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tv   Politics Public Policy Today  CSPAN  May 24, 2013 10:30pm-6:01am EDT

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>> that's right. >> there's a consensus but not a standard. >> the reason it is important of what the defaults are, my research shows when you're in incognito mode or you block the cookies or you try to use the browser features at love of the times there are companies that go around those. incognito mode. -- you can look at >> are you expressing a choice? >> they will say, we did not think they meant to opt out. they just deleted the cookies. so we wanted to help them and resurrect those cookies. what the reflect browser preferences are for the user, right? the user should be able to say i do not want to be tracked and i should send this signal.
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>> mike? >> i don't know what the question is. i'm happy to go through a walk-through of the standard used for browsers. >> sure, you can do that. again, we do not have a w3c standard. >> i think it would be useful for this audience to talk about the standard. with the presentation of do not track -- microsoft requires you to, well, they presented. it is default on. you have to turn it off. ,afari and chrome and firefox the four of those are the predominant browsers. they basically have it as an option. it is an privacy settings or some other setting. the user has to go in and express a preference not to be
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tracked. >> do they know there is invisible third party tracking going on? and then they find the setting -- >> ok, we will get to that in a second. so, in your browser, there are many privacy settings. privacy, security. to basic pattern is you go privacy. you click one. you have a list of options and you click again. that is something like do not call. you go to the website. you set it up. you click it. that's a basic approach. how easy it is to find varies. how well it is labeled varies. people can get into a lot of discussions. that idea of going to the settings and click is something people have done a lot of times in their browser. now use incognito browsing and again. most of the room when you ask
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whether they signed up for the do not call registry, look at them raise their hands. they go to some website. for the website. forgive me, it is not the most user-friendly. they found the number. they called it area they registered it. that's a fair amount of work, right? why is that not too hard, but going into your cookie preferences is? >> you notice when you get a call that interrupts your dinner. you notice when someone calls you on your cell phone when you are paying your minute. i think most consumers are not aware and the way this information is used is not immediately apparent to them. my research has shown that companies will provide different offers, different prices. most consumers do not realize another consumer who would receive a different price.
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there was one company that would profile you based on cars you browse online, and when you went to the toyota dealership and you signed up, they would send the dealership information about what other cars you look that. so when you are negotiating, that dealership knows that you like the red honda or the red toyota. and most consumers won't know that that is happening, to go into some very settings. so the question -- the large show of hands of people who did do not call, how many people have ever changed a browser privacy setting? >> wrong room, katie couric. [laughter] ,> i guess the question is there is the benefit to advertising, as i noted. is there the benefit to having targeted ads?
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own owncouncils that i one, which was fantastic. [laughter] for my kids, not for me. anyway, i tried the patch. cool repair the lining from these sites. i tried patching it. now we get catalogs on cool repair. i live in dc, writes? muchnot have a bathroom, less a pool. is it having tailored ads better than having jumped sent to you? junk.on't know if it is i think it's a fair question, but i think it begs the question, if it's so valuable, one consumers choose to do it? people will say, i like those amazon consumer preferences. i like them, too.
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i think it is a fair question to say, doesn't advertising have some value? i think if the consumer is choosing the tracking, it has a great deal of value. i'm not sure that translates to a third-party you do not know about. >> let me go to mike. there are a few more questions i want to get to. so, let me get to this -- mike, do you want to respond? >> i think consumers are learning more about this. in fact, i think consumers prefer tailored advertising, that content. that is key. the role is to have an educated consumer in power to make the choice, not some parochial decision made by an advocate or one company for tens or hundreds of millions of internet users. because that is fundamentally going to throw the internet
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economy out of balance. that's just the reality. there are several more questions i can ask. if you do have a question, please make it a question, not a comment and identify yourself. mark?cho -- >> first, two points -- >> [indiscernible] >> you went through a litany of harm, mastercard using mastercard data, catalogs. the fact is none of it has anything to do with do not track whatsoever. do not track has nothing to do with off-line data, has nothing theirwith merchandising data. it is exclusively about first parties versus third parties.
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i think that created an enormous confusions about what do not track with do and not do. the second use is about the competition issues. there are huge issues that the ftc to mission are mentioned just of this week, that they had not considered the impact on the small business, the small publishers on the independent and that thing. what about the small business and the small publisher? >> i think if you were playing do not track bingo, what is the harm is the center square. would say i agree. you are creating the business model. i do not see -- behavioral targeting is creating a business model of profiling the individual users and creating detailed summaries of all the places they go online. it is connecting all of that information to information that
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has been collected off-line and it is using it were a wide variety of her business, including, but not limited to behavioral targeting. i inc. that -- i think that that incorporates all of the harm i just listed -- sorry, to those who could not hear mark's question, he said off-line data is not covered. i think opting out or do not track does not -- allows you to limit the information going into that profile, allows you to prevent that kind of linkage, and does serve to significantly balance the harms. >> i guess it would make the point that the do not track process --and it's not really the do not track process, because it is not about stopping tracking. necessary always be uses of browsing behavior for things like adra porting, click fraud, other types of fraud prevention.
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group is not talking about preventing tracking. we should be clear about what we promise to the public. that is really key. it's not about stopping data collection for the exact same reasons that you have to -- when i as a user go to a website, by definition that website knows i am there. by definition there are third-party entities such as an analytical firm which helps that website know how many unique visitors they have each month. that's how they stay in business. they have to know i was at that website. that is going to happen. we are not going to stop tracking. were not going to stop collection. that's not what we are talking about. it is not about stopping behavioral advertising. what you are talking about is stopping the ability to collect any data
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which affects every online business. affects their analytics. affects the way they create their concept. almost all websites have third- party partners or other domains that they funnel information in from. to stop thatlike from happening. this is the way the internet works. what we ought to do and what peterc has done, because has gotten these groups to focus on a common privacy concern. i might as a user not want to have third-party entities collecting the long history of my browsing behavior. i might want to express my wish not to have that retained for a long time. that is what we are trying to empower. dnt is really about. >> i think the second part of mark's question is not answered. but you brought up the second
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the of the semantic issue, do not collect verses do not target. i want to go a little bit further, if i may, mark. you mentioned the white house and other policy framework from december 2010. the deputy chief technology officer at the white house at that time set up what do not track does not mean do not collect. rather it means advertisers must not collect user data for the purposes of behavioral advertising." from the federal trade commission, for her, the difference is when the user chooses do not collect. i do not have time to read senator roth -- senator rockefeller's thoughts on the subject, quite frankly. is it do not target or do not
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collect the information in the first place you go --? >> the reason that it has been emphasized the ftc chairman, this comes back to the market research thing i mentioned earlier. multisite code, the advertiser's code itself, part one is called collections, when you go across sites over time. there are two sections that are i brought that they said they will address. one is measuring market science and the other is product development. i said to the group, if those things get addressed in a way that i think they can be addressed, i think we could honestly say at w3c that we have collection limits that now would be accepted by a very wide range of actors to have agreed to that. it is not stopping all collection. there's a ton of collection that happens in a lot of ways. are we going to stop all
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collection on the internet? you can't send anything to their page unless you have their ip address. >> can i -- >> sure, go. go. identify the three other exceptions to collection. the reason i say you will not stop collection data online, even if you were a dnt user you will still have information collected for ad delivery and reporting, which is the economic engine of that light or service you have gone to, and things like that fraud and security. that is just not going to change. that's the way the internet is protected. that's the way companies do their research. that's the way they tear it out fraud -- ferret out fraud. and by the way, we also have legal obligations.
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things like the media ratings council which were wires us to collect certain information for certain purposes. so, you will never put in and to edit collection even if you are a dnt user. >> i want to take the opportunity to agree with mike. i thought we ought to do this at least once on the panel. get everybody a sense we not totally at loggerheads. yes, we will not stop collection. but that does not mean do what ever else you want with the information. that's a wide spec from there. reasonably speaking, we will information. that makes it more imperative we have strong guidelines or what the collection is and what you can do with it. toause we will not be able say nothing was collected at all. personally that is why i think
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congress needs to get involved. that's why we need legal detection not so much for members who are good actors, but for the limited number of people in any society who do not want to play by the rules, are not interested in doing anything but pushing the boundaries and doing more collection and creating more problematic situations. i think that's an argument for legal protection. were not saying do not collect anything ever. we will be reasonable. , here,ve a question here and over there in the front row. >> [indiscernible] >> can you identify yourself? >> one of the big questions was about third parties and cookie blocking sites. during one of those meetings we learned that the browser had delayed implementation of that. is this a concession to the w3c process and the stakeholders?
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are there technical considerations? is this something you can comment on? toi'm not inclined speculate. you can read the blog from the chief technology officer of mozilla. mozilla for delaying the incorporation of what they called a patch. we do not think delaying business operations which require cookies is a bug in their software. we happen to think it is a $36 billion industry that depends on cookies or some event of fire to run sites. we certainly applaud them for that. we would like to see if perhaps we can get something on do not track. mozilla has signals. that is their priority. they may be willing to back away from cookie blocking. i will tell you, we have an
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online petition up. i have 900 and 85 small publisher -- 985 small publisher websites let signed a petition saying if mozilla were to block cookies, those businesses might go under. there livelihood would be threatened. i'm glad it has not fallen on deaf ears at mozilla. >> i'm curious -- did those sites block safari? the patch would do what the mac browser, safari, does by default. >> most of these sites were created in the last few years, and so they have been living with this of our indecision. decision.e safari the reality is the safari marketshare is so small, they they have been able to grin and bear it. they are not happy about it. it's not lost revenue.
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the difference is mozilla with a 20% market share, a change, would be lopping off 20% of their revenue. >> it sounds a lot like if a lot of people do it we will not support it again. but if a lot of people are doing this, we will not support it. >> it is one company deciding they are going to be technologically blocking cookies, which are part and parcel of website operation. there is no agreement to it or non-agreement to it. they just do it. it is their decision. we ought to understand what the economic the leds are. there are hundreds of thousands of small american businesses at stake. that is not hyperbole. they are voicing their concerns. >> given the history of the ad industry, it is not targeted
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advertising. this idea you absolutely have to have third-party cookies to provide advertising online is absolutely all. false.ts. -- look at google. what percentage is from conceptual-based advertising? this has historically been the case. this is a red herring again. cookies are part and parcel to the way -- third-party cookies are part and parcel of the way the web operates. that's not true. that is a decision made a long time ago that not all browsers supported. , what you are doing is you are limiting your analysis to online behavioral advertising. i've already identified that's not what this discussion is about. it's not about stopping
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tracking. it's not about stopping collecting. third-party cookies are used for all kinds of things. analytics, content customization. certainly advertising is part of that, but it's not everything. when you block a cookie, you block the infrastructure for a website, you are fundamentally operations.their blac canhat i said was you promote other business models for measurement, poor things like i opt into sharing information about things i'm comfortable with and not others. and this idea that you must have this is again a red herring. you can have a variety of different innovative business models around this concept. >> i agree with everything except the last statement. i agree you can appropriately but limits on the internet and completely reengineer the
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internet. but that is not what were doing. that's not what anyone is interested in doing. >> i'm confused. we have this discussion about browsers implementing do not measures on iran, by default,, not by default. standard need a w3c when these browsers are going to implement anyway? why don't we just let the market why don't we-- just let the market decide? from the browser companies, why should we care? >> can i take a shot at that? earlier this-ed users andwired," and businesses and browsers, i think, should care. this is the way the arms race can go. we have this current story.
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we hope to come up with a standard. that's what we're trying to get to. let's say there's a bunch of cookie blocking that happens from the browser side. the advertising industry in its meetings have said they would have to seriously consider doing new tracking things that have often been called digital fingerprinting, which would be other ways to tell who the user is and wallowing them. there have been privacy objections. then some people on the browser do that,, let's because then we will figure out digital finger renting and we will start -- digital fingerprinting and we will start to block you there. that blocks a bunch of privacy choices and users have because ranges happen to what users thought they were doing. i have offered to people that in the negotiations when we learn how to send and receive and give
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consumers choice is better than an escalation of technical measures and countermeasures. that's the reason why w3c could get us to a better outcome. not just w3c, it could be legislation. but something different than this arms race. >> i have to ask you, if that does happen, if a browser implements i do not track feature, and i can turn it on and express my choice, i affirmatively say i do not want to be tracked, whatever i understand that the. let's say in your arms race tonario, a publisher wants circumvent that choice with some other kind of technology. is there any recourse, is there any measure in the regulatory perspective? with that not be considered not abiding by my choice? is there any recourse?
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>> is there an ftc official and me house -- in the house you go -- in the house? >> i think we're talking about two different things. one is cookie blocking. there's no problem if you do not circumvent it. if a user was sending a dnc signal, which is different -- sending a dnt signal, which is different. you reason peter wants an agreement is he wants the industry to abide by a standard. is the industry has agreed to abide by that standard, just as we have done in self regulation, we have an independent enforcement program that enforces against not just daa
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members but the entire ecosystem -- and you would have companies who would say if we followed the nt, and certainly -- if we follow dnt, and certainly, we would have a hook -- >> and the cook would be? ?hat would not be possible >> it's completely possible. you have browsers turning on dnt by default. not just browsers. software manufacturers, hardware manufacturers. i'm sure users have no idea. it's largely being a snort because there is note definition of dnt first of all. very few companies have said it would be followed. .> there has been a process many, many years ago, called p3p. there was a standard set in the taxonomy and the risen expression, i do not want this
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to be in place. my understanding is some companies circumvented that. why do that not trigger the federal trade commission section five authority? click there have been criminal investigations around circumvention around things like flash cookies, as well as expiring cookies -- >> i don't think they're in business anymore. >> these are business models you may not wish to support. there are a lot of cases where users -- i do not understand why the assumption is users do not know they are expressing that choice if these software turns it on by default. many people in this room could decide they want to use of ari because they want -- want to use safari because they want it turned on by default. >> microsoft is running an ad
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campaign on the idea that they are a very strong right to see protection company. >> their advertising mentions do not track, if i understand. >> can i get in another question? >> i think there is a lot of inner detainment in the world .hat does not track you there is a broader points. there is a value to doing this that is a general value, right? doing this amongst these disparate people, not having a regime in which we have tracking the default on the internet. i just hope we can find some common ground on this. i do think congressional action is key to bolstering that. i think there is common ground on this. >> [indiscernible]
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my question is about the prognosis. there has been a lot of talk. do you thinks, you will get to a final standard by next april? >> the consensus document says we are moving toward the july 13 last call deadline. last call is a standard term that no one ever knows what it means. [laughter] basically, it means we have to have a text that goes out to the world for public comment. you put out a document. the world 10 comment. in the process response to those concept. but the design is to have a site that people get to respond to. we are meeting next wednesday for an hour and half by phone.
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were trying to get to that document by the end of july. >> as someone who has been a participant in that working group before peter took over for almost two years now, i think we have finally, because we have identified what we are trying to solve instead of oiling the ocean and solving for everything, we found legitimate privacy concerns we can bounce the ball on, as chris said. there are challenges within the w3c with their rules and their process. i'm not sure we get everything done through the w3c, but i think there are opportunities to do things through the w3c. if we cannot get everything done there, there are willing partners out via the w3c. >> the gentleman in the checkered shirt. >> thank you for taking my question. -- the other stakeholder
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they had to be reminded at the beginning of their meeting yesterday of the consensus and the anonymity -- you know what i'm saying -- it's not the same thing. peter, what does this mean for your group, and don't you have to air on the side of industry a little bit? you can get 70% to agree, but if mike does not want to sign up -- do you have anything? >> i would say we do not have to lean to any one direction. i want to be very there on that. consensus is one of these magical terms-- i'm still learning the lower of what consensus means. a lot of times you say in a consensus setting, is there anything about this these you can't live with you go -- you can't live with?
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is there something here you can't live with? that's roughly what consensus means. not love it and cheering and waving a flag. who areconsumer groups, mostly thinking about users. we have browsers. we have third parties. we have the advertisers and others who did not put in the url. and then there are regulators. there are regulators who care and rest and all that. that's a lot of different folks with different spec does. .- perspectives my own focus is to make sure we have a tent for all the major parts of it so i can say with some confidence, this is better than the alternative of not having an deal. that is what i am personally trying to get to. some agree.
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some do not agree. are challenges. it is not inanimate. it's not a hecklers veto. ma'am? >> [indiscernible] enforcement. process is thetc only approach? if the user has said i do not want cookies on my computer, and some party goes in and puts cookies on the computer, why is that not a violation of the can or privacy act of using your employer's internet access against their terms? >> why are you going to look at me? >> i can play law professor here for a second. the fact that a user says you have to give me $50 if you send
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me your webpage does not mean the webpage has to send you $50. by a unilateral statement the user saying "i want meanhing" does not anything. the same thing if a website says something when you go to your page. you're talking about spyware, hacking -- you have famous lawyers who bring cases and there are defendants who say they are wrong. what you have then is you have these claims that it is a hack or a wiretap. there are a lot of cases filed and some have settled for money. all of this against the backdrop of our laws against hacking and spyware and wiretapping, but a lot of normal as this practices do not under our legal rules about hacking and spyware and wiretapping. so, look at the facts in a particular setting, and if you
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find a winning case, then find your favorite plaintiff lawyer and go get them. >> [indiscernible] thes not outside what most bull would consider normal -- --come cutera fraud computer fraud, one of the one of thee, discussions, the split in the courts is, if i give you words and say these are my terms of use and you say you don't care, is that enough to count as a hack? some say it has to be a technical measure, not just words in terms of use. i can tell you, that has not been anywhere near the center of the do not track discussions. >> we just have one more minute. in my estimation, what was said to the federal trade commission
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was not clear from the answer the panelists gave either -- >> [indiscernible] >> i'm not sure i did. >> marked it a lot of enforcement internally. i have worked with the ftc. .> somebodies own property just issued for whether they are doing deceptive marketing -- it has resulted in plaintiff actions. i do not agree that csa is the right law for this. it's outside what you would be able to enforce. unfair and have effective. that has the ftc as the regulator. >> i'm crestfallen. we have a lot of questions we did not ask, material to get
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through. thank you for your adhd. i have been tracking the protection group working .rocess for some time now i have stayed on it. what i see is, there is a lot more to go through. i just wonder whether it will he he better to burn out or fade away? or will people with their browsers at home be able to use this stuff? to thank the panel. thank the audience. happy memorial day recess. [applause] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013]
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-- we will also hear from saxby chambliss. >> this year's commencement speaker was senator al franken. the former saturday night live writer and performer spoke to 350 graduates about energy sustainability and u.s. policy and offered advice for dealing with future success and failure. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. wasn't holly great? [applause] i wish she would
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have shared one of those 25 drafts with me. [laughter] thank you, chancellor johnson, for your leadership here, for your stewardship of this great tradition of intellectual achievement and engagement, and most of all for that really warm introduction. i want to begin by congratulating some people who day ofarned a celebration. a day to take pride in their accomplishments and vinyl he relax a little bit after lifetimes of taking an impossible journey to get to this day. i'm referring of course to the parents of the class of 2013. [laughter] [applause]
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look, graduates, i will say nice things about you in a minute. [laughter] lookingne who has been forward to having kids graduate from college myself, i can tell you your parents are every bit theyb today as you are. are also every bit as stressed as you during the endless application process, every bit as miserable as you the wrist time you got homesick, every bit when you had aou big paper or a final exam coming up. your parents have grown up with you and gone through all the ups and downs with you for the past 22 years or so, including the four or five years you have been
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here. and they did not even get to go to the parties. [laughter] so please have them. please hug them. [laughter] later today and in the future a lot. got it? lecture over. now it's time for you who are graduating today to give yourself a deafening round of applause. now! [applause] now, in the program, next to your name, it lists your degree like it's no big deal. like you showed up on campus four years ago. there you are. i can understand why they kept it short.
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bethey really wanted to descriptive, it should have been your name, where you are from, "never madeg like anything less than an a-in high school, and then she got a c and actually had to go to the "hessor for help" or auditioned for jazz fest sophomore year and did not get in, auditioned junior year and did not get in, and then he ended up with one of these solar's and it was that the solos and it was spectacular" or was ayone in her family doctor, but she realized her passion was history and she had to go home for thanksgiving." [laughter] and she had to explain to her cardiologist mom why medicine just was not for her. many of you felt lonely.
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maybe all of you sometimes felt overwhelmed. definitely all of your -- made mistakes. sometimes the states that at the time made you thought you had ruined your entire lives. but you are still here and you are getting your degrees. thes incredible you made dean's list or the founders club or broke some athletic record at school. is it in some weird way impressive you want strike eight red bulls in a row so you could finish a paper in one night? i guess so. [laughter] part ofink the best what each of you has done you know youis felt uncertain, you know you screwed up at times, you kept
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going. you made it. congratulations. each of you have accomplished so much individually, what makes this an extra special place is what you have accomplished together. -- youhool's identity can see it in the traditions of providing free tuition for native american students. you can see it in the government structure that actually gives students a real voice in how the school is run. you can see it and the way the college and the community's support each other. morris did not become a leader in technology by accident. and it would not be a world the community and the
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college had not worked together to make it that way. it may be the first school in the nation to have on your money that gets pumped into the economy when you buy corn for the gasification plant, the student-run recycling program that processes more than 200 thousand pounds -- 200,000 pounds per year. it all happens because everyone at the school considers themselves to be a member of this immunity and everyone in this community considers themselves to be cougars. [laughter] i know folks here have heard a lot, i know folks have heard a lot about sustainability and sustainable energy.
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you know who else has heard a lot about it? the other 99 members of the united states senate. [applause] see, as chairman of the senate subcommittee on energy, i spend a lot of time trying to convince people out in washington that not only does sustainable energy reallyrgy conservation important, it is also something we can do. and as a senator, thank you. [laughter] and as a senator who represents a lottate, well, i spend of time bragging about you in particular. at a time when too many in
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admit thatwill not climate change is a real problem, one committee is showing us what a real solution itks like. and you're doing in a way that really exemplifies morrist about what means. you are reaching out and including everyone. your organizing on the grounds instead of waiting for someone else to lead. you are bringing the change you want to see in the world. comes to the change we all want to see in this country's energy policy, well, it won't be easy. but you have proven that change can come from the ground up, and don't think for a minute that you aren't making a difference beyond this campus. morris made the
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commitment to become a green school, it encouraged other schools to be more like morris. princeton review surveyed nearly 10,000 college applicants this year, and 62% said the school commitment to the environment would affect their decision to apply. you are making a real commitment. that is what this school is like. you know, world last local art schools do not spontaneously appear. [laughter] morris was founded here in the .iddle of the night, america because a group of ordinary citizens got together and decided a liberal arts college
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would be a good idea and got together to make it happen. no wonder morris turned out so people who learn how to make a mark on the world. working in washington the way that i do, i am looking for so many morris graduates. go hang out in any minnesotan's office on capitol hill, it will not be long before you meet a friendly, passionate morris grad. from theike gerrit class of 1978 who is working with the board members of .ongress i'm lucky enough to have a time of morris graduates on my staff.
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petersen is my state office and is one of my closest advisers. shelley schaefer, less of 1997, my deputy. , class of 2009, coordinate our internship program in washington. cougars tend to find themselves in leadership positions and that is a good thing, if you ask me. we could use more people in washington who know what it means to work, who always thinks to reach out to the community. who understand how to work with others. to make positive change. many members of the
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class of 2013 spent some time organizing on behalf of political candidates. forow that many organized me, thank you. i know many of you may be thinking about which leadership position you plan to attain when you leave here. hopefully not mine. [laughter] at least not for a while, ok? ok? [laughter] but even if you are in the politics business, you are thinking about what kind of leader you will become, what kind of places you will go and what kinds of things you will achieve. that's a fun thing to think about. and what makes the dream more than a dream, what makes it a goal is the impressive potential you have already shown right here at morris.
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and you guys are overachievers. something like 25% of you are double or triple majors. can alsohat potential lead to a lot of pressure. especially because there are only so many nobel prizes to go around. will walk out of here with a plan and execute it flawlessly. you know exactly what you want to get out of life and exactly how to get it, and you will be right. you will never doubt yourself. you will never struggle. you will never make a mistake. good for the two of you. [laughter] as for the rest of you, remember the times you felt lonely, overwhelmed, the times he made mistakes, felt like the
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end of the world. that will not stop happening just because you got a diploma today. don't worry. this is not me telling you that failure is a better teacher than success. failure actually kind of socks. -- failure actually kind of sucks. and so do the useless platitudes told by speakers like me at commencement addresses like this one. like failure is a better teacher than success. here's another one. it's lonely at the top. actually, it's a lot lonely here at the bottom. here's one i particularly don't like. when one door closes, another door always ends. first of all, that's not true. [laughter]
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and even when another door opens, sometimes it's a trap door. leading to that very lonely place at the bottom. [laughter] see -- fun.an, this is platitudes aside, nearly all of you will experience failure. have failureill you recover from. yes, learn from. yes, be all the better for, theuse once you have failure, that's the only good option. too take something from it. some of you will never recover from your failures and of youcally 2 in 5
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will spend some part of your life in prison. [laughter] it's one ofingly, those graduates will consider prison to be the best thing that ever happened to them. [laughter] sake of argument, let's say there's a middle ground between the white house and the penitentiary. youmiddle ground in which have a leg up over most college graduates, who in turn have a leg up over pretty much everyone else, but in which you are not exempt from anxiety and indecision, and yes, failure. i know it sounds like a mixed bag, especially considering this is supposed to be an inspirational speech. [laughter] but i have good news for you.
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you can make your mark on the world without conquering it errs. first.out conquering it and you can do it without leaving town. that may be one of the most important lessons you learn when you spend time on campus here at morris. morris is morris because generations of students, faculty, administration, gavebors who selflessly up their time, their resources, their potential to make it the landmark campus that it is. mattie graduated in 1976 with a degree in philosophy and the fourt for graduating -- writing. she has spent her career right here in morris, hoping to lead this community by organizing alumni to give back and telling incredible inspiring morris
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stories to the world. , maderlson, class of 1965 made hismater, live -- alma mater, alive by making jazz is profession. camp is more inclusive by incorporating different of different cultures into the life of the school. 1968.roberts, class of could have been a history professor anywhere. he was a brilliant teacher. of all.as a cougar most a former leader in student government and came back and contributed decades to this campus. his wisdom and his touched thehis wit lives of what must have been thousands of students who no matter who they were or what
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they are doing today, just would not be the same without him. i am not trying to convince you to stay in morris forever, wouldgh i bet mattie appreciate that and you could do worse than staying in a community in close proximity to don's. but milkshakes do not count as breakfast after the age of 25. [laughter] i'm here to suggest you can make a big impact on the world by making a big impact on your community wherever that turns out to be. your path will lead you somewhere you never expected to be. somewhere far away from the place in your mind today. it's possible that your path
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will turn out to exist and you will just have to invent it. success does not always come the way you think it will. not alwaysccess does end up meaning the same thing you thought it would when you started out. but whether you end up starting a business or running for business or discovering a planet or finding a job you like and raising a family and coaching little league and taking vacations, you are going to belong to a place. you're going to be part of a going to area -- are be part of a community. if you're lucky, you will find yourself in a community just like this one, the one you have been part of for the past four years. but no matter what community you write yourself in, you will do everything you can to make it more like this one. no matter what you end up doing,
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no matter what your path turns out to be, and no matter how many faults starts and wrong turns you encounter, you can always make a difference in the world by making your community a little bit more like morris, by making it a little more inclusive, by making it a little more fun, by making an example for the rest of the country and the rest of the world. you are part of a select group of people seeing firsthand what a community like that can accomplish. although, as i mentioned, i spent a lot of time trying to tell other people in washington about the secret, with everything you learned here, whether it is what you learned about chemistry or history or anthropology, what you have
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learned is about organizing and coalition building and the rush you get when you change the world around you. the question is not whether you will make your mark. it is where. so what can i tell you as you get ready for this next step? don't freak out when you fail. don't wear socks with sandals. [laughter] really. don't forget to hug your parents. beyond that, all i can really think to say is thank you. thank you for working tirelessly for social justice. thank you for setting a great example for the rest of us. and thank you for inviting me to this remarkable place to share this remarkable day with you. thank you. [applause]
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>> freshman senator ted cruz gave this year's commencement at hillsdale college in michigan. the texas senator talked about economic freedom, opportunity, and his father's escape from cuba as a teenagers seeking the american dream. this is 25 minutes. [applause] >> thank you very, very much. thank you so very much. ,raduates, moms and dads faculty, trustees, members of
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the hillsdale community. i am grateful for that warm welcome, and for that overly .enerous introduction it was edward armour road who described the ascension of winston churchill to be prime minister ship in 1940. "now the hour had come for him to mobilize the english language and send it into battle." these are different times to be sure. but we are all justifiably , his of his leadership good humor, and his ability to send the english language into today is a day of celebration. it's a celebration of your hard work, your commitment, time, prayerspassion, and that you have put into graduating hillsdale. it is a
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day of celebration for the sacrifice and dedication to her family has put in to get you here. i'm honored to join you today. let me say i fully recognize the most forgettable part of the entire day will be the all will be the politician they invited to be your commencement speaker. [laughter] today is the day your welcoming and celebrating with friends and family. but no worries. i'm in politics. i'm used to speaking when no one is listening. [laughter] back, i was years on an airplane, and a voice came paging tom cruise. somewhat sheepishly, i came to the run of the plane and i said, i think you may be looking for me.
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you have never seen so many disappointed light attendance. -- flight attendants. [laughter] had apportunity i wonderful opportunity to tour the campus of hillsdale. i was taken to the top of the tower. i carved my name in the top of the door. margarettatue of thatcher. i understand that statue was unveiled, she sent a letter of praise that said "hillsdale college symbolizes everything that is good and true in america. you uphold the principles and cherish the values which have made your country a beacon of hope." i could not agree more. i also understand that two of the men graduating today are the creators of that interesting game referred to as thatcher ball.
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that margaret thatcher would chuckle at the games only rule -- no murder allowed. [laughter] i'm not sure how she would react to the unusual way the score is tallied. [laughter] there are commencement speaking held on campuses all over the country this spring. but this one here is different. hillsdale is known across the country as a class by itself. those graduating from other colleges are being told to go out and make something of 280 77ves. before the men and women receiving their theee your today, expectations are much, much higher. because of the education you have received here, you are uniquely prepared to provide the desperately needed principled
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leadership to your family, your church, your community, your country, and your fellow man. while undergraduates have been exposed to college courses such as lady gaga and the sociology of fame -- and i feel quite confident the doctor will not be teaching that in the fall -- you have been grounded in an understanding of our constitution and our government that our founders delivered to us. you understand that precious legacy and the need to preserve it. the world lost baroness thatcher. in her honor, i would like to spend a few minutes discussing the miracle of freedom. in the history of mankind, freedom has been the exception.
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for millennia, it has been nasty, brutish, and short. which is how some of my senate colleagues describe me. [laughter] were taken away by the whim of monarchs area the british began a revolution in a meadow. as the magna carta provided to all free men of our kingdom, we have also granted for us and our heirs forever all these dignities written out before, to have and keep for them and their heirs. reached fullon flower in philadelphia in 1787 and the constitution that began firsto radical premises.
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that our rights did not come from kings or queens or even presidents, but on god almighty. as the declaration observes, we hold these truths to be self- evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with certain unalienable rights and among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. second in the constitution, the inverted the understanding of sovereignty. power comes not from the monarch on down, but instead of from we the people. and the constitution in turn lends authority to those in office for just a brief time. , "ifmes madison explained
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men were angels, no government would be necessary. isframing government which to be administered men over men, the great difficulty lies in this. you must first enable the government to control the governed. and in the next place oblige it to control itself." in my short time in elected office, i can assure you there washington.s in that is why, as thomas jefferson put it, the constitution serves as chains to bind the mischief of government. is limited,ent rights are protected and rule of law is honored, freedom flourishes. all of you know this already. hillsdale does not subscribe to the notion that all books published before 1900 are obsolete.
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against all odds, the college speaks up, as it did during the 19th century, for permanent things. with those foundations, what has freedom rocks? , the american free market system is the greatest engine for prosperity the world has ever seen. freedom works. no other nation on earth has allowed so many millions to come with nothing and achieve anything. and all the centuries before the american revolution, the average human lives on between one dollar and three dollars a day, with little difference between asia or africa or south america. from that point, the beginning of the american experiment, for the first time in history, per capita income in a few countries
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began to grow rapidly and none more so than the united states. over the last two centuries, the u.s. growth rate has far outpaced average growth rates throughout the world, producing per capita income about six times greater than the world average. 50% higher than the incomes in europe. put another way, the united states holds for wave five percent of the world population and produces a staggering 22% of the world output. infraction which has remained stable for two decades, despite growing competition from around the world. america's predominance is not new. by the 1830 route, the late redish economist angus madison observed american per capita income was already the highest in the world in the 1830s's.
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americanthe result of economic freedom which enables on the norse of small businesses .o flourish today the u.s. dollar is the national reserve currency. english is the standard language for commerce. the strength of the u.s. economy allows us to maintain the mightiest military in the world, effectively .nforcing a pax americana on culture, tv, the u.s. is preeminent in the world. 80% of the movies seen in the world are made in the united states. number of thenate world's great inventions in medicine, electronics, the internet, technology come from america. improving, expanding, and saving lives. america is where the telephone, the automobile, and the airplane were all invented.
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americans were the first to walk pong, moon. we invented space invaders, and the iphone. but most importantly, freedom produces opportunity. i would like to encourage each of you to embrace what i call opportunity conservatism, which is every domestic policy which is conceptualized, articulated should be viewed with a laser focus to how it impacts the most vulnerable among us. we should view every policy through the lens. how does it impact the most vulnerable? the most fundamental difference between left and right is both look at the economic ladder and those on the left was to physically move people up the
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economic ladder, and that is almost always driven by noble intentions, and yet it never, ever, ever works. the only way anyone has ever climbed the economic ladder is to push -- is to pull him or herself up one rung at a time. [applause] as president reagan observed, how can we love our country and not love our countrymen? and loving them, heal them when they are sick and revived opportunity to make them self- sufficient so they will be will in fact and not just in theory? historically our nation has enjoyed remarkable economic mobility. 60% of the households that were in the lowest income quintile in 1999 were in a
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higher quintile 10 years later. 60%. simultaneously almost 40% of the richest households fell to a lower quintile in 10 years. this is a nation where you can rise or fall, climb the economic ladder, based not on heredity, the blessings of aristocracy, but based on your talent, your passion, your perseverance, your willingness to fight for the american dream. economic freedom and the prosperity it generates reduces poverty like nothing else. fivees over and over again countries with higher level of economic freedom like the united states have poverty levels as measured by the united nations, that basket of conservatism, 75%
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lower than countries that are mostly repressed. i remember some time ago of former texas senator, phil gramm, participating in a senate hearing on socialized medicine. and the witness their explained that government would just take care of us all. senator graham gently demurred and said, i care more about my family than anyone else does. and this wide-eyed witness said, oh, no, senator. i care as much about your children as anyone. gramm smiled and said really? what are their names? [laughter] thanks to america's free-market system, the average poor american has more living a's -- hase typical nonpoor
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more living space than the typical nonpoor worsen in sweden, france, or the united was born,n the year i only 36% of the u.s. population enjoyed air conditioning. or households in america have air conditioning. and $.96 of poor parents stated -- 96% of poor parents stated they are children not go hungry during the year because they could not afford food. now there is still need. and all of us should act to help our fellow man. but more and more government is not the answer. to say otherwise is to ignore the fact that all major european nations have higher levels of unitedspending than the states does and all of them are poor. human beings are not happiest
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when they are taken care off by the states. those who depend on the yoke of the government are among the least joyous in our society. we all flourish when afforded the opportunity to work and create and accomplish. economic growth and opportunity is the answer that works. the prosperity and opportunity of the american remarket system gives us better healthcare, theer levels of education, means to better protect the environment. pneumatic where you look in the world, the evidence is clear, as a strategy to create greater well-being, freedom works. the advancement of economic freedom, empowering individuals to decide for themselves where to work or how to spend or invest their resources ,utperforms government programs
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centralized plants or increasingly regulated markets. it is for that reason so many millions have risked everything for a chance at the american train. father fled, my cuba. he had been imprisoned and tortured as a teenager in cuba. inay my father is a pastor dallas. to this day his front teeth are not his own because they were kicked out of his mouth when he was a teenager. , he didlanded in austin not speak a word of english. he had $100 sewn into his underwear. i-295 keeping your money in -- i do not add bias keeping your money in your underwear. he got a job as a dishwasher. he graduated from college.
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he got a job. he started a small business. he worked for the american dream. imagine if the minimum wage had two dollars an hour instead of .anging able to work for $.50 he may not have gotten that first job. i cannot tell you how many times i have said they got some well-meaning liberal did not come to him when he landed and put his arm around him and said, let's take care of you. let me make you dependent on government. and by the way, don't bother learning english. instead, my dad like so many millions before him came seeking a better life. when i was a kid my father used to say to me all the time, when we faced oppression in cuba, i have a place to flee to. if we lose our freedom here, where do we go?
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my dad has been my hero. i will tell you what i find most incredible in his story. how commonplace it is. has aone of us here today story like that. we could, pier 1 at a time to this podium and everyone could tell the story of our parents or grandparents or great great rant parents. we are all the children of those who risked everything for liberty. fundamental dna of what it means to be american. the value of freedom and opportunity above all else. in 1976, margaret thatcher delivered her pivotal written awakes speech. she said "there are moments in our history where we have to make a fundamental choice. this is one such moment, a moment when our choice will determine the life or death of
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our kind of society and the usurer of our children. let's ensure our children have caused to rejoice we did not forsake their freedom." if we do not fight to preserve our liberty, we will lose it. a world-of you with class education is perfectly .ituated to lead the fight to communicate one-on-one with your peers and neighbors and colleagues on facebook, on twitter, with internet videos, with creative communication, to tell and retell the story of theica re-. -- america free. to so many young americans who have never had the opportunity to hear that story from the media, from the schools, and certainly not from hollywood. the 287 men and women graduating
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today are are quick to situated to win that argument, tell that story. that your continued "-- dr. continued "of course, this places a burden on us, but it is to bearwe are reluctant it our freedom survives." at hillsdale, you are all prepared to go forward. carry the torch for freedom so each one of us works to ensure that america remains a shining city on a hill, a beacon of hope and freedom and opportunity for the rest of the world. thank you and god bless you. [applause]
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>> congressman james clyburn perceived honoring -- received honorary degrees from 31 universities across the country. the house democratic leader gave this year's commencement university,laflin advising graduates to take chances and never give up. this is about 35 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very, very much. thank you very much, dr. rice. if i had good sense, i would keep my seat at this moment. but i don't have good sense all the time, so i'm going to spend
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a few moments with you this morning, offering up the commencement address. let me begin by thanking your presidents, reverent hillsdale .- reverent hillsdale a good friend, and one i admire and respect a great deal. , the think his lovely wife first lady of this institution. i thank the members of the board tremendous for their leadership. those to thank participants in the program this morning. by sturm and then it. -- vice-chairman and it. mayor miller. chairman rice. but i want to begin my comments
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here today by sharing with you a little experience. i was invitedago, to do a commencement address at another college in this congressional district. i met twoeks later young ladies who told me that they were in attendance for that commencement ceremony. they said to me they thought i had given a very good speech. so i decided that they to play devil's advocate. and i asked them, what did i talk about? [laughter] .hey looked at each other
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and after a while, one of them said, i don't remember, but it was short. [laughter] so, i gathered from that experience that in order for a commencement address to be considered good, it must be short. [applause] now, you are going to have a great speech today. [applause] first of all, let me congratulate each and every one of you on this great accomplishment. having been through this ordeal that you have been through, i know that you ought to be congratulated. want to congratulate
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the administration, the faculty, the staff, all who contributed so much to getting you prepared for this day. hasow president tisdale asked you to stand already, but --ant to thank someone out think someone else. we are all very emotional about your accomplishments. we are touched, emotionally. but there are a couple people out here who have been touched financially. you to stand and thank them. stand and thank your parents, your guardians, who got you this far. [applause]
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there is a reason i asked you to do that. ton i was leaving home pursue my college education, my dad said this to me. he said,i want to repeat that. the first sign of a good education is good manners. of all the things that you learned, please learn to say thank you. [applause] you will be surprised at how much that will mean to the people with whom you come in contact.
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the second thing i want you to --to practice, that is, is the golden rule. to claflincame university with a set of experiences. each one of you has had a unique set of experiences which e wns that you see th differently from the others with -- with human directed whom you have interacted all these years. when you leave here, if you pursue further education, if you go anywhere in the world of work, you are going to encounter people whose experiences will make them see the world differently from the way you see it.
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it does not mean that they are wrong. it doesn't eman that you are wrong. nosimply means you can be more nor less than what your experiences allow you to be. so the second thing i want you to remember from today is to respect and honor the experiences of the others with whom you come in contact. treat them the same way you would like for them to treat youl . you will be surprised as to how it is to honor respect each other's experiences. myften tell the story that wife grew up on a 22 acre farm. sumpter. in
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wife grew up walking two and a half miles to work, school in the morning. two and a half miles back home. my elementary school was three blocks from my house. blocks.e school, 6 , also aigh school methodist school. toi do not know what it was grow up the way my wife grew up. and i learned very early that i had to make some adjustments and i made them. that, if i of
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continue to make these adjustments until june 24th, we'll celebrate our 52nd wedding anniversary. [applause] i want each of you to understand in theu encounter others workplace or in the home, learn to respect each other's opinions. each other'sr backgrounds and experiences and remember, it is those experiences coming into the home, into the work life, that allows you to grow and become better people. thing i want to say to you is -- you should never give up.
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has toldrman bennett you about some of the challenges you are going to face as you go out into the world of work. if you look at the program or if you listen to dr. wright, he has the you about all successes i have had. he did not tell you about the failures. the first time i ran for office in 1970, i lost. . ran again in 1978 i lost. i ran again in 1986. i lost. a friend of mine said to me at that time, what are you going to do now?
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you know what they say -- three strikes and you're out. i said to her, that's a baseball rule. [laughter] nobody should live their lives by baseball rules. of you you must remember you will not always succeed every time you attempt anything. their grandparents told you, your parents called you, if at first you don't succeed, try and try again. they did not say try it one more time. or two more times or three more times. they said try and try again. not a single one of you can tell me how many times, standards and failed -- times thomas edison failed. we don't remember him for his failures.
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we remember him for his success. each and every one of you will be remembered not for your failures of how well you overcome your failures. that is what he will be remembered for. [applause] here to facee the world, i've often wondered uponeople look commencements as the ending of something. the dictionary. commence means to begin. ending. ntot an it is a beginning. i want each and every one of you to leave here today remembering no matter how many times i may i will never give up. remember, i don't care how many times you attempt, the next
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time could very well be the time. so if you really want to honor your parents, your family members, your friends, this administration, the university, just remember you should pursue your life dreams and aspirations with an attitude that you will never ever give up. ,f i quit after three failures i never would have become number three in the house of representatives. [applause] andratulations, good luck
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godspeed. i want to come back here and , just likelebrate these platinum graduates are celebrating, and these golden graduates. let's all come back in 50 or celebrate -- 50 or 70 years and celebrate again at. thank you and god be. godspeed.ou and [applause] but i begin with integrity because it is so essential to who and what you ultimately will become. have a career path in mind. many of you have no idea where you will end up. a few of you may be surprised by where life takes you. i certainly was. in the end, it is not only what
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we do but how we do it. >> i have to start with -- give me one second. i am a professional so this will only take a second. when i woke up this morning and started writing my speech, i was thinking about my first month on campus in september when i was a freshman in the football team went into that season ranked number one in the nation preseason. i remember there was all this excitement on campus and our first game was at wisconsin and we went up there and we lost our first game, 21-14. it was crushing disappointment afterwards. i will like you to think of that soaring expectations followed by crushing disappointment as a metaphor for your next 20 minutes with me. >> next week and, more stories and advice are graduates friday .ight at 8:00 eastern
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including fbi director robert mueller of florida governor rick scott. and saturday at 8:30, business leaders including twitter ceo dick costello and steve wozniak fine speeches online at c- span.org we are showing you 2013 commencement speeches from around the country. next, saxby chambliss at the university of georgia. then senator tammy baldwin of wisconsin at beloit college. >> several thousand graduates at the university of georgia listened to senator saxby chambliss deliver this year's commencement address on may 10. the senate intelligence committee finance chairman described the world is a scary place and talks about working to ,revent another 9/11, boston or oklahoma city bombing. this is 15 minutes.
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>> thank you very much. it is a privilege and an honor to be here tonight. you, president adams, the trustees, fellow alumni, graduate, family and friends -- thank you for allowing me to ask e this momentous day with these graduates in this great institution. there is another group of people we need to thank tonight and that the proud parents and in particular, all of the mothers here tonight on this mother's day weekend. [applause] you mothers who have provided so much inspiration for these young folks, let's have them stand up and let's
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salute them for a minute. [applause] all you fathers, you played a pretty key role in this too but we have another month before we are going to recognize you. i also want to recognize and say ,hank you to my good friend mike adams, for his leadership here. he is been a leader on higher education issues across our .tate and across our nation he has been such a valuable service during his tenure here in athens. we wish he and mary the best at whatever phase are next life takes. tonight we gather between the hedges to celebrate the graduation of more than 5000
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women and men on this very special place. i have to tell you, i am a little bit intimidated. that never happens to me. politicians better not get intimidated or you are going to lose. but the reason i am intimidated is that i have been in this and on this field literally hundreds of times over the last 50 years but i have never performed on this field. and i know that most of you all here tonight are used to likermers on the field jason aldean. tonight, i'm sorry, you just get the other guy. the university of georgia is not only our flagship
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institution in our great state and a world-renowned school but also a very very special place to me personally. as president adams said, it is my alma mater and where more than 40 years ago, i met my wife. then they tell you, i am proud of that sheepskin on my wall but i really love my wife. you, i am proud of that sheepskin on my wall but i really love my wife. uga forms not just a foundation for my career "are storms of our life -- but one of the cornerstones of our life. , i knowed as you are most of you are sad to leave this beautiful campus. but remember -- today is about beginnings. webster's dictionary defines commencement as the act of
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starting something. find the friendships you have made here and the lessons you have learned here will ground you as you face the joys and challenges that will become a part of your life story. i know it's hard for you to see the news these days. yourot worry about generation and wonder how it will be treated. it's easy to feel overwhelmed with how much the world has changed just in the time that yolu have been ehrehere at uga. look no further than the events in boston last month where a single incident, a joyous event celebrating human stamina and achievement, transformed into a scene of life-changing carnage. urgency -- uncertainty and unease are two very powerful emotions. my position as vice- chairman of the senate select
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committee on intelligence, i hear daily about what a scary place the world can be. i am privy to details that keep me awake at night on a regular basis. but they also hear how dedicated young people like you say and night are out there working hard, piecing together value and from -- valuable information, taking down bad guys, and preventing another boston, and other september 11 or opal set -- or oklahoma city from happening. i want to issue challenges to graduates tonight. the first deals with this very topic. the world is an uncertain place. it's difficult and complex out there. isr challenge that i issue sureness out of
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unease, call him out, light out of shadows and resolutions out of questions. it is a changing world but great begets great opportunity. think of how your generation has forced change and become leaders in the cause of freedom in all parts of the world. in such facesld at tunisia, egypt, libya and of youren and women generation have raised their voices, stood up to tyranny, braved beatings and imprisonment and missed their life and limb to bring down some of the planets most notorious regimes. it was that change brought about by your generation that is given millions of people one of life's greatest gifts -- the
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chance to rule themselves. things you learned here and how you build on those experiences will have a direct impact on america's national interests and our place in this shifting world. some of you will choose to join those already in uniform serving our country and for that decision, i salute you. others of you will serve her country differently. some of you will be in laboratories where you will tackle problems that could prevent bioterrorism or cure diabetes. , others ofing firms you will invent new technologies. in classrooms, you educate the next generation of american leaders. [applause] and businesses, you will help from american competitiveness. he will revolutionize
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agriculture with new technology. no matter what career you embrace or how you decide to fit into this changing world, do it with dignity, do it with passion and with a spirit of community and most of all, do it with excellence. to be graduating from uga means that you're all smart. despite some of you spending your free time sitting on couches in the yard and drinking beer -- [applause] are. y'all know who you that was a lot more noise than i expected here, geez. so, just because you are here tonight tells me that all of your hard-working and you are blessed with the most
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important ingredients for success in life. but listen, no matter how smart you are, no matter how good- looking you are, no matter how tell it to you are or athletic ,ou are were brave you are here is my second challenge to you -- embrace humility. why do i say that? because you are going to need it. because somewhere along the line, each of you are going to fail. some of you in more spectacular ways than others. but he won't be alone. won't be alone. here is an abject failures. oprah winfrey was fired earlier in her career as a reporter for being unfit for tv. despite finishing third in her law school class, former supreme court justice sandra day o'connor could not even land an interview with nearly 40 law firms and was offered a job as a
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secretary. walt disney was fired from a newspaper job because he lacked imagination and have no good ideas. former british prime minister winston churchill who also spoke about winning and losing put it this way -- success is the ability to go from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm. tohael jordan, who failed try out for his high school varsity basketball team, catalog his career this way -- i have missed more than 9000 shots in my career. i have lost almost 300 games. the six times, i have been trusted to make the game-winning shot and missed. i've failed over and over again in my life and that is why i succeed.
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ladies and gentlemen, it can count on three things in life -- death, taxes, and failing at something somewhere along the way. .nd i speak from experience my first run for public office was not a success. in 1992, i got a little over 30% of the vote in the primary that i first ran in. about failing. it's about how you handle it. do you accept it as fact? or do you accept it as a challenge? humility is not a lack of confidence. it takes far more confident to be humble than to be arrogant. being humble will allow you to figure out who you really are, what you don't know and yet what you can do better. every successful person has
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doubled somewhere along the way and most successful people have understood that only by embracing humility will they figure out a path to improvement. saint augustine once queriedm, d, do you wish to rise? "dissenting. do you plan a tower that will pierce the clouds? the question of humility. the fact that you are sitting here today in your cap and gowns that you're blessed -- means tht you're blessed. of unto whom much is given, him will be much required. thomas jefferson put it a little differently. "there is a debt of service due from every man and woman to their country."
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i hope some of you will serve your inventio nation in the wayd not mention earlier that by running for public office. despite what the pundits, cynics and even the polls say, it is a noble calling. you are entrusted by voters to make difficult decisions to write laws and set policies and change not just those policies and laws but the very force of our nation. my final challenge to you is this -- getting gays. the active at the local, state, and federal political levels. your community and your country need you. in these uncertain times, we need your brainpower and her gumption and your enthusiasm more than ever. whatever path he may travel in life, there is no substitute for hard work and no short court --
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short cut to success. above all, stick to your principles and be bold. most of you were lucky enough to be born americans. some of you chose to be americans. you should take every opportunity to understand what being an american means. , read, engage others. be curious about the rest of the world. america has long been the , that "thep oppressed, strivers and those who simply you're in for a better life. your country offers you a great opportunity for success. i have every faith that your future is so bright, it is yours for the taking. godspeed as you begin that journey and go dogs! [applause]
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[captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] >> tammy baldwin was the commencement speaker for the graduation ceremony at beloit college. she is the first openly gay u.s. senator as well as the first woman to represent wisconsin and the u.s. congress were seized -- where she served seven terms. this is 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for that generous introduction. , want to thank the faculty administration, and staff who make beloit such an incredible school. i wanted to thank and recognize all the parents and grandparents, aunts and uncles, friends and neighbors who
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have helped make the members of the class of 2013 reached his proud moment in their lives. greeting to all the moms out there on this special mother's day. graduates, congratulations. this is such a special day for you. i would imagine that you are feeling a lot of different emotions. relief.lation, maybe it must feel kind of strange to walk around campus without the or at of the final exam term paper weighing on your shoulders. i know exactly how you feel. ofave the privilege representing beloit in the house of representatives for many years. in every campaign, beloit college with host the debate. it does not matter how prepared you are.
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when you're sitting in the the green room ready to debate your opponent, television cameras , you know that feeling you got when he saw a professor handing out blue book? same feeling. last year, i have the biggest test of my career when i ran for the united states senate. i remember how i felt on election night. , relieved but also a little bit anxious. i did not run for the senate because i wanted the title. i ran because i wanted a chance to do the job. in the same way, you do not come to beloit because you wanted a
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piece of paper you are about to receive. you came here because he wanted the chance to change the world and the short time you are going to be in it. just like my election night, today is a celebration but this is not an ending. it's a beginning. it's the beginning of something fun and exciting but also difficult and maybe even a little scary. some of you will challenge scientificto make discoveries or create new inventions. some of you plan to go to work on unlocking the puzzle of the mind are the mysteries of the ages. some of you dream of publishing your work or completing a on they or standing stage at carnegie hall. some of you have your eye on a desk at the oval office.
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all of you are going to confront the same questions pretty soon -- how do i start question mark i spent my first few months as a freshman senator confronting that exact question. i know it's unorthodox for freshmen to give advice to seniors but let me tell tell you how i tried to answer it. as i traveled the state of wisconsin in my campaign, i saw so much potential and frankly, a lot of pain. beloit is a perfect example. here we have a world-class college students are doing incredible things. we also have a community outside of campus where the unemployment is too high and middle class families are struggling just to make it. how can the [indiscernible]
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sothe state where we make many things be losing manufacturing jobs to other countries? has thea nation that biggest economy in the history of the world have so many roads going unrepaired? so many businesses struggling to keep the doors open. submit people -- so many people who have been out of work for months or years? i decided i would run my campaign on a simple message -- we can do better for our workers. i have lots of ideas about how they could do better. probably could level the playing field -- how we could level the playing field, maker tax system more fair, how we can rebuild our middle class.
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there was that question. i start? many of you will find the way you start your first job -- she will be told to wait your turn to speak. after all, you are new. you will have to work really to make the smallest amount of progress. -- found ini start my new. things move slower in washington. they don't always seem to move in the right direction. it is hard leaving the office knowing he had not found a job for everyone who wants one or giving a child a chance to attend the great public school, making sure every family has .ood health care
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it is hard to let the sun go down knowing we still have not orved the fiscal problem ensure that every american can marry the person he or she loves. it is hard to imagine i might spend six or 12 for 18 years and this amazing job and still not reach the finish line on some of these issues. might have day like that, too. when it seems the world is too big to get your arms around. i will tell you what i think about to get me through those days and get up every morning ready to get back to it all. , i was a mathnot major in college. . had a terrific professor i was a pretty sharp student
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was a realt class tough one. the professor did something in that class that took me by surprise. as part of her homework assignment, he assigned us insoluble problems. problems with no solution. we were not expected to come up with the answers but we were expected to show some progress. i never figured out any of those insoluble problems. i became areason politician and not a mathematician but over the course of my career, i thought back to that class many times. -- that byas that i pushing against the boundaries,
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we could expand those boundaries. after all, every problem starts as as an soluble -- insoluable but eventually someone goes ahead and cracks it. how do i area of a circle? how do you govern without a king or a queen? once upon a time, all of those were insoluable problems. nobody solved them all at once. nobody solved them all alone. but we solved them. rebuilding a country after a civil war. just like we planted our flawegn the moon. take on theaid to insoluble problems you encounter.
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you won't be able to solve them all at once or by yourself. but you will make progress. and maybe you'll inspire someone else to make progress. i was raised by her grandmother. 1906.s one of she wanted to be in a stronger. but the an astronomer times and her family dictated it would not be so. my grandmother was an incredible artist and seamstress. she made all of my close -- my clothes until junior high school when i remember asking permission to buy a pair of blue jeans. home made just could not compete with real levi's. she was so proud when i graduated from college and even prouder when i ran for office. she was born 14 years before
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women had the right to vote. was ablee of 92, she to vote for her granddaughter and watch me get sworn in as from wisconsin and congress. [applause] every time my name appeared in the newspaper, she looked out the article and and save it. she has all those clippings in the drawer of her nightstand. on top of that nightstand, she kept a photograph of my cousin great-r, her first grandchild. she will look that photograph every night before she went to sleep. don't know what was going
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through her mind at those moments later night but i think - late at night but i think when she saw the photographs, she would think about how much things had changed since she was born. how our country have become more fair, wiser, a better place. how great men and women had made such incredible scientific discoveries and build incredible buildings, bridges, factories. at must've been marveling what lay ahead for jennifer but i hope she was proud of the progress she made in her time, the progress i was beginning to make in my time in the progress jennifer would someday make in her time. have been a part
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of a legacy progress that whenches back to the day wisconsin was a frontier society. you are also part of a legacy progress that stretches back to the founding days of this country, a legacy that includes countless inventors, explorers, thinkers and statesmen. yes, we have big problems to solve and yes there are days when they seem insoluble but i am confident that you and i can progress together. we work and work just to get to the starting line, it could could be hard to know how to take that first of forward but i'm confident you and i can figure it out together. so here's to all the potentially
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and the here at beloit progress we will make in our time. congratulations, class of 2013. [applause] >> i begin with integrity because it is so intentional -- essential to who and what he will ultimately become. many of you have a career path in mind. many of you have no idea where you one that. -- where you will end up. a few of you may be surprised to where life takes you. in the end, it is not only what we do but how we do it. start byow i have to tweeting this, so give me a
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second. when i wrote up -- when i and startedthis morning thinking about my speech, i thought about my freshman year here. the football team was number one in the nation priest is in -- nation pre=e-season. our first game without wisconsin. we went up there and we lost, 20 1-14. it was crushing disappointment afterwards. -- likelike to think of you to think of that as a metaphor for your next 20 minutes with me. >> friday night at 8:00 eastern with administration and state and local officials, including fbi director robert mueller and florida governor rick scott. and saturday at 8:30, business leaders, including the costello and apple cofounder steve wozniak.
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five more commencement speeches online at www.c-span.org. u.s. naval academy commencement, president obama spoke out against sexual assault in the military, say they threaten the trust of discipline in the armed forces. here is a portion of what the president had to say. remains the most trusted institution in america. our armed forces have met every mission we have given them. but others have been distracted by petty arguments, our men and women in uniform come together as one american team. yet we must knowledge that even here, even in our military, we have seen how the misconduct of some cat have effects that ripple far and wide. , a singleital age image from the battlefield of troops falling short of their standard can go viral and
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endanger our forces and undermine our efforts to achieve security and peace. likewise, those who commit sexual assault are not only committing a crime, they threaten the trust and discipline that makes our military strong. that's why we have to be determined to stop these crimes because they have no place in the greatest military honors. -- military on earth. i say all this because you are about to assume the role of leadership. as officers, you'll be trusted with the most awesome of response abilities. the lives of the men and women under your command. ,hen your service is complete many of you will go on to help lead your communities, america's companies. he will lead this country. if we want to restore the trust
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that the american people deserve to have in their answer to ship, all of us have to do our part. in leadership had to constantly strive to remain worthy of the public trust. as you go forward in your careers, we need need to carry forth the values you learn at this institution. our nation needs them now more than ever. -- we need your honor that guides you in is hard and uncertain. that tells the difference between that which is right and that which is wrong. perhaps it will be the moment when you think nobody is watching but never forget that honor by character is what you do when nobody's looking. more likely, it will be when you're in the spotlight leading others. the men and women looking up to you to set an example.
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never ask them to do what you don't ask of yourself. live with integrity and speak with honesty and take responsibility and demand accountability. the white house has announced president obama will be in oklahoma sunday. look at the damage from the tornadoes in the town of moore. we will have coverage of the president's visit. seven crosses were erected today at the sight of what's left of moore,mentary school and in memory of the seven children killed during monday's fernando -- during monday's tornado.
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>> a discussion about online privacy and the prospects for a do not track ball. we would hear from a panel in favor of such legislation, chris calabrese. this is 90 minutes. >> welcome, everybody. i am the executive director of the congressional internet caucus committee. thank you so much for coming out today.
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the last date you for your memorial day recess. you deserve medals for being here. i really appreciate it. event is called do not track privacy, is it dead or alive? that is what we will be discussing today. i want to thank the congressional internet caucus co-chairs, senators leahy and thune and congress when - andatte and eshoo - congressmen goodlatte and eshoo. next week, we have another briefing on may 30. that issue is hot and high tech committee. cornyn corman -- senator just introduced legislation. inn there is the shield act
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the house. the week after that on june 7, .e will do a fact-based debate that sounds painfully boring but it is a good debate about the economics of the internet so you can better understand these important issues like net neutrality and some of those things. the twitter handle for today is #donottrack. , a anybody following along lot of the resources we are discussing will be put up on twitter. today's issue is on this concept has been track which going on for a long time but the issue and its name do not track callnspired by the do not registry that the federal trade
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commission implement a many years ago. in order to avoid telemarketing calls, you submit your phone number to the federal trade commission's west and you would presumably not get calls during dinner. .he idea was inspired by that i will get to more of that later but when the trade commission implement a do not call, they didn't have the authority to do that and some companies immediately filed suit and won. congress reacted immediately to that lawsuit. in house within 24 hours, the house and senate passed legislation almost unanimously to optimize the federal trade commission to do the do not call registry. it's important to remember how wildly popular that register was. now we are and do not track.
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and how you are being tracked .nline via websites people have been working on this idea, how do consumers say no to being followed across unrelated areas on the internet. today we went to look at whether implementing a technical measure, how would that work question mark is it feasible, necessary, wise? these are questions we will ask for today. i will quickly choose the panelist. to my left, peter swire. w3c the co-chair of the consortium. he is going to georgia tech as a professor. hehis bio, he mentions
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worked for the national economic council and then before that from 1999 two 2001, he was chief counselor for privacy in the white house under the clinton administration. that was the -- the first position of its kind i've ever heard of. i don't we we have an equivalent of that now. and we will go to ashkan soltani, an independent researcher and consultant. he has about 15 years of research on these tracking and online privacy issues. he was at the federal trade commission. he was also a senior advisor and consultant on the wall street journal's what they know series. you may have seen that over a. of years ago queers ago. -- over a period of ears a couple of years ago.
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zaneis was at the u.s. chamber of commerce. and chris calabrese. so what's the big deal with this issue? why do we care whether people are being tracked and being served up ads based on his experiences? is that a problem? why do we care? when we got into a maternity adse, you expect to see for diapers and other things. but if you go to other websites across the internet, you see the same as for perhaps diapers or things like that very or
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ecotality golf site and a travel site then you see ads for -- or things like that, then you got to a golf site and a travel site and you see ads for golfing. that's what this panel will go into. why are we here today? many years ago, a lot of groups from web rows are that implementing this do not track feature into the browsers. everyone has their favorite browser. , internet's chrome , safari,am a firefox when you're using your mobile device or your ipad, you have
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different browsing experiences. everybody has a favorite one. his browser companies are intimately these do not track features in a variety of different ways and it's putting pressure on people to get together and do a consensus. privacy advocates are calling for this do not track feature. the united states senators have introduced legislation on the topic and it is also been introduced in the house in years past. the idea that -- the idea behind cookies. cookies are being put on our browsers and being used to follow us across unrelated websites and thereby serve a tailored ad based on a surfing. the center problem? is that wise? is there any harm there? that's what i want to get to. this issue kicked around in a variety of different ways of the years leading in 2006.
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people can go back further on this. but recently, the world wide web consortium which is a standards that helps us create standards for our web rousing across the internet. they created something called the tracking protection working group to bring everybody together. i will let you explain that. -- i will let peter explain that. that group has been working very hard. they had their last face to face to get to may 6 consensus on is this dead or alive. i was not there. that's why we wanted the group to come together and say at least in this manifestation, is a dead or alive and depending on that question, what is congress
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likely to do about it? so they have to to get the paper out by july so we thought this would be great time to update people on where this is. whether folks so -- surfing the web will have some kind of feature to keep this from happening. with that, let me leave it up to peter to explain his role. it is an important piece in the puzzle. certainly the major one right now. is it alive or dead? thanks. i will try to say this as close to plain english as i can. how many people here have ever done a do not call opt out for your phone number? a lot of hands went up. you do step number one, go to the webpage. you see step number two and
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saved not me for this phone number. -- and say not me for this number. there are a bunch of ways you can do this on the internet now but if you go across different internet sites and do it over time, there has not been as handy a way to do that as a lot of privacy folks have asked for. maybe we can come up with a standard way to do it where it would be cookies or any other and you could do that one time cliquck and it would work. so a persistent, one-time user cance and that way you say i am comfortable, i want to have a lot of targeted ads or don't want to do that, i want to make a different choice. that's the idea. there have been lots of ways you can imagine doing that.
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the way that i working now is this group the w3c. by a guy whoded people say invented the web to rates of that's a pretty good start. when you put down what you have done in your career? invented the web, that is a good one. they are a standards group. you have heard of html. that was the place where they came up with the standard for html. this is not something new invented for do not track. they're trying to come up with a standard way to do this on the internet. that makes sense. tore has to be a way for you express your choice and send your choice. he will typically do that through a browser or something like that.
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this phone has got to receive the choice. in the phone book, the telemarketer is trying to find there are different kinds of ad networks out there. they have to be able to be see this thing. and we can send in a standard way and we see that in a standard way and nobody means, then we have something that is good for users. they get to express their choice and it works. the websites know what they are supposed to do. we get this really great standard that people really like. the word is interoperability. you have heard that. you will like to be able to plug in your phone charger for hundreds of different kinds of phones this way you can use any browser and go to any website and a standard way to do it. that is the hope. w3cave brought to gather in the working group. as of today, there are 99 different stakeholder roots.
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all we have to do to get to a consensus and that the standard. oh is easy to get -- the senate is easy to get consensus. you can all laugh about how rarely that happens. lived in town for a song as we have lived in town. as the my own role cochair of this process is a very third -- very good personal. the part that i'm working on is what it needs to comply with the standard. when he sent and received, what does that mean? -- when you send and receive, what does that mean? ihave worked with a lot
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different parts of industry and privacy community and the government. i am not trying to facilitate that. what that means, i will let others say. i will say a little bit more about what happened recently. there is an effort that will give users a choice that works. i will stop there. >> thank you. many of you might know me. i'm a technical technologist in the space. i'm dealing with not wearing a tie. i wore a short for two reasons. if you like this industry has a bit of pretension deficit disorder. if you look at the general issue, you have to go back to 1999 when there's a lot of attention for third party tracking. third party tracking is a site you go to like "the new uris times? were the cookies identify you.
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new york times" where the cookies identify you. and000 or so, microsoft basically netscape and mozilla -- mozilla at the time -- allowed users to block those cookies and maintain some privacy. .gain, the same issues came up what were the defaults? the defaults were that users had to know about the tracking and learn to block it. it was hard to do it. where were the exemptions? some of the op outs allowed companies to track users and identify them uniquely even when they do not want to be tracked for the purposes of measuring how often you use the website. it is contrary to when users think they are opting out.
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also the issue of consent. what are they consenting to? what are the terms? these are the same issues in the 2000 era. the same with the beginning of w3c process. how much tracking do we want to allow? how much they want to enable in this industry? on the key ways to understand this is the dirty little secret that not a lot of people discussed. it does not just profiling you or surfing you pet as if you have pets. they uniquely measure that you are you and that you have visited this page. or when you visited this page i visit another website.
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the unique tracking is how a publisher and advertisers go, we have served this many and vice versa. this is one of the big sticking points. in this debate, a lot of people want to maintain this bill of the tooth cap people. another goes against what we thought as do not track. there is a record of our to the being maintained by someone. there have been a bunch of technical solutions. don't store information for more than you need to. there has been a bunch of browser tools and technology solutions. it is supposed to help loch ness. most of my research has shown that it is supposed to help. -- it is supposed to help.
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aroundre ways to go consumer choices when they want to opt out and remain anonymous. to gois this arms race around the consumer choice. there is idea behind do not track. come up with a policy. peter describes this as a technical process. what it is really a policy mechanism. the user expresses interest or desire to privacy to a bunch of websites. they can respond accordingly. it is like raising a flag. it is not a high-tech, technical standard. having as sticker on your drivers license thing you do not want your organs donated. ends happening by providing
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a centralized or reliable and easy way for users to express choice is that you have third party tracking brought to the forefront. you also allow the industry to come up with new innovative ways to get information. for example, i like bikes. i'm happy to disclose that to third parties and get a lot of context about bikes. i might be sensitive about other things, i don't want to say isle dieting or i like sugar agree -- sugar free sodes. i want the able to choose what i express and what i don't express. so bringing this issue of
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targeting to the forefront you allow a better market and better working ecosystem. there is an opportunity here. >> thank you. before i go to mike, i want to mention that i didn't in my opening but i think it is important. a briefing we did two weeks ago in spectrum in wireless mobilities. the idea was the need for this spectrum crunch and have the mobile devices to download the content we want. the question is whether or not the band windth can prohibit users from accessing types of advertising on their mobile devices as on their p.c. or in their homes. if people couldn't access advertising on their mobile devices, the advertising platform that enables free content on the internet as we know it today, would not be available on mobile devices. we sometimes take for granted that advertising has generated, kind of the free services that we take for granted today. before i went to mike, i wanted to say we mentioned that last week but this is an important part of the conversation.
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what the role advertising plays here is important. >> i think that's right. thanks, tim for bringing this panel together and making that pitch for the importance of advertising. it is a home grown industry here in the united states. it is a $36 billion industry that provides over three million jobs to american workers. it's been a robust growing industry by 15% year-over-year in the last few years in a relatively down economy. we have to recognize that innovation and economic growth is apart of every policy decision we make for the internet. i think that is why today's discussion is really great. we're here -- tim asked the question, why are we here and why do we care? i can tell you that we're a 500- plus member company that creates original content and services
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that are fearly available to users because of the itselfing that supports the services. the advertising that supports the services. they care about consumer prives and that is because consumers care about privacy. they care about how data flows online and the experience that consumers receive in the data ecosystem. that's why we work with our industry partners, it's been a long process but it's not likely, even if it ends today you never hang a banner and say we figured out privacy. there is always a new challenge. the industry is going to continue to evolve and grow and consumer expectations will continue to change and we want to meet those expectations. we think we're going a good job. that's why we were a founding partners to come together and create the digital alliance,
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which is a self-regulatory program that was alouted by president obama's administration when they released the privacy bill of rights. they held the program up as a model of success how industry can self-regulate and create what they call enfoceable code of conduct. what that means is we've revolutionized the way consumers receive information about how data is collected online. the transparency principle. if you haven't seen it, once you look at it, you recognize it. if you haven't seen the ad choices icon, it is being seen in one trillion ads every month. that is revolutionary as far as consumer notice. we've empowered consumers to make a choice. as you look at the internet and you go from site to sight and you have concerns, a lot of
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consumers do. they can opt out of the entire digital ecosystem. about 120 companies participant. there's a lot going on in this space, there's a long history for more than a decade. n.e.i. has been a great partner at the d.a.a. and they are expanding their programs. this is all to meet consumer's privacy expectations. we recognized a year ago when we were at the white house and they were supporting our system. we can do better. we have to continue to evolve as an industry and through self- regulation and that is when we made the commitment to try to incorporate browser tools. that is what we're talking about
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at our company, as the user of the internet, you use your browser -- you have to by definition. we'll talk about that later. so maybe there's another possible consumer touch point. beside this ad choice icon, maybe we can provide another consumer touch point to allow them to exercise choice. that's why we're working with them and within the industry to try to come up with other ways to empower consumers. that's what this is really about. you know, the nice thing about self-regulation is it's becoming global. we rolled out a europe yap d.a.a., we're about to roll out a canadian d.a.a., we're working with south america to have inner operateability not because we want it for companies but for global internet users want to
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have a seamless, easy useable experience when it comes to privacy on fl the online space and this is something that self- regulation can achieve. the second question you asked was if this is dead or alive? it is very much alive. largely because i think when peter joined as a co-chair he breathed new life into it and that was refreshing. i think there is a real opportunity to get something done that is good for users and good for industry as well. but i think the key is going to be focusing on the technology, i think when you look at the two documents, one is a technical specification on how browsers talk to each other and how
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servers on the back end talk to each other. then there is compliance document, which is what are the legal obligations? every standard is voluntary. it requires industry to voluntarily agree to follow whatever the w3c comes up with. that is why getting the language right is key. but i think there's an opportunity to advance consumer privacy. i think the technical side is not that difficult. i think figuring out a consistent way for browsers to present this tool to users, a consistent way for browsers to talk to each other on the back end, this signal and response. we're working hand-in-hand in partnership with peter and regulators. >> chris, you represent a union of folks. why is this necessary?
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do consumers care about this? is this an issue? also, where is the agreement -- i'm trying to figure out where the agreement and disagreement is, if there is any? >> there is. thanks. i've been listening to my various panelists and i've been revising my remark a little bit on the fly, which is always dangerous. bear with me a little bit. i think one of the things we haven't talked about is why should we care? why is this a big deal? so i'm going to try to lay out a few scenarios that i think illustrate the potential harms. i'm not saying that all of mike's members are causing the harms but i want you to understand the basic framework that we view this through. what we believe or at least the aclu and i think other consumer groups as well, one of the problems with this collection of information and this tracking, especially when you're not aware of it.
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it creates a power imbalance, if you will. other people know things about you that you don't know about them or you don't know they know. what does that mean? this is very abstract. let me try to make that concrete. "the new york times" did a sad story about richard guthrie who was a senior citizen, i believe he was a world war ii veteran. in his old age he had become a little bit senile and had a tough time making decisions on his own. he was targeting in a marketing database as someone who would be as an easy mark. someone you can sell things to. he was milked out of substantial amounts of money. you could call and he would answer the phone and you can get him to buy a product that he
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didn't need. that is an extreme example. but if you can use information that you can collect you can make decisions about them. the target company does a good job of targeting consumers. they do a good job on what consumers may want to buy, often is not a bad thing. they got particularly good at it, apparently, they identified a certain category or types of purchases that indicated someone was pregnant. they would send them mailers, good news, you might want to consider buying all these other things. apparently, they had an irate father come in, why are you sending this to my daughter? she's only -- i think he was 16 or 17.
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he had to come back two weeks later embarrassed it seems like there was things going none my house that i didn't know about. she was pregnant. information could be revealed that you may not be aware of or know that you're revealing. what is more troubling is this information when it is collected can be integrated with other information. like, for example, how much money you make? that is something that is of great interest if you're an advertiser. what target does is they send you coupons based on things they know about you, like how much money i make? if i'm wealthy i may get a $10 coupon. if i'm a lower income customer i
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may get a $2 coupon buzz that's enough to get yu -- because that is enough to get you in the door. it's clearly knowledge that you didn't realize you had released to deprive you of a certain benefit or a possible benefit. that's something i think you have to consider here. i think that we want to bring in a do not track mechanism, at least the aclu does to help consumers level the plague field. -- playing field. i think, tim, you spoke about why industries should come on board and industry does think there is a benefit. i think there's still a significant category of people who are afraid of the internet. they don't know what is going on there. they worry about things like tracking. there's still a lot of people who have not plugged in.
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i believe giving them tools like do not track that allows them to control what information is collected is a great way to say, no, you don't have to be worried about this tracking. you can participant without tracking and i think that will help bring people on the internet and i think that benefits everybody. from an aclu point of view, we worry about not just tracking by industry but by the government. we fear that this kind of information collection can be accessed not just by customers but can be collected and sold to the government. the aclu uses the internet as one of the most powerful tools to exercise you're first amendment right since the printing press. you can speak, you can learn. this is a tool that is unparallel in its value. but if you're afraid to go on a
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particular website because you think that may put you in a certain profile or class, you may not want to learn about sensitive information. you may not want to delve into areas or join particular groups and we think that harms your first amendment freedoms. that is why we think a do not track mechanism is a powerful way to create a shield for you so you can do those things that you think are controversy. with all respect in terms of what you're doing in tomplese self-regulation. regulation. self- we don't believe self-regulation is not enough. passing a base line of creating a do not track option of some sort would be benefit herbal. it is a law, it means that it can't be changed by fine print. a company can't decide to opt out of it. this is a protection that i can count on and that means a lot. doing all of those positive
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things that i was discussing. i also believe that self- regulation does a good job of getting industry to do what they think are best practices anyway. right? all the good guys in a particular industry want to do certain things. but something that is an industry norm that needs to be changed, everything in the industry agrees with it, they are not going to pass a self- regulatory regime that is intri call to the industry. industry.l to the i think tracking is a portion of the advertising industry, not the whole but a portion and i think it is run realistic to expect self-regulation to do a good job of tackling that. too much talking? >> no, i want to make sure we get to the rest of our issues. >> absolutely. let me say there's a core value
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that we should say we should all control if we're tracked online. i will say that. >> we're here because of the tracking issue just had the last meeting and we have a july deadline. whether this do not track feature is feasible? so i think -- i have to ask, peter, where are we today? >> well, i think where we are today is pretty well represented in a one page that came out of the meeting. the first word i like, it says consensus. that is a good word. i'm going to briefly mention, sort of the four points that were in that, if that's ok? i will -- i try to say it in english, i've been a teach are for a long time.
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-- teacher for a long time. the key part was, there's been quotes in the press before we met that this thing was going to die. it was going to blow up that week. instead, the key languages, there was sufficient progress in the meeting and that was signed on by the privacy people in the room, the advertising people, the browser people, that was the room. i think it is interesting to note. they said look, we're not abandoning this thing. we should go forward. the first one is about audience measurement or market research. here's why this is here. the d.a.a. and mike's group is very much apart about it. they put out the code of good practices and they said there were collection limits. but there were a couple of important exceptions and one is if you're doing market research
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and you don't target back to tim, you can gather all the data you want, basically. my testimony in the senate last year before i came into this, i went to the d.a.a. and said this looks pretty wide open, do you think we can do something to change this? since that time, the industry says we have to come up with new language on measuring the audience. you track people partly and send an ad to that person but you have cookies to figure out how many people came here. we're trying to figure out that market research part so we can decide what is in and what is out. >> can you give me an offline example of that? are you talking about a block, zip code? >> tv, it is women or men watching "american idol" this year? so there's audience measurement on demographic for lots of reasons. there's a lot of reasons for advertising because you want to spend money where the people are that you care about. that could turn out to be a lot of data about the people. that is why it is part privacy
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and part people. what is it going to be the back and forthwith the websites? the advertisers and the browsers and others are having good conversations about that. the third one is once the data is collected, do you keep it for ever and do you keep it in full form forever? if you're going to address tracking, then keeping it in your database forever seems like tracking to a lot of people. so you might scrub the data over time so you don't have it linked back to peter or tim. then you scrub it but how long do you scrub it? how hard do you scrub it? it could be called data retention. what do the sites do with the data they collected?
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we worked a long time on that. those are three areas. then the fourth point said there will be ongoing discussions on unique identifiers as a critical issue for advocates. we're inviting proposals on ways to solve this issue. on the privacy side, i turn on do not track then as i go around the web someone is still putting unique cookie on me to identify me. that shouldn't be the way it works with do not track. the industry said, wait we have to have security for our systems. wait a second, we have to debug problems when they happen.
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maybe we have to keep track for accounting reasons. so there's a back and forth where the privacy side has said let's innovate a world where we don't need the unique identifiers. the industry has said that is not practical as we see it. if there was some magic technology that could get some advertising in and not have the unique tracking that would be very attractive. there's an invitation for people to find ways to do that. those are tissues that came out of the consensus document this month. >> so i want to ask the panelists -- does this document mean as peter says in number four, we're moving towards a document. when this is done after july, what does it look like when the users in the audience or at home want to download the latest version of fire fox, chrome, their favorite browser, it will do this to prevent tracking. what does that look like and how does that play out? >> we're not allowed to talk about what that will look like. that is the irony of this,
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right? we have browsers and present an opportunity for the user to present something. >> but we're not -- >> but you asked what it will look like. let's talk about what it won't look like then we can talk about what it might look like. i think that is helpful because we're having a discussion -- can browsers present something to users? at the w3c we're trying to have a discussion of what that should look like. we're trying to have that discussion, frankly, we're trying to work offline with the browser companies. if we're going to present something to users it should be clearly stated. i will circle back with the agreement we had with the white house a year ago and what everyone agreed to then, we
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should have a consistent browser user face and it should not be turned on by default. it should be a users' expressed preference. it is not the do not track, it is the tracking preference expression working group. so what we want to do -- >> protection. >> we want to give users a voice to express their preferences. that's key. so i'm not sure -- >> let me -- so when the user downloads the latest version of fire fox, under your imagination we're not w3c, the user has to do something affirmative to turn on that preference, to choose to not have this tracking issue happen? >> yes, we should have users expressing a premps. >> is there a consensus on that? >> let me surface why we don't necessarily agree with that. to kind of boil this down, it is
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an interesting question, right? people tend to leave whatever the default is. whatever you give them you leave it on. if the do not track is on they will leave it there if it is off they might leave it there. that is a big question. i think the advertisers, correct me film i'm discategorizing you. they think it is an unfair choice to present it to consumers as on. >> we don't believe it is a consumer expression when a company such as a browser when they decide to turn on the do not track. that was the first area of consensus and the w3c agreed that it should not be turned on by default. several groups agreed on that position for more than a year. >> can i unpack this because this is crucial. why is it a choice if it is given to you if it is off and you turn it on but it is not a choice if it is on and you turn
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it off? >> tracking has a value. >> not to beat a dead horse but it is the same issue we saw in 1999. we had the opportunity to do something rein the question came down to what should the defaults be? the general consensus that you get from the ad industries, as long as it is hard and not a lot of people do it then we're fine with whatever it is. in fact, some -- to be fair, there was a decision 10, 13 years ago to decide what the default should be and there is no reason why it should be now. if i happen to be gardening in your property and you say i want to take that back. i would safe i have a thriving -- i would say i have a thriving
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farm share based on you property but that does not give me the right to come into your property. >> can i challenge you? we're talking about opt in versus opt out? back in 1999, the first network advertising initiative agreement with the federal trade commission they agreed to have an opt out cookie and there was no opt in version of that. that seemed to satisfy them at that time. >> right. so i think the proliferation of tracking has gone up. >> so something has changed. >> just to finish, there's no way it should be one way or the other. microsoft has presented the first launch of the browser. is a fairly -- safari has blocked this for a long time. i think the assumption that it should be one way or the other is a false assumption. we can use anti-virus software. maybe i want my firewall to
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block all of this as well. >> let's unpack that a bit. there's been several accounts and maybe it is jennifer lopez and what she is doing. >> i've never been compared to jennifer lopez. [laughter] >> you have now. we invited all the browser companies to participant today and a lot of the west coast could not participant. where are we now? are they going to turn it on by default, some are, some aren't, some have backed way. where are we? >> safari blocks it with their firewall. >> everyone's browser has different things. if i'm looking at something that i don't want other people to look at i go into incognito mode in chrome. you can kind of mask those things or you can -- those are browsers, the cookie controls have been around for a long time.
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we're talk about implementing this do not track concepts. >> that's right. >> there's a consensus but not a standard. >> the reason it is important of what the defaults are, my research shows when you're in incognito mode or you block the cookies or you try to use the browser features at love of the times there are companies that go around those. hulu will go around it mode even if you have two browsers on -- a lot of the times, there are companies that around those. for example, hulu will go around those even if you have two browsers on that.
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this is known as flash cookies. they will resurrect those cookies. it should reflect what the browser preferences are for the user, right? the user should be able to say i do not want to be tracked and i should send this signal. >> mike? >> i don't know what the question is. i'm happy to go through a walk-through of the standard used for browsers. >> sure, you can do that. again, we do not have a w3c standard. >> i think it would be useful for this audience to talk about the standard. with the presentation of do not track -- microsoft requires you to, well, they presented. it is default on. you have to turn it off. safari and chrome and firefox, the four of those are the predominant browsers. they basically have it as an option. it is an privacy settings or
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some other setting. the user has to go in and express a preference not to be tracked. >> do they know there is invisible third party tracking going on? and then they find the setting -- >> ok, we will get to that in a second. so, in your browser, there are many privacy settings. privacy, security. the basic pattern is you go to privacy. you click one. you have a list of options and you click again. that is something like do not call. you go to the website. you set it up. you click it. that's a basic approach. how easy it is to find varies. how well it is labeled varies.
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people can get into a lot of discussions. that idea of going to the settings and click is something people have done a lot of times in their browser. >> i use incognito browsing now and again. most of the room when you ask whether they signed up for the do not call registry, look at them raise their hands. they go to some website. they searched for the website. forgive me, it is not the most user-friendly. they found the number. they called it area they registered it. that's a fair amount of work, right? why is that not too hard, but going into your cookie preferences is? >> you notice when you get a call that interrupts your dinner.
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you notice when someone calls you on your cell phone when you are paying your minute. i think most consumers are not aware and the way this information is used is not immediately apparent to them. my research has shown that companies will provide different offers, different prices. most consumers do not realize another consumer who would receive a different price. there was one company that would profile you based on cars you browse online, and when you went to the toyota dealership and you signed up, they would send the dealership information about what other cars you look that. so when you are negotiating, that dealership knows that you like the red honda or the red toyota. and most consumers won't know that that is happening, to go into some very settings. so the question -- the large show of hands of people who did do not call, how many people have ever changed a browser privacy setting? >> wrong room, katie couric.
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[laughter] >> i guess the question is, there is the benefit to advertising, as i noted. is there the benefit to having targeted ads? privacy councils that i own one, which was fantastic. [laughter] for my kids, not for me. anyway, i tried the patch. so, i bought the cool repair lining from these sites. i tried patching it. now we get catalogs on cool repair. i live in d.c., right? i cannot have a bathroom, much less a pool. is it having tailored ads better than having jumped sent to you? sent tohaving junk
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you? >> i don't know if it is junk. i think it's a fair question, but i think it begs the question, if it's so valuable, one consumers choose to do it? people will say, i like those amazon consumer preferences. i like them, too. i think it is a fair question to say, doesn't advertising have some value? i think if the consumer is choosing the tracking, it has a great deal of value. i'm not sure that translates to a third-party you do not know about. >> let me go to mike. there are a few more questions i want to get to. so, let me get to this -- mike, do you want to respond? >> i think consumers are
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learning more about this. in fact, i think consumers prefer tailored advertising, that content. that is key. the role is to have an educated consumer in power to make the choice, not some parochial decision made by an advocate or one company for tens or hundreds of millions of internet users. because that is fundamentally going to throw the internet economy out of balance. that's just the reality. >> there are several more questions i can ask. if you do have a question, please make it a question, not a comment and identify yourself. mark? >> first, two points --
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>> [indiscernible] >> you went through a litany of harm, mastercard using mastercard data, catalogs. the fact is none of it has anything to do with do not track whatsoever. do not track has nothing to do with off-line data, has nothing to do with merchandising their data. it is exclusively about first parties versus third parties. i think that created enormous confusion about what do not track with do and not do. the second use is about the competition issues. there are huge issues that the ftc to mission are mentioned just of this week, that they had not considered the impact on the small business, the small publishers on the independent and that thing. what about the small business and the small publisher? >> i think if you were playing do not track bingo, what is the harm is the center square. >> i would say i agree. you are creating the business model.
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i do not see -- behavioral targeting is creating a business model of profiling the individual users and creating detailed summaries of all the places they go online. it is connecting all of that information to information that has been collected off-line and it is using it were a wide variety of her business, including, but not limited to behavioral targeting. i think that that incorporates all of the harm i just listed -- sorry, to those who could not hear mark's question, he said off-line data is not covered. i think opting out or do not track allows you to limit the information going into that profile, allows you to prevent that kind of linkage, and does
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serve to significantly balance the harms. >> i guess it would make the point that the do not track process --and it's not really the do not track process, because it is not about stopping tracking. there will always be necessary uses of browsing behavior for things like ad reporting, click fraud, other types of fraud prevention. the w3c group is not talking about preventing tracking. we should be clear about what we promise to the public. that is really key. it's not about stopping data collection for the exact same reasons that you have to -- when i as a user go to a website, by definition that website knows i am there. by definition there are third-party entities such as an analytical firm which helps that website know how many unique visitors they have each month. that's how they stay in business.
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they have to know i was at that website. that is going to happen. we are not going to stop tracking. we?re not going to stop -- we're not going to stop collection. that's not what we are talking about. it is not about stopping behavioral advertising. what you are talking about is stopping the ability to collect any data which affects every online business. affects their analytics. affects the way they create their concept. almost all websites have third- party partners or other domains that they funnel information in from. people would like to stop that from happening. this is the way the internet
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works. what we ought to do and what the w3c has done, because peter has gotten these groups to focus on a common privacy concern. i might as a user not want to have third-party entities collecting the long history of my browsing behavior. i might want to express my wish not to have that retained for a long time. that is what we are trying to empower. that is what dnt is really about. >> i think the second part of mark's question is not answered. but you brought up the second part of the semantic issue, the do not collect verses do not target. i want to go a little bit further, if i may, mark. you mentioned the white house and other policy framework from december 2010. the deputy chief technology officer at the white house at that time set up what do not track does not mean do not collect. rather it means advertisers must not collect user data for the purposes of behavioral
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advertising. however, from the federal trade commission, for her, the difference is when the user chooses do not collect. i do not have time to read senator rockefeller's thoughts on the subject, quite frankly. is it do not target or do not collect the information in the first place? >> the reason that it has been emphasized the ftc chairman, this comes back to the market research thing i mentioned earlier. in the multisite code, the advertiser's code itself, part one is called collections, when you go across sites over time. there are two sections that are i brought that they said they will address. one is measuring market science and the other is product development. i said to the group, if those things get addressed in a way
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that i think they can be addressed, i think we could honestly say at w3c that we have collection limits that now would be accepted by a very wide range of actors to have agreed to that. it is not stopping all collection. there's a ton of collection that happens in a lot of ways. are we going to stop all collection on the internet? you can't send anything to their page unless you have their ip address. >> can i -- >> sure, go. go.
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>> i went to identify the three other exceptions to collection. the reason i say you will not stop collection data online, even if you were a dnt user you will still have information collected for ad delivery and reporting, which is the economic engine of that light or service you have gone to, and things like that fraud and security. that is just not going to change. that's the way the internet is protected. that's the way companies do their research. that's the way they detect out fraud. and by the way, we also have legal obligations. things like the media ratings council which requires us to collect certain information for certain purposes. so, you will never put in and to edit collection even if you are a dnt user. >> i want to take the opportunity to agree with mike.
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i thought we ought to do this at least once on the panel. get everybody a sense we not totally at loggerheads. yes, we will not stop collection. but that does not mean do what ever else you want with the information. that's a wide spec from there. reasonably speaking, we will collect some information. that makes it more imperative we have strong guidelines or what the collection is and what you can do with it. because we will not be able to say nothing was collected at all. personally that is why i think congress needs to get involved. that's why we need legal detection not so much for members who are good actors, book or -- but for the limited number of people in any society who do not want to play by the rules, are not interested in doing anything but pushing the boundaries and doing more collection and creating more problematic situations.
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i think that's an argument for legal protection. were not saying do not collect anything ever. we will be reasonable. >> i have a question here, here, and over there in the front row. >> [indiscernible] >> can you identify yourself? >> one of the big questions was about third parties and cookie blocking sites. during one of those meetings we learned that the browser had delayed implementation of that. is this a concession to the w3c process and the stakeholders? are there technical considerations? is this something you can comment on? >> i'm not inclined to speculate. you can read the blog from the chief technology officer of mozilla. >> i will not speculate on the reasoning. we don't happen to think the business operations which require cookies is a bug in their software browser. we happen to think it is a 36 billion dollars industry that depends on cookies are some
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sort of identifier to run sites. we certainly applaud them for that. we would like to see if perhaps we can get something on do not track. mozilla has signals. that is their priority. they may be willing to back away from cookie blocking. i will tell you, we have an online petition up. i have 985 small publisher websites let signed a petition saying if mozilla were to block cookies, those businesses might go under. their livelihood would be threatened. i'm glad it has not fallen on deaf ears at mozilla. >> i'm curious -- did those sites block safari? the patch would do what the mac browser, safari, does by default. which is block heard party cookies by default.
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>> most of these sites were created in the last few years, and so they have been living with the safari decision. the reality is the safari marketshare is so small, they have been able to grin and bear it. they are not happy about it. it's not lost revenue. the difference is mozilla with a 20% market share, a change, would be lopping off 20% of their revenue. >> it sounds a lot like if a lot of people do it we will not support it again. but if a lot of people are doing this, we will not support it. >> it is one company deciding they are going to be technologically blocking cookies, which are part and parcel of website operation. there is no agreement to it or non-agreement to it. they just do it. it is their decision. we ought to understand what the
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economic realities are. there are hundreds of thousands of small american businesses at stake. that is not hyperbole. they are voicing their concerns. >> given the history of the ad industry, it is not targeted advertising. this idea you absolutely have to have third-party cookies to provide advertising online is absolutely false. look at google. what percentage is from conceptual-based advertising? this has historically been the case. this is a red herring again. cookies are part and parcel to the way -- third-party cookies are part and parcel of the way the web operates. that's not true.
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that is a decision made a long time ago that not all browsers supported. >> and so, what you are doing is you are limiting your analysis to online behavioral advertising. i've already identified that's not what this discussion is about. it's not about stopping tracking. it's not about stopping collecting. third-party cookies are used for all kinds of things. analytics, content customization. certainly advertising is part of that, but it's not everything. when you block a cookie, you block the infrastructure for a website, you are fundamentally undermining their operations. >> what i said was you can promote other business models for measurement, poor things like i opt into sharing intor things like i opt
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sharing information about things i'm comfortable with and not others. and this idea that you must have this is again a red herring. you can have a variety of different innovative business models around this concept. >> i agree with everything except the last statement. i agree you can appropriately but limits on the internet and completely reengineer the internet. but that is not what were doing. that's not what anyone is interested in doing. >> i'm confused. we have this discussion about browsers implementing do not track measures on their own, by default, not by default. why do we need a w3c standard when these browsers are going to implement anyway? why don't we just let the market decide? from the browser companies, why should we care?
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>> can i take a shot at that? i wrote an op-ed earlier this month in "wired," and users and businesses and browsers, i think, should care. this is the way the arms race can go. we have this current story. we hope to come up with a standard. that's what we're trying to get to. let's say there's a bunch of cookie blocking that happens from the browser side. the advertising industry in its meetings have said they would have to seriously consider doing new tracking things that have often been called digital fingerprinting, which would be other ways to tell who the user is and wallowing them. there have been privacy objections. then some people on the browser side said, let's do that, because then we will figure out digital finger renting and we will start -- digital fingerprinting and we will start to block you there. that blocks a bunch of privacy choices and users have because ranges happen to what users
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thought they were doing. i have offered to people that in the negotiations when we learn how to send and receive and give consumers choice is better than an escalation of technical measures and countermeasures. that's the reason why w3c could get us to a better outcome. not just w3c, it could be legislation. but something different than this arms race. >> i have to ask you, if that does happen, if a browser implements i do not track feature, and i can turn it on and express my choice, i affirmatively say i do not want to be tracked, whatever i understand that the. let's say in your arms race scenario, a publisher wants to circumvent that choice with some other kind of technology. is there any recourse, is there any measure in the regulatory perspective?
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with that not be considered not abiding by my choice? is there any recourse? >> is there an ftc official in the house? >> i think we're talking about two different things. one is cookie blocking. there's no problem if you do not circumvent it. if a user was sending a dnc signal, which is different -- sending a dnt signal, which is different. you reason peter wants an agreement is he wants the industry to abide by a standard. is the industry has agreed to abide by that standard, just as we have done in self regulation,
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we have an independent enforcement program that enforces against not just daa members but the entire ecosystem and you would have companies who would say if we follow dnt, and certainly, we would have a hook >> and the hook would be? that would not be possible? >> it's completely possible. you have browsers turning on dnt by default. not just browsers. software manufacturers, hardware manufacturers. i'm sure users have no idea. it's largely being a snort because there is note definition of dnt first of all. very few companies have said it would be followed.
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>> there has been a process. many, many years ago, called p3p. there was a standard set in the taxonomy and the risen expression, i do not want this to be in place. my understanding is some companies circumvented that. why do that not trigger the federal trade commission section five authority? >> there have been criminal investigations around circumvention around things like flash cookies, as well as expiring cookies -- >> i don't think they're in business anymore. >> these are business models you may not wish to support. there are a lot of cases where users -- i do not understand why the assumption is users do not know they are expressing that choice if these software turns it on by default.
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many people in this room could decide they want to use of ari because they want -- want to use safari because they want it turned on by default. >> microsoft is running an ad campaign on the idea that they are a very strong right to see protection company. >> their advertising mentions do not track, if i understand. >> can i get in another question? >> i think there is a lot of inner detainment in the world that does not track you. there is a broader points. there is a value to doing this that is a general value, right? doing this amongst these disparate people, not having a regime in which we have tracking the default on the internet. i just hope we can find some common ground on this. i do think congressional action is key to bolstering that. i think there is common ground on this.
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>> [indiscernible] my question is about the prognosis. there has been a lot of talk. my question is, do you think you will get to a final standard by next april? >> the consensus document says we are moving toward the july 13 last call deadline. last call is a standard term that no one ever knows what it means. [laughter] basically, it means we have to have a text that goes out to the world for public comment. you put out a document. the world can comment. in the process response to those concept.
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but the design is to have a real live site that people get to respond to. we are meeting next wednesday for an hour and half by phone. were trying to get to that document by the end of july. >> as someone who has been a participant in that working group before peter took over for almost two years now, i think we have finally, because we have identified what we are trying to solve instead of oiling the ocean and solving for everything, we found legitimate privacy concerns we can bounce the ball on, as chris said. there are challenges within the w3c with their rules and their process. i'm not sure we get everything done through the w3c, but i think there are opportunities to do things through the w3c. if we cannot get everything done
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there, there are willing partners out via the w3c. >> the gentleman in the checkered shirt. >> thank you for taking my question. so, the other stakeholder -- they had to be reminded at the beginning of their meeting yesterday of the consensus and the anonymity -- you know what i'm saying -- it's not the same thing. peter, what does this mean for your group, and don't you have to air on the side of industry a little bit? you can get 70% to agree, but if mike does not want to sign up -- do you have anything? >> i would say we do not have to lean to any one direction. i want to be very there on that. consensus is one of these magical turns -- magical terms
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i'm still learning the lower of what consensus means. a lot of times you say in a consensus setting, is there anything about this these you can't live with you go -- you can't live with? is there something here you can't live with? that's roughly what consensus means. not love it and cheering and waving a flag. we have consumer groups, who are mostly thinking about users. we have browsers. we have third parties. we have the advertisers and others who did not put in the url. and then there are regulators. there are regulators who care and rest and all that. that's a lot of different folks with different perspectives. my own focus is to make sure we
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have a tent for all the major parts of it so i can say with some confidence, this is better than the alternative of not having an deal. that is what i am personally trying to get to. some agree. some do not agree. there are challenges. it is not inanimate. it's not a hecklers veto. ma'am? >> [indiscernible] enforcement. why is it the ftc process is the only approach? if the user has said i do not want cookies on my computer, and some party goes in and puts cookies on the computer, why is that not a violation of the can or privacy act of using your employer's internet access
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against their terms? >> why are you going to look at me? >> i can play law professor here for a second. the fact that a user says you have to give me $50 if you send me your webpage does not mean the webpage has to send you $50. so, a unilateral statement by the user saying "i want something" does not mean anything. the same thing if a website says something when you go to your page. when you're talking about spyware, hacking -- you have famous lawyers who bring cases and there are defendants who say they are wrong. what you have then is you have these claims that it is a hack or a wiretap. there are a lot of cases filed and some have settled for money. all of this against the backdrop of our laws against hacking and spyware and wiretapping, but a
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lot of normal as this practices do not under our legal rules about hacking and spyware and wiretapping. so, look at the facts in a particular setting, and if you find a winning case, then find your favorite plaintiff lawyer and go get them. >> [indiscernible] it is not outside what most people would consider normal -- >> computer fraud, one of the issues there, one of the discussions, the split in the courts is, if i give you words and say these are my terms of use and you say you don't care, is that enough to count as a hack? some say it has to be a technical measure, not just words in terms of use.
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i can tell you, that has not been anywhere near the center of the do not track discussions. >> we just have one more minute. in my estimation, what was said to the federal trade commission was not clear from the answer the panelists gave either -- >> [indiscernible] >> i'm not sure i did. >> marked it a lot of enforcement internally. i have worked with the ftc. >> somebody owns property. they have just issued for whether they are doing deceptive marketing -- >> it has resulted in plaintiff
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actions. i do not agree that csa is the right law for this. it's outside what you would be able to enforce. for now, we have unfair and effective. that has the ftc as the regulator. >> i'm crestfallen. we have a lot of questions we did not ask, material to get through. i do want to thank you for your adhd. i have been tracking the protection group working process for some time now. i have stayed on it. what i see is, there is a lot more to go through. i just wonder whether it will be better to burn out or fade away? or will people with their browsers at home be able to use this stuff? i want to thank the panel. thank the audience. happy memorial day recess. , cindyse]>> tomorrow
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from the american petroleum institute discusses the future of the keystone pipeline. about the proposed bipartisan shield law for journalists. an environmental reporter emily oaks how automatic budget cuts are impacting national parks. it is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern, on c-span. resident obama's nominee for commerce secretary testified thursday before the senate commerce committee. she is a longtime political ally and fundraiser for the president. she is chairman of the trans union credit barrel, heir to a hotel fortune and a member of the presidents economic recovery advisory board. the ranking republican on the committee expects her to be confirmed when the senate returns from the memorial day recess. the hearing is just over two hours.
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> good morning. this hearing will come to order. because we are confronted i too incredibly important and busy senators facing us, it would never occur to senator thune and i to do what we ought to do, which is give our statements first and make you wait. so what we are going to do, if it is alright with you, is ask each of you to give your statements and then we will give our statements and then we will give it to ms. pritzker. >> thank you for allowing us to come here today to introduce the nominee the president has offered to this committee and the congress for the important position of secretary of commerce. i know you are leaning in our direction, mr. chairman, because of your wonderful illinois-born wife and your connections to our
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great state, and we thank you for that. but it is that you are in the leadership, and i do not want to mess around with you. [laughter] >> that will be a first. mr. chairman, it is an honor to introduce penny pritzker. she is here that her family, whom she will introduce. what you see when you consider her is not only decades of business and civic experience, which make her a strong candidate for this position, but also a warm, compassionate worker who has given back to the community in illinois and across the nation. ms. pritzker has built five businesses from scratch, served on numerous report for us, and have been an effective leader of major corporations. she ranks as one of the most influential women in a report america.
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that is quite an achievement when you consider the glass ceilings and other obstacles which women face. her lifetime up his express includes her current role as chairman of pritzker realty group. she serves on the board of artemis realty, previously serving on the boards of wrigley company and lasalle bank corporation. her decades of experience will serve her well in leading the agency. her business experience is only enhanced by her service to the
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community in illinois and across the country. she has led initiatives that improve education and help connect people with job opportunities. she leads skills for america's future, a program that gives to others to prepare workers for 21st-century jobs and help them find employment. she is an ardent supporter of the arts. ms. pritzker is the member of the american academy of arts and sciences and former chairman of the board on the museum of contemporary art in chicago. the president appointed her to a counsel for jobs and headed a business and served on a board. you might think in the process of serving so many charities and boards and managing so many businesses that she would be a busy person. she is. for fun, she trains for and competes in ironman distance triathlons and in her spare time. penny pritzker's business know- how make her an excellent candidate to serve as secretary of commerce.
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her humanity and warmth only underscore those characteristics. ms. pritzker's contributions to the business world and illinois are appreciated. it is my pleasure to introduce to this committee ms. penny pritzker. i fully support her nomination and look forward to working for her as she becomes the secretary of commerce. >> thank you, senator. >> mr. chairman, i want to say i am very enthusiastic for penny's nomination. i see her as a voice for business that the president will have to heed. let me point out a few things that the senator mentions, that she started a new business from the ground up that already employs 3500 americans. i have a letter for you that i would like to summit for the record by the former chairman of the fdic, william isaac, that i
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think will help you, and say to my republicans -- >> that will be included. >> i will hope that this voice for business becomes our next commerce secretary. >> great. you two distinguished senators have a choice. you can listen to senator rockefeller and senator thune. we appreciate that offer. >> that is the correct answer. >> senator thune and i will give our opening remarks.
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and then what we will do is what we did yesterday, and that is other colleagues on both sides will not give opening remarks, but all question times will go for seven minutes, so you can do quite a lot with that. all right? >> yes, sir, mr. chairman. >> i would like to call this nomination hearing to order. it is an important one. we are meeting today to consider a distinguished nominee to be the next secretary of commerce. we have not had a strong secretary of commerce in quite a while. ms. pritzker's nomination comes at an important time during our nation's economic recovery. while we have the lowest levels
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of unemployment in four years, too many people are still out of work, and the across-the-board budget cuts imposed in march are creating a new drag on the economy. our nominee understands these challenges. your decades of experience in the private sector -- investing in and managing numerous companies -- have given you the skills to manage a large department. and that is what you will get, i very large department. you come from the business community and understand their needs. but your long track-record as a civic leader is also going to serve you well in this position.
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as many already know, you served on the president's council on jobs and competitiveness and the president's economic recovery advisory board. you also served as chairman of the aspen institute's skills for america's future project, which has fostered partnerships between more than 40 employers and 200 community colleges across the country. each of these experiences will be important to your task at commerce. the commerce secretary is in charge of 12 different bureaus with more than 40,000 employees. but to do the job well, you will need to reach far beyond the people under your direct management. the department of commerce serves very different constituencies that touch all corners of our economy. remarkably efferent, from the arctic ocean to telecommunications, everything. you will need to appreciate the immediate financial challenges struggling fishermen in the northeast are facing, while managing and conserving the nation's fisheries for the future.
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you will need to find ways to improve the resilience of coastal communities who face increasing threats from storms and sea level rise. sea level is rising. some believe in that. you will need to work directly with businesses and communities, partnering with them to create jobs and expand opportunities. collaboration between the public and private sectors is one of the centerpieces of the department's work. whether it is the creation of cyber-security standards or the development of manufacturing hubs for small- and medium-sized businesses, the private sector has to rely on and trust the commerce department's work. this trust is crucial to the
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long-term competitiveness of the u.s. economy. ms. pritzker, we will be depending on you to continue this collaboration and strengthen it where necessary. one crucial area of public- private collaboration is the development of the wireless economy. this committee is closely following the department's efforts in this area. expanding the spectrum available for wireless services and relieving the so-called "spectrum crunch" will be vital to jobs and growth in the nation in the years to come. at the same time, smart spectrum
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policy includes protecting vital federal operations. not all federal operations want to give up any of their spectrum. you will be running into the department of defense on that, and good luck. i expect that the department will continue to work in close cooperation with federal agencies and the private sector to open up more spectrum to meet our nation's spectrum needs. finally, the commerce department manages our nation's severe storm warning systems and weather satellites. this has been a troubled area for us, especially with satellites. the terrible tragedy in oklahoma is a stark reminder to us of the vital role that the national weather service plays in extreme weather events. in severe conditions like we saw in oklahoma earlier this week, minutes matter and are the difference between life and death. even as we face the sequester, we expect to come to a grand bargain, we have not, so sequester is part of the lives of all of us. we need a new weather-ready nation initiative to improve communications in face of events and to build community resilience in the face of increasing vulnerability to extreme weather. you have had a very full life and a highly successful life.
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i am one who believes in public service. you obviously do because of all of the boards that you belong to that deal with youth training and jobs of all of that. i look forward to your system running and hearing from my colleagues, especially my ranking senator thune.
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>> thank you, mr. chairman. i want to welcome her to the committee. ms. pritzker has an extensive background in the private sector and i look forward to hearing how she will apply that experience to achieve positive results at the department of commerce and for the nation's economy, should she be confirmed. the department of commerce is tasked with promoting business, facilitating job creation, and spurring economic growth. unfortunately, our nation's unemployment rate is still at an unacceptable level -- 7.5%. in december of 2007, the unemployment rate measured at 5%, and it peaked at 10% in october 2009. clearly, much work remains to get the unemployment rate back to pre-recession levels -- particularly when you factor in the 21.9 million americans who are unemployed or underemployed. despite positive reports in other areas of the economy, job growth remains very slow and so far in 2013, monthly job growth has lagged behind the monthly averages experienced last year.
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we in congress must make jobs and the economy our top priority, and that means we must strive to do what we can to unleash the great american entrepreneurial spirit. we need to remove needless and outdated regulation and reduce burdensome tax rates for businesses of all sizes. we must craft policies that spur the private sector to take risks to create jobs, and we must also seek to restrain the government's inclination to intervene in the marketplace. in other words, we should let the free market choose economic winners and losers, rather than having the government do so. that is why i believe it is critically important to have a secretary of commerce who has a strong record of accomplishment in creating jobs in the private sector, someone who knows the challenges and how to overcome the barriers the private sector faces in creating jobs. i believe the next commerce secretary must be a strong advocate for trade and open markets for america's farmers and manufacturers. the next commerce secretary must also work to create a more business friendly environment. it is no secret that the obama administration has been
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criticized for adopting a negative attitude toward business, which i believe contributes to some of the economic problems we've observed over the last several years. there's significant uncertainty in the private sector, and many within the business community are wary of the obama administration's predisposition to have the government intervene in the free market and its failure to adopt pro-growth policies. i believe we must have a cabinet official who is strongly committed to economic expansion, trade promotion, and policies that strengthen our competitiveness. so, i look forward to hearing ms. pritzker discuss her priorities with respect to these issues. i am particularly interested in hearing about ms. pritzker's experiences serving on the president's council for jobs and competitiveness. i'm also interested in ms. pritzker's views on making more federal spectrum available for commercial use. the commerce department is uniquely situated to play a role in this matter, particularly with one of its agencies, the national telecommunications and information administration, ntia. should ms. pritzker be confirmed, i would ask that she focus some of her time and energy on dealing with this issue, especially with respect to freeing up the 755 to 780 megahertz band. i hope that we can work together to resolve this issue, because if we are successful, it will
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ignite a great deal of economic activity across the country, assist in funding a nationwide public safety network, and ultimately help to ease the nation's debt by bringing billions of dollars into the treasury from the auctioning of this valuable spectrum to the private sector. finally, i would note that some concerns have been raised about ms. pritzker's role with, and position as a beneficiary of, an offshore tax haven, as well as her role in the failure of superior bank back in 2000 and 2001. i have been in communication with her on these matters, and would appreciate her continuing to work with us after the hearing to answer all of the questions i and other members of the committee may have, before we report her nomination. should she be confirmed, i hope that ms. pritzker will be a strong voice on the president's cabinet for lowering regulatory burdens, lowering taxes for businesses large and small, and promoting job creation in the private sector. on a personal note, ms. pritzker, i want to thank you for your willingness to serve our country.
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while i don't expect that we will see eye to eye on every issue, it is important that we have individuals with experience in business who are willing to put that experience to work in the service of our nation. thank you again for holding this hearing, mr. chairman, and i look forward to ms. pritzker's testimony. thank you. >> thank you, senator thune. the floor is yours. >> members of the committee, i am honored to be under consideration for secretary of the united states department of commerce. with me today is my husband, my rock and my best friend, as well as my son who just graduated from college and my daughter rose who just returned from her first year at college. over the past few weeks i have had the privilege to meet with many of you to discuss the department and how we can work together to give entrepreneurs and businesses tools they need to create jobs and keep our economy growing. thank you for your valuable time, insights, and
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perspectives. american entrepreneurship is at the heart of my family's history. my great-grandfather came to the united states from czarist russia, dirt poor at the age of 10. he taught himself english, worked several jobs, and earned his law degree at night, and opened a law practice at the age of 30. why father was the founding president of hyatt hotels. when i was a child he took me to work with him at the motel on weekends. i would play on his adding machine and help out with inspections of our property. as an entrepreneur and a business soldier, he has been my inspiration. my father died when i was 13, so in high school, as my interest in business grew, i turned to my grandfather. on his 80th birthday my mother said i could give him anything i wanted as a gift. i decided to write him a note on my green stationery.
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in it i asked him why he only talked to the boys about family business, when i was interested in businesses as they were. he said to me, penny, i was born in 1896. how am i supposed to know that young women are interested in business? he gave me a book on accounting and taught me the basics that summer and i was hooked. i attended college at harvard and received my mba and law degree simultaneously from stanford. and i began working with my grandfather, my uncle, my cousins in the family business. in the 27 years since then i have worked as an entrepreneur, both starting businesses from scratch and growing existing ones. it is not always been easy, but i have learned from both my successes and my failures.
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for example, my first startup involved residential communities for seniors. the initial team consisted of me, a secretary, and a -- lawyer. like most entrepreneurs, i found the first few years to be terrifying, particularly when the early 1990's recession hit. i held myself to high standards, suggesting to my uncle that he fire me if i could not turn things around enough. through hard work, we survived and grew and the company remains successful today, employing thousands of people. since then i have been involved in sectors ranging from the hospitality to manufacturing to real estate to financial services and more. i have founded and co-founded five companies each have created thousands of jobs across the country.
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i have sat on five corporate boards. my role in civic life has been both local and national in scope. at the local level i have served as chair of the chicago museum of contemporary art, as a member of the chicago board of education, and as co-founder of my family's foundation, which enriches the lives of chicago's children to education, health and fitness and arts and culture. on a broader level, i have served on the boards as a council on foreign relations, stanford and harvard universities, the kennedy center for the performing arts, and others. over the past few years i have served on the president's council and jobs and competitiveness and the president's economic recovery advisory board, both of which have helped to stabilize our economy and support jobs growth. flowing from this i launched skills for america's future.
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this initiative promotes partnerships between employers and community colleges to address the skills mismatch. in our first local model, launched last september, skills for chicago's future, we have secured commitments to hire thousands of unemployed chicagoans. if confirmed, i intend to leverage the sum of these experiences as an entrepreneur, as a business leader, and as a citizen deeply committed to american competitiveness in my service as commerce secretary. i should note that i have had first-hand experience with the commerce department over the years. for example, the information from the census bureau was the foundation for the decisions i made when starting the senior living company i described earlier. moreover, i know that thousands of businesses get the information, tools, and support they need from the commerce department each year. this includes patents for new products, support for small manufacturers, help for exporters who want to break into new markets, assistance for
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entrepreneurs from underserved communities, support for fisheries and coastal economies, dissemination of timely and accurate weather forecasts, and much more. overall, my vision is that the commerce department will continue to use all its assets to protect, promote, and anticipate what america needs to be, competitive and innovative in the 21st century. i intend to serve as an active and visible part of the economic team. i will bring both concerns and ideas from the business community to the forefront. i envision the commerce department maintaining its government-wide leadership in areas such as manufacturing, attracting businesses, innovation, and exporting.
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your partnership in all of these efforts will be crucial. i actively seek you or input, your advice, and your expertise. i believe strongly that we must ensure that american entrepreneurs can continue to pursue and achieve their dreams. if given the honor to serve, i will work every day to support these entrepreneurs as they create jobs and build our nation's prosperity. i will continue to uphold the core values and deep sense of patriotism that has been passed down to me. finally, let me say if confirmed i look forward to working with the dedicated and driven public service of the commerce department. thank you, and i look forward to your questions. >> thank you, and i will ask the
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first one. it relates to cybersecurity. it is embarrassing, i think, for congress because for four years now, all the defense and intelligence people have declared it the greatest national threat to our security, not al qaeda, not others, but cybersecurity, coming from computers. we made computers in the mid- 1990's, and now we use them, and now they are threatening us. we are trying to put together a bill. there are three committees that have jurisdiction. we are one of them. the department of commerce plays a key role in a wide range of cyber security efforts, including setting international standards. you will be conducting technical research and working with his assist to improve risk management. in fact, nist is leading the effort with the approval of all parties so far, because not many people know nist, it is an extraordinary place.
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they are leading the effort to develop a framework with industry to protect our most critical infrastructure from cyber attack. that is a tricky subject -- critical infrastructure. if confirmed, what priority will you give to the department of cybersecurity work and how will you bring the full range of department's capabilities to the problem?
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>> senator, thank you for that question. i understand the threat of cybersecurity. the business have been involved in experiences 3.8 billion cyber incidents a month. that is three times what it experienced three years ago, and the complexity of those incidents is 50 times greater than it was three years ago. i fully appreciate what we are up against here. if i am confirmed, i will work closely with nist, ita, the full commerce department to make sure we help develop a cyber framework as well as develop a close working relationship with the business sector to make sure we are addressing these cyber security threats.
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>> thank you. i would say to my friend senator thune, i had a good talk with the chairman of the appropriate committee handling cybersecurity in the house, and we have had lots of conflict over here about what is voluntary, who sets the standard, or you have to meet a certain standard, all those things. as he spoke, i said every word that you have just said to me. i agree with him. i have never met him before. we are going to meet, but it is i think for the first time we see a real opportunity of having a bipartisan cybersecurity bill that will be a miracle if we do it. it is the greatest national threat. i will ask one more question. this is on forensic science. i have a fascination or forensic science, and i am finding that some of my fascination is misplaced, that the more studies that go on and nist is important in this, that our system is badly in need of renewal. there are a lot of people who are in prison who should not be
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in prison, there are a lot of people who are not in prison that should be in prison, because forensics, through programs we think are absolute a follicle of hair, bang, it is guilty. it is not that easy, and we are discovering that now. getting forensics right is of enormous importance, so if confirmed, what do you see your role in supporting nist to increase the reliability of forensic science? >> forensic science is of enormous importance, and it has significant implications on outcomes in our justice system. i appreciate how important it is to get it right because there are consequences of using
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forensic science. if i am confirmed, i will use -- i will work not only with nist, but the entire department to make sure we bring to the forefront the best scientists and we will work closely with the department of justice to bring that forward as quickly as possible. >> it is stunning, isn't it, that for a couple of decades we have thought that it was an absolute science, it was just clear, you look to the microscope, you saw what you saw, and you made your judgment, and it does not work that way. it is not talked about much in
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public discussion, but i think getting forensic science where it needs to be up to date is of enormous importance, so i appreciate your answer. senator thune? >> the outrage over the actions taken by the irs against conservative organizations underscores how critical it is for government leaders to scrupulously honor the public trust. my question is, what if anything can you pledge to this committee regarding your commitment to safeguard the trust that would be bestowed on you as a cabinet secretary? >> it is important i bring my core values to the table if i am confirmed as secretary of commerce, and for me, being known as someone who is trustworthy, someone of high integrity and high ethics is what i strive to be. and so i hope i will set the tone at the commerce department if i'm confirmed such that the trust the taxpayers, all americans can have as well as the senate and the house and the work of the commerce department is something you will have full faith in. >> we have all watched this week
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what happened in moore, oklahoma, and our hearts and prayers go out to those who were struck by that tornado. we are grateful the warnings and alerts issued by the commerce department's national weather service helped save lives. as you learn firsthand every department agency is making tough choices in the face of necessary budget cuts, so it requires are for planning and prioritization. it no longer an option to do that. can we have your commitment that if confirmed you will ensure budget cuts are made in ways that prioritize funding for the public safety missions like the delivery of timely warnings about severe weather? >> the work of the national weather service is vital, as we know, to not just property, but
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to lives, most importantly to the lives of americans. we have seen this, as you said, in oklahoma, we have seen it in hurricane sandy, in the floods that we have been experiencing in the midwest. they remind us of the critical issue of saving lives that the national weather service does. if i am confirmed, i will work with the national weather service to make sure that the impacts of our budget do not impact the critical mission that the national weather service provides. >> can you pledge us that you will work with us committee to find efficiencies and ways to stretch taxpayer dollars further when it comes to the responsibilities of the commerce department? >> i have learned to stretch dollars, so that is something that i have experience in. the first thing that is required is put in place good leadership throughout the organization that shares the same approach, and then work with that leadership to be able to identify ways that the commerce department if confirmed can be as effective, but more efficient.
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>> as i mentioned, some have criticized the administration being anti-business. in 2010 a chairman of the business roundtable said, "the administration was fostering an increasingly hostile environment for investment and job creation." if confirmed, you would bring a track record of entrepreneurial activity to the private sector as well as service on the job council to the position of secretary. if confirmed, what will you do to foster a more pro-business attitude within the administration, and as a followup, can you provide actions that you will use successfully to create jobs in the private sector?
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>> when the president asked me if i was interested in taking this position, we discussed clearly his desire that i serve, if confirmed in this position, as a bridge between the administration and the business community, a role he saw that if i could play that role as part of his economic team, that he felt that the relationship would be improved. that is something i look forward to working very hard on. in terms of the examples of when i have created jobs, senator, i started a senior living company that today employs 3,500 people. i started an investment firm that today employees dozens of people. i have started in under her of businesses as well as grown businesses, and grown the number of employees. frankly, when i think about my job as a business person, the thing that made me most nervous was to try and make the best decisions i could because i knew how many lives were impacted by those decisions. and the ability to be not just a business leader, but a job creator is something i've been very proud of and something i will bring that experience to
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the role if i'm confirmed as secretary of commerce. >> thank you. i need to ask this question. there has been a lot written about this. with regard to the failure of the superior bank in 2001, it was a bank that was one of the leaders in subprime lending. some of your defenders have stated you had no active role in the management of the bank for seven years prior to the failure. but according to reports issued, concerns were raised by the office of thrift supervision about the mortgage aching practices as early as 1993 when you were still chair of the bank's board. others have pointed out that you served as a board member on a holding company and committee until its failure. could you just tell us what role you played at the bank in the years leading up to the superior bank's failure in 2001? >> thank you for giving me the
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opportunity. my uncle jay and a friend of his bought a bank in 1989. it was a failed bank. i was never an officer. i was chairman of the board from 1991 until 1994 when the primary activity at the bank was to clean up the balance sheet of the bank which had a lot of problem loans. i stepped down as chairman of the bank and the bank maintained its own separate board seven years before the bank failed. regulators concluded in 2000 that certain assets were overvalued. on the holding company, what one looks at is the balance sheet and the financial statements and deals with subsidiaries of the company. when the problem arose, my uncle had passed away. i stepped in on behalf of the ownership, of the 50% ownership of my family, to try to salvage the situation. unfortunately, those negotiations failed and the bank failed. and so then, thereafter, i went to the fdic, and the family owned only 50% of the bank, but
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voluntarily went to the fdic and said this was post-9/11, and i come from a family that is very patriotic, and i said to the head of the fdic, this country has been very good to our family and we need to make the situation right. we would like to negotiate something to make this right for the depositors. and that negotiation ensued and my family voluntarily agreed to pay $450 million. i was not on the audit committee of the board. that is something that is not right, and it was the right thing for us to do, because both for the depositors and for us as a family. >> let me follow up if i might, mr. chairman, so ultimately there were a number of uninsured depositors who had claims they
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lost over $100,000 of savings, including one who deposited her entire retirement account with superior a month before it failed. my question is, what do you have to say to those depositors who lost sums of money because of this venture, and what lessons did you learn from your experience that will inform your role as secretary of commerce if confirmed? >> i regret the failure of superior bank. it was an outcome or situation that i feel very badly about. the lessons i have learned are really about good management, good governance structure, the importance of diversification and risk management, transparency and having a solid governance. >> ok, thank you, mr. chairman. >> senator warner? >> i hope this committee will recommend you and you will be able to serve as someone who has
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a background in business as a voice that will be needed in the administration and the economy recover and focus on greater job creation. i want to raise a couple of quick questions. one -- one of the areas that will not readily fall within the department, but down a bit, is the national telecommunications and information administration, and part of that was a spectrum management. the president has laid out a goal to try to get 500 megahertz spectrum available over the next 10 years. i would like you to speak about how we can make sure we can keep that on track, and one of our challenges is to make sure it that our federal entities are more responsive in terms of spectrum sharing and trying to make sure that we take full opportunity and get full economy-wide value of these public assets. if you would speak to that
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issue. >> i support your belief in the effort to try to find the 500 megahertz of spectrum to make available for commercial use. it is my understanding at this point and ntia has found 500 megahertz available. spectrum sharing is a high priority and something that, if i am confirmed, we will look and see how we can find or spectrum that can be made available for commercial use. i appreciate how important it is that we have spectrum available for the explosion of the wireless world we are living in. >> i might just add, there are some spectrum in that 755 to 780 megahertz range, that we could move quicker on.
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i will not ask you to speak to that today, but we are starting to get into the weeds already. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013]
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[captions copyright national able satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> >> senator gramm smiled and said really? what are their names? [laughter] thanks to america's free-market system, the average poor american has more living a's than the typical nonpoor -- has more living space than the typical nonpoor worsen in sweden, france, or the united kingdom. think about that. i was born, year only 36% of the u.s. population
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enjoyed air conditioning. today 80% of or households in america have air conditioning. stated f poor parents hey're children not go hungry during the year because they could not afford food. now there is still need. and all of us should act to help our fellow man. but more and more government is not the answer. to say otherwise is to ignore the fact that all major european nations have higher levels of public spending than the united states does and all of them are poor. human beings are not happiest when they are taken care off by he states. areas under the yoke of dependency are among the least joyous in our society. we all flourish when afforded the opportunity to work and
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create and accomplish. economic growth and opportunity is the answer that works. the prosperity and opportunity of the american free market system gives us better healthcare, higher levels of education, the means to better protect the environment. no matter where you look in the world, the evidence is clear, as a strategy to promote greater wellbeing, freedom works. the advancement of economic freedom, empowering individuals to decide for themselves where to work or how to spend or invest their resources outperforms government programs, centralized planning or increasingly regulated markets. it is for that reason so many millions have risked everything for a chance at the american dream.
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55 years ago, my father fled cuba. he had been imprisoned and tortured as a teenager in cuba. today my father is a pastor in dallas. to this day his front teeth are not his own because they were kicked out of his mouth when he was a teenager. when he landed in austin, he did not speak a word of english. he was 18. he had $100 sewn into his underwear. i do not advise keeping your money in your underwear. he went and got a jobbing dishes. he made 50 cents an hour and he worked seven days a week. then he went to the university of texas. he graduated from college. he got a job. he started a small business. he worked for the american dream. imagine if the minimum wage had two dollars an hour instead of hanging able to work for $.50. he may not have gotten that first job. and work through school and work
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towards the american dream. i cannot tell you how many times i have said they got some well-meaning liberal did not come to him when he landed and put his arm around him and said, let me take care of you. let me make you dependent on government. let me sap your self-respect. and by the way, don't bother learning english. instead, my dad like so many millions before him came seeking a better life. when i was a kid my father used to say to me all the time, when we faced oppression in cuba, i ad a place to flee to. if we lose our freedom here, where do we go? my entire life my dad has been my hero. i will tell you what i find most incredible in his story. how commonplace it is. every one of us here today has a story like that.
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we could come up here one at a time to this podium and everyone could tell the story of our parents or grandparents or great great rant parents. we are all the children of those who risked everything for liberty. that is the most fundamental dna of what it means to be american. to value freedom and opportunity above all else. in 1976, margaret thatcher delivered her pivotal written -- britain awakes speech. she said "there are moments in our history where we have to make a fundamental choice. this is one such moment, a moment when our choice will determine the life or death of our kind of society and the future of our children. children ure that our will have cause to rejoice we did not forsake their freedom." if we do not fight to preserve our liberty, we will lose it.
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and each of you with a world-class education is perfectly situated to lead the fight. to communicate one-on-one with your peers and neighbors and colleagues on facebook, on twitter, with internet videos, with creative communication, to tell and retell the story of he miracle of freedom. to so many young americans who have never had the opportunity to hear that story from the media, from the schools, and certainly not from hollywood. the 287 men and women graduating today are perfectly situated to win that argument, to tell that story. thatcher continued, "of course, it is a burden on us, but
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is one we must be willing to ear if our freedom survives. at hillsdale, you are all prepared to go forward. carry the torch for freedom so that together every one of us works to ensure that america remains a shining city on a hill, a beacon of hope and freedom and opportunity for the rest of the world. thank you and god bless you. [applause]
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>> congressman james clyburn has received honorary degrees from 31 colleges and universities round the country, including claflin university in orangeburg, south carolina. his is about 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very, very much. thank you very much dr. wright. if i had good sense, i would eep my seat here this morning. i'm going to spend a few minutes with you this morning offering the commencement address.
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let me begin by thanking the president. president tisdal certain a visionary leader, a good friend and one whom i admire and respect a great deal. i thank his lovely wife, the first lady of this institution. i thank members of the board of trustees for their tremendous leadership. i want to thank those participants in the program here this morning. vice chairman bennett, mayor miller, and chairman wright. for their long friendship. i want to begin my comments here today by shareing with you a little experience. several years ago, i was invited
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at o a commencement address another college in this congressional district. and two weeks later, i met two young ladies who told me they were in attendance for their commencement ceremony. they said to me they thought that i had given a very good speech. so i decided to play devil's advocate and i asked them, what id i talk about? one of them said i don't remember but it was short.
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in order for a commencement address to be considered good, it must be short. [applause] now if that is correct, you are going to have a great speech today. [applause] first of all, let me congratulate each and every one f you on this brave -- great accomplishment. having been through this ordeal that you have been through, i know that you ought to be congratulated. secondly, i want to congratulate faculty,istration, the the staff all who contributed so much to getting you prepared for
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his day. we have each and every one of you to thank. we're very morning about your accomplishment. we are -- very emotional about your accomplishment. we are touched, emotionally. there is a group of people out here who have been touched financially. i want all of you to just stand and thank them. stand and thank your parents, your guardians who got you to this point. [applause] there is a reason i asked you to do that. when i was leaving home to
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pursue my college education, my dad said this to me. son, he said, the first sign of a good education is good manners. i want to repeat that. the first sign of a good education is good manners. of all the things that you learn, please learn to say thank you. [applause] you will be surprised how much that will mean to the people you come in contact. now the second thing i want you learn today, to practice, that is, is the golden rule.
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claflin you came to university and each one of you have a unique sense of experiences which means that you see the world differently from the others with whom you have interacted all these years. it means that when you leave here, if you pursue further education, if you go anywhere in the world of work, you are going to encounter people whose experiences will make them see the world differently from the ay you see it. it doesn't mean that they are wrong. it doesn't mean that you are wrong. it simply means you can be no
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more, nor can you be any less than what your experiences allow you to be. so the second thing i want you to remember for today is to respect and honor the experiences of the others with whom you come in contact. treat them the same way you would like for them to treat you. to how be surprised as important it is to honor and respect each other's experiences. i often tell the story of my wife. grew up on a farm.
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my wife grew up walking two and a half miles to work, school in the morning. two and a half miles back home. my elementary school was three blocks from my house. y middle school, 6 blocks. and my high school, also a ethodist school. so i do not know what it was to grow up the way my wife grew up. and i learned very early that i had to make some adjustments and i made them. and because of that, if i continue to make these adjustments until june 24th, we'll celebrate our 52nd wedding anniversary. [applause]
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i want each of you to understand when you encounter others in the workplace or in the home, learn to respect each other's pinions. learn to honor each other's backgrounds and experiences and remember, it is those experiences coming into the home, into the work life, that allows you to grow and become better people. the final thing i want to say to you is -- you should never give up. vice chairman bennett has told you about some of the challenges you are going to face as you go ut into the world of work.
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if you look at the program or if you listen to dr. wright, he has told you about all the successes have had. he did not tell you about the failures. the first time i ran for office in 1970, i lost. i ran again in 1978. i lost. i ran again in 1986. i lost. a friend of mine said to me at that time, what are you going to do now? you know what they say -- three strikes and you're out. i said to her, that's a baseball rule. [laughter] nobody should live their lives by baseball rules.
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each and every one of you must remember you will not always succeed every time you attempt anything. your grandparents told you. your parents told you, if at first you don't succeed, try and try again. they did not say try it one more time. or two more times or three more times. they said try and try again. not a single one of you can tell me how many times thomas edison failed. we don't remember him for his failures. we remember him for his success. each and every one of you will be remembered not for your failures of how well you overcome your failures. that is what you will be
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remembered for. [applause] so when you leave here to face the world, i've often wondered why people look upon commencements as the ending of something. that defies the dictionary. commence means to begin. today is not an ending. it is a beginning. i want each and every one of you to leave here today remembering no matter how many times i may fail, i will never give up. remember, i don't care how many times you attempt, the next time could very well be the time. so if you really want to honor
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your parents, your family members, your friends, this administration, the university, ust remember you should pursue your life dreams and aspirations with an attitude that you will ever ever give up. if i quit after three failures, i never would have become number three in the house of representatives. [applause] so let me say to each and every one of you, congratulations, good luck and godspeed. i want to come back here and help you celebrate, just like these platinum graduates are celebrating, and these golden
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graduates. let's all come back in 50 or 70 years and celebrate together. thank you and godspeed. [applause] > i begin with integrity because it is so essential to who and what you ultimately will become. many of you have a career path in mind. many of you have no idea where you will end up. a few of you may be surprised by where life takes you. i certainly was. in the end, it is not only what e do but how we do it. >> i have to start with -- give me one second. i am a professional so this will only take a second. when i woke up this morning and started writing my speech, i was
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thinking about my first month on campus in september when i was a freshman and the football team went into that season ranked number one in the nation preseason. i remember there was all this excitement on campus and our irst game was at wisconsin and we went up there and we lost our first game, 21-14. it was crushing disappointment afterwards. i would like you to think of that soaring expectations followed by crushing disappointment as a metaphor for your next 20 minutes with me. >> next week and, more stories and advice are graduates friday night at 8:00 eastern. with administration and state and local officials including fbi director robert mueller of florida governor rick scott. and saturday at 8:30, business leaders including twitter ceo dick costello and steve wozniak
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and find more commencement c-span.org. ne at we are showing you 2013 commencement speeches from around the country. next, saxby chambliss at the university of georgia. then senator tammy baldwin of wisconsin at beloit college. >> several thousand graduates at the university of georgia listened to senator saxby chambliss deliver this year's commencement address on may 10. he senate intelligence committee vice chairman described the world is a scary place and talks about working to prevent another 9/11, boston, or oklahoma city bombing. his is 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you very much. it is a privilege and an honor to be here tonight.
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to you, president adams, the trustees, fellow alumni, graduate, family and friends -- thank you for allowing me to share this momentous day with these graduates in this great institution. there is another group of people we need to thank tonight and that is the proud parents and in particular, all of the mothers here tonight on this mother's day weekend. [applause] to all of you mothers -- to all of you mothers who have provided so much inspiration for these young folks, let's have them stand up and let's salute them for a minute. [applause]
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all you fathers, you played a pretty key role in this too but we have another month before we are going to recognize you. i also want to recognize and say thank you to my good friend, mike adams, for his leadership here. he is been a leader on higher education issues across our state and across our nation. he has been such a valuable servant during his tenure here in athens. we wish he and mary the best at whatever phase their next life takes. tonight we gather between the hedges to celebrate the graduation of more than 5000 women and men on this very special place. i have to tell you, i am a little bit intimidated. that never happens to me. politicians better not get
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intimidated or you are going to lose. but the reason i am intimidated is that i have been in this stadium and on this field literally hundreds of times over the last 50 years but i have never performed on this field. and i know that most of you all here tonight are used to performers on the field like ason aldean. how about jason? tonight, i'm sorry, you just get the other guy. the university of georgia is not only our flagship institution in our great state and a world-renowned school but also a very special place to me personally. as president adams said, it is my alma mater and where more
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than 40 years ago, i met my ife. let me tell you. i'm proud of that sheepskin on my wall but i really love my wife. we are two children and six grandchildren later and you can see the u.g.a. forms not just a foundation for my career, but one of the cornerstones of our life. as excited as you are, i know most of you are sad to leave this beautiful campus. but remember -- today is about eginnings. in fact, webster's dictionary defines commencement as the act of starting something. you'll find the friendships you have made here and the lessons you have learned here will ground you as you face the joys
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and challenges that will become a part of your life story. i know it's hard for you to see the news these days. and not worry about your generation and wonder how it will be treated. it's easy to feel overwhelmed ith how much the world has changed just in the period of time that you have been here at u.g.a. look no further than the events in boston last month where a single incident, a joyous event celebrating human stamina and achievement, transformed into a scene of life-changing carnage. uncertainty and unease are two very powerful emotions. in my position as vice-chairman of the senate select committee on intelligence, i hear daily about what a scary place the world can be. i am privy to details that keep
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me awake at night on a regular basis. t i also hear how dedicated young people like you day and night, are out there working hard, piecing together value and from -- valuable information, taking down bad guys, and preventing another boston, and another september 11 or an oklahoma city city bombing from happening. i want to issue challenges to graduates tonight. the first deals with this very topic. the world is an uncertain place. it's difficult and complex out there. your challenge that i issue is to bring sureness out of unease, calm out of chaos. light out of shadows and resolutions out of questions. it is a changing world but great
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change begets great opportunity. think of how your generation has forced change and become leaders in the cause of freedom in all parts of the world. around the world in such faces -- places at tunisia, egypt, libya and syria, men and women of your generation have raised their voices, stood up to tyranny, braved beatings and imprisonment and risked their life and limb to bring down some of the planets most notorious regimes. it was that change brought about by your generation that is given millions of people one of life's greatest gifts -- the chance to rule themselves. hings you learned here and how you build on those experiences will have a direct impact on america's national interests and
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our place in this shifting world. some of you will choose to join those already in uniform serving our country and for that decision, i salute you. others of you will serve her -- our country differently. some of you will be in laboratories where you will tackle problems that could prevent bioterrorism or cure diabetes. in engineering firms, others of you will invent new technologies. in classrooms, you educate the next generation of american leaders. [applause] in businesses, you will help promote american competitiveness. on farms, you will revolutionize agriculture with new technology. no matter what career you embrace or how you decide to fit into this changing world, do it
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with dignity, do it with passion and with a spirit of community and most of all, do it with excellence. to be graduating from uga means that you're all smart. despite some of you spending your free time sitting on couches in the yard and drinking beer -- [applause] yeah, y'all know who you are. that was a lot more noise than i expected here, geez. none for these 4.0 guys, but the rest of you -- but even so, just because you are here tonight tells me that all of your hard-working and you are blessed with the most important ingredients for success in life. but listen, no matter how smart you are, no matter how good-looking you are, no matter how talented you are or how
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athletic you are or how brave you are, here is my second challenge to you. mbrace human illity. -- humility. why do i say that? because you are going to need it. because somewhere along the line, each of you are going to fail. some of you in more spectacular ways than others. ut you won't be alone. here are some abject failures. oprah winfrey was fired earlier in her career as a reporter for being unfit for tv. despite finishing third in her law school class, former supreme court justice sandra day o'connor could not even land an interview with nearly 40 law firms and was offered a job as a secretary. walt disney was fired from a ewspaper job because he lacked imagination and had no good
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ideas. former british prime minister winston churchill who also spoke about winning and losing put it this way -- success is the ability to go from failure to failure without losing your enthusiasm. michael jordan, who failed to try out for his high school varsity basketball team, catalog his career this way -- i have missed more than 9000 shots in my career. i have lost almost 300 games. 26 times, i have been trusted to take the game-winning shot and missed. i've failed over and over again in my life and that is why i succeed. ladies and gentlemen, you can count on three things in life. death, taxes and failing at something somewhere along the way. and i speak from experience.
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my first run for public office was not a success. in 1992, i got a little over 30% of the vote in the primary that first ran in. but it's not about failing. it's about how you handle it. do you accept it as fact? or do you accept it as a challenge? humility is not a lack of confidence. it takes far more confident to be humble than to be rrogant. being humble will allow you to figure out who you really are, what you don't know and yet what you can do better. every successful person has doubled somewhere along the way and most successful people have understood that only by embracing humility will they figure out a path to improvement.
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saint augustine once queried, do ou wish to rise? begin by descending. do you plan a tower that will pierce the clouds? late first the question of humility. the fact that you are sitting here today in your cap and gowns means that you are blessed. for unto whom much is given, of him will be much required. to whom men have committed much of him, they will ask the more. thomas jefferson put it a little differently. when he wrote. "there is a debt of service due from every man and woman to their country." i hope some of you will serve your nation in the way i did not mention earlier that by running for public office. despite what the pundits, cynics
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and even the polls say, it is a noble calling. you are entrusted by voters to make difficult decisions to write laws and set policies and change not just those policies and laws but the very force of -- course of our nation. my final challenge to you is this. get engaged. be aboutive at the local, state nd political levels. your community and your country need you. in these uncertain times, we need your brainpower and her gumption and your enthusiasm more than ever. whatever path he may travel in life, there is no substitute for hard work and no shortcut to success. above all, and remember this, stick to your principles and be bold. most of you were lucky enough to be born americans.
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some of you chose to be americans. you should take every opportunity to understand what being an american means. travel, read, engage others. be curious about the rest of the world. america has long been the lighted lamp, that "the beacon for the oppressed, strivers and those who simply you're in for a better life. your country offers you a great opportunity for success. i have every faith that your future is so bright, it is yours for the taking. godspeed as you begin that journey and go dogs! [applause] >> tammy baldwin was the commencement speaker for the graduation ceremony at beloit
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college. she is the first openly gay u.s. senator as well as the first woman to represent wisconsin and the u.s. congress where she served seven terms. this is 15 minutes. [applause] >> thank you for that generous introduction. i want to thank the faculty, administration, and staff who make beloit such an incredible school. i wanted to thank and recognize all the parents and grandparents, aunts and uncles, friends and neighbors who have helped make the members of the class of 2013 reached his proud moment in their lives. and a special greeting to all the moms out there on this special mother's day. graduates, congratulations.
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this is such a special day for you. i would imagine that you are feeling a lot of different emotions. pride, elation, maybe relief. it must feel kind of strange to walk around campus without the weight of the final exam or a term paper weighing on your shoulders. i know exactly how you feel. i have the privilege of representing beloit in the house of representatives for many years. in every campaign, beloit college with host the debate. it does not matter how prepared you are. when you're sitting in the the green room ready to debate your opponent, television cameras rolling, you know that feeling you got when he saw a professor handing out blue book?
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ame feeling. last year, i have the biggest test of my career when i ran for the united states senate. i remember how i felt on lection night. proud? yes. elated? of course. relieved? you bet. but also a little bit anxious. after all, i did not run for the senate because i wanted the title. i ran because i wanted a chance to do the job. in the same way, you do not come to beloit because you wanted a piece of paper you are about to receive. you came here because you wanted the chance to change the world and the short time you are going to be in it. just like my election night,
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today is a celebration but this is not an ending. it's a beginning. it's the beginning of something fun and exciting but also difficult and maybe even a ittle scary. some of you will challenge yourselves to make scientific discoveries or create new inventions. some of you plan to go to work on unlocking the puzzle of the mind or the mysteries of the ages. some of you dream of publishing your work or completing a symphony or standing on the stage at carnegie hall. some of you have your eye on a desk at the oval office. all of you are going to confront the same question pretty soon. how do i start? i spent my first few months as a
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freshman senator confronting that exact question. i know it's unorthodox for freshmen to give advice to seniors but let me tell tell you how i tried to answer it. as i traveled the state of wisconsin in my campaign, i saw so much potential and frankly, a lot of pain. beloit is a perfect example. here we have a world-class college where students are doing incredible things. we also have a community outside of campus where the unemployment is too high and middle class families are struggling just to make it. thouck state where we have made tools, cheese, bratz and beer, how can the
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state be losing manufacturing jobs to other countries? how can a nation that boasts the biggest economy in the history of the world have so many roads going unrepaired? so many businesses struggling to keep the doors open. so many people who have been out of work for months or years? i decided i would run my campaign on a simple message -- we can do better for our workers. our manufacturers. our small businesses, our families. i have lots of ideas about how we could do better. how we could level the playing field for our workers. how could we could make our tax system more fair, how we can rebuild our middle class. when i was sworn into the senate, there was that question. now that i have a chance to
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solve these problems, how do i start? any of you will find the way you start your first job -- she will be told to wait your turn to speak. after all, you are new. you will have to work really hard to make the smallest amount of progress. that's what i found in my new job too. things move slow in washington. too slow. they don't always seem to move in the right direction. it is hard leaving the office knowing he had not found a job or everyone who wants one or give every child the chance to attend a great public school, or making sure every family has good health care. it is hard to let the sun go down knowing we still have not solved the fiscal problem or
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ensure that every american can marry the person he or she loves. it is hard to imagine i might spend six or 12 for 18 years and this amazing job and still not reach the finish line on some of hese issues. you might have days like that too. days when it seems the world is too big to get your arms around. i will tell you what i think about to get me through those days and get up every morning ready to get back to it all. believe it or not, i was a math ajor in college. i had a terrific professor. jim henley. i was a pretty sharp student but my first class was a real tough one.
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the professor did something in that class that took me by urprise. as part of our homework assignment, he assigned us insoluble problems. problems with no solution. we were not expected to come up with the answers but we were expected to show some progress. i never figured out any of those insoluble problems. there is a reason i became a politician and not a mathematician but over the course of my career, i thought back to that class many times. professor henley's point was that by pushing against the boundaries, we could expand those boundaries. fter all, every problem starts but people keep
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pushing and making progress and eventually someone goes ahead and cracks it. how do you calculate the area of a circle? how do you govern without a king or a queen? once upon a time, all of those were insoluable problems. nobody solved them all at once. nobody solved them all alone. but we solved them. just like rebuilding a country after a civil war. like we rebuilt the world after world war ii. just like we planted our flag on the moon. don't be afraid to take on the insoluble problems you encounter. you won't be able to solve them all at once or by yourself. but you will make progress. and maybe you'll inspire someone else to make progress.
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was raised by my grandmother. he was born in 1906. she wanted to be an astronomer. times and her family dictated it would not be so. my grandmother was an incredible artist and seamstress. she made all of my clothes until junior high school, when i remember asking permission to buy a pair of blue jeans. home made just could not compete with real levi's. she was so proud when i graduated from college and even prouder when i ran for ffice. imagine, she was born 14 years before women had the right to vote. at the age of 92, she was able
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to vote for her granddaughter and watch me get sworn in as the first woman from wisconsin and congress. -- in the united states congress. [applause] every time my name appeared in the newspaper, she would cut out the article and save it. she kept all of these clippings in the drawer of her nightstand. on top of that nightstand, she kept a photograph of my cousin jennifer, her first reat-grandchild. she would look at that photograph every night before she went to sleep. i don't know what was going hrough her mind at those moments late at night, but i think when she looked at that photograph of jennifer, she was thinking about how much things had changed since she was born
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in 1906. how our country had become more fair, wiser, a better place. how great men and women had made such incredible scientific discoveries and built such incredible buildings, bridges, factories. won such important victories for justice. she must've been marveling at what lay ahead for jennifer but i hope she was proud of the progress she made in her time, he progress i was beginning to make in my time and the progress jennifer would someday make in her time. ere at beloit, you have been a part of a legacy progress that stretches back to the day when wisconsin was a frontier society.
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you are also part of a legacy progress that stretches back to the founding days of this country, a legacy that includes countless inventors, explorers, thinkers and statesmen. yes, we have big problems to solve and yes there are days when they seem insoluble but i m confident that you and i can make enormous progress together. yes, when you work and work just to get to the starting line, it can be hard to know how to take that first step forward, but i'm confident that you and i can figure it out together. so here's to all the potential that you show here at beloit and here is to the progress that we will make in our time.
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congratulations, class of 2013. [applause] >> i begin with integrity because it is so essential to who and what he will ultimately become. many of you have a career path in mind. many of you have no idea where you will end up. a few of you may be surprised to where life takes you. i certainly was. in the end, it is not only what we do but how we do it. >> you know i have to start by tweeting this, so give me a second. i'm a professional so this will only take a second. when i woke up this morning and started writing my speech, i was thinking about my -- my first month on campus in september when i was a freshman and the football team went into that
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season ranked number one in the ation preseason. there was all this excitement on campus. our first game without wisconsin. we went up there and lost our first game 21-14. there was this crushing disappointment afterwards. i would like you to think of that soaring expectations and crushing disappointment as a metaphor for your next 20 minutes with me. >> friday night at 8:00 eastern with administration and state and local officials, including fbi director robert mueller and florida governor rick scott. and saturday at 8:30, business leaders, including the costello and apple cofounder steve wozniak. five more commencement speeches nline at www.c-span.org. >> at the u.s. naval academy commencement, president obama spoke out against sexual assault in the military, say they
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threaten the trust of discipline that make the armed forces strong. this is just over an hour. >> ♪
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[applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, we invite all forecast to remain standing for our national anthem and the invocation. >> ♪ oh, say, can you see by the dawn's early light what so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last gleaming? whose broad stripes and bright stars
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through the perilous fight o'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly streaming? and the rockets' red glare the bombs bursting in air gave proof through the night that our flag was still there o say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave o'er the land of the free and the home of the brave? ♪ [cheers and applause]
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>> let us pray. heavenly father, as we gather to graduate and commission our class of 2013, we ask you to bless those who lead our nation, our navy and marine corps, and our academy. may they govern us in wisdom, and justice, and peace. we offer our thanks to those who have accompanied our graduates to this happy day. their parents, and friends, their teachers, coaches, and clergy. their mentors and their sponsors. for all who have encouraged and enlightened, challenged and supported these fine young people, we are truly