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tv   U.S. House of Representatives Legislative Business  CSPAN  March 22, 2016 2:00pm-4:01pm EDT

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to connect to a system that has already been tested in a handful of states including my home state of indiana and the district of columbia. now these are pilot programs that have achieved substantial reductions in the time it took to place these children into forever homes, reducing the time the child waited by 30%. for a child, that means a month and a half less time being shuffled from foster home to foster home, being taken in and out of school without a set routine. in one pilot scenario, indiana had an emergency request to place a child with a relative in florida. use of the system allowed both pilot states to exchange their case information the very same day, which under the current system, could have taken weeks. . another scenario a placement was
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breaking down and the child needed to be moved. the way the interstate placement process currently works, this child could have been sent back into the overloaded foster care system and back into temporary care arrangements for another couple months. instead, florida's use of this electronic system made a long-term placement of the child possible within 48 business hours. we can expect to see more of these positive results as use of this electronic system is expanded. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm pleased to join congressman todd young in leading h.r. 4472, the modernizing the interstate placement of children in foster care act.
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i joined my friend from indiana in introducing h.r. 4472 because it will help us make progress on an important issue -- redution the barriers and delays that continue to -- reducing the barriers and delays that continue to exist when the best new home for a child is in a different state than the unsafe home the child had to leave. given that my congressional district has one of the highest percentages of grandparents raising grandchildren in the nation, followed closely by two other congressional districts in illinois, child welfare issues are very personal to my constituents, to chicago, and to my home state. removing barriers that delay or prevent interstate child placements is a long time, bipartisan goal within congress. this bill addresses an important
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factor in those delays. the ability of state computer systems to link up, to process the paperwork, the current paper-based system is antiquated and slow. part of an h.h.s. pilot project, seven states and the district of columbia currently participate in the national electronic interstate compact that ise an online tool allows state office systems to talk to each other androcess interstate placements more quickly. i am very proud of the fact that illinois is one of these states. an early evaluation found that this system reduced waiting times for affected children by about a 1/3. 10 other states have already announced plans to join the
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exchange over the next two years. h.r. 4472 will accelerate the number of participating states in the short run, and ensure that all states participate in the long run. the director of the illinois department of children and family services, george sheldon, often emphasizes that we need to operate in kid time. not adult time. meaning that we need to recognize the urgency of restoring permanency for children in child welfare rather than allowing adult bureaucracy to impede permanency. modernizing the technology to increase efficiencies and quicken placements is common sense and respects the urgency of finding permanent loving homes for children. i am grateful to mr. young for
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ensuring that the bill extends up on existing progress on modernization within states and include tribal foster care systems. this is a good bill and i thank mr. young and his staff for their excellent work. i am pleased to join them and i urge support to move forward on h.r. 4472. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. young: mr. speaker, i thank my good colleague, mr. davis, and his staff for their hard work and his leadership on this effort. i now yield two minutes to the gentlelady from my home state of indiana who represents notre dame country, the hardworking mrs. walorski. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mrs. walorski: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i rise in strong
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support of the modernizing interstate placement of children in foster care act. this bill will reduce the amount of time kids waited to be adopted, placed with relatives, or placed with foster parents when they are going to be -- when they are going to a home in another state. the current paper-based process keeps children waiting while caseworkers mail physical documents. this bill incentivizes states to connect to an electronic system that's been pilot tested in a handful of states, including my home state of indiana. getting at-risk kids into a stable, permanent environment as quick as possible is critical to allowing them to thrive and reach their full potential. each day they spend waiting for paperwork to be mailed back and forth is time wasted unnecessarily. i want to thank my colleague, congressman young, for his leadership on this issue. i strongly urge my colleagues to support h.r. 4472 and do everything possible to get our
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most vulnerable children placed in a safe environment. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: thank you very much, mr. speaker. while we are discussing h.r. 4472, reducing the time that it takes to process a child who might come from a different state for adoption or foster care placement, there are other issues of child welfare, one that i will mention. the issues of child welfare have a long history of bipartisanship . in addition to modernizing interstate placement of children, i hope to engage my colleagues in addressing the substance abuse needs of families involved in child welfare. aside from the alcohol, other drug use, the number one reason for removing from the home.
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more specifically, approximately 1/3 of cases list alcohol, other drug use as the reason for a child's removal. what is exciting is that we have good, clear empiric evidence that certain strategies have demonstrated effectiveness, specifically these quality interventions help children and families affected by substance abuse experience. they have fewer days in care. higher reunification rates. less recurrence of child maltreatment, and better permanency over time. i am preparing to introduce a bill that scales up the successes from smaller targeted interventions into full-scale interventions while building the research to better inform federal policy overall. my bill does two key things.
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first, it dedicated staff under title 4-e for the coordination of substance abuse prevention and treatment services with child welfare services. secondly, it creates grants to expand the lessons learned from the research on smaller scale efforts to the state level. funding additional research to improve related federal policy. my home state of illinois has led the nation in addressing substance abuse issues in child welfare. we know that we need to do more to address this problem. we know that it works and of course i look forward to being engaged in the development of programs and activities that would further enhance that kind of success. again, i would want to thank mr. young for his tremendous work on h.r. 4472 and i reserve the balance of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from indiana vked. mr. young: mr. speaker, having no further speakers i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. once again the gentleman from illinois, mr. davis, is recognized. mr. chairman, i am pleased to yield three minutes to the gentleman from texas, one of the outstanding members of the ways and means committee, mr. doing e the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from texas is recognized. mr. doggett: thank you so much. i want to salute you and mr. young for your bipartisan initiative here that would eliminate some of the current paperwork barriers that are preventing abused and neglected children from being quickly placed in safe, loving homes which happen to be on the other side of a state border.
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they are coming together in this bipartisan initiative is constructive in helping some of the most vulnerable children in america. it is unacceptable for children who already face so many challenges to have to deal with this additional hardship because the process, as it exists now, just is not working. based on the experience we have had with those states that were involved in a pilot program, we know that waiting times there were reduced by almost a third. i think with that experience we can move forward under this bill for an electronic information exchange that will work and will improve the times that these young people face. while this bipartisan step is a welcome one, it should also serve us as -- serve as a reminder to us of all the work that remains. last week the national
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commission to eliminate child abuse and negligent fatalities -- neglect fatalities, a commission that was created with legislation that i authored back in 2012, issued its final report entitled, within our reach, a national strategy to eliminate child abuse and neglect fatalities. there are, however you count them, they focus on the data needed to adequately describe this problem, there are far too many children in america today who do suffer, including many who actually are killed by abuse and negligent -- neglect. our committee, much in the tradition of this piece of bipartisan legislation, has addressed these issues on a bipartisan basis in the past. i hope that we can do the same with the report of the commission, can move forward to consider some of its recommendations like its
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unanimous recommendation, and this was a bipartisan commission appointed by president obama and by house and senate democratic and republican leaders, they came together with unanimous recommendations on a number of pieces of legislation such as the importance of renewing the home visiting programs that go out and work with young parents that strengthen families, and help them be the kind of parents they want to be. we need an ongoing conversation here about foster care financing. the re-authorization of programs like the promoting safe and stable families program, that's coming up this year. and the family visiting or home visiting program fully known as the maternal, infant, and early childhood home visiting program is up for renewal this next year. i hope we can find ways to work together to advance what's been done here -- may i have another minute. mr. davis: as much time as you
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would want to consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for one more minute. mr. doggett: thank you. to advance specific legislation that will help reduce the number of children that suffer from abuse and neglect. i will -- i must note, though, that at the same time this legislation was approved in our committee, the -- under the republican budget the social services block grant was terminated. i hope that is not done by the congress as a whole. the social services block grant is a major source of funding for prevention of child abuse and neglect today. used by states and local governments to focus on prevention with far too little focus on prevention overall. that was one of the major conclusions of this commission on child fatalities is that we focus our attention so much on
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the end after the abuse has occurred, not on the beginning, to try to prevent abuse. we need to be focusing on prevention so at the same time this bill was approved that support was cut. hopefully the congress will reject the bill to eliminate the social services block grant and we can come together to find more resources to do what must be done to prevent us from just lurching from one tragedy to another and help stabilize and support families working to see that children are protected. i yield back and i thank the gentleman again for their effort. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back and the gentleman from indiana is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i reserve. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. and the gentleman from illinois is recognized. mr. davis: thank you, mr. speaker. and i yield myself some additional time.
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i want to associate my remarks by those made by mr. doggett relative to continuing the social services block grant funding which has provided a tremendous amount of resource and continues to do so for social welfare programs including those affecting children. associate myself by the comments made relative to the commission to eliminate .hild abuse and neglect just happens that one of the judges from my district, the presiding judge of the child protection services of the circuit court of cook county served on that commission, serves on it and, of course, had some findings that were different than the commission
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report. i think we need to consider all of those things as we move forward but i'm pleased to note that we are indeed making progress dealing with the issues of child welfare and, again, i want to commend mr. young and his staff for their 4472.n h.r. i'm pleased to join and urge strong support for it and i would yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back and the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. young: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. young: this bicameral bill was developed through a year-long process with key stakeholders to make sure there was broad support and involved a whole lot of painstaking support from staff members on the committee, both republican and democrat, from mr. davis, who i commend once again for
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his leadership on this issue and his staff. i just want to thank all the stakeholders involved. i'd ask unanimous consent, mr. speaker, that letters of support from the american public human services association, the children's home society of america, the partnership for strong families, the child welfare league of america, the american academy of adoption attorneys, and the california county welfare directors association be inserted into the record. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. young: i want to thank those stakeholders once again for all their help in getting this across the finish line and hoping for broad and full support from all members of this chamber. i hope we can all agree here today that we should do everything possible to get our most vulnerable children immediately placed into the setting that's best for them regardless of state boundary lines. i yield back the remainder moof -- remainder of my time.
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the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentleman from illinois. i'm sorry, the gentleman's time has expired. mr. davis: i yield. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4472, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 having responded in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, and without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from florida seek recognition? mr. miller: mr. speaker, i move to suspend the rules and pass
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h.r. 4436, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. to clerk: h.r. 4336, a bill amend title 38, united states code, to provide for the burial of the cremated remains of persons who served as women's air forces service pilots in arlington national cemetery. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from florida, mr. miller, and the gentlewoman from florida, ms. brown, each will control 20 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from florida. mr. miller: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and or add heir remarks extraneous material on h.r. 4336, as amended. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. miller: mr. speaker, i yield myself such time as i may consume. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized. mr. miller: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i do rise today to urge all members to support h.r. 4336, as amended. this bill, which was introduced by our colleague, representative mcsally of arizona, would ensure that
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active duty designees, including women air force pilots, are eligible for internment with full military honors at arlington national cemetery. active duty designees or members of civilian groups who served alongside the armed forces during world wars i and ii. these men and women were located in combat zones where they risked the lives to protect the freedom we should never take for granted. their contributions to the war effort were vital they got the most prestigious title they can bestow, that of veteran. as such they are able to be laid to rest in any cemetery of the department of veterans affairs. however, arlington national cemetery is run by the department of the army. between 2002 and last year, the army active duty designees with
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military honors in arlington national cemetery. then secretary mchugh reversed this policy which means many of those courageous individuals can no longer to choose to be laid to rest in arlington national cemetery. h.r. 4336, as amended, would reverse this decision and require the army to provide active duty designees internments with military honors with arlington national cemetery. r. speaker, it's our duty as a nation to make sure those that served our nation be treated with the utmost respect and dignity when they pass on. i ask my colleagues to support h.r. 4336, as amended, and with that i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. and the gentleman from florida, ms. brown, is recognized. ms. brown: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield myself such time as i may consume. i rise in support of h.r. 4336,
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as amended. arlington national cemetery has been called our nation's most hallowed ground. since the first military burial took place on may 13, 1864, arlington is the final resting place for over 400,000 active duty service members, veterans and their families. h.r. 4336, as amended, would overturn a recent change in army policy and restore the rights of women air force service pilots of world war ii, or wasp, to be buried in arlington. these brave women volunteered for duty and their service made a major contribution to our victory in world war ii. in addition, h.r. 4336 would restore the rights of others who assisted in this war and whose service and sacrifice was recognized with the enactment of the g.i. bill improvement act of 1977.
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i applaud my colleagues, representative martha mcsally and susan davis, for introducing this important bill and leading the fight, a fight that has widespread support and bipartisan support to recognize the service of these brave women and others who helped us defeat the power in world war ii. we are bringing this to the floor during women's history month is a fitting tribute to women who served in the past and women who today serve in our active duty forces. this is a matter of justice and matter of fairness. in 2009, we recognized the service and sacrifice of these brave women when we awarded a congressional gold medal to the women airforce service pilot -- women air force service pilots.
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today we have an opportunity to do it again. mr. speaker, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves, and the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. miller: thank you, mr. speaker. it's my honor now to recognize the sponsor of this legislation, a combat veteran herself, a pilot of the a-10 war hog from the second district of arizona for five minutes, ms. mcsally. the speaker pro tempore: and the gentlewoman is recognized for five minutes. ms. mcsally: thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, mr. speaker. i rise today in wholehearted support of h.r. 4336, the wasp arlington inurnment restoration act. this is the right thing to do and i want to thank the chairman for quickly moving through this to your committee and to the floor, chairman thornberry for signing off on this to allow these amazing women and these pioneers who went before us, who opened the door for so many of us in the military to serve, that they can be laid to rest in the place for the most hallowed, the most amazing men and women
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who have served and gone before us. the fact that these women were denied this right is unconscionable and quite frankly was infewer rating when we told you about it. let me tell but the wasp. they raised their right hand and said, i'll support. we needed all pilots, men and women to be able to do whatever it took for the war effort. these women went through training. 1,074 went through training. an additional 28 already had flight training and were brought in. it was actually 1,102 that said i'm going to be a pilot. general arnold at the time, had intended they be militarized. they went through military training. they marched. they slept in barracks. they did everything the men alongside them did. the intent was to militarize. the reason they didn't was the hang-ups of sexes and the role in the military then.
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we couldn't handle it back then. so these women served anyway. they flew 67 million miles, ferrying airplanes all over the theaters. they towed targets for the ground gunners to practice shooting at targets. they trained male pilots to then head off to the war effort. and 38 of them perished in training in the line of duty. yet, they were in this quasi--military benefit. no veterans benefits. no recognition at the time but they still served. at the end of the war they were discharged and told to go home. the men needed the cockpits. it wasn't until 1977 that this congress passed a law finally giving them veterans' rights so they would be treated as veterans. they were after the fact given honorable discharges. they were given the medals they deserved at the time. we saw this was finally over, the fight was over, that they would be recognized for all that they deserved and they be able to lay to rest with full military honors. ut a bureaucratic,
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technicratic glitch shut the door shut to them. this is an extraordinary example, by the way, for somebody bringing a wrong to our attention and for us to be able to make it right. i want to highlight elaine harman, who passed away as one of the wasps. she passed away last year. i met with her family. i read her handwritten will. she wanted to have her ashes in arlington. she requested it and we thought they were allowed so the family put in the request and it wasn't until they got the letter back saying denied. wasps are not allowed in arlington. that they didn't just accept that no. in the legacy of elaine harman -- and by the way, these men were feisty. they were strong. they were not going to take no for an answer. and in that spirit, her children and her granddaughter, erin milan is in the gallery today, said we're not going to take no for an answer. we're going to raise awareness to this. i'm going to get my grandmother
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into arlington. i heard this in early january. working with our colleagues susan davis, getting sponsors. this has been fast tracked through the committee in order to allow them to be laid to rest there. elaine harman's ashes are sitting on a shelf in her granddaughter's closet. we need to make this right as quickly as possible. but let me just say, mr. chairman. this isn't just about the pioneers that we read about in history books. these were personal mentors to me, these wasps. when i first went through combat training, we didn't really have any women to look up to and these amazing women came alongside me as wing women to encourage me, to mentor me. i had three of them sitting in my front row of my change of command ceremony when i took over command of a-10. they personally supported and encouraged me along the way. it's because of their service that the doors were opened for those of us in the military to serve and it's ridiculous that arlington would close the gates to them at the very time they were opening up all positions to women in the military. this is the right thing to do. i'd urge all my colleagues to
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support this legislation, especially in women's history month. the least we can do is allow the wasps to be laid to rest in arlington and elaine harman as quickly as possible. let's get this passed today. let's get it through the senate and on the president's desk so she can be laid to rest and the rest remaining that choose to have their ashes in arlington, this is their right. the only reason they were not active duty at the time was because of sexism. it's time to shut this remaining door and give them this final resting place. thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield the rest of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. and members are reminded to not make references to persons in the gallery. . the gentlewoman from florida is recognized. ms. brown: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield three minutes to the gentlewoman from new hampshire, ms. kuster, who is on theairs committee. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman from new hampshire is recognized for three minutes. ms. kuster: thank you very much, mr. chairman. i want to thank our colleagues on both sides of the aisle for
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acknowledging that women air force service pilots. my father was a p-47 fighter pilot in world war ii. he was able to access the benefits to due him in terms of his military career and it's own benefiting now in women's history month that we would begin finally to get the opportunity for the wasp to be interned here at arlington sem tearry. i want to acknonl our colleague, representative mcsally, and her verviss to this contry. and tammy duckworth, and also acknowledge the veterans who serve on our v.a. committee staff. we recently had a ceremony with brigadier general wilma, the first woman to reach the brigadier general status and the first woman to deploy within the air force bomber unit. she was an inspiration to us. and i just want to add one of
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the important reasons for doing this bill now is that we learned recently in a hearing in the v.a. committee that women are the fastest growing group of veterans, but often our women veterans do not access the v.a. benefits including health benefits and cemetery benefits to which they are entitled. we need to encourage women who have served the country you have served us and now it is our turn to serve you. we need to encourage our women veterans to come forward for the benefits they deserve. so i thank my colleague from arizona and i thank my colleagues on both sides of the aisle for bringing this bill forward. it's an important bill and it's great time to do it. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the chairman from florida is recognized. >> i yield one minute to another combat veteran, a women of our veterans' affairs committee, mr. coffman, sixth district of colorado. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman, mr. coffman, is recognized for one minute. mr. coffman: i rise today in
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strong support of h.r. 4336. in colorado springs, colorado, a monument stands in honor of the women air force service pilots, or wasp. with this legislation we salute them today and we recognize that we neglected to salute them for far too long. during world war ii more than 1,000 wasps flew over 60 million air miles. without official military recognition, families were forced to pay out-of-pocket to send 36 fallen comrades home. and after the war, the united states continued to deny them military status despite their extraordinary service to our country. but today, today we can help correct some of that injustice. h.r. 4336 would restore the
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right for these women to be buried at arlington. these women pennsylvania avenued the way for the women in une -- paved the way for the women in uniform today. they endured gender-based scridges for years. they served and died just as other members of the military did. i believe they belong in arlington. thank you, mr. speaker. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from is recognized. ms. brown: thank you, mr. speaker. i yield one minute to the gentlewoman from new jersey, mrs. watson coleman. the speaker pro tempore: the the gentlewoman from nngp -- new jersey is recognized for one minute. mrs. watson coleman: i thank the gentlelady from florida for giving me this opportunity to stand up here as part of women's history month and to say this is a bipartisan piece of legislation that represents well-done and overdue. it is -- i am proud to be able to say that there were women who went before me who were brave and who were courageous and who
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did all the jobs that were asked of them in the manner that was of high standard. and that they gave and sacrificed on my behalf. now we have the opportunity to eliminate some of the last vestiges of this treatment or secondary treatment or treating them as second class citizens. so i rise in support of the legislation and i congratulate my colleagues on both sides of the aisle for having brought this to our attention and giving us the opportunity to express our support. thank you. with that i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. miller: thank you very much, mr. speaker. i yield three minutes to the chairman of the subcommittee on disability and memorial affairs at the v.a. committee, a veteran himself, dr. abraham. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for three minutes. mr. adoctor ham: thank you, mr. speaker. i -- mr. abraham: thank you, mr. speaker. i'm here to support this piece of legislation to recognize the services of certain groups of men and women who have valiantly
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served their contry. when the g.i. bill improvement act became law in 1977, it contained language championed by senator barry goldwater and louisiana's own, lynndie boggs, that deemed certain groups of women, civilians, and foreigners who serve the united states as quote active duty, unquote, in order to qualify for benefits administered by the v.a. ultimately nearly 35 groups have been made eligible for benefits through that law. these include the women air force service pilots, the u.s. merchant seaman who served on black ships in operation mullberry on d-day. male civilian ferry pilots, u.s. civilians of the american field service, and many more. in recognition of their service, the cremated remains of these groups may be inurined in all cemeteries under the jurisdiction of the v.a. however, arlington is under the jurisdiction of the department of defense.
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not the v.a. this bill recognizes that all the individuals who are eligible to have their cremated remains inurined in arlington national cementtary to include groups given veteran status in the g.i. bill, including the wasp, may do so. decades after congressman bogs -- boggs championed this legislation, i'm proud to continue louisiana's long tradition of support for these groups by co-sponsoring the bill. i thank most greatly congresswoman mcsally for introducing this very important piece of legislation and i urge my colleagues to support it. it is long past overdue that we recognize these women and men who serve this country. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from florida, ms. brown, is recognized. ms. brown: i reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chairman from florida is recognized. mr. miller: thank you very much. next i have one minute scheduled for mr. bost, a marine and
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member of our v.a. committee, from the state of illinois, the 12th district. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from illinois is recognized for one minute. mr. bost: thank you, mr. chairman. thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, world war ii was a time when he americans came together to defend this nation against evil. entire families enlisted in the efforts. that included many brave and dedicated women who entered the women's air force service pilots or wasp. the wasp flew military aircraft in noncombat roles and served as instructors for male pilots. when the wasp program was created, it was intended that these women would receive full, i say full military status. sadly, that goal has not been achieved. that's why h.r. 4336 is so important. it overturns the previous army directive that restores burial rights in the arlington national cementtary for wasp veterans.
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i please ask that all of my colleagues join us in supporting their rights and putting them in place where they need to be and receiving those full military benefits. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from florida is recognized. ms. brown: i continue to reserve my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the chairman from florida is recognized. mr. miller: thank you very much. i now yield to the gentleman from the second district of texas, mr. poe, for two minutes. the speaker pro tempore: mr. poe is recognized for two minutes. mr. poe: i thank the gentleman, the chairman, for yielding time. mr. speaker, during the peak of world war ii sandy thompson now a houston resident left her teaching job and received her aviation wings on september 11, 1943. she had just volunteered for the women's air force service pilots known as the wasp. these pilots towed targets for live anti-aircraft practice. think about that, mr. speaker.
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they are in the air and you got these young teenagers learning how to shoot anti-aircraft guns and aiming at the target behind this female pilot pulling this. dangerous occupation. these pilots helped deliver planes to overseas bases. they tested new aircraft that was used in the pacific, used in europe. and of course they trained male pilots who went overseas. of the thousand women who were wasps, 38 were killed during their commissions. 16 of these original pilots of world war ii now live in my state of texas. they were considered civilians until 1977, and then congress passed and gave them veteran status. in 2002, the wasp were allowed to be cremated and have their ashes placed at arlington national cemetery, right down the street from this building. but now bureaucrats have decided that these veterans are not worthy of a proper military burial. and have revoked the burial rights at arlington because of space.
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this is disgraceful. shameful, and a sorry excuse to dishonor them. find space to permanently honor these women. as a former member of the united states air force reserves, i urge that we show respect to these pilots, give them the proper burial, and pass this legislation. that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from florida, ms. brown, is recognized. ms. brown: i would like to yield one minute to the gentlelady from ohio, ms. fudge. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized for one minute. ms. fudge: i thank the gentleman for yielding. mr. speaker, i first let me thank all of the men and women and women, who have sacrificed and served this nation. i can't imagine why any person, any person of sound mind, would deny women the right to the same benefits, to the same recognition that men get that serve this nation. i would think that not one
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person would deny them this right. i cannot imagine why those who serve would have to fight for the dignity that each and every single person that serves this country should have. i would say that i support this legislation, i support the people who support it, and anybody who doesn't should not be in this building, thank you very much. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the chairman from florida is recognized. mr. miller: thank you very much. i now yield a minute and a half to the gentleman from the 27th district of the lone star state, mr. farenthold. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman is recognized for a minute and a half. mr. farenthold: thank you, mr. chairman. mr. speaker, it shouldn't take an act of congress for these women to be inurned in arlington national cemetery. we have heard from numerous people on loathe sides of the aisle that this is simply the right thing to dofment the army should have said yes, get them buried there. the president should have used his pen and phone and ordered the army to do it if they
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wouldn't. guess what? we are here now and it's going to take an act of congress and it's going to be a very strong act of congress. i can't imagine we not passing this out of this house unanimously. and i suspect we'll see similar results in the senate. but the remains of this woman should not have to rest in her granddaughter's closet, they should be in arlington now. i urge my colleagues here to pass this bill unanimously, urge the senate to act quickly, and urge president obama to sign this into law. it's simply the right thing to do. we have just got to do t i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back. the gentlewoman from florida, ms. brown, is recognized. ms. brown: thank you, in closing let me just say that in recent hearings many of the service organizations indicated that this was one of their top priorities. i want to close by mentioning the fact that women have served in every single war in this
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country, and they deserve the same benefits and recognition of men. and i would urge my colleagues to support this important and timely bill to honor those brave women and others whose efforts was essential in the victory in world war ii. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields. the gentleman from florida is recognized. mr. miller: thank you very much. again i encourage all my fellow colleagues to support h.r. 4336 as amended. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is, will the house suspend the rules and bass h.r. 4336, as amended. so many as are in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, thirds third, the rules are -- ms. mcsally: i ask for the yeas and nays. the speaker pro tempore: the yeas and nays are requested. all those in favor of taking this vote by the yeas and nays
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will rise and remain standing until counted. a sufficient number having arisen, the yeas and nays are ordered. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, further proceedings on this uestion will be postponed. pursuant to clause 8 of rule 20, proceedings will resume on questions previously postponed. votes will be taken in the following order. ordering the previous question on house resolution 653. adopting house resolution 653, if ordered, and suspend the rules and passing h.r. 4742, h.r. 4755, and h.r. 4336. the first electronic vote will be conducted as a 15-minute vote. remaining electronic votes will be conducted as five-minute votes. . the unfinished business is the vote on ordering the previous question on h.res. 653. the clerk will report the house resolution. the clerk: house resolution
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653, resolution providing for consideration of the bill h.r. 2745, to amend the clayton act and the federal trade commission act to provide that the federal trade commission shall exercise authority with respect to mergers only under the clayton act and only in the same procedural manner as the attorney general exercises such authority and providing for proceedings during the period from march 24, 2016, through april 11, 2016. the speaker pro tempore: the question is on ordering the previous question. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a 15-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this ote, the yeas are 219 --
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the speaker: the yeas are 231 and the nays are 254.
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e previous question is ordered. he house will be in order. all members will take their seats. . e house will be in order the chair would ask all present to rise for the purpose of a moment of silence. the chair asks that the house now observe a moment of silence in memory of the victims of the terrorist attacks in brussels. without objection, five-minute
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voting will continue. all those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, the ayes have it. >> i request a recorded vote. the speaker: a recorded vote is requested. those favoring a recorded vote will rise. a sufficient number having arisen, a recorded vote is ordered. members will record their votes by electronic device. his is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 234, the nays are 153.
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 233, the nays are 154. the resolution is adopted. without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the gentlewoman from virginia, to rule on h.r. 4742, the clerk will report the title of the bill. he clerk: h.r. 4742, a bill to program to support
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entrepreneurship for him. the speaker pro tempore: will fb -- this will be a phi-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 383, the nays are 4. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed.
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 383, the nays are 4. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the unfinished business is the vote on the motion of the gentleman from virginia, mr. comstock, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4755 on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 4755, a bill to inspire women to enter the aerospace field, including science, technology, engineering and mathematics, through mentorship and outreach. the speaker pro tempore: the question is, will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill? members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute,
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inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: on this vote, the yeas are 380 the nays are 3. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed, without objection the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. the unfinished business is the vote on the motion from the gentleman from florida, mr. miller, to suspend the rules and pass h.r. 4336 as amended on which the yeas and nays are ordered. the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 4336 a bill to amend title 38 united states code to provide for the burial of the cremated remains of
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persons who served as women's air force service pilots in arlington national cemetery. the speaker pro tempore: the question is will the house suspend the rules and pass the bill as amended. members will record their votes by electronic device. this is a five-minute vote. [captioning made possible by the national captioning institute, inc., in cooperation with the united states house of representatives. any use of the closed-captioned coverage of the house proceedings for political or commercial purposes is expressly prohibited by the u.s. house of representatives.]
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the speaker pro tempore: the yeas are 385, the nays are zero. 2/3 being in the affirmative, the rules are suspended, the bill is passed and without objection, the motion to reconsider is laid on the table. without objection, the title is amended. for what purpose does the gentleman from new york seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that when the house adjourns today it adjourn to
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meet at 9:00 a.m. tomorrow. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. so ordered. the speaker pro tempore: the house will be in order. he house will be in order. the speaker pro tempore: the ouse will be in order. the chair will now entertain requests for one-minute
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speeches. for what purpose does the gentleman from pennsylvania seek recognition? mr. thompson: request unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and resize and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. thompson: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today in recognition of pennsylvania's wildlife recognition week. representative of pennsylvania's 5th congressional district, i know how quickly simple brushfires can get out of control often devastating acres of forest. in pennsylvania, it is nearly 7,000 acres are burned each year. all brushfires, an estimated 85% occur in the months of march, april and may. because of the prevalence of fires, i want to praise the efforts of our fire departments across the commonwealth.
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these men and women, the vast majority are volunteers, volunteer their time and service and put their lives on the line lives. property and all wildfires are caused by human activity and it is important to educate the public and stop wildfires before they stop. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: thank you. for what purpose does the gentlewoman from ohio seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute. ms. kaptur: to mark the first week of spring, this week i launched a countdown to earth day of 2016 across our district, the largest watershed in the entire great lakes that flows nto lake erie, with rising
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water. the growing challenge of blooms into the lake threatens our freshwater supply. this 21st century challenge is one we must meet. focus on l 22, i will ways for citizens to help. this week is people helping bees, butterflies are key to abundant plant growth that needs better land and plant management and one of three foods you eat are depend ent. citizen plantings of staple garden salads contribute to support in ecosystem health. they are landing pads for the growth of catter pillars and other insects. everyone can help. i encourage all americans to get outside and enjoy the new
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spring, restore our environment and plant helpful herbs in your gardens to pass on a healthier ecosystems to the next generation. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from texas rise? mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. poe: as passengers boarded their early morning flights and commuters boarded the train to work, multiple bombs exploded in brussels. days after they captured one of the suspected ring leaders in the paris attacks. at least 30 civilians were murdered and more than 200 others were injured. mr. speaker, it is obvious that the u.s. current strategy against isis which has allowed terrorist organizations to retain havens to launch attacks for nearly two years is
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inadequate. empty words are meaningless. the latest attack is not surprising. attacks will come to our soil if our leaders continue to refuse to define the enemy. they promised to bring terror to the united states and will deliver on that promise if we on't use our full resources. they are at war with us. so as we mourn for the people of belgium, the united states should work for all free people to eliminate this terrorist group, evil group, isis, and that's just the way it is. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from georgia seek recognition? >> permission to address the house for one minute and revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. carter: mr. speaker, i rise today to recognize david pring will for his retirement and
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congratulate him on his 37 years of employment with aleck insurance company. he started in mississippi, north carolina and west virginia. he was promoted to the senior vice president of government relations in 1990. he has maintained that position ever since. one of his most notable accomplishments is the state employee training program which he developed while working at the headquarters. he has accomplished himself as an expert in the field of health care, writing several publications on health care reform and insurance policy. dedication to the industry will be missed. i wish him the best. thank you. and i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. for what purpose does the gentleman from nevada seek recognition?
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>> ask unanimous consent to revise and extend my remarks. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. >> i rise today to honor the service of five of the most outstanding leaders in the united states air force. these five men, major general ay sevario, christopher short, colonel thomas dempsey and colonel erin stevens served with distinction back in my district in southern nevada. as a freshman member of congress, i could couldn't have asked for better officers to lead the many young servicemembers who call my district home. it has been a privilege to develop strong working relationships with each of these commanders and to seek their informed counsel on some of the most important issues affecting the capabilities of our air force as well as our national
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security priorities. while i'm sad to see them go, i know they will by the same integrity and leadership to their new command. to tonto, junior, chase, vader and fang, the nation is grateful to your service. aim high. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the entleman yields. the chair lays a personal request. the clerk: leave of eabs requested for mr. pape of new jersey for today. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. the request is granted. under the speaker's announced policy of january 6, 2015, the gentleman from new york, mr. zeldin, is recognized for 60 minutes as the designee of the majority leader. mr. zeldin: i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks
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and include extraneous materials on the topic of this special order. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. zeldin: thank you, mr. speaker. in 1981, we started a national celebration in the united states honoring women. congress passed legislation which authorized and requested he president proclaim the week as national history week. throughout the next five years, congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in march as women's history week. in 1987, congress passed a new statute, which designated the ntire month of march, 1987, as women's history month. between 1988 and 1994, congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the president to proclaim march of each year as women's history
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month. since 1995, presidents clinton, bush and obama have issued proclamations designating the month of march as women's history month. we have so many women all throughout our country and each one of our congressional districts who have gone above and beyond and eached their place into history through their outstanding service to their ommunity and their country. we have women who serve in our military or as teachers in our classrooms. women who are first responders or artists, business owners. i certainly wouldn't be able to be where i am today, standing here in this chamber, if not for all the women in my life, especially my two daughters b --
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daughters, mikayla and arianna, two women who have strong new . rk one roots george he head of washington's military spy ring, as part of the network of spies, she put it all on the ryan for liberty during the american revolution. hanging different garments on her clothesline as a signal to other patriots ton the movements of british forces throughout long island. jacqueline kennedy onassis. first lady to our 35th president, john f. kennedy. jackie o. was born on the east end of long island, in southhampton. in addition to her role as first lady, she is also remembered for er contributions to the arts and historic preservation.
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in each one of our districts, we can personalize what women's history month means to our individual depricts because etched in the history going -- districts because etched in the history going back so many generations is so much sacrifice to not only be able to take of their family bus to advance their communities and their country. the freedom and liberty that we cherish here in this chamber would not be possible without the sacrifices of so many who we honor throughout the year at different times but it's the month of march in particular that we take an extra special pause to say thank you. before i served in the -- in congress, i served in the new york state senate. during my time there, there were countless members to be supportive of ensuring that women are protected, giving
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access to opportunity, security, nd prosperity. as one of my colleagues, virginia foxx, recently pointed out, every issue is a women's issue. in 2012 and 2013, while serving in the state senate, i had the opportunity to vote in favor of the new york state senate's women's equality agenda, which passed the senate in both years. it was a robust package of legislation to help with various protections,ing including what i'm supportive of, equal pay for equal work. i also voted to create a work force training program within the department of labor. i fought for this program because with the current state of the economy, many women are struggling and their families. this program would help women to obtain higher paying jobs and give them access to better
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opportunities to provide for themselves and their families. in state houses all across this country, and local governments as well, there are opportunities to provide more of a chance for that woman and her family to be able to aheave truly the american dream but sometimes government and regulations and laws can block and prevent that access. access to educational opportunities, the ability, maybe, to own your own small business and grow it into something greater. it is our duty, whether you are serving as a village mayor or a local town supervisor or if you're a member of the united ates congress, to seek out opportunities to best represent those who we are elected to be
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their voice and ensure they are given maximum opportunity to succeed. i'm pleased to be joined this afternoon by mrs. diane black who is an amazing, exceptional woman who in her own right i'm sure that at some point there will be a women's history month special order in this chamber, a couple of generations from now, where they'll talk about your outstanding service. you have not only served your district well but have served our entire country well. i yield such time as she may consume to mrs. black. mrs. black: thank you, mr. speaker. i want to thank my good friend, mr. zeldin, for yielding to me and i've been sitting here listening to your words and i will say that i'm honored to have you here talking about the
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women in your life, particularly your wife and your two daughters and what the future may bring for them. mr. speaker, it's often said that every issue is a woman's issue and it's true. i know representative zeldin just made that comment. when we talk about tax reform for our smail businesses, directly impacts 30% of small business owners who are women. when we talk about repealing obamacare's harmful 30-hour rule, that is depressing hours and wage well, do so with the knowledge that the majority of those harmed by this rule are women. and when we talk about preserving and protecting the american dream for future generations, we do so with the hope that young girls like my granddaughters would be able to live a life that they choose for themselves, not that someone else chooses for them. for me, this topic is deeply personal. i spent the first years of my
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life living in public housing, the daughter of parents with no more than a ninth grade education. i know how matters of poverty acutely impact women because i lived it. i came from a background where people didn't always know how to dream and as a result i was prepared to settle for a life of unfilled potential. i had started to believe that as a young woman, growing up in the 1950's and 1960's, who literally lived on the other side of the tracks that maybe the american dream wasn't for me. but in time, mr. speaker, doors of opportunity were opened that helped me realize a plan for my life that was greater than i could ever imagine. i became the first person in my family to earn a college degree. i fulfilled my desire to become a registered nurse. and i became privileged to serve the state of tennessee in the legislature and now in congress.
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mr. speaker, i have traveled to far corners of the world and i have seen the struggle that women endure for access to education, a paycheck, and for real independence. i'm also keenly aware that only here in this country is this story of mine possible. only here could someone like me go from living in the halls of public housing to serving in the halls of the united states congress. and that's why we call this the american dream. on this women's history month, we must resolve to ensure that stories like mine aren't unique. the work we do here in congress must reach today's young women with the truth that they have the god-given gift waiting to be used and that the american dream is theirs to share as well. i again thank congressman zeldin for bringing us together for this important -- important
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conversation and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: i thank mrs. black for her important -- mr. zeldin: i thank mrs. black for her important words and again for all of her service. one of the things that i will forever be inspired by with regards to mrs. black's service here in this chamber is how much she values family. and the strength of a strong family and the need for champions at all levels of government to fight on their behalf. i mentioned earlier, my two daughters, mikayla and arianna. identical girls, 9 1/2, they're finishing fourth grade. when they were born, they were less than a pound and a half. they were born 14 1/2 weeks early. was actually in iraq in 2006
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and a red cross message came out that said that diana, my wife, went into labor the babies weren't going to make it and it was a sad time, that was the 22nd week. the doctors at georgetown university hospital for -- were amazing. somehow they managed to keep my daughters alive for three more weeks. they were born in the 25th week. these girls went through more in their 3 1/2 months in the hospital than i would ever wish upon anyone to have to experience. you learn a lot about prayer. we probably, i hope this is ok, we probably accepted prayer in about 16 different religions during that experience. we would see these two twins on one side of our girl the twins might be growing faster than ours and might say to ourselves, why aren't our girls growing as
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quickly as those two? but then on your other side, there might be triplets and you're watching parents mourn the loss of one of their triplets. you learn to count your blessings, understanding that it's not about you. it's about them and thank you to the miracle of prayer and modern medicine, they were able to come home. they weren about a dozen medications each. and heart monitors. wasn't easy. they didn't hit eight pounds until they were about 13 months old. but these girls were so strong. and what they experienced during their time in the hospital was absolutely amazing to me and my wife. they had multiple surgeries while they were there. and there was a time where one of my daughters, she went into
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what's called septic shock. which has an 0% or 90% mortality rate. while she was in septic shock, she had a stroke. and the doctors actually recommended that my wife and i discontinue treatment. mikayla wasn't getting better, but she wasn't get anything worse for about 24 hours up to this point where the doctors would recommend discontinue treatment and let her go. we decided if she was going to keep fighting, we were going to keep fighting with her. we elected to do this risky brain surgery. we went -- my wife and i went to her, said good-bye. went to the waiting room. expecting the worst, hoping for the best. doctors came to us when surgery was done and said, mikayla is not out of the woods yet but things went better than expected. with a whole lot of fight and
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strength and prayer and a lot of amazing medicine and expertise at that hospital, they're doing great. they're doing great. now mikayla ended up getting some early intervention when she was younger. and my two daughters, they're equals with their peer, theyive -- they've caught up to them. and just think of how many opportunities were provided to these girls from the moment they went into the hospital to today to be able to survive and to succeed. there are a lot of decisions that get made here in this chamber that impact women, future women leaders of our country, young girls and boys, who aren't old enough to vote. yet some of the most important
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consequences of the decisions made in this chamber impact not just the women of today, but those of tomorrow who don't even have a vote. there are women in this chamber now, i have a few freshmen colleagues who come to mind and there are several women who were ected, elise stefa nick, youngest woman ever elected to congress, just turned 31 years old. martha mcsally, the first female fighter pilot in american military history serving now as a freshman. i believe a happy birthday is in order to her. i would say maybe happy 27th birthday if you're listening. i don't want to get myself into trouble but a happy birthday to martha. mia love. the first black republican woman
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but she's mormon, haitian, all sorts of firsts, and she is inspiring so many. all of the three women i just mentioned, and there's more i could mention, inspiring. my daughter's generation, to aim high. because you may be a veteran, you might become a teacher, you might someday be an elected official or an artist or a business owner. and it's good to have role models. that's why i speak about anna strong. an american patriot who's part half story of how our nation was founded -- part of that story of how our nation was founded. or, as i mentioned, jacquelin kennedy owes in as i, who was born in the first congressional district of new york. the decisions that we make here in this chamber impact that next

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