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tv   CBS Overnight News  CBS  March 13, 2018 3:12am-4:01am PDT

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>> reporter: even as adult film actress stormi daniels makes public appearances staying mum on her alleged 2006 affair with the president. in a letter she made an offer to mr. trump. pay him $130,000, the same amount she received in 2016 from his personal attorney, michael cohn in exchange for being allowed to speak opponentenly and freely about their relationship she wants to publish text messages, photos and or videos relating to the president she may have without fear of legal action. does that mean that there are photos, text messages and videos related to this alleged relationship? >> i'm not going to comment one way or another. >> daniel's attorney, set a deadline for the president, 12:00 p.m. tomorrow. >> why would he accept this? >> if des noes not accept it, a stance of mr. trump and mr. cohn trying to site lense this woman and keep the american people from hearing her story.
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>> the offer seeks agreement that no action will be take tine prevent her recent interview for 60 minutes from airing. cbs news has not commented on the interview. last week, ms. daniels whose real name its stephanie clifford filed a lawsuit alleging the original nondisclosure agreement she signed shortly before the 2016 election was not enforcible because the it was never signed by mr. trump who is named in the original agreement as the david dennison. you say ms. daniels just wants to tell her story is that really all her end game its here? >> it truly is. we believe the offer that we made demonstrates that. >> president trump denied the affair. today the white house and michael cohn did not respond to our request for comment. and also told us that deposing the president is not out of the realm of possibility. jeff. >> julianna goldman on the story. with apologies davos sat down
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with lesley stahl and offered responses widely criticized. >> are the public schools in michigan gotten better? >> i don't know. overall i can't say overall that they have all gotten better. >> education secretary, betsey davos appeared on 60 minutes unable to answer question as the bout schools in her own state. >> have you seen the really bad schools? maybe tried to figure out what, what they're doing? >> i have not, have not, have not intentionally visit itted schools that are underperforming. >> maybe you should. >> maybe i should. yes. >> according to u.s. news and world report, michigan ranks number 36 overall in education. davos has championed school choice proposals which take funds away from underperforming public schools and invest in charter and private schools. >> the public schools here are doing worse than they did. >> michigan schools need to do better. there is no doubt about it. >> this afternoon.
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devos defended. missing from 60 minutes. children in charter schools in detroit are doing two times belter than their peers. the reforms are helping. but there is so much more to do. jericka, what is the white house saying about the interview to night? >> press secretary sarah sanders is saying she is not sure the president saw the entire interview on 60 minutes. sources tell, cbs news, major garrett that administrative officials inside and outside of the white house regarded this interview as uneven and ill prepared. either way, the president still has a vote of confidence in devos who was just put in charge of a special commission that will focus specifically on school safety. jeff. >> jericka duncan at the white house. thanks. cbs news poll out tonight find americans sharply divided on sanctuary cities. 48% say they should deal with if grants as they see fit.
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47% believe they should be forced to comply with federal efforts to detain or deport undocumented immigrants. on a matter. 38% of americans favor building a border wall. among republicans support is at 77%. coming up next it has happened again. eggs, embryos may have been damaged at a second fertility clinic. and later, a hey, need fast heartburn relief?
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in what peers to be a stunning, heartbreaking coincidence. a second fertility clinic said its equipment failed and hundreds of eggs and embryos may have been damaged. dr. tara narula has the latest on this. >> reporter: the incident at pacific fertility center san francisco happened on the same day as university hospitals in cleveland. the level of liquid nitrogen in a tank to preserve eggs and embryos dropped. raising the temperature in the tan tick putting eggs and embryt risk. representing pacific fertility center patients planning to file a class action lawsuit this week. >> never in their worst nightmares does that embryo become nonviable because of the conduct or miscon duskt the clinic. >> reporter: the clinic says they reviewed their storage
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equipment and protocols following the incident. they sent an e-mail to patients affected saying, in pact, while assisted reproductive technologies never come with guaranteed results we are committed to employing highest quality practices in our laboratory. we are incredibly sorry that this happened. >> it is a real shock because, you know, you put so much, faith in the process. >> katie miller is an ivf patient who has embryos stored at pacific fertility center. >> you don't think what is happening in the lab. you just assume that, is really being taken care of. not something to worry about. i never thought that, that the lab would have a problem. >> so, tara, who clinks in a couple dates. what needs to be done? >> there is no doubt an outcry for regulation. groups like american society of reproductive medicine issued a statement saying they're going to investigate and release recommendations guidelines based on what they find.
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bottle tom line, jeff, these are people's most precious, most prized, irreplaceable assets. so it is heartbreaking. >> indeed it is. tara, thank you very much. still ahead here tonight, can ape powerball winner remain anonymous. anonymous. the judge's great, another dead end. anonymous. the judge's sarge, i just got a tip that'll crack this case wide open! turns out the prints at the crime scene- awwwww...did mcgruffy wuffy get a tippy wippy? i'm serious! we gotta move fast before- who's a good boy? is him a good boy? erg...i'm just gonna go. oh, you wanna go outside? you gotta go tinky poo-poo? i already went, ok? in the bathroom! as long as people talk baby-talk to dogs, you can count on geico saving folks money. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance.
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mexican authorities say a blast on a ferry boat was caused by crude explosive device but not
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an act of terrorism. more than two dozen were hurt. the u.s. embassy narrowed travel warning for the city of playa del carmen. embas embassy. >> win of a $560 million lottery, won. she would be subjected to alarming harassment if were name were revealed that outweighs the public's right to know. her hometown could be revealed, merimac, new hampshire, 25 t. >> a thief went to a lot of trouble to steal a gum ball machine in an animal shelter in sacramento. police have now put out this video. he crawled three in a doggy door. but there was no way the machine was going out the same way. the gum balls, spilled, this genius thief then did grab $1 in quarters not noticing a donation box full of cash on the counter. after finding an exit, he tossed the machine over a barbed wire fence. and got away.
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a case no doubt for a gumshoe detective. police are looking for hem should i be making motorcycles? yes, you like motorcycles. should i start a motorcycle company? yes! you really like motorcycles! should i make a squarespace website for it? yes, they're very good websites. but why am i in the desert talking to myself? don't ask me. ♪ ok. [motorcycle revs away]
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♪ music fades
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we end here with something sweet from the wafflehouse. here is omar villafranca things run fast at the lamar, texas wafflehouse. >> you have to move fast. >> you need more coffee.
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>> for one brief moment, this waitress slowed down. a man eating at the counter needed help cutting his ham. another customer snapped this picture. >> what did he ask you? >> he said my hand is not working too good. been to the hospital for it. you could tell. you could tell, very shaky. >> the picture went viral. an older man, oxygen tank visible between his legs, sitting at the counter. 18-year-old nene cutting the man's food. laura wolf took the picture. >> picture is worth 1,000 words. >> right. >> what's one word for that picture? >> kindness. >> when did you know people were talking about you? >> later that day. >> how? >> facebook. >> what can i get for you? >> 78-year-old adrian sharpentier is the elderly man she helped. >> feel great.
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>> the mayor was thankful when he saw the picture. >> ebony nene williams day. proclaimed march 8, ebony nene williams day. making this 18-year-old. >> a day named after me. you wouldn't cry? >> what did you do on your day? >> work. >> but the biggest surprise came from texas southern university. which gave her a $16,000 scholarship. she plans to study business management, but this teenager has already shown she knows how to take care of customers. omar villafranca, cbs news. that's the "overnight news" for tuesday. for some of you the news continues.
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this is the cbs "overnight news." hi, welcome to the "overnight news," i'm demarco morgan. austin, texas is on high alert this morning after two so-called package boch package bombs exploded. one person killed, two others injured. police say they seem to be linked to another device that went off two weeks ago. david begnaud has the the story.
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the feds are not take over the investigation. austin police are leading it. at the most recent crime scene in a neighborhood. about 30 yard beyond the police tape where we are. look what is happening as everybody thinking of the unabomber who mailed explosive packages between the 70s and 90s. here's what makes this different. these were not mailed. police say these were dropped off and somebody walked off. >> the first bomb today exploded around 6:40 this morning. >> there was a package that exploded inside of the home. they have to our knowledge evacuated. five hours later another explosion, five miles away. >> we have trauma activation, 65-year-old female. they are treating trauma, head and torso. >> it was the third package >> the first happened on march 2nd. killing 39-year-old anthony steven house. now the early morning bombing today killed a 17-year-old boy, and sent an adult woman to the hospital with nonlife threatening injuries. in the afternoon attack, a 75-year-old woman was critically injured. >> we are looking at these incidents as being related based on similarities that we have seen. >> brian manley, austin's interim police chief. >> these packages are delivered during the night time hours. when the resident comes out front they're finding them. >> the devices were powerful enough to cause extensive damage
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inside the homes and showed ate certain amount of sophistication. both the fbi and atf are on the scene and have joined local police to investigate. we will leave no stone unturned, because we are not going to allow this to go on in our city. >> all three bombings happened on austin any eastside. the predominantly minority, and historically african-american part of town. >> what about a hate crime? >> well we know the victims of the three incidents. two are african-american, one was hispanic. again not going to rule out possibility that that may have be a motive. >> i gotten understand it. >> no matter the motivation, right now, people here are afraid. >> couple of people, they knew the family that i know. federal investigators are trying to discover what caused a helicopter to plunge into the east river. five passengers were killed and only the pilot survived. kris van cleave reports.
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>> pilot richard vance told investigators a tether from a harness worn by one of the five passengers wrapped around the fuel shutoff lever accidentally, cutting off the fuel supply. causing the choppers engine off to fail sunday night. crews pulled the battered helicopter from the east river today. >> we will be working with the nypd to recover any cameras or personal electronic devices, from the air craft. >> all five passengers on board died. divers had to cut them out of their safety harnesses. trevor cadican shot this as charter flight took off. >> did they walk you through how to get out of the harness in a hurry. >> eric adams with the same group on another helicopter sunday night. he took these pictures of the doomed chopper. here you can see the harness passengers wore. the metal ring, tethered them to the helicopter during the open door flight. >> do you think you could have found your way out. >> unlikely. like to think i could have. accidents happen fast. >> we went for a similar open door helicopter ride over manhattan today. >> i'm wearing a harness in addition to the seatbelt.
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this extra device here, designed to keep me inside the helicopter. we are 1300 feet up above the hudson river. if we lost the engine now we will be in the water in four seconds. >> peter van zungly flying helicopters for three decades. >> imagine that would be disorienting to get all this stuff off in an emergency upside down underwater. >> definitely. wind up in the water upside down you will dedisoriented. former porn actress stormi daniels says she is ready to pay back $130,000 in hush money, so she can talk publicly about her allege add fair with president trump. she has already spoken with 60 minutes. here is julianna goldman. >> reporter: even as adult film actress stormi daniels makes public appearances staying mum on her alleged 2006 affair with the president. in a letter she made an offer to mr. trump. pay him $130,000, the same amount she received in 2016 from his personal attorney, michael
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cohn in exchange for being alou alouds -- allowed to speak openly and freely about their relationship she wants to publish text messages, photos and or videos relating to the president she may have without fear of legal action. does that mean that there are photos, text messages and videos related to this alleged relationship? >> i'm not going to comment one way or another. >> daniel's attorney, set a deadline for the president, 12:00 p.m. tomorrow. >> why would he accept this? >> if does not accept it, an in stance of mr. trump and mr. cohn trying to site lense this woman and keep the american people from hearing her story. >> the offer seeks agreement that no action will be take tine prevent her recent interview for 60 minutes from airing. cbs news has not commented on the interview. last week, ms. daniels whose real name its stephanie clifford filed a lawsuit alleging the original nondisclosure agreement she signed shortly before the
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2016 election was not enforcible because the it was never signed by mr. trump who is named in the original agreement as the david dennison. you say ms. daniels just wants to tell her story is that really all her end game its here? >> it truly is. we believe the offer that we made demonstrates that. british prime minister teresa may demanding answers from the kremlin about the poisoning of an ex-soviet spy on the london street. charlie d'agata its following this case. >> and we will not tolerate such a brazen attempt to murder innocent civilians. >> prime minister teresa may gave russia one day to explain how a banned military grade nerve agent was used to poison double agent, found comatose on a park bench. >> should there be no credible response we will conclude this action amounts to an unlawful use of force by the russian state. against the united kingdom. >> first developed by the former soviet union in the 1970s.
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highly toxic and can act in between 30 second and two minutes which may have prompted britain's chief medical officer to issue an extraordinary warning to anyone in the area, to wash their clothes, eyeglasses, and cell phones. >> any items which cannot be washed and would be dry cleaned should be double bagged in plastic until further information is a available. >> residents worried why it took a week to issue the warning. >> i think it's a little too late. i think, there should have been -- more information quicker. >> it is no surprise that barricades are still up outside of that restaurant where they had lunch. in fact it has been reported that the table where they sat was so heavily contaminated it had to be removed and destroyed. authorities have now extended the no go zones of the investigation. today, here at parliament, the prime minister promised to
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president trump tapped betsey devos to head a commission to study gun violence. devos under fire since her confirmation hearings last year when she insisted some schools may require rifles to fight off grisly bears. leslie stahl spoke to the secretary. >> betsey devos visited the school in florida wednesday like everywhere else she goes she faced criticism. some of the students sent out angry tweets. you came to our school for publicity and avoided questions. betsey devos came to our school, talked to three people and pet a
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dog. many students are frustrate the at the administration for talking about school safety but not acting. >> i give a lot of credit to the students there. for, for really raising their voices and i think that, they are not going to let this moment go by. >> they want gun control. >> they want a variety of things. they want solutions. >> do you think that teachers should have guns in the classroom? >> that should be an option for states and communities to consider. and, i hesitate to think of like my first grade teacher mrs. zorhoff i couldn't imagine her having a gun and, and, being trained in that way. but, for those who are, who are capable, this is one solution, that can and should be considered. but no one size fits all. every state and every community is going to address this, this issue, in a different way. >> do you see yourself as a leader in this, in this subject,
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and what kind of ideas will you be promoting? >> i have actually asked to head up a task force that will really look at what states are doing, see, there are a lot of states that are addressing theser use in very cohesive and coherent ways. >> do you feel a sense of urgency? >> yes. >> because this sound like talking. >> no. >> instead of acting. >> there is a sense of urgency indeed. >> the reason betsey devos wanted to be secretary of education so she could promote school choice. >> what a great looking class. >> offering parents options other than traditional public schools where 90% of kids go. >> good to meet you. >> what are you working on? >> she proposed massive cuts in public education funding and wants to shift billions to alternative players, like private, parochial, and charter schools. >> we have invested billions and billions of dollars from the
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federal level and we have seen zero results. >> but that really isn't true. test scores have gone over the last 25 years. so why do you keep saying nothing has been accomplished? >> well, actually, test scores, vi and we have been middle of the pack. >> it's not acceptable. it's better than it was. that's the point you. don't acknowledge that things have gotten better, you won't acknowledge. >> i deon't think they have. >> there is the big argument. what can be done about that? >> what can be done about that is empowering parents to make the choices for their kids. any family that has economic means and the power to make choices, is doing so for their children. families that don't have the power, that can't decide, i'm going to move from this apartment in downtown whatever, to the suburb where i think the school is going to be better for
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my child. if they've don't have that choice, and they are assigned to that school, they are stuck there. i am fighting for the parents who don't have those choices. we need all parents to have those choices. >> are you sure about your answers on those? which one is bigger than the other? >> oh. >> the question does her solution work? do choice schools perform better than public schools? naturally, there are conflicting studies. it's complicated. >> does that represent 3/9? >> i think so. >> i think you are right. >> devos spends a lot of time showcasing schools like cold spring elementary, public school in indianapolis allowed to get rid of local teachers union. and create an innovative curriculum. but when parents choose these
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options, taxpayer funds follow the child. >> here, can i help you. >> that means that the public school left behind can end up with less money. >> why take money away from that school, that's not working, to bring them up to a level where they are, that school is working. >> well we should be funding and investing in students. not in school, school buildings, not in, institutions, not in systems. >> okay, but what about the kids who are back at the school that is not working. what about those kids? >> in places where is a lot of choice that's been introduced, florida for exam pull, the studies show that when there is a large number of of students that opt to go to a different school or different schools, the traditional public schools actually the results get better as well. >> has that happened in michigan. we're in michigan, your home state? >> yes, there is lots of great
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options and choices. >> have the public schools in michigan gotten better? >> i don't know, overall i can't say overall that they have all gotten better. >> the whole state is not doing well? >> well there are certainly lots of pockets where, where the students are doing well. >> but your argument if you take fund away that the schools bill get better is not working in michigan. where you had a huge impact and influence over the direction of the school system here. >> i hesitate to talk about, all schools in jen ram. because schools are made up of individual students attending them. >> the public schools here are doing worse than they did? >> michigan schools need to do better. there its no doubt about it. >> have you seen the really bad schools? maybe try to figure out what, what, they're doing? >> i have not, i have not i have not intentionally visit itted schools that are underperforming. >> maybe you should. >> maybe i should. yes. >> you can see the full report on our website.
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cbsnews.com. >> the "overnight news" will be right back. hey, need fast heartburn relief? try cool mint zantac. it releases a cooling sensation in your mouth and throat. zantac works in as little as 30 minutes. nexium can take 24 hours. try cool mint zantac. no pill relieves heartburn faster. powerful skincare,s now light-as-air
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federal officials are frying to deter men what caused the crash of a helicopter in new york city.
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five people died when the chopper went down in the east river. police say the helicopter had been hired for a go tow shoot. aerial photography is a growing business. usually safe. jeff glor took to the sky for this report. looking up across america's largest city impossible to beat the views. unless you try looking down. from central park, to one world trade, and the statue of liberty. new york is even more impressive from elevation. unbelievable shot. you can't get that anywhere else. you can't do it, via normal helicopter. >> one of the businesses taking advantage of a rapidly rising aerial photography market. by offering tours without the doors. >> this is an unobstructed view. nothing in between you and, the city. >> tim orr the company's coo. >> and the picture of the new york city doesn't have the personal touch. >> today people don't just want to look at great photos they want to take them, themselves.
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>> indeed an experience. the city is an experience from the air. nothing like it. >> when it launched in 2013 geared to professionals. >> all of this for social media. >> 100%, social media. posting foelt graphs what we see with the world. coming back tenfold. how can i do this. i want to do that. where did you get the picture. the lightbulb went off. it was like, i don't see why you can't come either. so we, opened the doors and people started jumping on board. >> orr quickly expanded to las vegas. miami, san francisco, and los angeles. >> this makes it accessible to everybody. you buy a seat. you go up when you want to. you take your photos. post it on instagram, facebook. and, your friend are going, whoa i want to do that. >> everybody is a photographer today. >> it's true. >> is that bad? >> no, i think it's great. >> a long way from where alex mclane started 42 yoorz ago.
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mclane published 11 books on aerial photography over his career. >> i would go up and go shoot, and come back, get my film back three days laltder. it was all overexposed you. wanted to shoot yourself. really expensive. now you get to see how you are doing right on the spot. very simple. >> his views of landscapes, range from tobacco farms to rows of cult flowe cut flowers to bo. >> i had to learn how to fly. that was tough in itself. because the i was terrified of flying. >> we joined him for a recent flight outside boston. >> i'm curious. >> in a cessna, 1272. >> there its nothing fancy about this. >> no. >> huh. >> what is that? >> this is wetlands next to the river. >> this is, the farm right here. it is a, an old farm, that's been here forever.
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>> there is -- right there. >> we flew over the famed walden pond. mclane pointed out the water level is so low, nearly surround by beach. much of his work today focuses on the environment. >> it's, uh you know, the most immediate threat in so many different ways. everywhere you look, you can see -- climate issues. at play. you know from agriculture. coastal areas. heat, forest fires that we have now. >> google its also in the game. earth lets users, aerially explore the planet in 3 d. now in an update you can trace the path of hurricanes, and see how our world has been affected. >> it is such, a unique, vantage point. to be able to see, a place, from that altitude and to kind of understand more of how the earth its connected, betweenlt ocean, and mountains and different land masses. and there is really no way to do that what having that kind of perspective. >> this year, google atted a voyager feature. part tourist guide. part teacher.
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you can tour everything from the kennedy space center to lost civil civilizations. if google earth is a police to get lost. voyager a police to learn. >> voyager part of your guide, and to navigate places and have that kind of ability to spin the globe, zoom into a place that you think might be interesting. and, and, go along for the rietrietde. >> it is a dikting. >> it is a little addicting. also doesn't cost anything. the beauty, you can see all the places from wherever is most come comfortable for you. orr says most important place to capture a memory is still in the mind. >> is there times when people are so focused on taking pictures they're not paying attention to what they're seeing with their eyes. >> they're shooting so fast. trying to capture something. we tell them. hey, put the camera done. look ought what you are seeing. picture in the memory is actually, some times a lot more valuable. >> jeff glor, new york.
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o.j. simpson back in the news in a previously unreleased interview from 2006, simpson outline house he would have gone about killing his ex-wife and her friend. vladamir duthiers reports. >> when simpson began to describe the night of nicole simpson's death he clarified this was a fictionalized account of what happened. but as he went on, simpson gave increasing amounts of detail. and seemed to slip into a firsthand explanation of how and why he committed the crime. >> very difficult for me because it is hypothetical. i know and accept the fact that people are going to feel whatever way they're going to feel. >>en his hypothetical pl play-by-pl play-by-play, he says that he and a friend charlie want to nicole brown simpson's house
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june 12, 1994, the night she was brutally murdered along with friend ron goldman. >> as things got heated. i remember, nicole fell. and hurt herself. and, and, this guy kind of got into a karate thing. i remember i grabbed the knife, i do remember that portion. taking the knife from charlie. to be honest, after that i don't remember. i think everything was, would have been covered in blood. >> simpson alternates talking about charlie and speaking in first person. >> you write about -- removing a glove, before taking the knife. from charlie. >> you know, i had no conscious memory of doing that. but obviously i must have because, they found the glove there. >> the former football star then says he and charlie fled and toss ed the bloody clothes. >> i think charlie is oj. >> this is no hypothetical. >> christopher darden was part of the special and one of the prosecutors in the criminal trial where simpson was found
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not guilty. >> i think he confessed to murder. >> the idea it was confession interview. a joke. >> sunday simpson's attorney, malcolm laverne, claimed that reagan was leading simpson through the interview to push book sales. >> scripted by the publisher of the book. mr. simpson went along because, quite frankly he got a lot of money up front to go along. more than a decade later, laverne says his client is moving on. still, the public may not be ready to do so. >> everybody is going to, give their opinion. heguilty. or he was purging his guilt. whatever you want to take from it. i cannot control it. in a statement, judith reagan tells cbs this morning as any one can see from his responses on the special i did not feed him lines. an attorney for ron goldman's father said while justice has alluded our family, fox entertainment enables everyone to make their own judgment. in a civil trial. simpson was found liable for
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deaths of nicole brown simpson and ronald goldman. that's the "overnight news" for tuesday. captioning funded by cbs it's tuesday, march 13th, 2018. this is the "cbs morning news." the storm-battered northeast is bracing for another hit as a third nor'easter brings winds and high tides, but the main event will be the snow. there's no evidence of collusion between donald trump's presidential campaign and russia according to the republican-led house intelligence committee, but the democrats say not so fast. and the texas community is on edge as the race is on to find a killer after three package bombs leave two dead.

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