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tv   American Morning  CNN  July 9, 2009 6:00am-9:00am EDT

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it was just about two months ago that panetta said, quote, it was against our laws and values to mislead congress. so questions this morning -- who's telling the truth? it could be another day of violence in iran. opposition leaders calling for new protest to coincide with the 10-year anniversary of the student uprising. iranian leaders are threatening to smash any protests. we're monitoring developments in teheran. also the story you will see only on cnn, uncovering new details about the lengths that michael jackson's family went to to try to break his reported escalating dependence on prescription drugs. also hear what sources close to the singer say about the final years of his life that left his family shocked. we begin with the developing story this morning. new revelations about how the c irk a fought the war on terror behind closed doors. >> new accusations that the agency does our country's dirty work and kept some of the darkest secrets from congress
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and from all of us. >> reporter: democrats now say the cia deceived lawmakers for years, especially from 9 dl/11 l now and the ci a's own boss admitted it. a letter signed by seven democrats accused leon panetta of contradicting himself and tell cia officials misled congress about significant actions since 2001. in light of that they want to take back a statement on may 15 when he said misleading congress is, quote, against our laws and values. back then, panetta is defending his agency against nancy pelosi who said the cia lied to congress in a classified briefing she received in 2002. >> they mislead us all the time. >> the cia held back details about harsh interrogation techniques including
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waterboarding, something the obama administration considers torture. some are calling nancy pelosi's complaint a war on the cia and demanded she back up her claims. it is not clear what specific actions the democrats say the cia lied about or concealed. a cia spokesman tell us cnn panetta stands by the earlier statement it is not cia policy to mislead congress. the timing of this letter is no coincidence. today the house is scheduled to vote on an intelligence measure that would give lawmakers access to top secret briefings. also following developments out of iran sh morning when most protests are planned in 200 cities and towns across the country to co-inside with the ten-year anniversary of the student uprising. iranian officials warning that any new protests would be, quote, smashed by security forces.
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we're live in the cnn center in atlanta fall heing the developments. what are you hearing from your sources about these planned protests? >> at this hour, things are quiet in iran. it's 2:30 local time in the afternoon. they haven't started until 4:00, 4:30 local time. look for it to happen in the next few hours. we haven't seen mass protests in 11 days now. but lots of buzz that people are going to take to the street en masse once again to say to the government, this isn't over. in the televised speech, mahmoud ahmadinejad declared and end to the disputed vote. but option leaders and their supporters say they're not finished fighting. heavy internet chatter on twitter, facebook, and e-mails all call for iranians to take to the streets on thursday to mark the ten-year anniversary of a student protest that led to a
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deadly government crackdown. rallies are scheduled in more than a dozen cities outside of iran as well, including new york, los angeles, toronto, and munich. option leaders issued a joint statement condemning the vote and describing the crackdown that followed is savage and shocking. we are saying the government has no legitimacy because it does not have the vote of the people said mir hossein mousavi on his website. reza aslan said the conflict has taken shape out of public view. >> this is far from over. the number of people on street have diminished, the uprising has shifted from the streets to the halls of power. >> in the halls of power, a heavy faceoff. on one side, the establishment -- president ahmadinejad backed by supreme leader ayatollah khamenei and
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the powerful security forces. on the other, the opposition. led by mir hossein mousavi, and former reformist president, all founders of the 1979 islamic revolution and disciples of the father of the revolution, ayatollah khomeni. >> it seems the two sides, the proahmadinejad and anti-ahmadinejad sides have solidified. the people in the center, the clerics, the religious establishment has yet to go one way or the other. >> in a country where the word of god outweighs democratic institutions, observers say it's the individual clerics that could be the difference maker. the indications are, they are even split, some siding with the option, others siding with the establishment. all eyes on teheran and other cities around teheran. security forces will be out in
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the street. so will protesters possibly making for another volatile situation, kiran. >> the other interesting development, reza people talked about was as long as it gets it attention of the world, there are many protesters who believe their voices will be heard. they think if the world stops focusing attention on that, their plight could fade off of the map. what are they saying about that this morning? >> the focus of the world has not stopped either. other than the scheduled protests in iran, we have scheduled protests in more than a dozen cities outside of iran. so a lot of efforts made outside of iran to keep the focus on what's happening inside. >> reza seya for us this morning. if go to cnn.com/amfix to share your thoughts. president obama in italy for day two of the g-8 summit, today's talks focusing on fixing
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the economy and the planet. in the meantime, brand new polls you're seeing for the first time on cnn on how the americans view the president. according to a cnn research corporation poll, 70% believe the president is a strong leader, 28% think otherwise. the number of americans who say the president is a strong leader is down 10% from february. and the number of americans who think the president is tough enough is down by 9%. and when asked if president obama has a clear plan, 53% say yes, down 11%. >> a lot of people looking at the economy and new economic numbers out there putting it at double digit unemployment making the administration take a few hits right now. >> a lot tougher than people thought. eight minutes past the hour now. north korea may be behind the massive cyberattacks that targeted dozens of websites in the u.s. and south korea over
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the july 4 weekend. internet addresses have been traced to north korea but that doesn't necessarily prove that the north korean government was involved. it's difficult to quickly identify the attackers. >> oh. >> police in nashville are confirming the death of steve mcnair was indeed a murder/suicide. they say it was his 20-year-old mistress who shot him four times while he was sleeping and them turned the gun on herself. the nashville police released this video of sahel kazemi for being arrested for dui. mcnair was a passenger. he was not charged. mcnair was married and has four children. a story you'll see only on cnn about michael jackson, releasing details and new insight on the strained relationship with his family because of purported drug use. it's nine minutes past the hour. (announcer) we speak car.
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good choice. only meineke lets you choose the brake service that's right for you. and save 50% on pads and shoes. meineke. welcome back to the most news in the morning. there's good news at the gas pump. a year ago we were paying $4 a gallon to fill the tank. >> i don't want to go back. >> i don't think anyone does. >> gas has dropped for the 18th day in a row. the national average, $2.58 a gallon. well, the operator of a boston trolley could face three years of prison convicted on negligence charges. 24-year-old aden quinn indicted yesterday. he admitted he sent a text message seconds before his trolley rearended another one in
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may. quinn ran through yellow and red warning lights 25 mile-an-hour before that crash. 60 people were injured. the crash costs some $9 million in damages. and authorities from cook county, illinois are investigating a grave selling scheme at an historic african-american ceremony. four are in custody accused of digging up 100 remains, dumping the remains and reselling the plots to customers. blues legend die in a washington are among the prominent african-americans at the cemetery. we'll talk to the investigator about that investigation. new details this morning about the jackson family's desperate intervention to try to get michael off of drugs. >> and the fallout that left his family shut out of michael's home and life. here's drew griffith. it was 2007 that was two years after michael jackson's trial for child molestation in
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california. the jury acquitting him. but he was scarred. he all but disappeared, first going to bahrain for a self-imposed exile and briefly to ireland. we're told he was happier and his career was going nowhere. this is a period he rarely saw his family. sources tell us michael jackson became fixated with music superstar celine dion and the permanent show she was starring in in las vegas. jackson thought that kind of show might be his path back to show business so he moved to vegas. in early 2007, he was believed to be living in this large rented home. two sources close to the family think janet jackson who's seen little of her brother in recent years visited him there and was shocked. we're told the house was baron of furniture and creepy looking according to one source. but it was the extremely thin dishevelled michael that
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frightened janet. that brought us up to the all-star weekend in february in las vegas. she was there with the brothers, she asked the brothers to go back to michael's house trying to get michael to get help. reportedly, michael ordered the new security guards not to let them in. michael jackson at that time was refusing to take calls from his own mother, katherine jackson, who had been repeatedly pleading with her son to get help. now, all through this time, the family had been concerned. and according to both our sources, michael jackson would simply refuse to see anybody to stop him from using drugs. one source saying, if you tried to deal with him, he would shut you out. you just wouldn't hear from him for long periods of time. other sources telling us the family was concerned for a long time. but it was janet now who tried to force the issue two years ago. we must tell you back in 2007, "people" magazine did report about an alleged family intervention.
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the jackson family denied it releasing this statement which said in part, we categorically deny ever planning, participating in, or having knowledge of any kind of intervention whatsoever. that statement was signed by member of the jackson family, but not signed by janet jackson. joe, kiran? >> intervention. a story a lot of people can relate to around this country. trying to get somebody straightened out when they're in real trouble. >> and the trick is that they're trying to convince people who are -- they're allowed to fend for themselves and make their own decisions, they tend to surround themselves with people who don't tell them what they're doing is wrong. that's the problem. sad situation. drew griffin is digging up new details so we'll continue to follow that with the special investigations unit. also, new developments in the investigation of jackson's death. the singer's long-time dermatologist ernie klein is on the list of doctors being
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investigated. klein spoke to cnn's larry king last night about jackson's drug addiction and whether or not he fathered any of jackson's children. >> did michael tell you he used diprivan. >> i knew at one point he was using diprivan on tour in germany. he was using it with an anesthesiologist to go to sleep at night. i told him he was insane. you have to understand this drug you can't repeatedly take. it's what happens with narcotics no matter what you do, you build a tolerance. >> what about the rumors of you and the fathering of those children. >> here's the most important thing -- michael loved those children as a father. those children loved him as a father. as far as they're concerned, that's the most important grouping there is. >> that's not answering the question. >> i'm not going to answer it the way you want it answered. >> i went to a sperm bank. to the best of my knowledge, i'm not the father.
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>> to the best of my knowledge? it's like being half pregnant. it doesn't happen. >> he said he donated sperm to a sperm bank. so i guess there's -- there's where the -- to the best of my knowledge -- comes. >> fascinating intervow. >> he was one of the doctors being investigated and talking about this. see where that investigation leads.
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♪ go on take the money and run ♪ welcome back to the most news in the morning. 20 minutes past the hour now. five months after improving the president's $787 billion economic stimulus package, some members in congress are asking, where is the stimulation? republicans are saying the president's plan isn't working. all of the problem with shovel-ready projects, ready to build, put people to work. they want to know where the
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stimulus money has gone. kate baldwin following the story from washington. there's a lot of back and forth over this question, kate, is the stimulus working? others are saying, wait a minute, we haven't gotten anywhere near releasing all of the money yet. so give us some time. >> both very good answers. both being asked -- is the recovery plan making a difference? well, some house republicans are giving a resounding no to that. and we saw in a house hearing yesterday, they say the stimulus isn't living up to what the president and congressional democrats predicted. even as the obama administration counts the jobs being created by recovery act spending -- >> we're starting to see some real progress. >> unemployment has soared to 9.5% and 3.4 million jobs have been lost in the past six months. republicans say the stimulus isn't working and wednesday, they pounced. >> i think we need to justify how much money we're spending and where are the jobs saved and where have they been preserved?
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and i think we've got major credibility crisis here. >> the president is quoted as the stimulus has, quote, done its job, is that true or not true? >> we believe the stimulus has had the impact we predicted, which is job creation. >> reporter: in the hot seat, the budget deputy director rob nay boris who said it's slowing the economic free fall. nabors said 150,000 jobs have been created or saved. >> a work in progress, but steady progress. >> reporter: the government accountability office said of the $29 billion delivered to hard-hit states so far, most have gone to medicaid costs, balance budgets, and avoid layoff. vermont's chief officer says funds for big job producing investment like broad band and smart grid are still caught in the stimulus pipeline. >> the frustration has been that the money has not come out. and we kept hearing later and later dates for the money coming
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out. >> reporter: massachusetts governor patrick says states are ready and waiting. >> no fund, no project, no project, no job. >> also in the hearing, robert nabors, the deputy director of omb, he seemed to criticize states for making what he called unwise choices to use stimulus money to balance their budget, kiran. the administration says actual stimulus funding will peak in 2010. of course, there's talk of perhaps another stimulus. how's that going over on the hill? >> you can be sure that was asked in the hearing. in that hearing yesterday, this all comes from a white house economic advisor, kiran, earlier this week, as you know, bringing up the possibility that we should possibly start thinking about a second stimulus. the house majority leader said this week that he would be open or would consider a second stimulus. robert nabors, the white house's deputy budget director said
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clearly no one in the add anybody strags is talking about a second stimulus at this point. we're just wanting to implement the recovery act that's been passed. here's our answer for now. >> kate baldwin, thanks so much. taking its rightful place
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in a long line of amazing performance machines. this is the new e-coupe. this is mercedes-benz.
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welcome back to the most news in the morning. it's been a deadly day in iraq and afghanistan with bomb blasts killing dozens. the two war zones may be the u.s. military's primary concern. but there's plenty more to keep the pentagon's top brass up at night. barbara starr is following that at the pentagon. good morning, barbara. >> we decided to have a look around the world at some of the hot spots that are not combat
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for the u.s. military but sure has them plenty concerned. so just for a few minutes here, we're going to rename cnn's magic wall, the wall of worry. >> reporter: let's begin here in western china where sudden violence flared this week, forcing the chinese to put their own security forces on to the street as ethnic tensions boiled over between two groups -- the majority hun chinese and chinese muslims who say they're suffering discrimination. why is this so significant? well, of course, the obama administration would have china focusing on getting north korea on getting north korea to give up the missile and nuclear programs rather than focusing on ethnic tensions and security operations on their own street. over here in iran, we've seen much of the same thing for the last several weeks, of course. iranian forces on the street against their own people since the disputed electionment so.
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some of it has quieted down a bit through intimidation, of course. nuclear is still number one in iran as well. just this week, we saw top u.s. officials say they're getting worried that time is running out for diplomacy against iran for the nuclear efforts and military options still remain on the table. over here, honduras, central america. once again, troops on the streets in a place we never expected it. there was a military coup. violence broke out, demonstrations. this is a country that's been peaceful for decades. why is this so important now? well, of course, honduras is a major part of the central american counterdrug issue. in this area, it's a major shipping route for drugs coming up from colombia on to american streets. so look at it this way, joe, in all three of these places, we're seeing the countries put their troops, their security forces on
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the street against their own people. it's an area of instability. look for defense secretary robert gates in the weeks ahead to start talking about this challenge more and more. joe? well, barbara, the u.s. military is well spread out right now as you know. it's not like we're going to send troops to all of these different places. what's the challenge for the pentagon here? >> that's exactly the issue. right now, in fact, there's a major study under way here that gates has ordered up called the quadrennial centrifuge. every four years, take a look at the world. what co-do you do about it? how do you fashion the military? what weapons do you buy? how do you train the troops? what do you do about all of the places. the list of countries goes on and on. somalia, africa. a country that's falling apart which is a great worry they'll become the next al qaeda safe haven. it's tough to follow. not a lot of media solutions. >> the world is a dangerous place right now. thank you so much, barbara starr at the pentagon.
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half past the hour. we check our top stories. a strike at iran's government aimed at preventing further street demonstrations. officials warning that security forces will, quote, smash any attempt to protest. option leaders have called for rallies in teheran and other iranian cities today to coincide with the anniversary of a student protest that led to a government crackdown. full refunds are being offered to thousands of fans who bought an estimated $81,000 worth of tickets to the show. aeg says fans also have the option to receive a ticket as a commemorative item in place of money. aeg has created a website to sell merchandise that would have been sold at jackson's concerts. >> lisa ling says she's spoke to her sister who's a prisoner in north korea, laura ling and euna lee were sentenced last month to 12 years of hard labor for
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illegally entering north korea and, quote, hostile acts. here's what ling told kodr about the conversation. >> it was a tremendous relief to hear laura's voice last night. it was only the first time i have heard her voice in weeks. and for the last two weeks, we were just going day and -- day -- you know, long days just without hearing anything. and that silence has just been so terrifying and deafening. without actually seeing her and without -- people actually seeing her physically, it's very difficult to tell. but she was very specific about the message that she was communicating and she said, look, you know, we violated north korean law and we need our government to help us. we are sorry for everything that has happened but now we needy -- need diplomacy. >> she's seeing a doctor
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regularly. she is okay. but the state department calling for the release of both of those journalists. the brutal balance threatening mexico and pushing deeper to the u.s. is in part fueled by what secretary of state hillary clinton called america's insatiable appetite for drugs. there's another reason behind the booming trade and that's foreign policy decisions we made. brian grim, the author of a brand new book, "this is your country on drugs," a look at the history of getting high in america. he's the senior correspondent for the huffing ton post website. thanks for being with us, brian. one of the things you talk about in your book is nafta and how that opened up the borders for a lot of the trucks to get in here. many of which were not being checked for contraband. >> and one way to look at the unintended consequences is to call them something like expected but acceptable consequences of a policy.
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1994 was a terrific year to be the head of a mexican drug cartel. president clinton knew it at the time. that's since come out. he knew that if you opened up the border, it would be a boone for drug trafficking. one official called it, a deal made in narco heaven. you have to understand what was happening. in the '80s, drugs were coming up from colombia, to the caribbean, up to miami and the u.s. now we come and step on cocaine in the caribbean. that moves it over to mexico in the early '90s. just as nafta comes in, 1994, is when the mexican cartels get 2,000 trucks a day pouring over the border. in the same time in the '80s, we went after the meth industry in the u.s. pushed it down to mexico. so the mention cab cartel took over meth and cocaine in the early '90s. they get the free flow up to the border. at the same time, we were cutting off the california border so the cartels were
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forced to shift eastward. thinking of mexican drug cartels. they say we need to crack the december moibs market. >> in 2009, it has been in part because the mexican government is trying to crack down harder as well. what is the solution when tougher enforcement can squeeze the trade to another place? oh. >> the solution increasingly being offered in mexico is legalization. it wasn't covered here much in the u.s. press, but the mexican government has decriminalized marijuana possession and is talking about decriminalizing, you know, a lot of other drug use down in mexico because they're the ones that are bleeding and dying down there. this is a real drug war, not a -- not a metaphorical one, people are shooting and killing each other. >> right. >> a lot of people in the u.s. are calling for legalization saying it's the logical extension of what hillary clinton said -- if there's an insatiable appetite for drug use, then why are we trying to
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lock people up? deal with the fact that people do get -- that people do get high -- treat it as a public health problem and stop going to war against it. >> it's an ideological argument but people say politically it's not viable to try to legalize drugs in the united states. but at the same time, it brings us to the next topic of drugs that are legal here, the prescription drugs and the abuse has skyrocketed as well. we have an interesting statistic that talks about deaths by overdosing on prescription drugs like oxycodone, methadone, jumped more than 90% between 1999 and 2002. this is about the time drug companies were allowed to advertise about the effectiveness of their painkillers. what do we do about this growing problem? >> it's a difficult situation. what i argue in the book is that for hundreds of years, going back to the beginning of american history and around the rest of the world, going back to the beginning of world history, people have sought out
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inebriation in one way or the other. if you attack one drug, say you go to war against marijuana, and it becomes less available, then people are going to shift over to something like prescription drugs that they see as maybe not having the same stigma as something -- something like cocaine or something else. >> right. >> it goes all the way back. 1830s, we started eed to stigm alcohol. drinking plummeted but there was a rise in opium. it's been going on through the course of american history. you can't stop people from some certain level of getting high. >> right. >> and you talk about the reason why, quickly, i found it so fascinating, the nature of life here in america. what makes it so different? >> as the rise of the -- of the internet has kept kids inside and as they've been overscheduled and less free time, that's less time to go behind the woods, the alley, the
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shed and smoke a joint. they're sitting in front of the computer and the thing that's more available is across the hall in the medicine cabinet. since 2000, you've seen a 20%, 30% reduction in teen pot use and a rise in teen prescription drug use. that's how it's been going and how it will keep going. >> interesting book. "this is your country on drugs." also a quick --
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mr. evans? this is janice from onstar. i have received an automatic signal you've been in a front-end crash. do you need help? yeah. i'll contact emergency services and stay with you. you okay? yeah. onstar. standard for one year on 14 chevy models.
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as i was saying before the break. no, welcome back to the most news in the morning. check now the a.m. rundown. these are the stories coming up in a few minutes. extreme radar coming back this morning. check with reynolds wolf and see who's under the gun and whether your travel plans could be affected. school's out and cricket is in. new york police department are reaching out to kids in immigrant communities with one of the most popular sports outside of the u.s. president obama is overseas taking some heat back at home. there's a new cnn opinion research poll about how people feel, especially as it relates to the economy. we'll bring you that as well. >> christine row maps is here,
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minding your business. and i guess we're going to have to talk about toxic assets yet again. >> you bet you. toxic assets. >> love the toxic assets. >> what happened to those? we had to get them off of the bankbooks. they were the root of all of the problems. four months after the plan was announced and several lit rations later, we find out the worst acronyms after tarp. i'll spare you all that. this is a plan to get the plan off of the bank's books and put them in a market that people buy and sell them. blackrock, alliancebernstein. these are nine companies who the treasury department announced will scale down the big programs to help the banks to get the assets off of the books. what happens next? $30 billion of your money goes in to this to match the money that gets raised from these banks. firms will raise $500 million in
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12 weeks and ten smaller firms have been tapped with partners. these are small or minority and women-owned businesses to opening this program to a lot of different folks there. the treasury department position is why is this scaled down? because the situation has change in the past four months. the banks are in a better position than they have been. critics say it's scaled down because the program won't work. there's a big fund manager named pimlico. you heard of bill groh, he's a guru. he originally thought he'd have his firm be involved. he stepped back and said this is not right for us. we're not sure of the details of the plan. we're involved in other rescue efforts but not this one. see if it works. >> romans numeral for us? >> ten -- 10 months, actually. >> 10 months since tarp has pass? >> ten months since we started talking about how to get the gosh darn toxic assets off of the bank's book.
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ten months later, it's a scaled down plan to create a market. we'll have to wait and see -- some of the analysts are saying they're looking forward to this. see how it works. others are saying they're small. it's not exactly the broad getting the toxic assets off of the banks books than in the beginning. >> not a silver bullet. i need to buy some of those. we need to -- >> i've got a couple. >> ten months, you could have another kid. >> i could have -- oh, gosh, no. a lot has happened in ten months. i feel like i've had a kid in the last ten months. >> christine, thanks. it's 4 after the hour.
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[note] put your money where your mouth is ♪ ♪ that's what you get for waking up in vegas ♪ ♪ a live look atlas vegas. 82 going up to 104. stay in the air conditioning where the machines are. >> listen for the coins to drop. up to 46 past the hour. reynolds wolf is in the weather center in atlanta. >> one thing that's not great to see the high temperatures through parts of texas. it's summer. we've had extreme temperatures in the lone star state. show you what we have in store today. dallas and houston going up to
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the triple digits for dallas. houston, 98. when you factor in the humidity, it will feel much warmer. yesterday in austin, 106 degrees. today would be close to that. we'll keep a sharp eye on it. any chance for any showers in parts of texas maybe to cool things off. doesn't look like it will get in the mix. if you get to the central plains to the northern plains, the great lakes, a good chance of storms in the afternoon. maybe hail producers, maybe damaging winds. certainly something to watch out for. with that chance of rough weather, we can certainly expect some delays especially later in the afternoon for places like minneapolis. atlanta, tampa, orlando, a delay of 30 minutes. maybe a bit longer. boston, san francisco, watch out for the low clouds. as we speak, we're seeing precipitation forming across parts of florida. a few thunderstorms, nothing severe. that could occur later in the day. that's the latest on the forecast. joe, let's send it back to you. >> excellent. thank you so much, reynolds.
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it's 6:47 right now. and we're headed out to the break.
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♪ you got to keep it strong ♪ move along move along ♪ ♪ >> welcome back to the most news in the morning. few american teenagers would rank cricket among their favorite sports but it's wildly popular in much of the world. >> the police department launched a cricket league reaching out to communities who don't know much about america's pass time. it's the second year. it's a big hit. richard ross is wielding the willow for us. oh, cricket talk. you know you know it now.
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hi, richard. >> you sure you don't want to talk about baseball. >> it used to be in the summertime in the city of new york, to keep the kids off of the streets, all you needed is a bat and ball. new york has changed. the melting pot is thicker. a tougher job connecting with the groups for the nypd, the police. >> hi! >> yeah! another. >> teammates cheer on the batter. but they're not playing baseball on this new york city field. he is actually a batsman because this is cricket. many of the teenage players come from the city's caribbean and south asian neighborhoods. the new york police department started this league in an effort to foster better relations with the immigrant communities which in the past may have been lacking. >> this is the sport they're comfortable with. we need to be comfortable with it as well. we want to forge new relationships. we want to show them we're willing to expand our horizons as well. >> reporter: in the second year, the league has expanded to ten
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teams and 170 players. >> provide all of the uniforms, the fields, we put together the schedule. the kids need to get down here. they love it. >> reporter: what's happening on the field is having an impact off of it. >> it makes a big difference. once you represent the nypd league, it makes you think twice about what you're doing, what you want to do when you're out there on the streets and stuff. you think twice. >> reporter: and others hope that the nypd gains better insight to their community. >> we're also very happy that the police due to the fact they have a different perception and improved relationship between the two. >> reporter: cricket's called the gentleman's sport but hasn't stopped girls from participating. >> my friends think it's pretty cool. being the only girl, they cheer all the time for me. my little sister thinks it's pretty cool to play with all of the guys. >> reporter: and many members think this is a beginning for cricket in america.
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>> it will be a while to turn on sben or baseball or cricket, basketball or cricket? it might be a little while. >> reporter: traditional cricket matches can last days. the new york police cricket youth leagues play a shorter version called a 20-20, three hours, even shorter than some american league baseball games. i'd like to come on the show and explain more. keep this in mind. this is the bat that's used in cricket. >> what about the glove. that's an interesting glove. you hold it here and hit it with this flat side. >> what's this? >> that's the wicket-keeper's glove there. but it's a wonderful game. and it should get more popularity like soccer in america. but it will take time. >> wildly popular in the caribbean. just wildly -- in places like jamaica and, you're right, it goes on for days. >> yeah. and the funny thing is like a roddick-federer match.
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the nypd has gotten very creative with the community policing tactics that worked and made a difference. this is a example of that. >> that's right. six teams, ten teams, booming. new york city, as you know, you can go through the borough of queens and come across dozens of communedyes. communities. it's a veritable united nations there. >> let me know if you get any good at it. >> we've had lots of talk of gloves lately. live at the g-8 in italy. also some details about janet jackson and the trip to visit her brother in vegas that left her worried about his safety and health. it's 55 after the hour.
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welcome back to the most news in the morning.
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57 minutes after the hour now. president obama is meeting with world leaders in l'aquila, italy this morning. they're trying to figure out how to cool things off. the issue of global warming is the focus of a summit taking place. back here at home, critics are turning up the heat on something else, that would be the economy. republicans are saying that the president's stimulus isn't working. they want to know where the jobs are. and our senior white house correspondent ed henry joins us live from l'aquila this morning to take a look at that. we have a new poll out from cnn opinion research that shows if people ask if obama has a clear plan. 57% only said yes, down 11% since february. a lot of people are attributing that to some jiters about the economy. >> that's right, good morning, kiran. the economy and exchange two hot buttons back in the states. it's also dominating the agenda here as well. president obama may be in italy for the first g-8 summit
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but he's trying to stay focused on a pressing concern back home, the still ailing u.s. economy. mr. obama joined the other industrialized nations in reaffirming the commitment to restoring growth in the market and he's vowed to help tighten the regulations. >> we've discussed the importance of europe and the united states raising standards on financial institutions to ensure that a crisis like the one that's taking place will never happen again. >> the president is also trying to move aggressively to deal with another potential crisis. climate change. he helped lead the group to support a reduction of green house gas emissions among developed countries, 80% cut by 2050. >> this is a significant step forward in that this is the first time the g-8 is published data on where countries are with regard to their prior commitment. >> but the declaration has no enforcement mechanisms. the white house officials hope
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it provides momentum for real change. the president wants to use the g g-8 to stop iran and north korea from obtaining nuclear weapons. >> very important for the world community to speak to countries like iran and north korea and encourage them to take a path that does not result in a nuclear arms race in places like the middle east. >> italian prime minister silvio berlusconi moved the summit to the city of l'aquila to highlight devastation from an april earthquake. people still living without homes here are playing off mr. obama's campaign slogan, yes, we can. by telling the world, yes, we camp. now mr. obama met this morning with president l urk l arklula one of the countries not signing on to the gas cut. and sanctions against iran. this is a reminder that there
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are real limits to the global institutions in terms of improving real radical change, kiran. ed hepry live in l'aquila. thanks so much. as the president continues his trip, cnn will be with him every stop. on monday, america's first black president visits africa and our anderson cooper will be sitting down one-on-one exclusively with president obama. see that at 10:00 eastern. glad to have you with us on this thursday -- what's today? july -- >> i lose track. >> 9. >> 9. thank you very much. glad to be here. wide awake at 7:00 a.m. eastern time. the big stories we're breaking down. new accusations that the cia kept secrets from congress. they're coming from seven house democrats and the source said to be the agency's own director, leon panetta. brianna keiler has that letter
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that's raising questions. and more republicans saying the stimulus isn't working. where are your tax dollars going? a new report breaking this morning said it may depend on how your county voted. parts of the country that are blue getting more of the stimulus cash. >> plus, new exclusive details that michael jackson's family tried to get him off of drugs. janet was frightened into action by his aappearance two years ago. the special correspondent drew griffin has exclusive reports just ahead. but we begin with a bombshell inside the beltway. seven house democrats saying this morning cia director leon panetta admitted in testimony in congress that the agency had been concealing information and misleading lawmakers for eight years. brianna keiler is tracking developments live from capitol hill. break this down for us. what happen? good morning, joe, this is a long and winding story. let's start at the beginning. back in mid may, house speaker
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nancy pelosi accused the cia of misleading congress in a secret 2002 briefing that she received. this is a briefing that had to do with harsh interrogation tactics. the bush administration was using on terror suspects, including water boarding. she said the cia misled her. the response from leon panetta said it was not the practice of the cia to mislead congress. so fast forward now to about two weeks ago. on june 26, the seven members of the house of representatives sent this letter right here. seven members of the house intel committee. they sent the letter to the cia. they referred to some testimony that had happened a couple of days before according to one source, testimony of cia director panetta behind closed doors with the intel committee. and in this letter, they reference it saying recently you testified that you have determined the top cia officials have concealed significant action from congress from 2001
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to this week. this letter here, joe, actually asked cia director panetta to correct the record, to come out and correct that statement that he made in mid may that not the practice of the policy of the cia to mislead congress, joe. >> a lot of stuff going on there at a time when the congress is looking at the intel spending bill. thank you brianna keiler. as the back and forth continues over whether or not the stimulus is working in washington, a new report in "usa today" is complaining the amount of money your countdy gets may depend on how you voted. counties that obama won got twice as much money per person as those who voted john mccain. the counties that supported obama the reports show received about $69 on average. counties that supported mccain received about $34 per person. but that imbalance didn't just start with the stimulus. from 2005 to 2007, counties that
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voted for obama collected 50% more government aid any way. many are doubting it's working and say it's a $787 billion mistake. does president obama have a pr problem? kate baldwin is tracking the story. how much of the package is out there in the nearly five months since it became law. >> there are a lot of numbers blowing around. it's important to talk about actual spending. $57 billion has been distributed, about 7% of the total. there's $43 billion in tax relief, something we know is important. is the recovery plan making a difference, that's a difficult answer. some house republicans, though, are giving it a resounding no. they say stimulus is not living up to what the president and congressional democrats predicted. >> reporter: even as the obama administration out thes it jobs being created by the recovery
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act spending. >> we're starting to see some real progress. >> reporter: unemployment is soared to 9.5% and 3.4 million jobs have been lost in the last six months. republicansin s say the stimulu isn't working and wednesday they pounced. >> i think we need to justify how much money we're spending. where are the jobs saved. where have they been preserved and we have a major credibility crisis here. >> the president is quoted as saying that the stimulus has, quote, done its job. is that true or not true? >> we believe the stimulus has had the impact that we predicted which is job creation. >> reporter: in the hot seat, the deputy budget director rob nabors who said the stimulus plan is slowing the free fall. he said 150,000 jobs have been created or saved. >> it's a work in progress but steady progress. >> reporter: the government accountability office says of the $29 billion delivered to hard-hit states so far, most have gone to pay medicaid costs,
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balance budgets, and avoid layoffs. at the same time, vermont's chief recovery officer said, funds for big job producing investments like broad band and the electric smart grid are still caught in the stimulus pipeline. >> the frustration has been that the money has not come out. we kept hearing later and later dates for the money coming out. >> massachusetts governor patrick says states are ready and waiting. >> no funds, no project. no project, no job. >> also in that hearing, robert nabors, the deputy director seemed to criticize states for making what he called unwise choices to simply use stimulus money to balance their budgets. the administration said actual spending will peak in 2010. >> all right, kate baldwin for us, thank you so much. bringing in christine romans, minding your business. what about the stimulus?
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>> 10% is spent. $77 billion has been spent. $20 billion in tax relief. and $56 billion in projects. that's how much has gone out the door. harry reid said 10% has gone out the door. we know that. that's how much has gone out the door. the state part of this is that the gao report showing that the $49 billion going to the states, states are playing defense with this money. the education money was meant to build new schools and expand early childhood education. but some of the places, the states are in such trouble they have to fill the hoelles. they're trying not to fire 2,000 teachers in florida miami dade county. you can't start a new program when you're barely holding on to the program we've got. some money has not been spent because they're waiting for the guidelines. there are stipulations on this money. they have to show it's going to work and improve education and teacher productivity. they have to make sure they're using the money. that's one reason the money has not been spent in some cases.
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>> may be not creating new jobs but could be saving the jobs. >> saving the jobs. in the gao report, one of the things they pointed out is the 2,000 teachers in florida's miami dade county. there are some cases they used the money so they didn't have to lay off a bunch of new teachers. flint, michigan hasn't had a new school in 30 years. but they are also in trouble. it's hard to figure out how to build a new school or fix your school when you're just trying to fill the hole. so, look, we're going be unraveling this money for years. we have never spent this money so quickly. so we're all -- we'll all be very busy on this. >> meanwhile, time for romans numeral. this is a number we bring you every day on the program that's driving the story about your money today. what is your new numeral this hour? >> 2.3 million. 2,300,000. this is about the job. are we seeing a job. 2.3 million is the number of jobs lost since the day it was
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passed. the white house will tell you the pace is slowing. since they passed it, that's the number lost. the administration said we saved 150,000 jobs. we're on track to save 750,000 jobs. that puts in perspective how many jobs have been lost. how do they know? how do they know? it's a formula. it's a formula that says every $92,000 goes out the door in stimulus spending, it's the jobs created. it's a formula, not an exact. >> is there a delay in getting the stimulus money out? is this a delay or is this how it was supposed to go? >> in many cases, this is how it's supposed to go. in the state aid, they're ahead of track on the state aid. that's part of it. but things have changed. conditions have changed. and states seem to be using this money defensively, not to start something new, but to -- >> stop the bleeding. >> stop the bleeding. >> christine romans for us. thank you. new information on a jackson family intervention attempt which began with michael
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jackson's sister, janet. how her brother's appearance frightened her into action and this is the only place you'll see this side of the story.
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welcome back to the most news in the morning. with the memorial for michael jackson wrapped up and the thousands of fans heading home, los angeles officials are bracing themselves for what's next -- the price tag. officials estimate the memorial cost $1.4 million, most of it overtime for the 4,000 officers on hand. the memorial itself was a mammoth television ratings event. some 31 million people watched the service on 18 networks. you guessed it, more people chose cnn as the network to watch, more than doubling fox news and msnbc. now to a cnn exclusive. a jackson family may have seen this tragedy coming. two years ago, michael jackson's sister, janet, was apparently so alarmed at what her brother looked like, she took steps to stage an intervention. just uncovered some dramatic
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details. here's siu correspondent drew griffin. john, kiran, it was 2007, it was two years after michael jackson's trial for molestation in california. the jury acquitting him. he was scarred. he all but disappeared going to bahrain and then briefly to ireland. we're told he was happier but that his career was going nowhere. this was a period where he rarely saw his family. sources tell us michael jackson became fixated with music superstar celine dion and that permanent show she was starring in in las vegas. jackson thought that kind of show might be his path back to show business. so he moved to vegas. in early 2007, he was believed to be living in this large rented home. two sources close to the family think janet jackson who'd seen little of her brother in recent years visited him there and was shocked. we're told the house was baron
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of furniture and creepy according to one source. but it was the sight of an extremely thin dishevelled jackson that frightened janet. that brings us to the all-star weekend in february in las vegas. janet jackson there with two brothers, she asked the brothers to go back with her to michael jackson's house trying to convince michael to get help. reportedly, michael ordered the new security guards not to let them in. michael jackson at that time was refusing to take calls from his own mother, katherine jackson, who had been repeatedly pleading with her son to get help. now, all through this time, the family had been concerned. and according to both our sources, michael jackson would simply refuse to see anybody who tried to stop him from using drugs. one source saying, if you tried to deal with him, he would shut you out. you just wouldn't hear from him for long periods of time. another source telling us the family was concerned for a long time. but it was janet, now, who tried to force the issue two years
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ago. we must tell you that back in 2007, "people" magazine did report about an alleged jackson family intervention. but jackson family denied it. releasing this statement which said in part we categorically deny ever planning, participating in, or having knowledge of any kind of intervention whatsoever. now that statement was signed by members of the jackson family but not signed by janet jackson. joe, kiran? >> thank you for digging up new details for us. new focus on michael jackson's doctors this morning as well. los angeles county coroner's office has drawn up physicians who treated the pop star before his death and they want to question him to find out what medications are prescribed. up with of the doctors on that list is michael jackson's dermatologist. robert klein spoke one-on-one with larry king. listen to what he said about the report that he is the buy long call father of jackson's kids. he said you couldn't -- you
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couldn't answer that one way or the other. >> i still can't answer it one way or the other. >> that means you donated sperm. >> i once donated sperm. i don't know -- you have to know -- >> you donate it to him? >> no, absolutely not. >> you donated to him. >> to a sperm bank. i don't think i should go over my legal -- to the best of my knowledge, i'm not the father. this discussion, however, is between michael, his children, and his person -- not to be discussed who the father is over national television. >> what about all of the rumors about you and the father of those children? >> here's the most important thing -- michael loved those children as a father. those children loved him as a father. as far as i'm concerned, that's the most important grouping that there is. >> that's not going to answer the question. >> i'm not going to answer it the way you want to answer it. >> you could say no. >> i could say no if you want to hear. >> i want to know what you know. >> i think what's most important
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about this whole thing is the most important thing is who the father is, who the father is, who the children want their father to be. i will tell you this, i will say no because the most important person to these children is how michael loved him and how he loved his children and how he loved him. because they would never go past him without saying i love you, daddy. he would say i love you. >> now dr. klein also told debbie rowe, the biological father of jackson's two older kids to, quote, get active and be the mother of those children. he revealed interesting things to larry king as they look at whether or not diprivan, the powerful anesthetic could have contributed to his death. he said on tour in germany years ago he was using it and he told michael, quote, you ear absolutely insane talking about how risky it was to use it for insomnia. >> dr. sanjay gupta saying it's one of the strangest sounding stories he heard. here's what's on the am
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rundown. the white house is holding a summit on swine flu. if it comes back with a vengeance this fall, are we ready. kathleen sebelius joins us nus. lisa ling talks to her sister, laura, who's being held by north korea. what it's like being a prisoner inside this secretive state. and 7:37, one republican in alaska said she has the evidence to bring palin down. palin is using her last days in office to fight back.
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21 minutes past the hour. 6 the white house is putting all states on notice today asking two big questions. if swine flu comes back with a vengeance, will we be ready. they're holding a summit in a few hours to get some answers on that. for more, i'm joined by secretary of health and human services. kathleen sebelius. thank you for being with us. >> nice to be with you, kiran.
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>> where do we stand now with the h1n1 virus, the so-called swine flu? >> around the country. we have documented about 33,000 cases. and we've had about 170 deaths in this -- country and. >> sorry, are you hearing somebody in your ear? i'm sorry about that. hopefully we'll get that worked out. i want you to go ahead and continue. we talked about 170 deaths so far in the u.s. >> we've had about 170 deaths so far. but the cdc modelling indicates that we have more like 1 million cases in the united states. we've had summer camps closed and lucky kids are not in school right now. so we haven't had the kind of school disruption that we saw earlier this spring. what we're really watching is what happens in the southern hemisphere who's in the middle
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of their seasonal flu. and a mix of h1n1. because we'll learn a lot from that. we want to be ready for the fall. so we're bringing together governors and their top health and emergency planning, managers, to use these summer months to plan for a fall vaccine campaign, to look at hospital capacity, to be prepared for a more serious flu that may return to the fall months. >> so there is a possibility as we've heard from various doctors that it could return, that it could return stronger. but -- so how are you balancing this with preparations for the seasonal flu which we need to gear up for every year as well that kills about 36,000 americans annually? >> that's right. we know we're going to have season flu year in and year out. and the good news is that the seasonal flu vaccine is ready to go. we would urge everyone to get their seasonal flu shot. in addition, we're moving towards the likelihood of a
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specific vaccine for h1n1 where testing the virus strains now. preparing for the production linds, beginning clinical trials. what we need to do is make sure we have a vaccine, one that combats this virus. we have a safe vaccine. we know the right dose, we know the targeted population. in the meantime, we need to keep reminding folks that there are a lot of things that every family can do. the hand washing hygiene is very much in place. wash your hands frequently. cough into a sleeve or into a tissue or throw the tissue away. please, if people feel sick or if your kids are sick, keep them home. don't share this. we know h1n1 shares very quickly. so there are a lot of steps we can take to try to reduce the transmission of the virus right now. >> all right, a lot of good advice. kathleen
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kathleen sebelius. thank you for being with us this morning. >> sure. we'll keep you posted as we move toward the fall. >> we'd like to hear about that. if the recommendations change and there's recommendation to get a vaccine. >> sure. lisa ling talking to her sister, laura, held in north korea. that is next here on "american morning." te hats on! if you're not into fake sword fights pointy slippers and green wool tights take a tip from a knight who knows free credit report dot com, let's go! vo: offer applies with enrollment in triple advantage.
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27 minutes past the hour. it's been weeks since court tv journalists laura ling and euna lee were sentenced to hard labor on doing a story illegally. they were doing a story on chinese emigration at the time. imagine how relieved lisa ling was to get a phone call from her sister from inside north korea.
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here's what she told kovr about the conversation. >> it was a tremendous relief to hear laura's voice last night. it was only the first time i have heard her voice in weeks. and so for the last two weeks, we were just going day and day -- you know, long days without hearing anything. that silence has been just so terrifying and deafening. without actually seeing her and without people actually seeing her physically, it's very difficult to tell. but she was very specific about the message she was communicating and shep said, look, we violated north korea law and we need our government to help us. we're sorry about everything that happened but now we needy ploem si. >> the fate and the lives of laura and unaare at stake here. coming up on the bottom of the hour.
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a truck bomb in afghanistan killing 25 people. this happened near kabul. the interior ministry said the dead include 21 civilians and policemen. immigrants in the area appear to be that target. cyberattacks. seven sites are under attack after hackers bombarded the websites. a dozen sites, including those at the white house, pentagon, state department as well were targeted in a coordinated cyberattack. and the coast guard is searching this morning for five people after their plane crash in the gulf of mexico. it happened northwest of tampa. the authorities say the twin engine cessna took off from mckinney, texas and tampa was the final stop. the passengers names have not yet been released. an capitol hill, a scathing letter has gone public. the cia has hidden intelligence from congress and misled
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lawmakers. and the source -- their boss. leon panetta. but it begs the question, shouldn't we expect the nation's top spy agency to keep some secrets or not? joining me now is the contributor and home labd advisor to the bush administration, fran townsend. thank you so much for coming in. >> good morning, joe. >> let's look at the letter that's been making the rounds so far. we have a graphic of it right now. it says recently you testified that you've determined that a top cia official have concealed significant actions from congress from 20 1 to this week. this comes from six democratic members of congress. what do you make of that letter? >> you know, joe, i think because of the controversy over the nancy pelosi briefings, people are going to put these things together. this morning i spoke to white house and cia senior officials who confirm to me these issues, the pelosi briefing which panetta made clear she had been
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briefed honestly and fully and this issue are unrelated. these are two separate issues. what happens, joe, as you know what oftentimes what happened is cia and other agencies do briefing. they'll go back, realize they inadvertently left information out. things they were unaware of that they didn't tell congress. you want them to come back up. i suspect what happens here is they realized there's something not included in the briefing and they did the right thing -- they notified the congress. we have to be careful with congress issuing letters on intelligence matters and playing politics with the intelligence community. it may have the opposite effect of what they want, which is full and complete information. >> dig a little deeper on that. if you step away back away from it, you know one thing, pelosi challenged the vor rasty of the c irk a. she challenged the fact that they were being truthful. now you look at this letter that comes out. even though we don't know all of the between-the-lines information, does it look like
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she is vindicated? should she be vindicated? or does it look like her colleagues in the house are trying to make it look like she's vibd kated. >> i think it's the latter, joe. i think her colleagues are playing politics with this to make her look vindicated. cia issued a statement to a spokesman yesterday making it clear that leon panetta, the director of the cia stood by his statement issued in may related to the nancy pelosi briefing. that's done. it's clear she was briefed. it's clear cia fulfilled their obligations there. this is a separate matter. we got -- that's why i say it's very dangerous for the house democrats to be playing politics with the house intelligence community when you want them to do if they found they made a mistake as an oversight matter is come up and tell you about it. i think this is a very dangerous game they're playing. >> also a behind-the-scenes fight going on right now on capitol hill as to whether more people on the hill should be privy to certain information that coming out of the intel
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general community or whether a back of eight, certain specific individuals on capitol hill who get to see this stuff should continue to see the stuff. is that part of the politics of this letter coming out? >> i think you're right to raise it. i suspect it is. we should tell our viewers that the senior advisor will recommend he veto the administration if the briefing numbers are expanded. the more people that know, the more likely it is that critical information, classified information will leak. it's very dangerous. you want effective oversight by the people who know the most and have responsibility in the area. that's why there's the gang of eight. but you don't need 40 members knowing this critical and classified information. it may put lives at stake for the least. still ahead, we're going to be hearing from one of the
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whistleblowers behind some of sarah palin -- soon to be former alaskan governor's ethics violations that caused what she said is a lot of unnecessary turmoil. 34 past the hour. ththththththh
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♪ rescue me ♪ protect me in your arms ♪ rescue me ♪ i want your tender charm welcome back to the most news in the morning. sarah palin's sudden and surprising decision to step down have a lot of people, reporters and critics wondering why. accusations against the governor kept coming. sean callebs caught up with one critic behind many of those complaints. joe and kiran, depending on how you speak with, the number of accusations are either trivial and a waste of the governor's time, or very serious in providing keen insight on the way palin has governed the state. anchorage is bathed in an unusual heavy haze. a hot, dry, alaska summer is fueling scores of wild fires. governor sarah palin met with smoke jumpers in the town of
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mcgrath praising their courage. she's burning up twitter, sending out a number of messages including the cryptic -- today, try this -- act in accordance to your conscience, risk by pursuing larger vision in opposition to popular, powerful pressure. author unknown. she has 2 1/2 weeks left in office until she becomes citizen sarah. she's quitting because of a host of ethics violations. costly and time consuming for her and the state. >> it doesn't cost the critics anything to file frivolous lawsuits or ethics violation charges. it costs our state such a great deal. thousands of state staff hours, millions of dollars in public resources that aren't going to things that it should. >> andrea mccloud has been a sharp thorn in palin's side. >> i have all of the evidence. >> she's filed four complaints against the governor and her staff and two lawsuits. here are some of the litany of complaints leveled against pape lynn.
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the conflict of interest because she wore a jacket that had a logo on it while at a snowmobile race. another alleged she had the state pay for her children's travel. she has since reimbursed the state. one of andrea mccloud's accusations said she used cronyism to improperly hire a friend for a state job. that complaint was dismissed. mccloud said the governor threw down the gauntlet. >> sarah palin said alaskans, hold me accountable. back at you. we did and what did she do? she quit. >> james muller is a political science professor at the university of alaska anchorage. >> most of the ethical complaints are fairly trivial. almost all of them had been dismissed by the various levels of review that has taken place. >> there are a couple of charges pending but palin has been cleared in all of the others. palin's lawyer says the accusations have personally cost the governor more than $500,000
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in legal fees. >> every one of these complaints have to do with sarah palin's personal choices. she always puts her personal interests before the state's interest. >> the governor's attorney tells us the complaints are, quote, the boy who cried wolf. even though she's leaving office, the complaints in the system won't simply go away. the state officials tell us they will run their course until they're legally resolved. joe, kiran. >> sean callebs looking in to all of that. thanks so much. people were shocked to hear about the death of very, very popular nfl quarterback steve mcnair. >> steve mcnair. absolutely. new details coming in on that. it's quite a story just yet. a lot of people around this country, both in baltimore where you played last time as well as tennessee where you played before that. we have more on the death of steve mcnair coming up next.
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welcome back to the most news in the morning. there's brand new information this morning on the shooting death of former nfl quarterback steve "air" mcnair. police in nashville are officially calling it a murder/suicide and the circumstances of his death are leaving fans with mixed emotions. here's our david mattingly. >> reporter: steve mcnair was behind one of the biggest moments in super bowl history falling a few yards short of
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taking the titans to victory in 2000. nine years later, fans in nashville still loved him, knowing to be generous and approachable in public. but in private, mcnair was taking a serious and unexpected risk. a married man with children, mcnair was seeing 20-year-old srk ahel kazemi, the pictures snapped recently by tmz. her family said the relationship was going five months and she was confident mcnair was divorcing his life and they would soon live together. but early saturday, that ended with this 911 call from a friend of mcnair's. >> tell me what happened? >> i have no idea, sir. i received a phone call that there were injured parties inside this apartment. >> male or female. >> two people. >> that call came from this condo in a building not too far away from titan's stadium. police arrived to find the couple dead.
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mechanic nary had been shot twice in the head and twice in the chest. police now say it was a clear case of murder/suicide and mcnair may have been asleep and did not know what was coming. police describe her as a young woman in turmoil, reeling from financial pressures, complaining to her friends that her personal life was a mess and that she should end it. early thursday morning, she was arrested for dui. that evening, police say she bought a 9 millimeter handgun. >> we have reason to believe that kazemi recently believed before this day that she believed mcnair was involved with another woman and that, too, participated in her state of mind, we think. >> former nfl running back eddie george tells me the man who was murdered was not the steve mcnair that he knew since 1996. >> not at all. he was in search of filling a void. >> he believes his old friend was having a crisis of his own, maybe struggling with life after
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football. >> what people fail to realize is that when you make a transition away from the game, emotionally, physically, mentally, spiritually, you go through something. you change. and you're constantly searching for something. >> and in nashville, fans now search for ways to celebrate the life of a star athlete who brought them many fond memories while mourning his scandalous death. david mattingly, cnn, nashville. >> thanks. 46 minutes past the hour. we fast forward through the stories that will make news later today. 9:00 a.m. eastern, drug wars and your security. a hearing on capitol hill about the increasing rise of violence and mexican drug cartels south of the border. how all of it affects our national security. today marks it ten-year anniversary of a bloody confrontation in iran between students and security forces. that crackdown happened in 1999. still resonates in those today. the large scale resignations
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being disputed in last month's disputed elections. including one in london outside of the iranian embassy. that kicks off at 1:00 p.m. eastern time. vice president biden making the rounds to highlight the progress of the stimulus. at 10:15 a.m., he'll be in cincinnati. later he makes a stop in saratoga county, new york. which is better since you've done both shifts. stay up late or be a morning person? >> i used to think i was a real morning person. then i started working at night, right? at 2:30 a.m., thank you very much. but now i think i'm an evening person. you can exercise more in the morning. >> it's interesting. i love being a morning person. by 6:00 at night, i'm shot. so, our sanjay gupta is going to join us to talk about that. night owls versus morning people. how it affects as and are we wired to be a certain way? contain a nitrogen-enriched cleaning system... that seeks and destroys engine gunk... left by lower-quality gasoline. it protects engines from performance-robbing gunk.
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this is a shoutout to all of my 6:00 a.m. people. if you're watching us right now, you're probably more of a morning person instead of a night owl. and you're better off than those who burn the midnight oil. we're paging dr. gupta. he's in atlanta to explain. it's better for the alarm to go off at 2:45 a.m. until not going to bed until then? >> well 2:45 a.m. may be a different extreme. we could take it to that, as well. but we know a lot more than we have about morning people than night owls. a couple things struck me. and i've been fascinated by this whole thing for some time.
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most are born with the tendency to be one or the other. i'm a morning person, my wife is a night owl. it varies depending on which you are. morning people are going to be sharper typically mentally in the morning as opposed tonight owls, later on in the day. what this study looked at was more physical performance. trying to look at what happens to people who are night owls versus morning people. this is a machine, if you're a night owl you're not going to be paying attention to this anyway, but it measures strength in the calf. people who are morning people, and that's in the green graph here versus evening people really viewed to have significant changes with regard to their strength. green again, morning person, pretty level throughout the day stays around 9:00 a.m., but evening people, lower for pretty much during the day but then they get to a peak that's higher
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than baseline for anybody around 9:00 p.m. it makes a lot of statements about when you should exercise, when your physical performance. athletes paying a lot of attention to that. this area of the brain that probably makes the -- people very focussed on the hypothalamus. that is pretty fixed in most people, but you can start to change it over time, kiran. >> that's interesting. if you are a morning person, you say maybe you should just stick with what's working for you. if you want to sort of try to wind down a little earlier in the day and be peppier in the morning, how do you change that? >> if you watch something like this and said i'd like to have more of my peak performance earlier in the day, there are certain things you can do. sleep is very critical. we talk about this all the time. figure out how much a lead you need and start to adjust 15 minute inkments earlier. first thing in the morning, try
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to get lots of light into your eyes, open the window, look outside, try to get light, hopefully it is light and don't sleep in even on the weekends. there is a medication out there known as mel tonen, consider the hormone or darkness. take it when you want to feel sleepy, you want to think it's night outside. >> all right. very, very interesting. we're going to put joe johns on our dynomometer. thanks so much, if you want to see more about that, cnn.com/amfix. you can check it out when you're surfing the net at 1:00 in the morning. >> it is 53 minutes past the hour.
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it's a somewhat gruesome story. authorities in cook county, illinois, investigated an alleged grave selling scheme by
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workers at a cemetery that involved digging up more than 100 graves, dumping the remains and reselling the plots to unsuspecting customers. tom dart is the cook county sheriff, joining us from outside the cemetery in illinois. thank you so much, sheriff, for coming in. how did you find out about this? >> the management called us because they were made aware of some financial irregularities and then some employees who talked about other things that might not be right. we came here looking for it as a financial crime and we found something quite different in addition to the financial crime. >> well, this thing has been described various ways, one of the words is revolting. what did you see when you got there? >> you know, joe, this one's really hard to put your arms around it because you don't know where to start because it's so upsetting, unsettling, that somebody would be doing these type of things. but we walked around here for
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the last week and each step you take, you're finding more remains, more bones at different locations. and we don't even have our arms kpleetdly around the magnitude of this yet. >> so how were they supposed to be making money with this scheme? just simply digging up the body? >> you know, joe, it was actually a pretty straightforward scheme, but nonetheless, it was also something that was well thought out because what they would do was an unsuspecting individual would come forward to have a loved one buried, they would get a deed to do that, and they would then leave thinking everything's all set for my loved one, they would then take the person that was in the deed that they just gave to that person, go disinter that body, and all they nuknew was they haa plot there and their loved one wasn't there. they're scattered all over,
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scattered all over, joe, all over the different parts of the cemetery right now. >> in the till among others, he's one of the famous figures who was lynched years and years ago, he among others is buried there. is there any indication that his grave was disturbed? >> no, you know, as a matter of fact, i was out here talking yesterday with grounds keepers who have not been implicated in anything. specifically asking them about that. and they've attested and we've interviewed other people, as well, to let us know that that grave specifically has not been in any way have they been touching that one. but the reality of is it is, frank l we've been bringing in high-tech machines that will be able to be used to make sure that nothing has been tampered with. we have thermal imaging units that are going to be on site here soon. and we're going to double check everybody's because as we've told people, this is an
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incredibly historic cemetery for the african-american community, but as well as the notables, there are regular family members everywhere, children, grandparents. when you look at some of the gravestones that we come across that have been dumped throughout the cemetery and have been hidden, you see gravestones of babies, gravestones of grandparents, wives, husbands, this is heart breaking stuff. >> cook county sheriff, tom dart, thanks so much. >> thanks, joe. and good morning, once again. so glad you're with us on this thursday, july 9th. we have joe johns in for john roberts. great to have you with us, as well. >> plenty of coffee. >> plenty of coffee. you learn that one. here's what's on the morning agenda. it's the letter that has everyone talking this morning in washington. seven house democrats saying that the cia has been misleading congress and keeping information from lawmakers for eight years.
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but the nation's top spy agency supposed to keep some things secret? we're live in washington with more on that. president obama and other world leaders focusing on global warming today at the g-8 summit in italy. but the issue being overshadowed by heated debate back home about the economy and whether the president's stimulus plan is really working. our ed henry is live with the latest just ahead. well, for firefighters, the most brutal blazes to battle are in high-rises and for the first time since the september 11th terror attacks, they have a simulator that puts them in there with fire. it's the only one of its kind. you've never seen fire training like this. new allegations surfacing on capitol hill in a letter that was just made public. seven house democrats say that cia director leon panetta that his agency has been misleading lawmakers since 2001. the latest developments live from capitol hill. break down for us what was in this letter and what they're
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claiming has been going on within that agency. >> reporter: yeah, i certainly will, kiran, but really this starts in mid-may with nancy pelosi accused the cia of misleading her and other members of congress in a 2002 intel briefing about harsh interrogation tactics that were being used on terrorism detainees, like waterboarding. at that time leon panetta issued a strong statement saying it wasn't the policy or the practice of the cia to mislead congress. well now fast forward to about two weeks ago, june 24th, cia director panetta came to the hill, he testified before members of the house intel committee and actually told them that he -- that the cia had been misleading members of congress since 2001, so the last eight years and because of that, this is the letter that went out a couple days later newly released from members of the house intel committee saying in part recently, this is to leon
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panetta. recently you have determined that top cia officials have concealed significant actions from congress from 2001 to this week. so now, kiran, you have these members of the house intel committee asking cia director panetta to correct the record, to correct that statement. he said that the cia does not mislead members of congress, kiran. >> and what about the information? do we know or will we ever know what the cia allegedly misled congress about? >> no, we don't know and it's very possible we're not going to know any time soon because it's classified. we've got a lot of people being careful about what they say about that, kiran. >> and this comes under the backdrop of congress getting set to vote on an intelligence measure. >> reporter: that's right, the house will vote on the intel spending bill. there's a provision in this bill that would expand the number of members of congress who get these secret briefings like the one that nancy pelosi got in 2002. this is something that some key democrats really support, they want more people to be briefed in these intel briefings. but at the same time, the obama
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administration, kiran, has issued a veto threat on this just because of that provision. >> all right. brian brianna keilar, thanks so much. well, the president is at the g-8 summit in italy, his stimulus plan is under fire on capitol hill. republicans tore into the president's deputy budget director over how many jobs have been created and how many haven't. >> how do you justify saying that you're slowing the freefall? >> well, i think that what we would do is look back at the job loss that we saw in the first quarter, which was approaching 700,000 a month, and look at where we are right now, we're not happy with the job loss that we're seeing -- >> we're not happy either. but the projection that the administration put forward in what would happen and not happen if we did or didn't do the stimulus are dramatic. they're unacceptable. >> we believe that the job loss is unacceptable, as well.
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>> the president's quoted as saying that the stimulus has "done its job." is that true or not true? >> we believe it has had the impact which we predicted, which is job creation. >> and in a brand new cnn research opinion poll, the number of americans who say the president has a clear plan now at 53%, that's down 11% from february. in the meantime in italy, the president is trying to balance a discussion about global warming and the debate back home over a stimulus plan. senior white house correspondent ed henry live at the g-8. even though he's overseas where a explosive debate getting over the stimulus, is this getting back -- is this getting to the president over there? >> reporter: absolutely, joe. white house officials acutely aware that it's not just republicans leveling criticism about the stimulus not working fast enough. there are some top democrats
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doing that and suggesting, as well, maybe there needs to be a second stimulus package to get the economy going. that's one reason why the president here in italy is making sure the financial crisis is at the top of the agenda. >> reporter: president obama may be in italy for his first g-8 summit, but he's trying to stay focussed on a pressing concern back home, the still ailing u.s. economy. mr. obama quickly joined the other leading industrialized nations in reaffirming their commitment to restore growth. and he's vowed to help tighten financial regulations. >> we discussed the importance of europe and the united states raising standards on financial institutions to ensure that a crisis like this will never happen again. >> reporter: the president is trying to deal with another potential crisis. climate change. he helped lead the group to support a reduction in greenhouse gas emissions among developed countries, an 80% cut by 2050.
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>> a significant step forward in that the g-8, this is the first time the g-8 has published this sort of data on where countries are with regard to their prior commitments. >> reporter: but the white house officials hope it provides momentum for real change. the president also wants to use the g-8 to gain momentum to stop iran from obtaining a nuclear weapon. >> it's important for the world community to speak to countries like iran and north korea and encourage them to take a path that does not result in a nuclear arms race in places like the middle east. >> reporter: italian prime minister moved the summit to the city to highlight devastation from an april earthquake. people still living without homes here are playing off mr. obama's campaign slogan yes, we can, by telling the world, yes, we camp.
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>> mr. obama met this morning with the president of brazil, one of the key developing countries, not signing on to these greenhouse gas cuts, making it not worth very much in the minds of environmentalists, joe. >> ed henry, thanks so much at the g-8. other stories this morning, journalist lisaling is breathing a sigh of relief after she had a chance to speak with her sister laura. here's what she told cnn affiliate kovr about their phone conversation. >> it was a tremendous release to hear laura's voice last night. it was only the first time i had heard her voice in weeks. and so for the last two weeks we were going day and, you know, long days just without hearing anything, and that silence has just been so terrifying and deafening. without actually seeing her and without people actually seeing her physically, it's very difficult to tell, but she was
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very specific about the message that she was communicating and she said, look, you know, we violated north korean law and we need our government to help us. we are sorry for everything that has happened, but now we need diplomacy. >> laura ling and euna lee reporters sentenced to 12 years hard labor for hostile acts. well, a second wave of cyber attacks targeting websites in south korea this morning. seven sites under attack. it comes after hackers bombarded in south korea as well as here in the united states over the july 4th holiday. there's speculation that the north koreans are behind the coordinated computer attacks. the head of the protective service speaking out. it's a story we first told you about yesterday on american morning.
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saying "i take full responsibility, i'm the director of the organization." undercover investigators managed to successfully sneak bomb-making materials into federal buildings every time they attempted to do that. well, still ahead, we're going to be speaking with t. boone pickens. he had an ambitious plan to build wind farms and reduce our dependence on gas. and now that plan has hit a bit of a snag. he'll be joining us to talk about why. nine minutes past the hour.
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it's 11 1/2 minutes past the hour. t. boone pickens made billions of dollars investing in oil. last year he unveiled what he called the pickens plan and decided to heavily invest in the world's biggest wind farm. but he also says those plans have changed partly because of
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the economy. joining me now to talk about it is t. boone pickens. i want to ask you about this, we talked to you a year ago, this was to construct the world's biggest wind farm it would have been in texas. and now you're trying to find a new location for those wind temperatuurbines turbines. what happened? >> well, my garage wasn't big enough. no, i don't get the turbines until 2011. and we don't get the transmission until 2013. so what we'll do is we'll move those turbines out to other projects. then 2013 we'll be back on the project again. all it was it's been postponed a couple of years is what's happened. >> did you run into resistance in dealing with local and state governments as you tried to get, you know, approval for this and the land to put it in different places around the area? >> that's done. the people want it and we're going to do it is the way it's going to work.
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but it's going to take us a little bit longer to get the project going because of transmission. but it's a go project. >> so this is still taking place. >> oh, sure, yeah. >> it's still happening. what about the area in tampa. when you say there's a transmission, a delay in transmission, what does that mean? >> that you don't have a place to off load your power to, so you need a transmission system lines to be able to move the power down state. and so that line will be in '13. but the biggest part of the pickens plan, can we go to that? >> yeah. >> was the natural gas to replace foreign oil, and that is working very, very well. that's in the house bill 1835, which is authored, and that came out about six weeks ago. yesterday was a huge day in washington. and that bill, from the senate
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side it's 1408 is the bill number, those two bills will come together and that will be the way that -- that's authored by senator menendez and hatch. that's big. >> if people are not familiar with what we're saying. basically what you would be doing is shifting what powers some of our vehicles to natural gas, freeing up, freeing up having to use oil and petroleum for that. these wind farms would then take the place of what natural gas is being used for. >> we have so much natural gas, we can power, you know, the power generation, we can do that, and it'll pique off wind. you need to be able to generate power when wind is still. and that all will happen. and also, we have so much natural gas, we can replace foreign oil. and natural gas is a fantastic
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fuel. it's cleaner, it's cheaper, it's abundant, and it's ours. >> you bring up a lot of good points in this is that does the public will for this stuff sort of fade as gas prices ebb and flow? right now we're at $2.58. last year at this time we were at $4.11 a gallon. it falls off the radar with people and they're not paying as much for gas. what you're saying is i'm more popular when gas prices are high? >> yeah, lately. >> that is a point. but, remember, when last year at the same time we were importing almost 70% of our oil. where are we today? almost 70% of our oil. okay, what my issue is security. security from a country when you are buying 70% of your oil and a great part of that is coming from people that do not like you. and in some cases your enemies. that is what i'm trying to fix
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is a security issue. that did not change. it's just the pain is not as great today as it was a year ago. but we have made huge progress on the pickens plan. somebody asked me the other day, what is it? on a ten what is it? i said it's a ten. >> when will we see wind power having a profound effect on our energy here in the u.s.? >> wind, it's having a profound effect. the largest increase of wind energy came in the united states last year. you'll never have in america any more than 25% of your power being generated by wind and solar. so these are not going to replace other, and people think they are are not being realistic about it. you're going to have to have some coal, you're going to have to have natural gas to pique wp and then put the renewables in and put them altogether. that's the way it works.
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we're going to have a system in america we're going to be proud of, a 21st century grid and we're going to have our trucks first will run on natural gas. >> all right. well, good luck with the project. you say it's still a go. just going to take a little bit longer than originally hoped. >> we're going to get it done, but i'm in a hurry because of my age. >> well, you will be around, i can pretty much guarantee that. it was so great to have you on the show. thanks for being with us. kiran, coming up, it was one of the lessons of september 11th, 2001. getting training for firefighters inside high-rise buildings while those buildings are burning. we'll be right back with that report and some pretty good pictures.
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live picture right now, some low hanging clouds over new york city. i walked in here early this morning, it was nice and warm, but doesn't look so good at this point. cloudy, 66, later partly cloudy, 74 in the big apple. how can you possibly train for a wall of fire? for firefighters, battling a high-rise blaze, the only way is on the job, right? not anymore. brace yourself. i saw some of these pictures and they're pretty impressive. >> they are absolutely. firefighters will tell you that one of the most dangerous places to fight is a high-rise fire. so a city known for skyscrapers, it's hard to believe up until now the only realistic training for firefighters was a real
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fire, well, not any more. we were given an inside look as they show us the newest training tool. and check out the victim. >> fire 42nd floor. >> we have it under control. >> how is the pressure looking? >> reporter: imagine a fire breaks out on the 42nd floor of a new york city high-raise building. >> victim on the fourth floor. >> preparing to start a rescue. >> down, down. >> reporter: like me, you find yourself balancing on a window ledge waiting to be rescued. >> i'm going to grab you around the waist. >> reporter: yes, it's a drill, but for them it's the closest thing to actual game time. >> right after september 11th, we realized how difficult it is to fight a high-rise fire. you have to have that pressure on, you have to have that build-up of anxiety so that you know how you're going to
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operate. >> reporter: wind-driven fires can be hard to fight because the temperatures can reach 3,000 degrees. the four-story training facility is the first of its kind in the nation. >> when i first heard they didn't have a high-rise in new york, i was astounded. >> reporter: dennis looeery pla a firefighter in his show "rescue me." his foundation paid for the simulator. >> real smoke, real flame that you can experience, no joke. the moment that you run into a real fire, mixture of panic and pure courage. >> reporter: the kind of courage also needed to rescue people trapped in what would normally be dark airless elevator shafts. >> this gives us a little bit more freedom to experiment different problems that would arise. >> reporter: or scale a building. >> 100 stories, we'll drop two stories and break a window below and we'll hook the rope and bring them in that window.
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>> we've got thousands of high-rise buildings in new york city. this turns out to an enormously vital tool. >> reporter: the drill we just did, have you done that before separately? >> the way you train -- we train very well, and fight fires very well. >> nice job, everybody, thank you. >> trains for every possible disaster and it looks a lot like hollywood sets, even a subway platform with real subway cars. it allows as many as 15 fire companies to train every day practicing a coordinated response and fire chiefs tell us it is making a huge difference. >> a little scary coming down that window, wasn't it? >> sitting in the window, yeah, it was very difficult to let go of the frame. but then you had this firefighter just give you the confidence you needed. >> yeah. you have to have courage to save yourself.
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>> absolutely. nobody got hurt. >> great. >> deb, thanks so much. for more of our interview with dennis leery, check out our blog on cnn.com/amfix.
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right now, there are some new developments in the michael jackson investigation. sources telling cnn that the singer's long time dermatologist dr. arnie kline is on the list of doctors being investigated. he spoke last night about jackson's suspected drug use. >> did michael tell you he used diprivan? >> i knew when he was on tour in germany, and so he was using it with an anesthesiologist to go
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to sleep at night. i told him he was absolutely insane. i said you have to understand that this drug you can't repeatedly take. what happens with narcotics no matter what you do, you build a tolerance to them. >> and in a story you'll only see on cnn, we're also uncovering new details about the lengths that michael jackson's family went to break his reported drug addiction. here's cnn's special investigations unit correspondent drew griffin. >> reporter: it was 2007, that was two years after michael jackson's trial for molestation in california. the jury acquitting him, but he was scarred. he all but disappeared. first going to a self-imposed exile and then briefly to ireland. we're told he was happier, but that his career was going nowhere. this was a period when he rarely saw his family. sources tell us michael jackson became fixated with music superstar celine dion and that permanent show she was starring in in las vegas. jackson thought that kind of
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show might be his path back to show business, so he moved to vegas. in early 2007, he was believed to be living in this large rented home. two sources close to the family say janet jackson who had seen little of her brother in recent years visited him there and was shocked. we're told the house was nearly barren of furniture and sleepy looking, according to one source, but it was the sight of an extremely thin dishevelled michael jackson that frightened janet. and that brings us up to the nba all star weekend in february in las vegas. janet jackson there with two of her brothers, she asked those brothers to go back with her to michael jackson's house trying to convince michael to get help. reportedly michael ordered his new security guards not to let them in. we've also learned that michael jackson at that time was refusing to take calls from his own mother katherine jackson who had been repeatedly pleading with her son to get help. now all through this time, the
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family had been concerned, and according to both our sources, michael jackson would simply refuse to see anybody who tried to stop him from using drugs. one source saying if you tried to deal with him, he would shut you out. you just wouldn't hear from him for long periods of time. another source telling us the family was concerned for a long time, but it was janet who tried to force the issue two years ago. we must tell you back in 2007 people magazine did report about an alleged jackson family intervention. the jackson family denied it, releasing this statement which said in part we categorically deny ever planning, participating in, having knowledge of any kind of intervention whatsoever. now, that statement was signed by members of the jackson family, but not signed by janet jackson. joe and kiran? >> drew griffin for us, looking into that, thanks. checking our top stories. deadly bombings across iraq and afghanistan this morning. at least 41 people are dead in
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iraq after deadly blasts in baghdad. and just outside kabul, afghanistan, a truck bombing killed 25 people. calling for new demonstrations in tehran. these are pictures you're looking at from protests that happened sunday shot on amateur video. a top iranian official is warning security forces will "smash" any protest attempts. today also marks a 10th anniversary of students that led to a bloody government crackdown there. and the white house is putting all 50 states on alert this morning, a swine flu summit in washington is working to make sure we're ready if the h1n1 flu comes back full force later this year. the cdc confirms the virus has killed at least 170 people here in the u.s. and this morning, a bomb shell claimed in a letter saying
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that leon panetta recently testified that the cia misled congress for the past eight years. joining us now is mike allen for politico. thanks for coming in. >> good morning. >> what's your take on this? you've been talking to sources? this is something that hit us this morning. >> it is a surprise. and it'll revise an issue that the white house and nancy pelosi don't need right now. what happened is the cia is trying to clean up its act and go back and be sure that congress is being briefed on everything that it should be. overbriefed even because of the complaints that have come up and because of lapses they believe occurred during the bush administration. so what you had here was the cia director leon panetta who we remember from when he was a democratic member of the house, when he was the white house chief of staff under president clinton coming to the congress and saying, look, yesterday, this was in late june, yesterday i learned about a program that had been going on a covert
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program that you should have known about. it had gone on for at least eight years, went on to the obama administration. we're not sure if it's still going on. and so here's the info about it. it became public because these seven members, most of them liberal went public, posted a letter on their website. but, nancy pelosi had had a problem with her complaints about the cia. she weathered that storm, and now she's having, joe, as you know, her weekly press conference coming up, and now a topic she doesn't want to be asked about. >> and the thing that's very complicated on these intelligence issues is you never can really get to the bottom of it because you can't get anybody to give you a full briefing, right? >> that's right. it's clearly a fascinating program. they said it was significant or they wouldn't have gone public with it, gone on for at least nine years. the cia director was in 24 hours, went up to congress when he learned about it. so it's juicy, no doubt, hopefully we'll find out before
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the next bob woodward book. >> that's a lot of detail. the next question is, panetta says he knows that the cia was doing misleading here. what if anything at the end of the day is he likely to do about it? >> well, if somebody actively misled, of course that could be investigated and could lead to prosecutions, sounds like this was largely a matter of omission. i was joking about bob woodward, but i should make clear there are a love of programs we should not know about it. there's no reason that the public should know about it. it'll be interesting if it comes out. but there's a reason that our system is built so that congress is looped in on these. congress now is trying to expand the number of people who are briefed on some of these because of the questions that have come up, the white house is resisting that. keeping it to the smaller circle. so the public by and large is going to side with the cia in this. the doesn't look good for a
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democratic white house and congress to be picking this fight. democrats have been looking strong on national security, they want to stay there. this is an issue this president will want to put to bed as quickly as possible. it doesn't help him or the democratic leadership on capitol hill. >> mike allen, chief white house correspondent for politico. thank you so much for that reporting this morning. >> have a great day. >> you bet. it is 34 minutes after the hour. the car listens. you say call nina, you get nina. you say play puccini, 12 sony speakers... play puccini. you say get me to the game, you get there step by step. with our voice activated sync technology, no one speaks your language like we do. we speak the 2010 ford fusion. get in... and drive one.
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well, these are some of our top videos right now on cnn.com. researchers are using teeth to help people see again. this is unbelievable. they're taking tissue from inside a tooth to repair damaged corneas. the procedure's already been successful in europe and asia. it would be a first in the u.s. this kansas teen we fed up with last summer's high gas prices, so he decided to do something about it. he built himself an electric car. he says he used plans from the internet and replaced his car's engine with an electronic forklift motor. and finally a slippery situation in turkey here at the
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annual oil wrestling festival. wow, simply put a bunch of men get together, they drench each other in olive oil and try to pin each other to the ground. this would be better if they weren't wearing jeans, because it would be harder to hold on to each other. it would make it much more difficult because right now you can grab the guy by the seat of his pants. >> maybe like a sumo wrestling outfit. >> that is the oldest wrestling festival in the world. olive oil, though, fabulous for the skin. absorbs right in. wonderful. >> a lot better than sun block. >> well, you should use sun block too. sanjay's going to come up here and kick your butt if you don't. deep in the recession, a boom town rising, and to find it you have to go 80 miles from atlanta to west point, georgia. so why west point? well, there's a thriving auto industry there. and in our special series money
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in main street, alina cho found out why. >> reporter: in the heart of the south, it is literally changing. the old pizza hut is a korean barbecue, the old kfc, young garden, jobs are finally returning. >> just like christmas time. like christmas. >> reporter: christmas in the middle of a recession? in west point, yes. >> we jokingly call it kiaville. >> reporter: it is about to open manufacturing plants thanks to $400 million in tax breaks. even in the midst of a recession, the company will hire 2,500 new workers, add suppliers and new businesses, and the mayor says west point's population 3,500 stands to gain 20,000 jobs over the next five years. divine intervention.
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>> the economic activity is tremendous, the trickle down effect has been staggering. >> reporter: remarkable for a city that was slowly becoming a ghost town. textile mills that once defined west point shut down in the 1990s, leaving many out of work. including 52-year-old margaret, laid off last year, now working again at one of kia's suppliers. >> did you ever think you would be making car parts? >> not at all. >> reporter: new construction is everywhere. at roger's barbecue, business is booming. >> well, we can get them in here one time, we can get them back. and they're coming back, and enjoying it. >> reporter: malcolm's car wash business is up 70%, and down the street at irish bread pup, ruth anne invested her life savings, it's paying off. >> i came here because of kia. we have jumped in with both feet and we have not looked back one time. >> reporter: so how is this tiny
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rural community adapting to the new asian infusion? >> does west point feel more like a melting pot now? >> you've got the culture coming in. >> reporter: from mill town to manufacturing mecca, a bright spot in an otherwise gray economy. in facts the mayor of west point his old friends are actually starting to call him again, inquiring about moving back home. kia, in the meantime, has already gotten 43,000 applications for just 2,500 jobs and we're told that some of those applications are coming from auto workers from around the country, including, guys, detroit. joe and kiran? >> thanks. and for more stories on how people are thriving in a rough economy, watch money in main street tonight 8:00 eastern right here on cnn. how are we going to make this business work
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and keep the economy going? you know it's the local pizza guy that needs to pay his supplier for the dough. during these times when you think most people would roll over, small business owners figure out a way to fight, and i just love being part of that kind of a team. we've been able to help tons of small business customers. and in this day and age, i'm sure there's a lot of small business owners that really don't have the time to do their banking inside of a branch. so why not do all that stuff electronically? they could take over the actual payroll process themselves just through our website. we are able to provide customers with ways that they can keep their business running and profitable. we don't want to say no to a customer. we want to be able to help them. whether they're started out in the business, whether they're looking to expand their business... we grow with them as they grow their business. we're going to do everything we can to be an advocate for that customer and to really help them... help them get through this tough time. committing small business specialists like myself to the community, i think that speaks loudly to what bank of america thinks the heart of the community is - the small business.
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brand new information this morning on the shooting death of former nfl quarterback steve air
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mcnair. police in nashville are now officially calling it a murder/suicide. and now the circumstances are leaving fans with mixed emotions. here's our david mattingly. >> reporter: nfl quarterback steve mcnair was behind one of the biggest moments in super bowl history, falling just a few yards short of taking the tennessee titans to victory in 2000. and nine years later, fans in nashville still loved him, knowing him to be generous and approachable in public. but in private, mcnair was taking a serious and unexpected risk. a married man with children, mcnair was seeing 20-year-old kazemi, these pictures of the couple snapped recently by tmz. her family said the relationship had been going for more than five months and that she was confident mcnair was divorcing his wife and they would soon live together. but early saturday, that ended with this 911 call from a friend of mcnair's. >> tell me what happened.
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>> i have no idea, sir. >> okay. >> i received a phone call. >> uh-huh. >> and an injured party inside this apartment. >> male or female? >> two people. >> reporter: that call came from this condo in a building not too far away from titan stadium. police arrived to find the couple dead. mcnair had been shot twice in the head and twice in the chest. police now say it was a clear case of murder/suicide. and that mcnair may have been asleep and did not know it was coming. police describe kazemi, reeling from financial pressures, complaining to her friends that her personal life was a mess and that she should end it. early thursday morning she was arrested for dui, that evening police say she bought a .9 millimeter handgun. >> we also had reason to believe she recently learned before this day that she believed mcnair was
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involved with another woman and that too participated in her state of mind, we think. >> reporter: they shared their findings with mrs. mcnair, they did not know if she was aware of the relationship. this kind of image of mcnair saddens fans who gathered where they knew him as a competitor and philanthropist. he spoke of his family at his retirement. >> it's a blessing that now i have get to walk away in this game, you know, on my own two feet and to realize that family's very important. >> reporter: that was just 16 months ago. former nfl runningback eddie george tells me the man who was murdered was not the steve mcnair he's known since 1996. >> he was in search of filling a void. >> reporter: george believes his old friend was having a crisis of his own, maybe struggling with life after football. >> what people fail to realize is that when you make a transition away from a game, emotionally, physically, mentally, spiritually, you go through something, you change.
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and you're constantly searching for something. >> reporter: and in nashnashvil fans search for ways to celebrate a life of a star athlete who brought them many memories while mourning his scandalous death.
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less than a week after returning from his suspension for using female fertility drugs, manny ramirez was rejected for arguing with the umpire. ejected. when asked about it he said the argument started when he forgot my birthday. >> you liked that one, didn't you? >> yeah, i wonder if he asked him if he thought he was fat.
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>> does this uniform make me look fat? welcome back to the most news in the morning. our own dr. gupta is about to hit a milestone, did you know this? sanjay is just four months away from his 40th birthday. wow. >> is that all? >> and to celebrate, he's getting in the best shape of his life and he wants everyone else to join him. no more me and you saying people our age, because that's over now. i'm going to start saying what was it like back when dot, dot, dot. >> kiran, have you turned 30 yet? come on, now. >> well, no, a lot of people, though, are already sending you tweets, asking for advice. and our first viewer asks, what sort of activities do you recommend shedding weight around the middle. i'm a 40-year-old female. and a lot of people tell you as it gets older, it gets harder and harder. >> it's not necessarily a celebration because it's a lot of work to get in shape. but i think it's one of those important things you can look at
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yourself in certain points of your life and say it is time to do this. so for our first tweeterror, i would say belly fat is one of these things we talk about all the time. it is metabolically active fat, it raises your risk of heart disease, stroke, and some types of cancer. we talk a lot about the various things you can do. couple things to keep in mind. moderate consistent exercise seems to be best. you're not going to see differences early on because you're usually targeting deep fat, at least early on. if you get -- if you start to get rid of the fat but starting to go for low body fat overall, you've got to look at diet more than anything else. people trying to get rid of the spare tire, it's not simply getting rid of fat in the diet, getting rid of the rong types of fat. adding saturated fats with every meal, making a huge difference, olive oil, nuts and seeds. eat a little bit of that, it'll make you feel full. it is a process, it takes months, good luck to you. >> and the other thing too,
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people might not know this about you guys, you've decided also not to keep meat in your house. you talk about the importance of a plant-based diet. you may eat meat when you're out, but a lot of people who think they can down the cheese burgers all the time and eat a lot of meat. why does it make a difference as you get older to start watching that? >> well, first of all, my wife and i said we're not going to keep meat in the house, doesn't mean we won't eat meat. and that was sort of a moderation we came up with. it tends to get harder to burn those calorie, especially as you get older. your metabolic activity tends to change. if you do nothing different from this day forward, you eat the same, you exercise the same, you will still likely gain about 2 pounds a year, 20 years later you're 40 pounds heavier. you need to do more in terms of diet and exercise. >> i joked at my husband, told him you did that, he said if we did that, only thing we'd have in our house is a jar of
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mayonnaise. >> wrong kind of fat. >> well, you can follow his four months to fitness. i'm going to check it out. >> you look great, kiran, appreciate that. >> got to worry about keeping up the muscle mass when you're a female getting older. but also two ways to do it. follow sanjay on twitter. or you can read more on our show blog cnn.com/amfix. good luck, happy birthday, you've accomplished more in your 40 years than most of us do in our entire life. rock on, sanjay. >> appreciate it.
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still cloudy and overcast out there. right now in new york city, 67 degrees, partly cloudy, that looks more than partly to me. later today, going up to a high of 74 degrees, and this is just not quite beach weather for
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early july, i would say. i don't think i'm putting on the shorts any time soon. >> you have them on right now under the desk. >> stop it. >> teasing. >> don't tell my secret. >> don't look downward, sir. few american teenagers would rank cricket among their favorite sports and now it may be catching on here at home. richard roth here with your -- >> wicked fads, whatever. i walk softly and carry a big stick. as new york's -- by the way, as new york's famed melting pot of global populations gets even thicker, the city tries new ways to reach out and keep everyone cool under the hot summer sun. that means bowlers, wickets, and googlys. >> reporter: teammates cheer on the batter, but they're not playing baseball on this new york city field. he is actually a bats man because this is cricket.
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many of the teenage players come from the city's caribbean and south asian neighborhoods. the new york police department started this league in an effort to foster better relations with those immigrant communities, which in the past may have been lacking. >> this is the sport they're comfortable with. so we need to be comfortable with it, as well. we want to forge new relationships, we need to show them we're willing to expand our horizons, as well. >> reporter: now in its second year, the league has expanded to ten teams and 170 players. >> provide all of the uniforms, the fields, we put together the schedule and assist the kids if they need to get down here with transportation and they love it. >> reporter: and what happens on the field is having an impact off it. >> i think it makes a big difference. once you represent ny league, when you're on the streets, it makes you think twice. >> reporter: and others hope the
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nypd gains better insight. >> due to the fact that, perhaps, they will have a different perception and improve relationship between the two. >> reporter: cricket's been called a gentleman's sport, but hasn't stopped girls from participating. >> my friends think it's pretty cool. and the only girl that's here all the time. and even my little sister thinks it's pretty cool with all of the guys. >> reporter: and league members believe this is just the beginning for cricket in america. >> i think it'll be a while before we turn it to espn and a deciding should i watch baseball or cricket? it might be a little while, but this is where it starts. >> reporter: cricket is not a sport played at the olympics, cricket lovers are trying to change that. they may want to bring this into a meeting to persuade people. kiran? >> it's fascinating, though, you say the games can be all day games, can go on several days. >> there's a shorter version that the leagues play in new york

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