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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  October 3, 2022 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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today at six. the chancellor bows to pressure and scraps the cut in the top rate of tax just ten days after he announced it. the pm puts on a brave face at the conservative party conference. before he made his speech this afternoon, the chancellor admitted their plan had to change. this 45 pence rate became a distraction, and i, along with the prime minister, decided that the best course of action would simply be not to proceed with the abolition of the rate. junked first thing, justified all day by a determination to focus on other thing, that will help grow the economy. this has been a very difficult day for a government facing more difficulties ahead. have the chancellor and the pm done enough to win back the markets,
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critical tory mps — and the public? also tonight. the energy regulator ofgem warns of a "significant risk of gas shortages" this winter. the man accused of murdering nine—year—old olivia pratt korbel appears in court in liverpool. cheers for the king and queen consort on their first public engagement since the end of the period of royal mourning. coming up in sportsday later in the hour on the bbc news channel: there's always pride at stake in the east midlands derby, but there could be jobs on the line as well, as leicester face nottingham forest. good evening and welcome to the bbc news at six. "it's been a tough day" — that's how the chancellor began his speech to the party faithful at the conservative party
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conference this afternoon. it follows a dramatic u—turn this morning when the government suddenly dropped its plan to scrap the 45p top rate of income tax. only yesterday, the prime minister had insisted the tax cut would stay. but now kwasi kwarteng says criticism of the measure had become a "huge distraction" that had "drowned out" other measures announced in the government's so—called mini budgetjust ten days ago. his change of heart followed mounting criticism among tory mps about the tax cut. our political editor, chris mason, reports. first thing this morning, things are moving. and fast. the planned tax cut for the highest paid is being junked, the highest paid is being junked, the government has blinked. it was the government has blinked. it was an ambitious _ the government has blinked. it was an ambitious plan _ the government has blinked. it was an ambitious plan and _ the government has blinked. it was an ambitious plan and we _ the government has blinked. it was an ambitious plan and we talked . the government has blinked. it w—s an ambitious plan and we talked to lots of people up an down the country, i saw the reaction, we considered what to do with it, and i felt and the prime minister felt that this was just a distraction on
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what is a very strong package. translation, the idea tanked so have poll ratings and there was little chance mps would vote for it so it is being ditched as the chancellor's next interview beckoned. d0 is being ditched as the chancellor's next interview beckoned.— is being ditched as the chancellor's next interview beckoned. do you owe an apology- — next interview beckoned. do you owe an apology- having — next interview beckoned. do you owe an apology. having the _ next interview beckoned. do you owe an apology. having the humility - next interview beckoned. do you owe an apology. having the humility to i an apology. having the humility to sa we not an apology. having the humility to say we got this — an apology. having the humility to say we got this wrong _ an apology. having the humility to say we got this wrong an - an apology. having the humility to say we got this wrong an we - an apology. having the humility to say we got this wrong an we won'tj say we got this wrong an we won't proceed _ say we got this wrong an we won't proceed with the abolition of the rate _ proceed with the abolition of the rate do — proceed with the abolition of the rate. , ., proceed with the abolition of the rate. ,, ., , .,, proceed with the abolition of the rate. ., , ., ., ”i rate. do you owe people an apology. we have listened _ rate. do you owe people an apology. we have listened to _ rate. do you owe people an apology. we have listened to people, - rate. do you owe people an apology. we have listened to people, there i rate. do you owe people an apology. we have listened to people, there is| we have listened to people, there is humility— we have listened to people, there is humility and contrition in that. contrast— humility and contrition in that. contrast what he called humility today with the pride of the original announcement, just a week last friday. announcement, 'ust a week last frida . �* ., ., ., ., announcement, 'ust a week last frida . �* ., ., ., friday. but i am not going to cut the additional _ friday. but i am not going to cut the additional rate _ friday. but i am not going to cut the additional rate of— friday. but i am not going to cut the additional rate of tax - friday. but i am not going to cut the additional rate of tax today, | friday. but i am not going to cut i the additional rate of tax today, mr speaker. i am going to establish it all together. from april 23rd, we will have a single higher railway station of income tax of a0%. in station of income tax of 40%. in contrast the chancellor this morning with the prime minister yesterday.
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are you absolutely committed to establishing the 45 pence tax rate. yes. ., ., yes. little wonder after the u-turn some ministers _ yes. little wonder after the u-turn some ministers discovered - yes. little wonder after the u-turn some ministers discovered the - yes. little wonder after the u-turn some ministers discovered the art| yes. little wonder after the u-turn i some ministers discovered the art of quick walking when in the company of cameras. ., ., ., ., , , ., cameras. you are going to bump into wall, ou cameras. you are going to bump into wall. you are — cameras. you are going to bump into wall. you are going — cameras. you are going to bump into wall, you are going to _ cameras. you are going to bump into wall, you are going to bump - cameras. you are going to bump into wall, you are going to bump into - cameras. you are going to bump into wall, you are going to bump into a i wall, you are going to bump into a column. �* ., ., , ., ., ~ column. although others would talk. sometimes you _ column. although others would talk. sometimes you from _ column. although others would talk. sometimes you from the _ column. although others would talk. sometimes you from the to - column. although others would talk. sometimes you from the to fate - sometimes you from the to fate political reality and that is what they have done. the political reality and that is what they have done.— political reality and that is what they have done. political reality and that is what the have done. ., ., , ., ., they have done. the ma'ority of what was announced h they have done. the ma'ority of what was announced say _ they have done. the ma'ority of what was announced say the _ they have done. the majority of what was announced say the cut _ they have done. the majority of what was announced say the cut in - was announced say the cut in nationai— was announced say the cut in national insurance, the cut in corporation tax is going ahead and that is— corporation tax is going ahead and that is fundamentally important to -et that is fundamentally important to get to— that is fundamentally important to get to economic growth. this was the flotsam _ get to economic growth. this was the flotsam and _ get to economic growth. this was the flotsam and jet sam of the announcement. thank you. and flotsam and jet sam of the announcement. thank you. and as for what labour — announcement. thank you. and as for what labour make _ announcement. thank you. and as for what labour make of— announcement. thank you. and as for what labour make of it. _ announcement. thank you. and as for what labour make of it. the _ announcement. thank you. and as for what labour make of it. the mini - what labour make of it. the mini budaet what labour make of it. the mini budget showed _ what labour make of it. the mini budget showed what _ what labour make of it. the mini budget showed what their - what labour make of it. the mini | budget showed what their instinct were, it was to cut task force the wealthiest in society, paid for by borrowing which in the end, current and future taxpayers will have to pay for. and future taxpayers will have to -a for. ~ , ., pay for. the prime minister and chancellor _ pay for. the prime minister and chancellor have _ pay for. the prime minister and chancellor have binned - pay for. the prime minister and chancellor have binned one - pay for. the prime minister and chancellor have binned one bit| pay for. the prime minister and i chancellor have binned one bit of plans that improved impossible to sell. there is a lot else that may not prove popular either, the
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prospect of spending cut, benefits cuts and spiralling interest rates which critics will blame on them. and then there are those within the conservative party who are sceptical of the government, who will now ask on what else might they budge? the on what else might they budge? tie: chancellor of on what else might they budge? ti2 chancellor of the exchequer. on what else might they budge? the chancellor of the exchequer. enter l chancellor of the exchequer. enter at less than _ chancellor of the exchequer. enter at less than a _ chancellor of the exchequer. enter at less than a gallop _ chancellor of the exchequer. enter at less than a gallop kwasi - chancellor of the exchequer. enter at less than a gallop kwasi kwarteng for his hastily rewritten speech, greeted by pop lite applause. thank ou greeted by pop lite applause. thank you conference. _ greeted by pop lite applause. thank you conference. what _ greeted by pop lite applause. thank you conference. what a _ greeted by pop lite applause. thank you conference. what a day. - greeted by pop lite applause. thank you conference. what a day. it - greeted by pop lite applause. tusfua; you conference. what a day. it has been tough, but we need to focus on the job been tough, but we need to focus on thejob in hand. the been tough, but we need to focus on the job in hand-— the job in hand. the chancellor wearinu the job in hand. the chancellor wearing the — the job in hand. the chancellor wearing the demeanour- the job in hand. the chancellor wearing the demeanour of - the job in hand. the chancellor wearing the demeanour of a i the job in hand. the chancellor. wearing the demeanour of a man winded by events, leaning on gallows humour. hf winded by events, leaning on gallows humour. h t winded by events, leaning on gallows humour. .., winded by events, leaning on gallows humour. , ., ~ humour. ifi can be the frank, i know the _ humour. ifi can be the frank, i know the plan _ humour. ifi can be the frank, i know the plan put _ humour. ifi can be the frank, i know the plan put forward - humour. ifi can be the frank, i know the plan put forward ten | humour. ifi can be the frank, i- know the plan put forward ten days ago has caused a little turbulence, i get it. i get it. we are listening. and have listened. and now, i want to focus on delivering the major parts of our growth package. the major parts of our growth ackaue. ., ,
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the major parts of our growth ackaue. .,, ., ., package. there was though, a defiance from _ package. there was though, a defiance from kwasi _ package. there was though, a | defiance from kwasi kwarteng, package. there was though, a i defiance from kwasi kwarteng, a determination not to be derailed from his main mission. igrate determination not to be derailed from his main mission. we couldn't siml do from his main mission. we couldn't simply do nothing. _ from his main mission. we couldn't simply do nothing. we _ from his main mission. we couldn't simply do nothing. we can't - from his main mission. we couldn't simply do nothing. we can't sit - from his main mission. we couldn't simply do nothing. we can't sit idlyj simply do nothing. we can't sit idly ljy, simply do nothing. we can't sit idly by, what britain needs more than ever is economic growth. and a government wholly committed to economic growth. with grit, with drive and with determination we can meet the challenges of this new era. thank you. applause. thumbs up from a colleague, smiles of relief, a slow walk after a long day. which will leave an indelible mark on this government. chris mason, bbc news, in birmingham. chris mason, bbc news, in birmingham. the pound has strengthened against the dollar in response to the climb—down on cutting the top rate of tax. government borrowing costs have also fallen to around the level they were before the so—called mini budget ten days ago. but will today's u—turn improve the government's credibility, calm the markets and help with people's mortgages? here's our economics editor, faisal islam.
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it was meant to be a growth plan, not a budget. it was meant to underpin the confidence of investors in all projects from those involving towering cranes to ordinary house moves to make that investment, but instead it amplified an interest rate shock from around the world and targeted it at the uk. natwest last week were quoting five—year fixed rate at 3.77, whereas the changes that were made to take their five—year fixed—rate cheapest is 5.14. and that was with a 40% deposit. ten minutes walk from the chancellors speech, a birmingham mortgage broker is still seeing the shock waves from last week hit ordinary consumers. it's been a massive shock this past week, the pace of change very difficult to keep up with, lenders are withdrawing products with little or no notice or even retrospectively telling us a deal has gone so it makes us
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the extent of the u—turn in financial terms is modest. the £45 billion of unfunded tax cuts becomes £43 billion. the now abandoned cut in the 45p rate was to cost the exchequer 2 billion pounds but by for a bigger cut was the reversal to the national insurance rise. that's worth £18 billion and that's already been legislated for, and then the largest cut was the abandonment of the rise in corporation tax on company profits, worth nearly £19 billion a year. there could be some pressure for policy reverses here as well as to extend the existing windfall tax on rising energy prices. this u—turn is small in value terms but hugely symbolic. the markets reacted well initially with sterling going up a bit and the government's borrowing costs going down a bit. on the one hand this reflects the government coming into line with the market consensus but there is a need for a plan with a solid set of numbers. on the other, the markets now don't know if there are other things
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in the plan that eventually will require a u—turn that has not been admitted to right now, and for the chancellor, in the two fundamental aspects of doing his job, which is getting market credibility and being able to pass the budget, he is still playing catch up and he thinks growth is the answer. in the meantime a mini budget premium on borrowing costs remains and pressures on tax and spending are being noticed in the nearby northfields constituency which switched to the conservatives in 2019. universal credit is not enough. we are worried for our children pause they will— are worried for our children pause they will struggle. they are struggle with their mortgages. people — struggle with their mortgages. people who earn more should pay more tax, simple as. people who earn more should pay more tax. simple as— tax, simple as. pressure will be iled on tax, simple as. pressure will be piled on spending _ tax, simple as. pressure will be piled on spending cut, - tax, simple as. pressure will be piled on spending cut, not - piled on spending cut, not increasing spending plans with inflation could mean an effective £18 billion real terms cut to many already struggling service, perhaps
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tax credits and benefits won't be increased in line with inflation but earnings instead. instead. that is worth 5.5 billion a year, but difficult during a cost of living crisis. or long—term investle could be cut back but that was the backbone of the promise to level up. it could rival the austerity package. the new chancellor has decided to stop digging the hole created at the mini budget, but how the fill the one created in the public finances remains unclear. let's get more now from our political editor, chris mason, at the conservative party conference in birmingham. chris. we have had this u—turn now, how difficult will it be for the government to regain credibility with the market, with mp5, and crucially with wider public? ht is crucially with wider public? it is really difficult, _ crucially with wider public? tit 3 really difficult, because this is a government that went out of its way
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in its opening days to embrace the idea that it would do stuff that was unpopular, it tested that theory to destruction, and then, it buckled. let me give you a sense of the life psych offal this idea that has been junked today. it was originally floated in liz truss's circles over the summer when she was still a candidate to be prime minister. it was fast—tracked into that first announcement ten days ago, and then, ten days later, fast—tracked straight into the bin. so, people are asking, what happens with the other stuff? all of those difficult decisions we heard faisal talking about there that are coming down the track, will there be sufficiently resolute in government for it to be able to stick to their guns on those policies, where they weren't able to be on a policy that wouldn't have cost them that much money, in the grand scheme of things and only benefitted a slither of the population, so that is the big question being asked here tonight, about the extent to which the government has the stomach to stick to the course, there is no doubt
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they are politically weakened by think decision. they have been robbed of their own swagger by their own about turn and have to pick themselves up from that. they hope one excruciating day is better than a series of painful days associated with this one nowjunked policy, there is still difficult days to come on the whole plethora of other policies. and you can find more updates, news and analysis on bbc news online, that's bbc.co.uk/news, and by using the bbc news app. the uk is facing "a significant risk" of gas shortages this winter, according to the industry regulator, which could impact electricity supplies. ofgem says due to russia's war with ukraine, there is a possibility the uk could enter a "gas supply emergency". this would lead to supplies being cut to power stations which use gas to generate the country's electricity. our business correspondent, caroline davies, is here.
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the prime minister reassured us during her leadership campaign there would be no energy rationing this winter — but now we have this warning from ofgem, what are we to make of it? well i think it is certain this winter will be up like any one we have had for several years and we know it is notjust ofgem that concern about the russia impact on energy supply, we know concern about the russia impact on energy supply, we know the concern about the russia impact on energy supply, we know the national grid are putting out a winter outlook and that will be more detail with more different outcomes than before, we knee in the summer, the government were coming up with their own plans for worst case scenarios where there could be shortages of black out, how difficult is it going to be in how likely? it is difficult for our analyst to say. they have been saying the uk is in a strong position with its energy supplies, but there are some variables that are outside of people's control, whether or not there is a cold winter here, a cold winter in
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mainland europe, what russia decides to do, whether there is severe weather could cut off energy supplies, these are the sorts of things the government has been trying to model to make sure we are safe for, butlet mattingly they are preparing for all scenarios. caroline, thank you. a man has appeared in court charged with the murder of olivia pratt—korbel. the nine—year—old was killed when a gunman chased another person into her house back in august. her mother was injured. thomas cashman, who is 34, has also been charged with two counts of attempted murder. our north of england correspondent danny savage has the latest. this is the man accused of murdering olivia pratt—korbel. 34—year—old thomas cashman is the alleged gunman who police believe shot the schoolgirl in her own home. earlier this morning on the waterfront in liverpool city centre he and another man were brought to court. they both appeared before a magistrate.
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as well as the murder of olivia, thomas cashman, from west derby in liverpool, is accused of the attempted murder of olivia's mother cheryl korbel and joseph nee. the man being chased at the time of the shooting. the second man, paul russell, is charged with assisting an offender, the 40—year—old is alleged to have driven thomas cashman to an address and disposed of his clothing. he was remanded in custody. both spoke only to confirm their name and address. nine—year—old olivia was killed after a commotion outside her house late at night, on the 22nd august. her mother opened the front door as a gunman fired at another man he was chasing. olivia was hit in the chest and died. this afternoon thomas cashman appeared here again, this time in front of a crown courtjudge. after a short hearing, which lasted just 13 minutes, he was remanded in custody. olivia's mother was among those in the public gallery, listening to proceedings.
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she and olivia's father stared intently at thomas cashman. he will go on trial in march next year. danny savage, bbc news, liverpool. but has just gone a quarter past six. ourtop but has just gone a quarter past six. our top story this evening... liz truss stands by her chancellor at the conservative party conference, after he abandons plans to cut the 45p top rate of income tax, saying it had become a distraction. and still to come... and she only began running seriously in lockdown, but was the fastest british woman in yesterday's london marathon. coming up on sports day in the next 15 minutes on the bbc news channel, all the details from the women's champions league draw. it has been kind for chelsea, but not arsenal who have to face the eight time winners lyon.
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the king and queen consort have attended their firstjoint public engagement since the end of the period of royal mourning. the couple visited dunfermline in fife, where king charles gave a speech to mark its new status as scotland's eighth city. our royal correspondent, daniella relph, was there. bagpipes play dunfermline welcomed a new monarch, and they looked pleased to see him. it was malcolm iii who first created this royal seat of power, almost 1000 years ago. today it was charles iii who met the crowds and granted dunfermline city status — awarded to mark his mother's platinum jubilee. it is my hope that this new distinction will not merely burnish the legacy of our past, but will also brighten the prospect of their future.
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that would, i know, gladden my dear mother's heart, as it certainly gladdens mine. marking the 950th anniversary of dunfermline abbey is relatively safe territory, but in these early days of the king's reign there has already been a noticeable shift. in line with government guidance, he will be attending the cop climate conference in egypt next month. the freedoms of being prince of wales replaced by the constraints of being king. in edinburgh, the focus moved to the palace of holyroodhouse, and a reception to celebrate the british south asian community. the event here fits firmly into the king's thinking as he begins his reign. he has already pledged to use his time as monarch to protect the diversity of the uk. in holyrood's great gallery there was a clamour to get up close to the king and queen consort. some were even able to sneak in the odd selfie. amongst the guests, representatives
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of the nhs, the armed forces and the arts, including the music producer naughty boy, who started his career with a grant from the prince's trust, now here to meet the king as an ambassador for his community. i'm a muslim pakistani, british—born, you know, and that gives me so much hope for the future. and british—asian trust as well, with everything they're doing in pakistan, india, bangladesh, you know, issues that are sometimes marginalised in the news but our king cares about them. balancing those issues he cares about with his responsibilities as head of state, the challenge the king now faces as his schedule of official engagements begins. daniella ralph, bbc news, edinburgh. in ukraine president zelensky says troops have made more advances against russian occupying forces. it comes just days after ukraine retook the strategic town of lyman, a move seen as a significant setback for the russian campaign in the east.
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and now the ukrainian push in the south is also making gains — president zelensky said two villages near the city of kherson have been recaptured. despite that, russia's lower house of parliament has unanimously ratified a bill today annexing these four regions of ukraine. so what is life like for the millions of people now living in territory occupied by russia? our correspondent paul adams reports from southern ukraine. ukrainian forces on the move again, this time taking back villages in the south. progress has been slow here since the summer, but this all seems to happen quickly, again taking russia by surprise. for ukraine's president, volodymyr zelensky, it was more good news to report in his nightly address. he thanked the units involved. and that's not all. far to the east, scene of september's lightning counteroffensive, ukrainian troops are still pushing forward, now threatening to enter territory annexed by russia on friday.
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russia now has major headaches on two fronts at the same time, just when it's trying to conscript, train and equip badly—needed extra troops. vladimir putin may have celebrated annex in chunks of ukraine, but his problems just keep multiplying. hello, boris. is that you? but for civilians trapped inside russian—controlled territory, life is getting harder. we reach a man in kherson who doesn't want to be identified. he says the big fear is conscription. well, the conscription is just a matter of time. we don't know which people around kherson are being conscripted by the dozens, and it makes us all afraid, of course. russia's annexation is also making it much harder for people to leave. here at the reception centre in zaporizhzhia,
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officials are used to seeing 1000 people a day freeing occupied areas. today it's practically deserted. 19—year—old maxime finally made it after four days of travelling and waiting. he's here with his brother, mother and the family cat. translation: we stayed there - because we didn't know where to go, but after the referendum it got very scary because i could get conscripted into the russian army and i could neverfight for russia. maxime's family is moving on, hoping to find safety and some kind of future far from russian occupation. 30 people have made it out so far today — hope and uncertainty mixing in equal measure. paul adams, bbc news, zaporizhzhia. a new search is being carried out for the remains of a man the ira abducted, murdered and secretly buried almost 50 years ago. columba mcveigh was 19 years old when he disappeared in 1975. the ira claimed he was an informer, something mr mcveigh's
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family strongly rejects. investigators working for the independent commission for the location of victims' remains are searching an area at bragan bog, near emyvale, in county monaghan. our ireland correspondent chris page is there. chris... what more can you tell us about the story? what more can you tell us about the sto ? ~ . , , ~ what more can you tell us about the sto 7~ ., ,, ~ what more can you tell us about the sto 7. ., ,, ~' , story? what is striking about this lace is story? what is striking about this place is how _ story? what is striking about this place is how remote _ story? what is striking about this place is how remote and - story? what is striking about this place is how remote and bleak i story? what is striking about this place is how remote and bleak it| place is how remote and bleak it feels. investigators say they are convinced columba mcveigh is lying somewhere in this fast bog land just south of the irish border. he was one of the victims of the conflict in northern ireland who became known as the disappeared, those who were killed and then buried in secret locations. the commission which was set up to try to find the hidden remains carried out searches based on information it receives, most often from former members of paramilitary groups. so far, 13 bodies have been recovered but four are still missing. so the new excavation is focused on an area of
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two acres and has now been paused for the night but two figures have been turning up the ground just over there next to a small forest. earlier today, columba mcveigh's brother oliver visited the site and said the most important thing in his life would be to finally give columba funeral and lay him to rest beside their late parents. after 47 years, the family do have some hope they might get some news over coming weeks. , . ~ they might get some news over coming weeks. , ., ,, , ., now a look at some other stories making the news today. vodafone is in talks with 3 about merging their uk businesses. between them they have 27 million customers and — if approved by regulators — the new company would be larger than current leaders bt, ee and virgin media 02. the water regulator has ordered £150 million to be returned to customers after the firms failed to meet their
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targets in areas such as supply interruptions and pollution incidents. the money will be taken off household bills from next april. rare photos of the beatles performing in their early days at liverpool's cavern club have been discovered. the images were taken in 1961, a year before their debut single love me do was released. police are investigating after a "significant quantity" of what is thought be cocaine was found washed up on a beach in wales. a large number of black bags tied to buoyancy aids were found on a beach near aberystwyth by passers—by on saturday morning. our wales correspondent, hywel griffith, reports. washed up with the flotsam and jetsam, a giant haul of class a drugs. the black bags were spotted on tan—y—bwlch beach by a walker on saturday morning, who called in the police to this quiet corner of cardigan bay. then yesterday, more emerged. so the police boatjust came in down here and pulled up just at the start, really,
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of the decking on the marina. hazel was at the marina when she spotted the police boat arriving, so she started taking photos. the police officers that had been waiting here rushed down to meet them with a trolley, and what looked like large parcels of drugs were then transported from the boat to the trolley. it's quite shocking, really. it's quite surreal. it's something that, you know, you tend to see in movies, really. the beach is now back to normal. only dog walkers patrolling the pebbles this afternoon. the investigation clearly continues. i've seen a helicopter overhead and just north of aberystwyth, a police boat out on the waters, trying to work out what else might be hidden beneath the waves. the search has unsettled some. it's quite worrying, to be honest, that you can think that if it is drugs and that's majority... that amount of drugs. to be in cardigan bay, it's very worrying. large drug seizures here are unexpected, but not unprecedented.
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three years ago, down the coast off fishguard, the police recovered 750 kilograms of cocaine on a yacht, one of the largest hauls in uk history. the police believe recent storms may have helped uncover this latest haul. so far, they've not made any arrests. hywel griffith, bbc news, aberystwyth. two hours, 27 minutes and 59 seconds. those were the magic numbers for rose harvey at yesterday's london marathon. she only began to run seriously during lockdown — but that time meant she was the fastest british woman in this year's race. and all that after drama in the build—up to the race left rose fearing she wouldn't even be able to compete. joe wilson has her remarkable story. on london marathon monday the muscles protest, but pride soars. rose harvey, you did it.
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she started with the elite. she finished tenth as the leading british woman. but rose is a lawyer and only really began running seriously when she lost her job during lockdown. it was the most incredible and slightly surreal day. running was really, you know, it was something... it was a project that i could do to keep busy. and that's really what it became, you know, it was a lockdown project to stay motivated and stay positive. if rose is sore today, it's to be expected. just ten days before the marathon, her leg had an altercation — with a car. i wasjustjogging down to my local park on the pavement and someone pulled out of their driveway without looking and went straight into me. i whacked my knee really hard. even the day before the marathon, i managed three miles, but i tried to do some
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strides and couldn't. it was just too painful. the london marathon is packed with personal victories, and that's what rose harvey represents. joe wilson, bbc news. now, just look at this for a beautiful sight in the skies over northumberland. the northern lights — or aurora borealis to give it its official name — were captured by staff at the kielder observatory. the light show happens when atoms high up in the earth's atmosphere collide with charged particles from the sun. time for a look at the weather. here's matt taylor. though the weather be equally gorgeous? another site like this? theoretically, fiona, yes. realistically, i think the satellite imagery behind me tells the tale, probably not! loud extending from the atlantic right towards us, a bit of rain for western scotland today and more to come especially across western areas. this is the forecast of rain for the next few days, maybe more than this for parts of western
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wales into western scotland, 30—80 millimetres. notice not too much further south and east. the first month of above average rainfall here since february, but look at this reservoir near barnsley. still need the rain desperately at some of these areas. but not tonight because it is the north and the west, then as it eases in scotland, another batch pushes into western parts of ireland through the night. pretty mild night as well and not as cold as it was last night to england and wales, but we start dry. some sunshine around, wet start for early risers in scotland but then things brighten up, turning wetter and cloudier across northern england but especially north—west england and also wales through the day. the further south and east, east anglia, maybe the southern counties of england and the channel islands, you will stay dry, pretty mild even though breezy than today, highs of 19, 20. a fine end to the day in scotland and northern ireland before that rain pushes northward once again as we go through the night and
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into wednesday. on wednesday we are watching how this little feature develops. could bring

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