left residents in the city of slovyansk without water for two ploz. adding to the suffering in cities under siege. this city comes under nightly bombardment. it was hit again last night and early this morning. explosions off in the distance. the general told us it happens around three times a day, hitting random civilian targets,
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even hospitals. >> charlie d'agata in ukraine. the fighting comes as the white house announced it is sending another billion dollars worth of military aid to ukrainian forces. mostly ammunition that comes from existing u.s. stockpiles. one thing the u.s. army does not have enough of these days is recruits. so the pentagon announced a new program to help fill the ranks. david martin has the story. >> reporter: fresh out of college and looking for a steady paycheck, kevin and jocelyn sellers went to the go army website. >> the army pays well. the army can really provide a future for us. and for our children, who don't even exist yet. >> reporter: but there was one very big problem. he weighed 305 pounds, and she weighed 190. obesity is one reason more than 3/4 of young men and women do not meet the basic eligibility requirements for enlisting in the armed forces. another is a shocking decline in test scores for reading and
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math. >> only about 1/3 are passing the academic test to come to the army, where it used to be about 2/3. >> reporter: army chief of staff general james mcconnell expects the warmy will be about 10,000 recruits short this year. have you missed by that much before? >> well, we haven't missed by that number in recent history. >> reporter: mcconville says the army is setting up prep camps to get potential recruits in good enough phycal and mental shape to enlist. >> four, five, six. >> reporter: kevin and jocelyn sellers did it on their own, working out with their recruiter staff sergeant jimmy vander haul. >> i lost almost 70 pounds and jocelyn's lost quite a bit of weight as well. >> i went from 190 to 160. >> so about 100 pounds between you. >> yeah. we lost a whole person. >> reporter: they are finally scheduled to report to basic training in two weeks. but it took them over a year of heavy lifting to qualify. it's a small victory in what
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pentagon officials say is the most difficult recruiting year since the all-volunteer force was created nearly 50 years ago. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. one of the largest garbage dumps in the world is located in the otherwise pristine waters between california and hawaii. max starro reports on one group's effort to clean it up. >> reporter: the sailing ship kauai returned from its trip to the great pacific garbage patch. its catch, tons of abandoned fishing equipment, single use plastics, and household goods. >> it's a very sad and eerie feeling to be in the middle of the ocean and to see our own garbage floating out there. >> reporter: located halfway between hawaii and california the floating mess contains more than 1.8 trillion pieces of plastic, which amounts to about 250 pieces of debris for every human on the planet. the kauai covered more than 4600
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nautical miles between san francisco and honolulu. after a 45-day trip the ocean voyage institute's crew pulled 96 tons of waste like this out of the pacific ocean. >> one thing that we encountered out there was just a great amount of consumer plastics. all those types of things. they end up thousands of miles out in the pacific. >> reporter: mary crowley is the founder of ocean voyages institute. she says every piece of trash will be repurposed, recycled or upcycled into building blocks, insulation, furniture and even energy. >> we've worked with h power in hawaii where they use it to power homes. we've turned it into fuel. the kauai ship and other organizations are working sfo keep the dump from growing larger. >> this vessel and others could be out there for decades doing this job and keep coming back with cargo holds full of plastic for years to come. >> reporter: that is, unless humans change their habits and consumption of single use
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plastics. max darrow, cbs news.
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there are more than 80,000 wild horses running freely across public lands in ten western states. the federal government says that's too many and has launched a high-tech roundup that's sparking controversy. joy benedict has the story. >> reporter: it is a calm that's blanketed this hillside since the west was won. but just after dawn on this summer day in the high desert of
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northern california it was the hum of machine that sliced through the silence. on the range this is the sound of controversy for man and mustang. >> some horses herege the u.s. cavalry. >> reporter: jeff fontanaasking federal bureau of land management. it's charged with caring for america's wild horses. >> they're living symbols of the historic and pioneer spirit of the west. >> reporter: but with an estimated 82,000 of them running free in ten states, this year alone the bureau, known as blm, is tasked with slimming the herds by 20,000 horses and burros. >> we've been using helicopters for most of the program. and really helicopters are a safe and efficient way to move large numbers of animals across the landscape. >> reporter: as the xhoper descends on a group of horses it pushes in, pulls back, pushes in again, eventually corralling
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them into a trap. >> how dangerous is this for them? >> well, injuries occur. we're talking about whiled horses, wild animals that have noefr been around humans. but our track record is really good in this program. injuries regarding in death from our gather activities are less than 1/2 of 1%. >> but of course you have to understand how traumatizing or sad it is for the public to see you lose any horse. >> sure. it's also a situation we're trying to avoid, losing horses on the range due to degraded resources. >> reporter: and while it's hard to imagine the overpopulation of anything out here, that's what the blm says is happening. >> we try and keep the herd at the right size. or else we're going to have animals that don't have food to eat or water to drink. >> reporter: jason luterman works for the national horse and burro program. it's operating 46 round-ups in the west this year, including this one in california. >> wild horse and burro herds increase 15% to 20% a year. if we weren't here to manage that growth the herds will keep
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growing. eventually they will degrade the land enough to where they will run out of food and water. >> so you're basically saying you manage the herd to keep the herd. >> that's exactly right. yep. our goal is to manage healthy herds on healthy public lands. the way we can do that is to make sure there's enough resources out here for those animals to survive. >> reporter: the blm manages 26.9 million acres of land, accomplished in the 1940s to oversee and prefrk federal lands and lease them for lucrative livestock grazing. when wild mustangs started being hunted, congress passed the wild roaming horses and burro act in 1971 to protect them and the land they live on. >> the charge of the government, the blm, is to humanely manage. and there's nothing humane about what's going on. >> reporter: congresswoman dina titus, a democrat from nevada, has initiated a formal review of what the blm is doing. >> it wasn't until some of the
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activist groups started tracking those round-ups and taking video of them that i realized just how horrendous they are. they use helicopters. they run horses down. >> reporter: she also introduced a bill to ground the choppers, which last year were used in round-ups where 25 horses died. she says there may be a more humane method. >> they charge a high rate. i say if you don't use helicopters you can hire cowboys. so save a horse and hire a cowboy. they know how to round up horses and i'm sure it's more humane than this. >> reporter: the bureau of land management spent more than $450 million in the last five years on its wild horse and burro program. 25 million went to gathering animals. but most of the money goes to caring for horses in long-term captivity. >> unadopted animals are kept for long term in what we call offrange pastures. these are big open grasslands for these animals to roam for the rest of their lives. and yes, it does cost about 60% of our budget to care for the
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unadopted animals. >> reporter: though the horses is held up for adoption. the blm only monitors adopted horses for the first year. >> we don't place them in private ownership if we believe people have the intent to sell them for slaughter and we try to monitor that as best we can. >> but still it does happen. >> it's happened. you know, i can't deny that those kinds of things have happened. it's something we're acutely aware of and always on top of. >> reporter: and as for using cowboys to round up mustangs? they stopped doing that back in the '70s. >> i've talked to people who worked in the program prior to the use of helicopters and moving horses with -- from horseback was just a really, really difficult situation. >> reporter: but on this morning the bureau of land management collected 46 horses including six foals. most of the animals were sent to temporary holding facilities except two. a vet euthanized them for poor health. and although a handful of these horses will receive birth control and be released the rest
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will now live a domestic life off the range and away from the land that once made them wild and free. when you humble yourself under the mighty hand of god, in due time he will exalt you. hi, i'm joel osteen. i'm excited about being with you every week. i hope you'll tune in.ed be encouraged. ioo ard to seeing you ght he.yo comptelyquipped for the race that's been designed for you. (male) there are many voices in today's world. everyone is voicing their opinions about everything,
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and jesus is no exception to that. what if there was a clear voice telling you exactly who jesus is? (male announcer) join dr. david jeremiah as he teaches who jesus is and what that means for your life. tune in to dr. jeremiah's new series, "christ above all", on the next "turning point", right here on this station.
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during the pandemic millions of americans adopted pets to keep them company while they were house-bound. well, now a lot of people are putting those animals up for adoption. michael george reports. >> reporter: mira horowitz of lucky dog animal rescue unloads a transport van of animals fortunate enough to be finding homes. >> this is the toughest summer that i have seen in 13 years of being involved in animal welfare. >> reporter: horowitz and her team work with high-kill shelters, bringing animals to the d.c. metro area for foster and adoption. but those needing a home have far outpaced people looking for a pet. >> i've never turned down puppies. i am turning down puppies this year. >> reporter: data from best friends animal society show 355,000 cats and dogs were
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killed in u.s. shelters in 2021, the first increase in five years. inflation-induced financial hardship is now forcing some owners to surrender their pets. >> we had to make a decision about like, you know, we need a roof for the baby. >> reporter: shelters in parts of the country are overwhelmed and understaffed. >> we only have so much space in our facility. so if we don't have the room then we have to tell them no. >> reporter: another reason for the animal surplus, a suspension of spay and neuter early in the pandemic. >> now we're in like the fourth generation of those unwanted litters that came out of that time. >> reporter: organizations like the aspca are offering assistance to owners in need, ranging from food to veterinary care to help keep pets in their forever homes. the aspca's community veterinary clinics like this one in brooklyn provide partially and fully subsidized preventative care to qualifying pet owners. horowitz hopes the dog days of summer don't slow down the pace
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of giving these little guys a new leash on life. michael george, cbs news, new york. and that's the "overnight news" or this wednesday. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm caitlin huey-burns. this is "cbs news flash." i'm matt pieper in new york. president booind is setlo-await ex-mannedcces to and bits for veterans who were exposed to toxins during war. but there are concerns about how the va will go about implementing the legislation amid its existing backlogs and quite a poor track record. republican congressman scott perry says the fbi seized his cell phone while he was traveling with his family. it was not immediately clear what investigation prompted the search warrant, but perry has been a figure in the congressional investigation into the capitol insurrection. and the emmys will be hosted by kenan thompson. the "snl" actor says it's ridiculously exciting to be part of the show, which airs next
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month. for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm matt pieper, cbs news, new york. the fbi bombshell. the search warrant executed on a former president's home. agents seizing boxes including what are believed to be classified documents, and accessing his safe. donald trump defiant as the gop comes to his defense. cbs's major garrett is in florida with the new details. what we're learning about the fbi's investigation. and cbs's robert costa on what it all means. the llingsfo muslim men.rque. the chip crunch. after critical supply chain shortages president biden gives u.s. chip makers a multibillion-dollar boost. how long will it take for the u.s. to catch up?
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cbs's meg oliver reports, it's easier said than done. >> how complex is it to make these microchips? >> it is extremely complex. and moving on. tennis great serena williams serves up a surprise announcement, saying she's ready to focus on her family. >> i can't do this forever. sometimes you just want to try your best to enjoy the moment. >> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." good evening and thank you for joining us. i'm jericka duncan in for norah. tonight there are new details about the unprecedented fbi search of former president donald trump's florida home. what we're learning about the investigation that's focused on his potential mishandling of what could be classified material. sources tell cbs news that the fbi was met by trump's attorneys, along with the secret service.
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it is the first time in american history that a search warrant has been issued on a former president. and given the political implications, approval came from the very highest levels of the department of justice. white house officials say president biden had no prior knowledge of the search, and current fbi director christopher wray was appointed by trump five years ago. cbs's robert costa is here in studio, but we begin tonight with cbs's major garrett with all the details from palm beach, florida. good evening, major. >> reporter: jericka, good evening. a trump lawyer who was at mar-a-lago yesterday told us the fbi pretty much arrived in full force, with agents and personnel numbering more than 30. they brought a box truck for document removal. the search, this lawyer told us, targeted three rooms -- the former president's bedroom, his office, and a storage room. the fbi executed a search of mar-a-lago, former president trump's primary residence,
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around 10:00 a.m. monday. two sources told cbs news investigators seized boxes and paper documents but no electronics. the secret service maintains a constant presence at the former president's home and facilitated the fbi's entry. authorities also opened trump's safe. at least two of trump's attorneys were present during the search. >> that's right. another day in paradise. this was a strange day. you probably all read about it. >> reporter: the documents are believed to contain classified information. trump and federal investigators had been in negotiations over the records and the fbi visited mar-a-lago in june. mishandling classified materials is potentially criminal. federal law requires presidential records to be turned over to the national archives. it is not known what documents were taken by federal authorities monday. the justice department has so far declined to comment. ♪ as night fell monday, pro-trump protesters gathered outside mar-a-lago. more assembled there today. what do you think will be the practical political reaction for
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people who favor or support former president trump after yesterday? >> i think he will win in a landslide in 2024. >> reporter: trump was not home but released a statement alleging he was a victim of a politicized justice department. a sentiment echoed by former vice president mike pence who said "the appearance of continued partisanship by the justice department must be addressed." congressional republicans rushed to trump's defense. house minority leader kevin mccarthy said republicans would investigate attorney general merrick garland's role in the fbi search. >> what the hell are these people doing? >> reporter: south carolina republican lindsey graham spoke to trump today and called the search of mar-a-lago suspicious and dangerous, yet helpful to the president's political fortunes. >> one thing i can tell you is i believed he was going to run before. i'm stronger in my belief now. >> reporter: trump, eager to portray himself the victim, sent out two fund-raising texts to
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supporters. speaking of money, in a separate development a federal appeals court ruled democrats on the house ways and means committee can obtain former president trump's personal and business tax returns, something trump argued unsuccessfully congress had no legitimate right to pursue. later tonight at his golf club in bedminster, new jersey trump will huddle over dinner with more than a dozen conservative house republicans. jericka? >> major garrett for us in west palm beach tonight. thank you. for more on the possible criminal and political implications of this fbi search let's bring in cbs's robert costa. robert, good evening to you. what sort of implications does this have for a potential run for the former president, which is looking at a possible bid in 2024? >> it could speed up his decision on 2024. cbs news has learned tonight that many top republicans on the trump side of the party are calling him saying get in now, consolidate the base around you, block out rivals from running and complicate life for the justice department. become a federal candidate even while you might be under federal
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investigation. others are saying hold off, wait, see how this develops. >> and donald trump has endorsed nearly 200 candidates already since he left office. what are republicans saying in reference to him being the sort of de facto leader by some, some would say that that's what he is in the party? >> he is the leader of a wing of the party, but the party isn't universally behind him. as major said, about a dozen house republicans are going to be in new jersey tonight, rallying at his side, but senate republican leader mitch mcconnell today? quiet, silent. didn't want to weigh in. wants to see how this all develops. that's the mood inside the senate gop in some quarters. wait to see how this plays out. because they know that trump is still a risk for the party in many ways. but at the same time so many in the party are ready to aggressively go after the justice department in 2023 should republicans win the house majority this fall. house republican jim jordan and others preparing investigations.
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political war on the horizon. >> all right. robert costa for us tonight. thank you. tonight the fda signed off on the biden administration's plan to stretch out its limited supply of monkeypox vaccine. this will allow shots that use only 1/5 of the usual dose. the idea is to inject a smaller dose closer to the skin, where more cells can take in the vaccine. experts say this method has worked with other vaccines. well, a grand jury in mississippi today declined to indict the white woman whose accusations set off the lynching of emmett till nearly 70 years ago. carolyn bryant donham now 88 initially claimed till made unwanted advances toward her at her family's grocery store. it led to the brutal torture and lynching of the 14-year-old. the prosecutors said the grand jury found insufficient evidence to charge donham. the "cbs overnight news" will be right back.
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>> announcer: this is the "cbs overnight news." now to some breaking news. the manhunt in albuquerque, new mexico is over. police say they have made an arrest in the killings of four muslim men whose deaths sparked fear in muslim communities nationwide. cbs's omar villafranca is there. >> reporter: tonight the manhunt in albuquerque is over. >> this crime made our community feel like it was under attack. >> reporter: authorities announcing they have arrested muhammed syed, 51, after finding evidence that ties him to the murders of two muslim immigrants. >> this is the kind of work, this collaboration, that will yield results.
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this is law enforcement and all partners at their best. >> reporter: investigators are charging syed with two counts of homicide and are investigating other charges related to the other two murders. authorities say they matched gun casings from the crime scenes with the gun found at syed's home. police say the suspect may have known the victims to some extent and describe an interpersonal conflict that may have led to the murders. >> as we know, over the last few days our community has been rocked to its core by the loss of members from our muslim community. >> reporter: the break in the case comes after four men were shot in ambush-style attacks, three in the last two weeks and one in november. 25-year-old naeem hussain was shot friday just hours after attending funeral services for muhammad afzaal hussain and aftab hussein, who were killed in similar attacks. last year 62-year-old mohammed zaher ahmadi was murdered in a similar-style attack. tonight's arrest ends the cloud of fear that gripped this tight-knit community, but police say the investigation continues.
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>> there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. there is still a lot of evidence that needs to be verified. this case is not resolved until we have a successful prosecution and people are held accountable. >> reporter: police credit the muslim community for sending in hundreds of tips that led to an arrest. and even though a suspect is in custody, they don't plan on stopping those increased patrols around mosques and islamic centers. jericka? >> omar villafranca in albuquerque. thank you. we turn now to the end of an era. tennis great serena williams says she is evolving away from the sport she has redefined for the last 23 years. williams tells "vogue" magazine that this month's u.s. open will likely be her last. here's cbs's jamie yuccas. >> phenomenal! >> incredible. >> reporter: she's one of the greatest tennis players ever. but yesterday's win was serena
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williams' first in over a year. post-match, williams seemed playful. >> i guess there's just a light at the end of the tunnel. >> i know you're joking, but can you -- >> i'm not joking. >> reporter: then, just hours later, came this bombshell essay in "vogue," where williams writes, "i've been reluctant to admit that i have to move on from playing tennis. it comes up and i start to cry." next month williams will turn 41. >> her mind and spirit would love to keep playing, but she realizes her body is just saying i'm done. i don't think the benevolence was like first and foremost in her mind, oh, let's let the younger generation -- she would love to crush them. >> reporter: having grown up before our eyes, williams has won 23 grand slams, including six u.s. open titles and seven wimbledon championships. on the court williams is a superstar. off the court she's a brand. "forbes" puts her net worth at $260 million.
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and she's used her influence to speak out. on civil rights and motherhood. and just how it feels to miss a major milestone. "she took her first steps. i was training and missed it. i cried." her daughter olympia greeted serena after monday's match. moving toward the end of her storied career, she boils it down to just one word. >> freedom. >> reporter: the news bringing lots of reaction. tennis great billie jean king credits williams with inspiring a new generation of players and fans, raising the global profile of the sport. williams' husband posted late today that "serena's story is just starting." jericka? >> yeah, jamie, a lot of people wishing her the best and looking forward to seeing that next chapter. thanks. back here in washington president biden signed the bipartisan $280 billion chips act to boost the manufacturing of semiconductors in the united states. a severe chip shortage has added to the supply chain slowdown and helped fuel inflation.
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cbs's meg oliver takes an in-depth look at fixing the chip crisis. >> reporter: tonight u.s. chipmakers got a boost to their assembly lines. >> we need to make these chips here in america, to bring down everyday costs and create jobs. >> reporter: the legislation will provide $52 billion in subsidies and tax credits for chip manufacturing in the u.s. and more than $200 billion for scientific research. global foundries is one of the largest chip makers in the country. how big is this facility? >> give or take, about seven football fields. >> reporter: at this high-tech facility everything looks yellow. special lighting is used to protect the delicate production of microchips. christopher belfi is equipment engineering manager. how complex is it to make these microchips? they're in everything we use. phones, tvs, cars. >> it is extremely complex. and as the demand on capability increases, so does the complexity. >> reporter: the chip shortage is a growing crisis. they help power everything from
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appliances like refrigerators to gaming consoles and weapons. the u.s. relies heavily on east asia for chips. >> we don't want to rely on foreign entities to be able to give us the brains and the guts of what drive our everyday vehicles, devices, our cell phones. >> reporter: experts warn the lack of production in the u.s. poses a national security risk. tom caulfield is the ceo of global foundries. what stage are we at in this chip shortage? >> it takes years to put capacity on. and i think for the better part of the next five to ten years we'll be chasing supply in this industry, not demand. >> reporter: the u.s. only produces about 12% of the world's chip supply, and it will take years to ramp up production here, which means for now americans will still have to pay higher prices on everything from appliances to cars. jericka? >> got to start somewhere. thanks, meg. the pain at the gas pump is easing, but is the relief here
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as the summer driving season winds down, americans are finally seeing relief at the pump. the average price of gas has fallen for more than 50 straight days. the national average is on the verge of going below $4 a gallon for the first time since march. here's cbs's errol barnett. >> it's a miracle. i was really stressed out. >> reporter: around the nation -- >> i'm thrilled. >> a lot better. >> reporter: -- relief has finally arrived. >> it means i put more money away in the bank. >> reporter: tonight nearly half of the country, mostly in the south and midwest, is seeing gas below $4 a gallon. partly due to increased oil supply and fears over a global recession. but american drivers can also
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thank each other. when inflation hit 9.1% in june, its highest level since 1981, gas prices were a major component, with fuel making up nearly half of the increased costs. aaa found most americans changed their driving behavior as a result. >> we know that 75% of people said they would change their lifestyle when it hit $5. and ourvey, r follow-on ms tor tha you know, 65% of the people said i made a change in my lifestyle. >> reporter: since june energy demand, measured through gasoline deliveries, has been dropping steadily. it's now at lower levels than in june of 2020, during pandemic lockdowns. however, weather events could reverse this trend. >> we are entering the heart now of hurricane season, and a hurricane barreling through the gulf coast, hitting all the areas where there's oil
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production as well as oil refining capacity, that can cause problems. >> reporter: now, the big question is how long will this last? well, the good news is gas prices are forecast to hover at or below $4 a gallon for the rest of the summer. but the bad news here is that the energy markets are volatile. in fact, crude oil prices jumped up more than a percent today. so jericka, if you do have a fuel tank, fill them as much as you can. >> absolutely. thank you, errol. there's a lot more news ahead on the "cbs overnight news." do you have a life insurance policy you no longer need? now you can sell your policy - even a term policy - for an immediate cash payment. we thought we had planned carefully for our retirement. but we quickly realized we needed a way to supplement our income. if you
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"heatwave," and "baby love," just to name a few. dozier was inducted into the rock and roll hall of fame and songwriters hall of fame. he was 81. we'll be right back with a wrestling ogram that's helping
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finally tonight, a sports program in chicago is going to the mat for kids from underserved communities, teaching them how to be champions in competition and in life. here's cbs's charlie demar with tonight's "unifying america." >> reporter: where roy phelps lives wrestling has a bit of an image problem. >> there aren't many black people or people of color. >> reporter: he's from chicago's south side. >> two of my best friends were killed due to gun violence. >> reporter: but everything changed for him when the 15-year-old found wrestling through a group called beat the streets. >> i want to be better than i was at the beginning of the day, and i thought wrestling was a way to help. >> reporter: the program uses one of the world's oldest sports to teach lessons kids can use on and off the mat.
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mike powell runs the chicago chapter. what is a success for you? >> creating life champions. a life champion to us is somebody who has changed their lives, the way they function, their futures, right? >> reporter: when it comes to diversity, wrestling lags badly behind other college sports. a recent survey found about 7% of division one wrestlers are black. compared to 48% of players in football and 56% in basketball. >> being a minority in any sport's very different. you kind of don't know your place. >> reporter: ed ruth won three ncaa championships at penn state. now he shows young wrestlers of color what's possible. >> what i'm doing is actually making a difference. >> that's got to make it worth it for you. >> that makes it worth it. >> reporter: roy phelps is charlie demar, cbs news, chicago. and that is the "overnight news" for this wednesday. for some of you the news continues. for others check back later for
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"cbs mornings." and of course follow us online anytime at cbsnews.com. reporting from the nation's capital, i'm jericka duncan. this is "cbs news flash." i'm matt pieper in new york. president biden is set to sign the pact act. the long-awaited bill will expand access to va health care and benefits for veterans who were exposed to toxins during war. but there are concerns about how the v.a. will go about implementing the legislation amid its existing backlogs and quite a poor track record. republican congressman scott perry says the fbi seized his cell phone while he was traveling with his family. it was not immediately clear what investigation prompted the search warrant. but perry has been a figure in the congressional investigation into the capitol insurrection. and the emmys will be posted by kenan thompson. the "snl" actor says it's ridiculously exciting to be part of the show, which airs next month.
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for more news download the cbs news app on your cell phone or connected tv. i'm matt pieper, cbs news, new york. it's wednesday, august 10th, 2022. this is the "cbmo mar-a-lago mystery. republicans are demanding answers following the fbi search of donald trump's home in florida. what his lawyer says in a new interview. manhunt over. police in albuquerque capture a suspect in the murders of four muslim men. the possible motive and how the community helped out. surprise announcement. tennis star serena williams says she's ready to move on. her future plans after one more tournament. well, good morning, and good to be with you. i'm anne-marie green. republicans are pressuring the justice department for answers after the fbi

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