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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 3, 2022 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines the chancellor says he's had a "tough day" as he addresses the conservative party conference — just hours after abandoning plans to cut the top rate of tax for the highest earners. the uk faces a �*significant risk�* of gas shortages this winter — according the energy regulator ofgem. it could lead to supplies being cut to power stations — which use gas to generate electricity. a man's been remanded in custody
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after appearing in court — charged with the murder of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel. thomas cashman — who's 3a — is due to stand trial in march. king charles and the queen consort have greeted crowds in dunfermline on their first official engagment since the period of royal mourning came to an end. and meet the man from kent who makes his living from doodling — and has achieved a childhood dream, by covering his whole house in drawings. the chancellor kwasi kwarteng has defended his u—turn on abolishing the 45p income tax
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rate, following widespread criticism, at the conservative party conference. this morning he backtracked on the plans, which were announced just 10 days ago in the mini—budget, follwoing several senior conservative mps voicing their opposition. in a speech in the last hour, he admitted it's been a difficult day, but told the conservative party conference that the uk needs a "new approach" and that economic growth is the only way to "spread opportunity and prosperity". what a day. it has been tough, but we need to focus on thejob in hand. we need to move forward. no more distractions. we have a plan, and we need to get on and deliver it. that's what the public expect. that's what the public expect from the government. but first, conference, welcome back to birmingham. this is a remarkable city. it has a history of great brilliance. joseph chamberlain in the 19th century was an extraordinary
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civic leader who led birmingham and the world through the industrial revolution, and today andy street is following in that great tradition. applause. graft and grit turned this small town first into a thriving industrial market, then into one of the centres of the industrial revolution, which powered and grew notjust the british economy but provided the new technologies that changed the world forever. the industrial revolution was one of the most monumental transformations in human history, and it began here, with determination and application. those britons built a thriving economy. they inspire me today. they remind us that in britain, with the british people, absolutely anything is possible. our plan today focuses
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on the same bold sentiment, the same inspiration, to deal with the challenges of today by giving people the tools they need to thrive tomorrow. to get britain moving. applause. we have great ideas. we have the same inspirational people, and i know we have the same determination. our growth plan set out ten days ago will ensure we focus relentlessly on economic growth, because we must face up to the fact that for too long, our economy has not grown enough. the path ahead of us was one of slow, managed decline. but i refuse to accept that it is somehow britain's destiny to fall back into middle league status, or that the tax burden reaching a 70—year high is somehow inevitable. it isn't, and it shouldn't be.
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we needed a new approach, focused on raising economic growth, because that is the only real way to deliver opportunities, to deliver higher wages, to deliver morejobs, and crucially to deliver that revenue to fund our precious public services. and it is the best and only way of achieving long—term fiscal sustainability because it is only by raising economic growth that we will spread opportunity and prosperity to every corner of our country. with economic growth, everybody benefits, and i mean everybody. while we all believe in growth, we as conservatives also believe that it is an important principle that people should keep more of the money they earn. i don't need to tell you that.
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applause. i don't need to tell you that. that isn't radical. that isn't irresponsible. it is a deeply held belief that we all share as conservatives. we were faced with a 70—year high tax burden. we were confronted with low growth. and the path we were on was clearly unsustainable. so that's why we are cutting taxes for working people. that's why we will reverse the national insurance hike on the 6th of november, and that's why we will bring forward the 1p cut to the basic rate of income tax by one year. that's why we will take 200,000 people out of paying stamp duty altogether. taken together, this is what our support will do for all our people. thanks to our energy intervention, a typical person in a semi detached property will save £1150 on their energy bills this winter
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on top of the £400 discount. and if they are earning an average salary, they will benefit from an additional tax cut of around £1100. that is almost a £2000 saving this year alone. but i can be frank. i know the plan put forward only days ago has caused a little turbulence. i get it. we are listening, and have listened, and now i want to focus on delivering the major parts of our growth package. because with energy bills skyrocketing, a painful covid aftermath, war on our continent, a 70—year high tax burden, slowing global growth rates, and glacially slow infrastructure delivery, we couldn't simply do nothing. we can't sit idly by. what britain needs more than ever is economic growth, and a government wholly
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committed to economic growth. that is why we will forge a new economic deal for britain, backed by an ironclad commitment to fiscal discipline. applause. more businesses... morejobs, higher pay, more money for public services, because we cannot have a strong nhs without a strong economy. we can't have good schools without a strong economy. we cannot fund our armed forces without a strong economy. so growing our economy should be our central and guiding mission. with this plan, we are aiming for 2.5% annual growth. we have done it before and we will do it again. even in the face... applause. and even in the face of extreme
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volatility in global markets, with major currencies wrestling an incredibly strong us dollar, and longer term trends from demographic change to climate change, we will show that our plan is sound, that it is credible and that it will increase growth. that is our pledge to the people of this country. applause. there was the chancellor speaking at the tory party conference. what a 2k hours it has been. 0nly yesterday morning we heard the prime minister who we saw in the audience they're saying that she was committed to scrapping the 45p tax rate. kwasi kwarten: scrapping the 45p tax rate. kwasi kwarteng summed _ scrapping the 45p tax rate. kwasi kwarteng summed it _ scrapping the 45p tax rate. kwasi kwarteng summed it up - scrapping the 45p tax rate. kwasi kwarteng summed it up at - scrapping the 45p tax rate. kwasi kwarteng summed it up at the i kwarteng summed it up at the beginning of his speech. he worked on and said what a day and it has been, you could tell by the
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substance of his speech reflecting the turmoil there has been at the tory party conference so far by being pretty anodyne. there were no new policy announcements, it was a short speech or about 20 minutes, and not to what had happened saying he wanted to drop a line under it with no more distractions and getting on with delivering the growth plan, focus on the energy bill support package and other measures they want to trumpet but he wanted to keep that pretty brave, no surprises, nothing that might shock but it was designed to reassure and lay out the government's plans rather than being any sort of major event. it wasn't a very warm reaction in the hall, may be at the end there was a warm up from the audience but it was a pretty flat speech from a chancellor who has been to a bruising experience this morning. been to a bruising experience this morninu. ., ., ., , .,
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morning. how do delegates feel about this they have — morning. how do delegates feel about this they have seen _ morning. how do delegates feel about this they have seen opinion _ morning. how do delegates feel about this they have seen opinion polls, - this they have seen opinion polls, one poll giving labour a 33% lead. it's interesting when you talk to people here, yesterday there was more tension, it was more fractious, tory mps were popping up to have a p0p tory mps were popping up to have a pop at the government on various fronts, more mps going public with their worries about the budget two days since that u—turn there has been a welcome from people who were uneasy about it, still nervous about the economic credibility which has not been restored and many people's eyes because the 45p reversal was only going to generate a small amount of money anyway so there is still this uncertainty about how the rest of the tax cuts will be funded so i don't think the government has done enough to placate people but if you talk to tory party members, many are staying we need to steady the ship, they are willing to give liz truss the benefit of the doubt. you
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will not find many people who are outraged by what has happened but it gives a sense of a party influx, division among the mp level and you get a sense that she may have been able to quell the dissent over the 45p but already you're getting other potential disagreements. we talked about benefits not rising as promised under the last administration in line with inflation so for many people are real terms cut in their incomes if they are receiving benefits, liz truss refused to rule that out yesterday and today the former work and pensions secretary esther mcvey said benefit should be given at a cost of living rise and the book should not rising as promised under the last administration in line with inflation so for many people a real terms cut in their incomes s if they are receiving benefits, liz truss refused to rule that out yesterday and today the former work and pensions secretary alistair mcrae said benefit should be given at a cost of living rise and the book should statement at the end balanced
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on the back benefits so you get a flavour of future battles to come in the tory party. kwasi kwarteng mentioned the measures they intend to announce in the coming weeks and months before his next statement at the end work and there will be a lot of political flashpoints, the end work and there will be a lot of politicalflashpoints, on immigration, planning deregulation, reforms to the energy market and childcare, these all have the potential to cause fights in the tory party and you get a sense that some people who of the government see it has changed course after course on other the other headlines on bbc news... andi and i think this could get them to change course on other measures.the chancellor admitted his budget has caused many turbulence but he has told the conservative party conference that the uk needs a new approach on growth.— conference that the uk needs a new approach on growth. according to the ener:
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approach on growth. according to the energy regulator— approach on growth. according to the energy regulator ofgem _ approach on growth. according to the energy regulator ofgem supplies - energy regulator 0fgem supplies could be cut to power stations which use gas to generate electricity. a man has been remanded in custody after appearing in court charged with the murder of nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel. thomas cashman is due to stand trial in march. critics of the chancellor's original plan to scrap the top rate of income tax have welcomed today's u—turn. the employers group the cbi said it allows the government go forward with what it said are good reforms. after the announcement, the cost of borrowing over five years — which determines most mortgage rates — dropped slightly, but it's still much higher than last week. with his analysis of where the move leaves the chancellor's plans, here's our economics correspondent, andy verity. the new rate will be 50% and will come in from april next year. ever since former chancellor
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alistair darling brought it in back in 2009, the top rate for top earners has been a political dividing line. in 2013, george osborne cut it from 50p to 45p. it's paid by those earning more than £150,000 a year. that's around 660,000 people. scrapping it would have saved those higher earners on average £10,000 a year. this was the smallest measure from a fiscal point of view, if not a political point of view, in the mini budget. it is about 5% of the tax cuts, so to the extent that what we saw a couple of weeks ago was leading to fiscal unsustainability, it still is. nothing really has changed. the big story that this is now a 43 billion as opposed to a 45 billion tax giveaway remains. after the record falls in the price of uk government bonds last week
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in reaction to the mini budget, there was some relief the government was adapting its plans. but traders are still worried that kwasi kwarteng's plans are not credible. this is the chart you want to watch — it shows the cost of borrowing money at a fixed rate of interest over five years and it is that that determines the cost of a five year fixed—rate mortgage. this is the dayjust before the mini budget was announced and it shoots up. it has come down just a little bit this morning, but it is still much higher. this chart shows what happens to the cost of insuring debt against default. that too has shot up since the mini budget, another sign the markets have little faith in the government's plans. the markets still see this fiscal package as inflationary with not enough taxes being raised elsewhere to fund this deficit for essentially the future. this means that monetary policy side, the bank of england will have to act to contain inflation. if this fiscal polish unleashes inflation even more, the bank has
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to offset that which is leading to higher mortgage rates and higher cost of borrowing. to try to curb the mini budget�*s inflationary effect, city traders still expect the bank of england's official rate, currently 2.25%, to rise by more than a percentage point to 3.4% next month and then to 4.4% in december and 5.5% by march. andy verity, bbc news. there mini budget tried to help people with their energy bills and on energy we have heard to from 0fgem, the energy regulator. they say britain faces significant gas shortages because of the war in ukraine and gas supplies from russia. the uk may face a gas supply emergency. let's talk to our business correspondence caroline davies. tell us more about what
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0fgem are saying and how worried we should be. this came out in a letter from 0fgem to an energy company talking about increased risks that great britain could enter an energy supply emergency. 0ne great britain could enter an energy supply emergency. one thing is they were doing was talking to a group station that owned four power stations powered by gas you were worried that if there is a gas emergency they will have their supplies cut off and so will end up with penalties of multi pound is because they have already sold that energy to other people who will not be able to supply them because their gas was shut off so they are asking on a cheat to make sure people will not be charged with these penalties which shows the knock—on impacts, so if gas becomes short the suggestion is some larger gas users like power companies might have limitations put on them so these are the sort of things that are trying to be worked
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out. we know that even in the summer the government were coming up with plans of extreme scenarios where they could be blackouts or shortages but at the same time they have said this about extreme situations. when 0fgem was asked about the potential for blackouts or shortages they said this would be a more challenging winter than previously because of the russian disruption of supplies to gas in europe. they said britain is in a good position compared to other european countries which are more reliant on russian gas but they also say we need to be prepared for all scenarios this winter. so all of this is just a warning, not a prediction. even the markets are struggling to comprehend how bad this could be this winter because there are variables that are not within any one's controlled because if there is cold winter here or in europe and severe weather disrupts the channels
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we normally get energy through, we could see more difficulties but there is of extreme examples so we just don't yet know how bad it could be. at the moment there seems to be a relative confidence but we will have to wait and see. a 34—year—old man has been remanded in custody after appearing in liverpool crown court charged with 0livia pratt—korbel�*s murder. 0ur correspondent danny savage has been in court and has this report. much of the discussion for legal reasons cannot be repeated, but i think the opening remarks of the judge when he started talking to the court are interesting. he said for obvious reasons i'm familiar with the circumstances of this case, and many people across the uk and around the world will be familiar with the awful circumstances around the death of olivia pratt—korbel, nine years old, shot dead in her home
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after her mother opened the door after hearing a commotion outside. a gunman was chasing a man, and shots were fired and one hit 0livia. since then a police investigation has been under way here in merseyside to try and track down who was responsible for that. there were a number of arrests over that period and since then about 11 arrests, and it was the arrest in the middle of last week that has led to these two men appearing in court today. the other man, paul russell, 40 years old, was charged with assisting an offender, he appeared before magistrates this morning and has been remanded in custody to appear before liverpool crown court at the end of this month. this afternoon's hearing was exclusively focusing on thomas cashman, the 34—year—old who is accused of murdering 0livia. and there was some discussion in court about the timetable of where things go from now on. a trial date was set for the 6th of march next year, with a four—week trial expected.
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there will be another significant hearing in this case about how it goes forward in january next year. but for now, thomas cashman has been remanded in custody, he will stay in custody from now on, he has been taken out from the courtroom after the hearing which lasted just under a quarter of an hour here at liverpool crown court. he is accused of one count of murder, two counts of attempted murder and possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life. so possession of two weapons. the future political direction of brazil, south america's biggest country, is on a knife edge. the presidential election there is going to a second round run off with a choice between the far right incumbentjair bolsonaro and his radical left—wing challenger luiz inacio lula da silva. with almost all the votes counted, lula has won 48% against bolsonaro, who did better than opinion polls suggested, and got 43%. as our south america correspondent katy watson reports,
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voters now have four weeks to decide which of the two men should lead the country. cheering. there were cheers for lula as well as tears. but this wasn't the outright victory that his supporters had hoped for. polls had predicted a 14 percentage point gap between him and bolsonaro. but they vastly underestimated the support for the right wing leader. after the results, lula said there would be no let—up in campaigning. translation: i've never won an election in the first round. | it's like destiny wants me to work a bit more. we are going to win the election again. it's just a question of time. meanwhile, bolsonaro had this to say. translation: i know there's a desire to change from people, _ but there are certain changes that will end up worse. and we tried to show that during the campaign, but clearly that didn't get through to the most
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important part of society. these elections were seen as the most important since brazil returned to democracy in the 1980s. 11 candidates were running, but only two were realistic options. a leftist former leader with a legacy of corruption, or a far right president criticised for his democratic record. for his democratic record. the queues on sunday showed people cared about the outcome. this weekend, bolsonaro fans paraded their candidate ahead of what they saw as a guaranteed win. they don't believe the polls, they wanted a first round victory, too, and they won't give up their fight. why not believe in democracy? it's time to change, let's change, but let change peacefully. "there's going to be beautiful blood spilt in this city," this man tells me, "i'm prepared to kill all the socialists and communists in the world." after sunday's results, lula fans remained upbeat. i'm not disappointed, actually,
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because i already expected that we wouldn't win in the first turn, but at least we are ahead in the overall results. bolsonaro said that polls are a lie. do you think that he's got a point? i think he will... i think he will be a bad loser. what do you make of the result? we were expecting to make it on the first turn. but we are very happy that it's a win. and we are really, really happy and the second time it's going to be lula. and we can't stand bolsonaro any more, like, i'm an lgbt person and we want our rights and we want our people to have our voice in this country. it's actually much more of a relief than a victory parade. the race for the presidency is far from over. the next few weeks will see intense campaigning which is bound to become much more personal. two political foes now
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going head to head to lead latin america's biggest nation. there's concern this race could also get violent. katy watson, bbc news, in sao paolo. the native american actor and activist sacheen littlefeather, who famously refused marlon brando's oscar on his behalf in 1973, has died at the age of 75. the academy gave her a formal apology in august, after she was booed off stage when she spoke out against hollywood's treatment of native americans an amazing show of the aurora borealis has been captured in northumberland. the phenomenon, also known
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as the northern lights, was seen at kielder observatory. the light show happens when atoms in the earth's high—altitude atmosphere collide with charged particles from the sun. now it's time for a look at the weather. hello. spells of wet and windy weather on the way as we go later weather on the way as we go we will see heavy rair northern later we will see heavy rain in northern ireland, away from that a dry night, more cloud than we saw last night and with that it will be much milder, temperatures of 14 or 15 tomorrow. it starts within scotland and northern ireland but turning drachmas two batch of rain per south into england and wales, some of the wettest weather tomorrow will be in wales, that rain never really reaching southern and south—east parts of england, a warm day there tomorrow, fresher in
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scotland but pleasant compared to today with more sunshine. that rain pushes back northwards on tuesday evening, wet and windy weather on wednesday, could be disruptive gusts of wind especially across western areas. thursday and beyond it's back to sunshine and showers.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines:
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the chancellor has said he has had a tough day as he was addressing the conservative party conference just a few hours after he abandoned plans to cut the top rate of tax for the highest earners. i know the plan put forward only ten days ago has caused a little turbulence... i get it, i get it. we are listening and have listened. and now i want to focus on delivering the major parts of my growth package. elsewhere in his speech he said he would soon publish a medium turn fiscal plan and promised a full forecast from the budget of responsibility. elsewhere, the uk is facing a significant risk of gas shortages this winter, according to the energy regulator. it could lead to power cuts to power stations which use gas to generate electricity. in liverpool, a man has been remanded in custody after appearing
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in court after being charged with the murder of olivia pratt couple. the king and the queen consort have been greeting people in dunfermline in their first official visit since the period of royal morning came to an end. holly has the sport, starting an end. holly has the sport, starting with the bottom of the table clash in the premier league? yes, the bottom two, it is leicester city and nottingham forest at the king power stadium. leicester have one point so far and they probably table while second from bottom nottingham forest have just four points. i nottingham forest have 'ust four oints. ~' ., nottingham forest have 'ust four oints. ~ ., ., ., points. i think of where we are at, i think it is — points. i think of where we are at, i think it is about _ points. i think of where we are at, i think it is about putting - points. i think of where we are at, i think it is about putting the - i think it is about putting the wrong right, regardless of who we are playing and get to the levels we need to be at and want to be at. so there is two things, the game against leicester is a big one
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because whatever part of the season and league positions, it would be a big game. because the local side to it. that is important to us, of course. very important to us. what is also important to us is that we improve and we prepare right for the game and we try and pick up points for us. it game and we try and pick up points for us. , . ., ., ., , ., for us. it is a great game for us to look forward _ for us. it is a great game for us to look forward to, _ for us. it is a great game for us to look forward to, we _ for us. it is a great game for us to look forward to, we really - for us. it is a great game for us to look forward to, we really owe - for us. it is a great game for us to | look forward to, we really owe the surrporters — look forward to, we really owe the supporters on this one. has been a great _ supporters on this one. has been a great start— supporters on this one. has been a great start to the season. we are very determined, the attitude is there. _ very determined, the attitude is there. the — very determined, the attitude is there, the energy is there to produce _ there, the energy is there to produce a _ there, the energy is there to produce a performance that can h0pefuiiy— produce a performance that can hopefully kick—start the season. that game is at eight o'clock tonight and alessia russo has withdrawn from the england squad withdrawn from the england squad with a small injury, meaning she will miss the game against the world champions, usa. the manchester united forward missed their league cup tie this weekend i will remain at her club to continue her
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rehabilitation. sarina wiegman�*s side will face the usa at a sold—out wembley stadium on friday before the czech republic in brighton. in the women's champions league, arsenal are set to face eight time winners and current holders, early on in the group stage. the draw took place earlier and our reporterjane dougal was watching. place earlier and our reporterjane dougal was watching.— place earlier and our reporterjane dougal was watching. arsenal are in u-rou dougal was watching. arsenal are in a-rou c dougal was watching. arsenal are in grow) c and — dougal was watching. arsenal are in grow) c and they — dougal was watching. arsenal are in group c and they will— dougal was watching. arsenal are in group c and they will play _ dougal was watching. arsenal are in group c and they will play the - group c and they will play the current holders, but also the record holding eight time champions, lyon. that is going to be an incredibly difficult match in the group stages, make no mistake. because every season, lyon's main ambition is to win the champions league. but arsenal have started their domestic season very well, they are top of the wsl and became a close second last season. the other teams will be fearing them because arsenal are still the only british women's team to have won this competition in 2007. they also playjuventus and
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zurich. 2007. they also play juventus and zurich. , ., 2007. they also play juventus and zurich. , . . . , , 2007. they also play juventus and zurich. , . ., , ., 2007. they also play juventus and zurich. , . . , ., , ., zurich. chelsea, arguably a bit more straightforward? _ zurich. chelsea, arguably a bit more straightforward? yes, _ zurich. chelsea, arguably a bit more straightforward? yes, chelsea - zurich. chelsea, arguably a bit more straightforward? yes, chelsea were| straightforward? yes, chelsea were the first team _ straightforward? yes, chelsea were the first team out _ straightforward? yes, chelsea were the first team out of _ straightforward? yes, chelsea were the first team out of the _ straightforward? yes, chelsea were the first team out of the drawer- straightforward? yes, chelsea werej the first team out of the drawer and they are protected, they were in the seeded part, as champions of england. they will play parasite jermaine and always a difficult side to play. and they will also play real madrid who finished third in the spanish league. caroline weir left manchester city to play for real madrid and she has been performing well. chelsea also take on a flat near, the first albanian team to get to the last 16 and any format for the last nigh season. they have won the double in their league. we can take a look at the groups. group d is interesting, lasses and's runners—up, barcelona bay daily—macro play bayern munich. lucy bronze and keira walsh who have just moved to borsellino, the
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champions of europe have that winning the euroes with england, they will come up against georgia stanway, always a winner of the european championships as well. indian fast bowler, just the boomerang has been ruled out of the men's t20 world cup at the back stress fracture. it's considered one of the best bowlers in the world so this is a huge blow for india. they are seen as one of the favourites for the tournament which begins later this month. olly foster will be here with a round up on sports day at 6.30. but that is all from me, goodbye for now.
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the chancellor is going to scrap the top tax benefit. one poll gave labour a 33% lead at one stage last week. what do you think of a u—turn in terms of how the voters perceive a u—turn? did they think it is good because the government is listening? or do they think it is a government who doesn't know what it is doing? that afternoon. the first thing to say is we shouldn't underestimate what a difficult position the chancellor was in today and over the past few days. 80% of the country think the economy is in a bad state and six in ten think that the chancellor has made it worse. this was a difficult conference the conservatives were heading into. one of your specific questions about u—turns, we find mps are more concerned about this on the public.
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in some ways if you get to the right result eventually, people can move on. but it is whether the conservatives can retain their reputation on the economy. we found two thirds of the company daily—macro country don't have confidence in the new economic plan. whilst that u—turn might be welcome to a certain extent, they have a long way to go before they regain the trust. , ., , ., long way to go before they regain the trust. , . , ., ,. . the trust. this was a screeching u-turn, the trust. this was a screeching u-turn. we _ the trust. this was a screeching u-turn, we heard _ the trust. this was a screeching u-turn, we heard liz _ the trust. this was a screeching u-turn, we heard liz truss - the trust. this was a screeching l u-turn, we heard liz truss saying u—turn, we heard liz truss saying yesterday she was absolutely committed to this tax rate policy. then a few hours later it had gone, it had been ditched.— it had been ditched. yes, what we have not it had been ditched. yes, what we have got to _ it had been ditched. yes, what we have got to remember _ it had been ditched. yes, what we have got to remember is - it had been ditched. yes, what we have got to remember is liz - it had been ditched. yes, what we have got to remember is liz trussj it had been ditched. yes, what we l have got to remember is liz truss is very new as prime minister under many ways it is a new and a conservative government. the public are in a state of the jury is out on this government. in that context, what they hear from this government
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first will define what they think of them in the longer term. these opening weeks and months of the liz truss administration are very important for how the public view her and her government long term. the government's economic policy, its plan is very much focused on this dash for growth. it is all about growth. what does that mean to voters, to people who are struggling with the cost of living at the moment? did they care about this concept of growth? irate moment? did they care about this concept of growth?— concept of growth? we have been doin: concept of growth? we have been doing some _ concept of growth? we have been doing some research _ concept of growth? we have been doing some research and - concept of growth? we have been doing some research and lookingl concept of growth? we have been i doing some research and looking at this question. there is a couple of different things i will say. the first, people see growth as a positive thing and they see the benefits of it with rising wages, more jobs and perhaps benefits of it with rising wages, morejobs and perhaps more money for public services. oh that is a contentious issue at the moment. at the same time people find it hard to describe themselves. they find it quite difficult to a tribute economic growth nationally to what they are personally feeling in terms of the cost of living, they are much
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more likely to see their pay, impacting their cost of living, rather than what economic growth is nationally. i suppose the key for the government looking forward is going to be, if there is any growth is to come, people will wonder what will benefit them. people don't necessarily want economic growth at any cost. when it comes to protecting the environment and climate change, people are more inclined to prefer to prioritise those things over economic growth, evenif those things over economic growth, even if it is harder, rather than progress economic growth at the expense of the environment. economic growth is seen as a positive thing but not at the expense of anything and people want to know how it benefits them.— and people want to know how it benefits them. ., , , benefits them. looking more broadly at the political _ benefits them. looking more broadly at the political situation, _ benefits them. looking more broadly at the political situation, we - benefits them. looking more broadly at the political situation, we are - at the political situation, we are seeing huge fluctuations, may be volatility in terms of the electorate. we have this big majority for the conservatives under borisjohnson. as i said, polls that
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show up to a 33% lead for labour, is that a vote of volatility or is it what we are seeing, in government and in westminster? what what we are seeing, in government and in westminster?— and in westminster? what we have seen over the _ and in westminster? what we have seen over the last _ and in westminster? what we have seen over the last few _ and in westminster? what we have seen over the last few elections - and in westminster? what we have seen over the last few elections we j seen over the last few elections we have been going through something of a realignment in terms of how people vote. i think that has continued in the last few years. we have had a global pandemic, we have a cost of living crisis and we now have a new prime minister and the new government. the public are constantly re—evaluating what they think of those people in charge. when you get big events like the mini budget last week that can be a spark that changes people's opinions. what will be important is where we are in the weeks and months to come. we havejust had a labour party conference, this budget and then the u—turn. liz truss will give her headline speech this week. the key will be when the dust settles, where are the parties and can liz truss regain momentum? it has been a difficult time for her, baptism of
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fire, if you will. so if we see she can stamp her authority and whether labour's lead in the polls will continue. labour's lead in the polls will continue-— labour's lead in the polls will continue. ., ,, ., continue. 0k, we will talk to you when the dust _ continue. 0k, we will talk to you when the dust settles, _ continue. ok, we will talk to you when the dust settles, if- continue. 0k, we will talk to you when the dust settles, if it - continue. 0k, we will talk to you when the dust settles, if it everl when the dust settles, if it ever does. the united nations is calling for ukraine to release thousands of disabled people from its care institutions — after a bbc investigation revealed systematic abuse and neglect. the bbc team who first broke the story was asked to give evidence to the un after finding severely malnourished children and teenagers tied to benches and adults living in cots. danjohnson reports from geneva. these are the hidden lives of confinement we uncovered in ukraine's network of institutions. we saw malnourishment, mistreatment and underdevelopment from years of neglect. like oleg, trapped in a bed—ridden
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existence, denied the chance to live independently. and vasil, taken from his family and tied to a bench — ignored by a system that does not care. and anna, grinding her teeth through the anxiety of childhood trauma. we told their stories on behalf of thousands of disabled people, locked away in places like this across ukraine. and then we were invited to bring that testimony to the united nations, to give evidence to its committee on the rights of people with disabilities. now, we have its conclusions. the committee is calling for ukraine to free disabled people from homes, what it calls "de—institutionalisation". it also calls for alternative care in the community, so that disabled people can live independently, or with families. but breaking up such
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a long—standing system means challenging outdated attitudes and changing an ingrained mind set. at the top, the first lady admits ukraine owes these young people more. translation: we want kids to stay in foster families and _ adopted families. there should be no more orphanages around. and i think that we will use this time to overhaul the entire system, to change it entirely. but the war will make that so much more difficult. this what is what's left of borodyanka, after three weeks of russian occupation. 12 disabled people died in an institution here — left without basic care. others were used by russian forces as human shields. the un's calling for all orphanages in the occupied areas to be evacuated immediately. it also criticised ukraine for not considering disabled people in its
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evacuation plans. egor and his mum live in fear. his autism and epilepsy make it impossible to leave their home in kyiv. difficult even to take shelter underground. so, he and his brother, hleb, are trapped. translation: he heard hleb constantly - asking me if we were all going to die. egor understands the things. his questions were terrible. in addition, all the people around started to leave the city. they feel under threat living next to a factory, which has been targeted by the russians several times. and it's a struggle even to get the medicines needed to control egor�*s seizures. translation: the period when i found i out there are no medicines for egor. in ukraine, i thought i would go crazy. so i live in fear all the time.
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i would like us not to have this panic, but to have some kind of stability. the war�*s put pressure on families and made lives of institutional constraint even more difficult. but this system fostered abuse and neglect long before the invasion and the un's insistence is, in defending its population, its existence and its freedom, ukraine must also protect the rights of its disabled people. danjohnson, bbc news, geneva. keiran pedley is a research director columba mcveigh was killed and secretly buried by the ira. he is one of the victims of the conflict he became know as one of the disappeared. excavation have begun in the irish republic from where
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chris page now reports. almost half a century on, this bog land is being searched for the precious last race of life. columba mcveigh was 19 when he was killed, his murderer is intended that his grave wouldn't be discovered. bodies bufied grave wouldn't be discovered. bodies buried here. — grave wouldn't be discovered. bodies buried here, shot— grave wouldn't be discovered. bodies buried here, shot like _ grave wouldn't be discovered. bodies buried here, shot like a _ grave wouldn't be discovered. bodies buried here, shot like a dog - grave wouldn't be discovered. bodies buried here, shot like a dog in - grave wouldn't be discovered. bodies buried here, shot like a dog in a - buried here, shot like a dog in a bleak place, buried like a dog that no one can find. surely to god, getting him and getting him a christian burial, into a plotter is the most important thing in my life. what is very striking about this place is just how remote it is, we are a number of miles from the nearest village. it covers a vast area of land and carrying out an excavation to try to find a body here requires a lot of expertise on the part of archaeologists and other
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scientists. the commission which tries to recover hidden remains carried out excavations based on information it receives. often from former paramilitaries. the information _ former paramilitaries. the information we _ former paramilitaries. the information we work - former paramilitaries. tue: information we work on former paramilitaries. tte: information we work on is confidential and i don't propose going into that. safe to say the commissioners and commission are happy that this needs to be explored further and it hasn't as yet been searched. ., , searched. there have been five revious searched. there have been five previous digs — searched. there have been five previous digs in _ searched. there have been five previous digs in the _ searched. there have been five previous digs in the search. - searched. there have been five| previous digs in the search. the actor, james nesbitt, has got to know the family. he is the patron of an organisation which helps people who were bereaved during the northern ireland conflict. taste who were bereaved during the northern ireland conflict. we are 'ust so northern ireland conflict. we are just so hopeful— northern ireland conflict. we are just so hopeful that _ northern ireland conflict. we are just so hopeful that finally - northern ireland conflict. we are just so hopeful that finally the i just so hopeful that finally the information has been accurate and if he is here, they will find him. the family don't want revenge over an investigation, they want the information to be able to locate their beloved son, that beloved brother and bring him home. 13 gt
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brother and bring him home. 13 of the victims _ brother and bring him home. 13 of the victims known _ brother and bring him home. 13 of the victims known as _ brotherand bring him home. 13 of the victims known as the disappeared have been found in operations like this. fourare have been found in operations like this. four are still missing. columba mcveigh's relatives are longing for news in the coming week so they can finally lay him to rest. chris page, bbc news in county monaghan. the headlines on bbc news... the chancellor has admitted his mini budget has caused what he called turbulence, hours after abandoning a cut to the top rate of tax. he has been abandoning his plans, telling the tory party conference the uk needs a new approach. the energy regulator is warning of a significant risk of cash shortages this winter. it could see supply is cut to power stations which use gas to generate electricity. a man has been remanded in custody in liverpool after appearing in court charged with the murder of nine—year—old olivia. thomas cashman is due to stand trial in march.
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the nobel prize in physiology or medicine has gone to sweden, and a person who worked on human evolution. the prize commission said he achieved the seemingly impossible task of cracking the genetic code of one of our extinct relatives, the neanderthals. he discovered a previously unknown relative, and extinct species or subspecies of a human. let's talk to the archaeologistjulian have, who is also known as the muddy archaeologist. it isa it is a remarkable achievement and it has taken decades to get a whole genome of an extinct species of
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human being from just bones, it has taken a huge amount of science and it has created a brand—new science for archaeologist, it has created a brand—new science forarchaeologist, in it has created a brand—new science for archaeologist, in that we can take an extinct humanoid species and that we can then find the genes of them. he also discovered another cousin. we have the homo sapiens, which is us and that is all that is left of humans now, but there where the neanderthals and they both came out of africa and one went west on the other went east, basically. so they are cousins. we have not evolved from them, but we certainly has interbred with them. some of their dna, both of them are in as today, all those in the europeans have got neanderthal in them and those in the asians have got the other cousin in them.— other cousin in them. these investigations _ other cousin in them. these investigations and _ other cousin in them. these investigations and the - other cousin in them. these l investigations and the science really does matter? tt
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investigations and the science really does matter? it matters in how our genes — really does matter? it matters in how our genes work _ really does matter? it matters in how our genes work and - really does matter? it matters in how our genes work and how - really does matter? it matters in| how our genes work and how they might vary. we are finding out exactly who we are, the tibetans have what we call super athlete genes which has come from the archaic humans, which gives them the ability to breathe in high altitudes. the end the are short and stocky, i think i am on the high of neanderthals. we have denser bones and they have discovered an immune difference, an autoimmune difference for those who have a lower level of it. it is going to be useful for medical if we can work out what part we have got in there, it might help us understand our own medical genes as well. ~ ., ., ., , ., , as well. what more remains to be discovered _ as well. what more remains to be discovered in _ as well. what more remains to be discovered in this _ as well. what more remains to be discovered in this field? _ as well. what more remains to be discovered in this field? what - as well. what more remains to be discovered in this field? what do | as well. what more remains to be i discovered in this field? what do we know that we don't know, if you like? ., know that we don't know, if you like? . , ., , know that we don't know, if you like? . ,. , . like? that is always the difficult ruestion like? that is always the difficult question because _ like? that is always the difficult question because we _ like? that is always the difficult question because we don't - like? that is always the difficult| question because we don't know like? that is always the difficult - question because we don't know until we find it. like opening an excavation, you don't know what you will find unless you see it. by
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creating a new science it has opened up creating a new science it has opened up information which will be studied for notjust decades, but generations. it is the greatest finding of the dna sequence only decades ago and it is enabling us to look at things we would never have imagined 50 years ago. when neanderthals were found in the 18505, i neanderthals were found in the 1850s, i don't think they would have been able to believe we could take the genome, take a dna sequence and work out what makes them them and what makes us, us. 50 a work out what makes them them and what makes us, us.— work out what makes them them and what makes us, us. so a nobel prize, it is uuite what makes us, us. so a nobel prize, it is quite unusual _ what makes us, us. so a nobel prize, it is quite unusual isn't _ what makes us, us. so a nobel prize, it is quite unusual isn't it _ what makes us, us. so a nobel prize, it is quite unusual isn't it for- what makes us, us. so a nobel prize, it is quite unusual isn't it for a - it is quite unusual isn't it for a nobel prize to be awarded in this field, in this kind of category? yes, to be in archaeology, it is quite unusual. because it has made this huge leap forward using science as well as archaeology, the science of archaeology, in a way of putting the two of them together. it will have implications, not only for archaeology as to how we can
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understand the things we fine, but how we look at ourselves today. it is a massive breakthrough. a really huge, to be able to put the two together. archaeology is always about us as human beings, but this is even more fundamentally about the building blocks that make us us. great to talk to you. thank you so much for your time. imagine doodles covering every inch of your home. well this is the reality for mr doodle, who, as his name suggests he's covered everything — from his bedding to his microwave — with doodle art. it's a labour of love that's taken two years, 400 cans of spray paint and more than 2,000 pen nibs. tim muffett reports. hello, there! mr doodle here. it started when he doodled on his parents' furniture. since then, sam cox — or mr doodle, as he's known — has turned something some of us
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might do if we're bored into a very successful career. when i first started playing video games and reading comic books, when i was much younger, i really sort of fell in love with the characters. i would ask my parents if i could draw on, like, this table or something like that, and they'd eventually let me, after a bit of persuading, turning these 3d objects into sort of works of doodle art. and today i'm going to doodle a wormy—type thing. with a huge following on social media, mr doodle's videos get millions of views. when you're doodling, what's going through your mind? it's just such a great process. you feel almost like an out—of—body experience. you're just indulging yourself in this free—flowing state of creation, and it'sjust the best thing anyone can do, i think. i've just bought this house. sam's childhood dream was to live in a completely doodled home. bzz, bzz, bzz! big buzzes of doodles!
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almost three years after he bought it, it's mission accomplished. the bedroom is actually the first room that i started when i began doodling over the house. all the drawings in this room are themed around lots of sleepy characters. so you're going to wake up every morning and see this? yeah! yeah. i mean, this is sort of paradise for me. so you're actually going to cook on this? well, i'd like to, but i'm not actually sure that any of this is workable after we've painted a doodle on it. she's not totally aware of that yet. that's where you'll be eating your pot doodle.
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what's that like? in a way, because i don't want my work to have any political meaning. a home like no other. a unique approach to diy... doodle it yourself! now it's time for a look at the weather. do you ever doodle on your weather charts? all the time. it is how i pass my time. this evening and two today he would have needed a waterproof pen if you are dealing outdoors. this is the view in dumfries and galloway. the rain has cleared away from here at the moment but raining heavily
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across northern and western areas. these weather fronts are held out to the north and west, sweeping northwards and eastwards as we go through tonight and then starting to move southwards as we move tomorrow. at the moment the rain as they are pretty relentless across the north and west of scotland. has eased away from dumfries and galloway, eased away from northern ireland the time and it will ease northwards tonight so it will be drier for and it will ease northwards tonight so it will be drierfor a time before the next batch of heavy rain worked its way into northern ireland in western scotland later. away from that, strengthening breeze on a south—westerly direction and more cloud than last night so it won't be as chilly tomorrow morning. we start the day pretty wet, it will be drier and brighter through the morning and the rain will shift into northern and western parts of england and into areas of wales. in east anglia, it will be dry all day long but a blustery day and mile. temperatures
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in 219, 20 celsius. blustery day and mile. temperatures in 219,20 celsius. we blustery day and mile. temperatures in 219, 20 celsius. we the david cloud and outbreaks of rain going to the north west midlands and what they for the far west of wales. a brighter end for scotland and northern ireland. on tuesday into wednesday the rain returns northwards and with it winds will strengthen to gale force in western areas. another mild night, particularly to the south and east of the country. as we go into wednesday we have a developing area of low pressure. how quickly it develops will dictate how strong the winds will be. winds could be potentially disruptive and damaging across northern and western areas as we go through wednesday. rain to go with it, particularly in the morning but because of the strength of the wind it will sweep away quite smartly from west to east and clear away from east anglia in the afternoon and it is sunshine in blustery showers. some of their share was heavy with hail and thunder across scotland and northern ireland but the wind could be a key feature. these are the average wind speeds we will see the gusts much
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higher than that. there is the potential, particularly across parts of western scotland, maybe into the northern irish sea winds gusting 60, 70 miles an hour. the cooler end to the day and a cooler and to the week and we are talking sunshine and blustery showers are specially across northern and western areas. the further south and east you are towards the end of the week, you will probably stay dry. i will have more details throughout the rest of the evening and fiona has your bbc news at six next.
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today at six. the chancellor bows to pressure and scraps the cut in the top rate of tax just ten days after he announced it. the pm puts on a brave face at the conservative party conference. before he made his speech this afternoon, the chancellor admitted their plan had to change. this 45 pence rate became a distraction, and i, along with the prime minister, decided that the best course of action would simply be not to proceed with the abolition of the rate. junked first thing, justified all day by a determination to focus on other thing, that will help grow the economy. this has been a very difficult day for a government facing more difficulties ahead. have the chancellor and the pm done enough to win back the markets,
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critical tory mps — and the public? also tonight.

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