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tv   BBC News  BBC News  October 3, 2022 2:00pm-4:00pm BST

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this is bbc news. good afternoon, it is two o'clock. the headlines... the government performs a u—turn on its tax cut for higher earners. just ten days after he unveiled the policy, the chancellor backtracks after growing opposition from fellow tory mps. we felt that the 45p issue, the 45p rate, was drowning out a strong package of intervention on energy, a strong package of intervention on tax cuts for people generally, and we decided not to proceed. the uk faces a significant risk of gas shortages this winter, according the energy regulator ofgem. it could lead to supplies being cut to power stations which use gas to generate electricity. a man has appeared in court charged
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with the murder of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel. she was shot in her home in liverpool in august. king charles and the queen consort camilla visited dunfermline on their first official engagment since the period of royal mourning came to an end. and coming up we meet mr doodle — the man from kent who makes his living from doodling and has covered his whole house in drawings. hello, if you havejustjoined us welcome to bbc news. just to remind you we will have live coverage of the chancellor kwasi kwarteng's
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speech to the conservative party conference later. he has been forced into a dramatic u—turn to scrap the 45p top rate of income tax. the decision to ditch the policy — a decision which mr kwarteng confirmed this morning — came less than 2a hours after the prime minister liz truss had publicly defended it. in a statement, mr kwarteng said the 45p tax plan had become a "huge distraction" and that the government had "listened" to people's concerns. yesterday on the bbc, the prime minister said she was absolutely committed to the policy and that she would not abandon it. the move would have benefited those earning more than 150,000 pounds a year; a number of conservative mps had suggested that they were likely to vote against it in the house of commons. there was an early reaction to the u—turn this morning, with the pound jumping by more than a cent against the dollar. government borrowing costs also fell slightly. 0ur political correspondent, ione wells, reports from the conservative party conference in birmingham. it was meant to be the chancellor's
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big day, his chance to outline in a speech his vision for growing the economy, but the focus was all wrong. too many conservative mps were uneasy at plans to scrap the top rate of tax for the highest earners. former cabinet ministers like michael gove and grant shapps warned the government would lose a vote on their plans, but it didn't stop the prime minister doubling down on them yesterday. are you absolutely committed to abolishing the 45p tax rate for the wealthiest people in the country? yes. the chancellor was planning to say today that we must stay the course but last night senior ministers here were ringing around worried mps to try to win hearts and minds. it didn't work. we talked to lots and lots of people up and down the country, we talked to lots of... not only colleagues, mp colleagues but also people, voters, constituents, crucially people in the country and i felt that the 45p rate was a huge distraction on what was a very
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strong set of measures. the energy intervention, for example, that essentially meant that the average household bill for energy will be £2500. the move has been welcomed by some tory mps. we have a plan for growth and it's going ahead. if you're borrowing money to cut taxes for people - who are already better off, - then the public, who for example, one constituent said, - i'm taking on extra shifts because mortgage rates- are going up because inflation has to be fought but also - because you are borrowing money in order to run these tax cuts, and that is a combination - that doesn't work. hopefully, moving on from the 45p rate conversation allows you to get back into the growth and funding public services and what it's all meant to be about. i think it's the correct decision. i think this has been a huge distraction from what we should have been talking about over the last week or so,
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which is the tens of billions of pounds the government is spending to support families and businesses through this energy price crisis. but the move has blindsided some ministers. the lib dems are calling for the chancellor to resign. the snp, who were never going to cut the tax in scotland, said his u—turn showed utter ineptitude, and labour say it's come too late. it was obvious they weren't going to get this through the house of commons. they were forced into this screeching u—turn. but so much damage has already been done, with higher government borrowing costs and huge worries for people about how they're going to afford their mortgages. yesterday, seniorfigures in government couldn't quite tell me what the narrative was. how were they going to sell cutting tax for the highest earners while hinting that benefits and public services might get squeezed? ministers hope this u—turn will give them room to sell the policies like their energy support package that were getting lost, but it's left the chancellor and prime minister politically wounded just weeks into their premiership. after a morning of all the worst headlines for him, kwasi kwarteng hopes to use his big speech today to draw people's minds back
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to his other ideas for growing the economy. ione wells, bbc news, birmingham. leila nathoo is at the conservative party conference for us. humiliating from the chancellor point of view, but in a sense i suppose for a lot of tories, he may have done the wrong thing ten days ago but he has done the right thing now as they perceive it? yes. ago but he has done the right thing now as they perceive it? yes, really interesting — now as they perceive it? yes, really interesting to _ now as they perceive it? yes, really interesting to consider— now as they perceive it? yes, really interesting to consider the - now as they perceive it? yes, really interesting to consider the impact i interesting to consider the impact of the u—turn because i'm talking to you from the conservative party conference, rememberthis you from the conservative party conference, remember this is the forum of the conservative party to pick up its new leader and enjoy a new administration coming in for supporters to welcome new ministers and their new leader. instead we are on day two talking about a massive u—turn. so yes, there will be some who say we have done the right thing, that is certainly how kwasi
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kwarteng is trying to present it. he said i got it, i heard what people had to say and i'm changing my mind. but there will always be people saying, why did you make the decision in the first place? that is some concerns of the political judgment in the first place. remember how kwasi kwarteng presented the 45p tax rate. a lot of what was in the mini budget was outlined in advance, we knew there would be a tax—cutting agenda, but there was no mention of cutting tax for the highest earners and that was part of kwasi kwarteng's big reveal. remember it is 46p in scotland 45p, remember it is 46p in scotland which has not gone. it was his rabbit out of the hat in the mini budget, and now 2a hours after the prime minister defended it, it has been dumped. in prime minister defended it, it has been dumped-— prime minister defended it, it has been dum ed. ., ., , been dumped. in scotland the highest earners face a — been dumped. in scotland the highest earners face a tax _ been dumped. in scotland the highest earners face a tax rate _ been dumped. in scotland the highest earners face a tax rate of— been dumped. in scotland the highest earners face a tax rate of 46p - been dumped. in scotland the highest earners face a tax rate of 46p in - earners face a tax rate of 46p in the pound, one of those differences that has been thrown up by
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devolution over the years. either way the plans have now gone. is it government minister's aim to answer this question... if it isn't necessary because it doesn't raise much revenue, why do it in the first place? it much revenue, why do it in the first lace? , ., , , place? it is really interesting because there _ place? it is really interesting because there is _ place? it is really interesting because there is actually - place? it is really interesting j because there is actually two dynamics of this. one is the politics of it, the judgment in the first place. politically why did they choose to do that? that is something tory mps have been concerned about. then the politics around the u—turn because tory mps will be saying we put pressure on the government, we made our concerns clear in public, and now they have listened and actually made a decision to u—turn on that. so they think maybe we can have some impact elsewhere. there is the economics of it too so it's not a great big revenue raiser but many mps had concerns about the economic credibility of the government, and actually this doesn't really go that
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far to address that because it's not going to go very far to address the concerns of people who are worried that all the other tax cuts and the package of support for energy bills this winter, it's not going to go very far in addressing the concerns of people who think where is the money going to come from to fund those? really the bottom line is it's a massive about turn for the government on day two of what should have been a party conference celebrating a new leader and her new administration.— administration. leila nathoo in birmingham. _ administration. leila nathoo in birmingham, thank _ administration. leila nathoo in birmingham, thank you. - administration. leila nathoo in birmingham, thank you. just i administration. leila nathoo in birmingham, thank you. just a | birmingham, thank you. just a reminder we will hear the chancellor in his own words atjust after 4pm this afternoon. stay with us on bbc news for that. critics of the chancellor's original plan to scrap the top rate of income tax have welcomed today's u—turn. the employers group the cbi said it allows the government go forward with what it said are good reforms. after the announcement, the cost of borrowing over five years — which determines most mortgage rates
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— dropped slightly, but it's still much higher than last week. with his analysis of where the move leaves the chancellor's plans, here's our economics correspondent andy verity. the new rate will be 50% and will come in from april next year. ever since former chancellor alistair darling brought it in back in 2009, the higher tax rate for top earners has been a political dividing line. in 2013, george osborne cut it from 50p to 45p. it's paid by those earning more than £150,000 a year. that's around 660,000 people. scrapping it would have saved those higher earners on average 10,000 a year. this was, if anything, possibly the smallest measure from a fiscal point of view if not a political point of view in the mini budget, it's about 5% of the tax cut. so to the extent that what we saw a couple of weeks ago was leading
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to fiscal unsustainability, it still is. nothing really has changed. the big story that this is a a0 — now 43 billion as opposed to a £115 billion tax giveaway remains. after record falls in the price of uk government bonds last week in reaction to the mini budget, there was some relief that the government was adapting its plans. but traders are still worried. but traders are still worried kwasi kwarteng's plans aren't credible. this is the chart you want to watch in this crisis. it shows you the cost of borrowing money at a fixed rate of interest over five years. and it's that that determines the cost of a five—year fixed rate mortgage. and you can see this is the day just before the mini budget was announced, and it shoots up. and it's come down just a little bit this morning, but it's still much higher. this chart shows what's happened to the cost of insuring the government's debts against default. that too has shot up since the mini budget. another sign the market has little faith in the government's plans. the market is still seeing this
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fiscal package as inflationary, with not enough taxes being raised elsewhere to fund this deficit essentially in the future. so this means the monetary policy side, the bank of england will have to act to tame the inflation dragon. this fiscal package unleashes inflation even more. the bank of england has to raise rates to offset that, leading to higher mortgage rates and unfortunately, higher cost of borrowing for households. to try to curb the mini budget�*s inflationary effect, city traders still expect the bank of england's official rate — currently 2.25% — to rise by more than a percentage point to 3.4% next month, and then to 4.4% in december and 5.5% by march. andy verity, bbc news. let's speak to sarah 0lney, the liberal democrat treasury and business spokesperson and mp for richmond park.
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this is the outcome you wanted? not at all. we this is the outcome you wanted? iirrt at all. we would not have been proposing a tax cut of this kind in the first place. we are very much opposed to many of the tax cuts proposed in the budget. in the intervening ten days or however long it's been since it was announced, we have seen chaos. the conservatives have seen chaos. the conservatives have completely lost control of the economy and it's had a massive impact right across the money markets which has led to increased interest rates and the expectations of further rises which will cause chaos and misery for homeowners. so certainly not the outcome we were looking for. i think this shows this is one small change they have made to their budget, but what we are saying is that kwasi kwarteng has to go. he either has to resign or be sacked because there is no way the markets and the public can have confidence in the government when he is still in post. they need to scrap the whole of the mini budget and
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come forward with a properly costed budget with the tax and proposed spending with a full 0br forecast that can be properly scrutinised. they said they are going to do all of that next month. irate they said they are going to do all of that next month.— they said they are going to do all of that next month. we are waiting weeks, it needs _ of that next month. we are waiting weeks, it needs to _ of that next month. we are waiting weeks, it needs to be _ of that next month. we are waiting weeks, it needs to be done - of that next month. we are waiting weeks, it needs to be done now! . of that next month. we are waiting. weeks, it needs to be done now! we are saying we would like to have scrapped the commons recess, we want parliament to be recalled and we want to be able to hold the government to account on its plans immediately, this week. you shadowed i think kwasi kwarteng _ immediately, this week. you shadowed i think kwasi kwarteng in _ immediately, this week. you shadowed i think kwasi kwarteng in his _ i think kwasi kwarteng in his previousjob as business i think kwasi kwarteng in his previous job as business secretary, what was your impression of him? mr; what was your impression of him? i’i impression what was your impression of him? ii impression of him what was your impression of him? ii1 impression of him then what was your impression of him? ii1: impression of him then was what was your impression of him? ii1 impression of him then was very much somebody who was quite ideological driven, he had his ideas about how things were supposed to work, and i thought he was somebody who thought he was right. i dare say i thought he was right. i dare say i thought he had a bit of a superiority complex, if i can call it that. someone who doesn't listen to advice, and i think that is what we
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have seen. he fired treasury officials who could have warned him officials who could have warned him of the potential hazards of pursuing the path he has pursued. he has failed to take heed of what the bank of england have been saying, what the 0br have been saying, very much pursued this course along with liz truss who obviously very much hand in glove the two of them on this particular budget, and they have pursued what i would say is an ideological course and stayed fixed and on it. they were fixed on it yesterday when liz truss was on the laura kuenssberg show, she was determined to power ahead with this, and it's only when they have conservative mps threatening to rebel, worried about losing their seats, that they have been persuaded to climb down. you seats, that they have been persuaded to climb down-— to climb down. you mentioned liz truss, i to climb down. you mentioned liz truss. i think _ to climb down. you mentioned liz truss, i think we _ to climb down. you mentioned liz truss, i think we can _ to climb down. you mentioned liz truss, i think we can see - to climb down. you mentioned liz truss, i think we can see her - truss, i think we can see her arriving at the conference centre this afternoon. doubtless she will be taking her seat in the front row and enthusiastically applauding her chancellor. another issue has come
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up chancellor. another issue has come up this afternoon actually. you may remember during her leadership election contest, she said there would be no rationing of energy this winter. we havejust had would be no rationing of energy this winter. we have just had an exchange of letters between sse, the scottishpower company, which was worried it could face millions of pounds of penalties if it can't fulfil its promise to supply electricity, and 0fgem has written back to the company saying this... there is a possibility the uk could enter a gas supply emergency. this would lead to supplies being cut to power stations. would lead to supplies being cut to powerstations. i would lead to supplies being cut to power stations. i wonder what you make of that. power stations. i wonder what you make of that-— power stations. i wonder what you make of that. this is something that has been talked _ make of that. this is something that has been talked about _ make of that. this is something that has been talked about for— make of that. this is something that has been talked about for quite - make of that. this is something that has been talked about for quite a - has been talked about for quite a while. 0bviously liz truss as you mentioned was asked about this during the leadership contest and i think the situation with gas supplies to the uk and to europe as a whole has been something that has been a matter of considerable
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discussion. i sit on the public accounts committee and we were asking the permanent secretary about this in the mid—summer. but the tories have spent all summer talking to themselves, immersed in their leadership contest, and much too busy talking to themselves to get to grips with some of the real pressures facing the country right now, and that includes our energy supply. their only intervention on that so far since liz truss has become prime minister is to say they want to bring back fracking. everybody knows that is not a solution in the short term, the medium term or the long term. we are in this position because the conservative government has failed to invest properly in renewables which could have provided us with a greater part of our energy mix this winter. again we see the tories talking to themselves and not getting to grips with the real and
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urgent issues facing the country. thank you very much. let's talk now to our correspondent robin brant. this exchange of letters between sse and 0fgem, quite worrying for people at the start of the winter. they don't know what the weather will be like, they have seen their bills go up, and for businesses as well. if you couple that with the risk of gas shortages, it's not a happy environment. pardon the ond it's not a happy environment. pardon the pond but — it's not a happy environment. pardon the pond but we _ it's not a happy environment. pardon the pond but we had _ it's not a happy environment. pardon the pond but we had the _ it's not a happy environment. pardon the pond but we had the price - it's not a happy environment. pardon the pond but we had the price hike . the pond but we had the price hike over the weekend, millions of people across great britain being urged to take their metre readings, and then in a matter of hours the concerns around energy supply, particularly the availability of gas across britain really hotting up. here it is in black and white from 0fgem, the letter to sse, one of the big
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power generating companies. they are blaming the war in ukraine. there is a significant risk, 0fgem says, of gas shortages this winter. britain could enter a gas supply emergency, and if that happens, supplies would be cut to the largest gas users. that means plain and simply less gas to make electricity for us to consume in our businesses and homes. it is in the advisory letter today. sse has a concern notjust for its consumers but for itself because if it cannot make electricity it faces the prospect of sizeable million pound fines on a daily basis. we have already seen companies in france only a few weeks ago being effectively taken over by this date because they were to all intents and purposes insolvent because of this problem of costs too high and can't supply the service or get the money back for people because they can't afford the bills. bud
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back for people because they can't afford the bills.— afford the bills. and that is sse's concern here, _ afford the bills. and that is sse's concern here, it _ afford the bills. and that is sse's concern here, it is _ afford the bills. and that is sse's concern here, it is caught - afford the bills. and that is sse's concern here, it is caught in - afford the bills. and that is sse's concern here, it is caught in thel concern here, it is caught in the middle in this crisis, its contractual obligations to supply energy to its consumers. president macron urging people in france to reduce energy consumption in terms of air conditioning or heating their homes by 10%. we haven't had anything as prescriptive in this country from liz truss during the leadership campaign, she was quite clear ruling out rationing. we had it in stark terms from jake berry, the conservative party chairman, over the weekend saying when bills land on desks and doorsteps and they will be higher, the choice is to consume less or get a higher paying job. consume less or get a higher paying “ob. ., , �* ., consume less or get a higher paying “ob. .,, �* ., ,, ., consume less or get a higher paying “ob. �* ., ,, ., consume less or get a higher paying “ob. �* ., «i ., , job. robin brant, i know you will be back if we have _ job. robin brant, i know you will be back if we have further _ job. robin brant, i know you will be back if we have further reaction. - back if we have further reaction. thank you. joining me now is pamela hatswell from
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shrinkyourbills.co.uk. what do you make of this? is it a surprise? what do you make of this? is it a surrise? ., ., , ., surprise? no, earlier in the year we were comparing _ surprise? no, earlier in the year we were comparing our _ surprise? no, earlier in the year we were comparing our ability - surprise? no, earlier in the year we were comparing our ability to - surprise? no, earlier in the year we were comparing our ability to star l were comparing our ability to star with european counterparts and centrica has been given approval to reopen a place to store ten liquefied natural gas cargoes but it needs some renovation work. it will come on fairly quickly so that is a help but we do need more storage to protect us when we don't know what the weather will be like over the winter months. they are based off the north—east coast near yorkshire. your earlier comments about the big energy users, a little bit of an explanation there. you can'tjust switch off an appliance when you are one of the big energy users, cement or glassworks. equipment has to be checked to make sure it's in a suitable condition when it is restarted so it is a major problem for them and they need to be able to plan ahead. for domestic users,
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there is an issue with people perhaps on the priority register. if they have medical or other needs and they have medical or other needs and they need to be protected there. fin they need to be protected there. on they need to be protected there. on the business side of this, you make a valid point about that, that it is not simply switching off and switching on again when supplies are restored, it could have operational delays of days or weeks for some of the bigger operators. given that, presumably it is a better option to look at rationing somehow than do allow cuts. , , .., ., ., «i ., allow cuts. yes, if they can look at the domestic— allow cuts. yes, if they can look at the domestic customer _ allow cuts. yes, if they can look at the domestic customer first - allow cuts. yes, if they can look at the domestic customer first and i allow cuts. yes, if they can look at. the domestic customer first and ask them to do things at different times of day, out of peak times, and perhaps reward them with a better tariff, that would start the process and enable the grid to predict when they need to have everything working. for business, there is already a method in place to reward business users if they can switch
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equipment off. iii business users if they can switch equipment off-— business users if they can switch equipment off. in june this year i was in germany _ equipment off. in june this year i was in germany for _ equipment off. in june this year i was in germany for the _ equipment off. in june this year i was in germany for the g7 - equipment off. in june this year i l was in germany for the g7 summit equipment off. in june this year i - was in germany for the g7 summit and germans were already talking about and politicians were engaging them with the question of rationing this winter. do you think this is a debate we should be having here? absolutely yes. the sooner it is started, the better. we are aware of what has to be done, and there's loads of differences people can make about whether they have left lights on in a big office block at night, why do they do that, so yes, lots of tiny things will make a difference. how would you reassure people watching now who are already worried about putting heating on anyway, about putting heating on anyway, about whether bluntly the gas will be there to supply the electricity they use or indeed they are gas users? �* , ., , they use or indeed they are gas users? 2 ., , ., , , users? it's a very real possibility. it users? it's a very real possibility. it depends _ users? it's a very real possibility. it depends on _ users? it's a very real possibility. it depends on the _ users? it's a very real possibility. it depends on the weather- users? it's a very real possibility. it depends on the weather and i users? it's a very real possibility. | it depends on the weather and it's an unpredictable situation in this country. people in scotland are
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worse off than us in the south because they have shorter daylight hours and they have more severe weather conditions. so i think it is to have a plan and have that plan ready so that if the situation does occur, you know exactly what you are going to do. the domestic user might be able to move to another place where heating can be provided rather than staying at home. a business user might be able to adjust their hours. user might be able to ad'ust their hours. ., , ., ., ., hours. one last thought, pamela. there is a question _ hours. one last thought, pamela. there is a question of _ hours. one last thought, pamela. there is a question of priorities i there is a question of priorities here, isn't there? how does the supplies of energy determine those priorities? you have talked about vulnerable people. we have institutions that might be more vulnerable than others, hospitals are the obvious one and care homes, and yet industry's needs at a time when the economy is having such difficulties can't be ignored. the idea of going — difficulties can't be ignored. iie: idea of going off grid becomes more appealing, and if industry can start
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to have an alternative method they can fall back on, so i think hospitals tend to rely on their own generators in this situation, so perhaps we need to invest in more plans for local communities to have solar panels, air source heat pumps, and not to be quite so dependent on the grid but to have an alternative. pamela hatswell from shrinkyourbills.co.uk. thank you, pleasure to speak to you. some breaking news now, thomas cashman has been held in custody, charged with surname's murder. a provisional trial date for the 6th of march next year. the court heard the trial was estimated to last four weeks, there will be a plea hearing on january the weeks, there will be a plea hearing onjanuary the 10th. weeks, there will be a plea hearing on january the 10th. mr cashman weeks, there will be a plea hearing onjanuary the 10th. mr cashman not required to enter a plea at this
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stage, it isjust a remand. according to the press association, thomas cashman looked to the ground throughout most of the hearing. let's talk now to our correspondent, danny savage, in liverpool. 0ver let's talk now to our correspondent, danny savage, in liverpool. over to you. danny savage, in liverpool. over to ou. .., danny savage, in liverpool. over to ou. _, ., , you. the court hearing 'ust literally finished * you. the court hearing 'ust literally finished a i you. the court hearing 'ust literally finished a few h you. the court hearing just - literally finished a few moments ago, lasting 30 minutes. much discussion for legal reasons cannot be repeated but it's interesting the opening remarks from the judge when he started talking to the court is that he said for obvious reasons i'm familiar with the circumstances of this case. and many people in the uk and across the world will be familiar with the awful circumstances which surrounded the death of olivia pratt—korbel. nine years old, shot dead in her own home after her mother opened the front door on august the 22nd late in the evening after hearing a commotion outside. the gunman was chasing a
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man and shots were fired, and one of them hit 0livia. since then, a huge police investigation has been in north—west england to england to try to track down who was responsible for that, and there were a number of arrests over that period since then, 11 arrests since then, but it was the arrest last week that led to these two men appearing in court today. the other man, paul russell, 40 today. the other man, paul russell, 1l0 years old, was charged with assisting an offender. he appeared before magistrates this morning and has been remanded in customary —— in custody. this afternoon's hearing was exclusively focusing on thomas cashman, the 34—year—old accused of murdering 0livia cashman, the 34—year—old accused of murdering olivia and there was some discussion in court about the timetable of where things go from now on. a trial date was set for the 6th of march next year with a four week trial expected. there will be another significant hearing in this case about how it goes forward in
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january next year, but for now thomas cashman has been remanded in custody and will stay in custody from now on. he has been taken out from now on. he has been taken out from the court room after that hearing which lasted just under quarter of an hour. he is accused of one count of murder, two counts of attempted murder, and the possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life with the possession of two weapons. life with the possession of two wea ons. ., «i life with the possession of two weaons. ., «i i. y life with the possession of two weaons. ., «i ,, , . weapons. thank you very much indeed for that. weapons. thank you very much indeed for that- dannlr — weapons. thank you very much indeed for that. danny savage _ weapons. thank you very much indeed for that. danny savage in _ weapons. thank you very much indeed for that. danny savage in liverpool. i a search has been renewed for the remains of a teenager from northern ireland, who was murdered and secretly buried by the ira in 1975. columba mcveigh, who was 19, is one of 16 victims who became known as "the disappeared". investigators have recovered the remains of 13 people, but four remain missing. i'm a i'm a bit confused by that because it adds up to 17 but perhaps we can
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get clarity on that from our ireland correspondent.— get clarity on that from our ireland corresondent. , ., a correspondent. yes, columba mcveigh is one of the — correspondent. yes, columba mcveigh is one of the victims, _ correspondent. yes, columba mcveigh is one of the victims, known _ correspondent. yes, columba mcveigh is one of the victims, known as - correspondent. yes, columba mcveigh is one of the victims, known as the - is one of the victims, known as the disappeared, those who were murdered and secretly buried during the course of the troubles. there have been five searches so far in this part of county monaghan for him but never before has this area of land just over my shoulder been searched, so investigators are searching on an area of two acres. you can see diggers there, they are paused at the moment but they have begun this work. investigators led by an independent commission who are tasked with finding the remains of the disappeared are pretty convinced that columba was killed and buried here, but it's a big area of land
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and it's also very remote. we are a few miles from the border with northern ireland, so the technology as these searches continue over the years has evolved. archaeologists are involved in the search, other scientists are too, but it is quite an operation. investigators think this search potentially could take a few weeks. it all depends partially on the weather, but they are hopeful, and so is columba mcveigh's family, that this could provide a breakthrough after so many years. columba was 19, from county tyrone. the first search here was in 1999, so the family have been here through a number of searches. each time they have been disappointed, but the commission have said they believe a credible reason to restart the
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search. the commission doesn'tjust search. the commission doesn'tjust search speculatively, it bases on information it receives, often from former paramilitaries, and it says well it cannot reveal details, it has the belief that it is worth while mounting this search once again. so investigators are at work, columba �*s family are here, his brother said all he wanted was to give his brother finally brother said all he wanted was to give his brotherfinally a christian burial to lay him to rest with his late parents. so it is certainly a time of renewed hope for the families, but they will wait anxiously i should think over the next few weeks as the day progresses. they will hope that the weather conditions remain helpful to the process of trying to recover columba's body. how do people regard this? northern ireland never had a truth and to process, a lot of
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people thought we just had to move on. this is an important example of what it is not possible to move on for some families because they still have this uncertainty hanging over them. , , ., , ., them. yes, the story of the disappeared _ them. yes, the story of the disappeared for _ them. yes, the story of the disappeared for many - them. yes, the story of the i disappeared for many people them. yes, the story of the - disappeared for many people in northern ireland is one of the most poignant and shocking aspects of the conflict. there have been a number of families who the commission have worked with over the years. so far the commission has found the bodies of 13 people were secretly buried decades ago, but four of the disappeared have not yet been found. columba mcveigh is one of them at that list of the disappeared has changed the years as victims have been added to the original list that the commission began working with. all of this fits into the overall picture, the question of how northern ireland does deal with its troubled past. currently the covenant is putting legislation through parliament which would mean that there would be no more prosecutions —— back at the
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government is putting legislation through. no civil cases connected to the conflict. many victims groups are strongly opposed to that and are calling for the government to change course but for now the focus here is on the search for a columba mcveigh, one of the best known victims of the troubles because his case was so tragic. 19 abducted and secretly buried and 47 years on his body has not been found.— not been found. chris page, thank ou. not been found. chris page, thank you- some — not been found. chris page, thank you. some breaking _ not been found. chris page, thank you. some breaking news. - not been found. chris page, thank you. some breaking news. do - not been found. chris page, thank you. some breaking news. do youj you. some breaking news. do you remember the case of the women who work for state television in russia? she held a sign saying stop the war, no war, during an evening news bulletin watched by millions of people. you can see marina behind the news reader. we havejust had a newsflash out of moscow saying that russia has now put marina
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0vsyannikova on the wanted list. the controversy at the time was that it wasn't a war and it was illegal to call it a war, it was a military intervention in ukraine. russia is taking steps against those who have opposed it. this is quite a dramatic acceleration of the moves against her. she had been to a certain extent you could argue dealt with with kid gloves because she was high—profile but she is now on the wanted list in russia and we will bring you more if we get it. now it's time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. spells of wet and windy weather on the way as we go through this week. today it's northern ireland and western scotland that have been seeing some rain so far, and that rain pushing across more of scotland as the afternoon goes on. easing from northern ireland — still a bit of patchy, light rain out there from a lot of cloud. a lot of cloud through england and wales, as well, but it's thin enough to allow some hazy brightness
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to come through on a mild afternoon. one or two showers towards southwest england — perhaps northern england, as well. now into tonight, we start with outbreaks of rain across parts of scotland. another dose of rain then spreads across northern ireland into western scotland — very wet start to tuesday here — 30 to 50 millimetres is possible, so that could cause some disruption early on. and with the rain both today and into tonight towards the northwest of the uk, it's very windy, as well. tomorrow, that rain starts to move southwards across wales, across a large part of england — with the exception of east anglia and the southeast. behind it, northern ireland and scotland turning drier and brighter through the day. still a few blustery showers around, on a mild day. bye— bye. let's get a sport update from holly. i hope you had a good weekend, how is it today? very kind of you to ask. i hope you had a good weekend. we start with the women's champions league with arsenal set to face eight—time winners and current holders lyon in the group stage. the draw took place earlier and our reporterjane dougall was watching.
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arsenal are in group c and will play the current holders but also the record holding eight time champions lyon. that is going to be an incredibly difficult match in the group stages can make no mistake. because every season lyon's main ambition is to win the champions league. arsenal have started their domestic season well, top of the wsl, they came very close second last season, as well. and the other teams will be fearing the biggest don't forget arsenal are still the only british women's team to have won this competition back in 2007. they play the italian champions juventus and switzerland's zurich. arguably a bit more straightforward for them. , ., ., , ., for them. chelsea where a first out of the, for them. chelsea where a first out of the. they _ for them. chelsea where a first out of the, they were _ for them. chelsea where a first out of the, they were protected - for them. chelsea where a first out of the, they were protected in - for them. chelsea where a first out of the, they were protected in the l of the, they were protected in the seat pot as champions of england. they will play psg, runners—up in the french league, and the champions last year of the semifinalist.
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always a difficult side to play. they will also play at real madrid who finished third in the spanish league, drawn in group one. caroline weir left manchester city to play for real madrid. she has been performing well that will be an interesting match. chelsea also take on the first albanian team to get to the last 16 or under any format for the last 16 or under any format for the last 16 or under any format for the last nine seasons, that they have won the double in their league so it will be fascinating, albanian team. we can look at the four groups of four. group d is interesting. last year's runners—up barcelona. lucy bronze and keira walsh of england, who havejust moved lucy bronze and keira walsh of england, who have just moved to barcelona, of course the champions of europe after winning the euros with england, they will come up against georgia stanway of bayern munich, also a winner of the european championships. championship side middlesbrough have
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sacked chris wilder after less than a year in the role. boro have won only two of their 11 championship matches this season and sit third from bottom after saturday's 1—0 defeat at coventry. and england's t20 cricket players will shortly be on their way to australia for a final three—match series before the world cup. yesterday they clinched a 4—3 series win in pakistan. dawid malan led the way with an unbeaten half century as they posted an impressive 209—3 from their 20 overs thanks to some huge hitting. pakistan never got close, chris woakes taking three wickets including the key one of babar azam as england won by 67 runs. that's all the sport for now. thank you and we will speak to you again later. back to our top story this hour. the chancellor announced his u—turn this morning by saying, "we get it and we have listened."
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so what have they been listening to? 0ur correspondent duncan kennedy has been talking to voters in the tory—held seat of winchester. home to 130,000 people and plenty of strong views on the chancellor's tax decision this morning. we came across cassie, an independent business owner, aaron, who's on universal credit, and deborah, who's a pensioner. cassie white owns the projects, which is part cafe, part antique shop and part giftware. she says the government should never have considered cutting the 45p tax rate as it's simply unfair on the low earners. it's a bit of a joke, maybe, in my opinion, but i don't think it actually has a huge effect on me and my business and what i do. it's definitely going to cause our new prime minister some problems and possibly some trust in her might be difficult. aaron within is on universal credit.
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he's been a conservative voter but he believes today's u—turn is politically damaging, especially for the chancellor. i think it's damaged them quite a lot. i think, really i think the chancellor should go because of all the uproar about it. it's that serious? yeah, it's that serious. deborah bennett is a pensioner who's also voted conservative. she believes the government was right to act swiftly by reversing the 45p tax change. i'm glad they changed their mind but they shouldn't have - done it in the first place. i feel that all they're concernedj about is making the rich people richer and the poor people poorer. this is only one location but the government's decision to alter its tax policy has brought about strong reactions from all sides of this community. duncan kennedy, bbc news, in winchester.
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chris curtis is head of political polling at 0pinium. it is too early to get reaction to the announcement this morning but what do we know about what people have been saying to pollsters during the last ten days since the mini budget, the fiscal event, however you want to describe it, was announced?— you want to describe it, was announced? , , ., announced? the response to the mini budaet has announced? the response to the mini budget has been _ announced? the response to the mini budget has been incredibly _ announced? the response to the mini budget has been incredibly dramatic. | budget has been incredibly dramatic. 0ne budget has been incredibly dramatic. one of the biggest movements in polls that i have seen in my career, probably in my lifetime. it has been a the complete opposite direction to what liz truss and the chancellor would hope for. going into the budget we were showing the conservatives slightly behind the labour party in the polls, four or five points. 0ur labour party in the polls, four or five points. our latest poll has their 19 points behind. but the big shift has been on this question of economic competence. previously conservatives were seen as the party who were competent, the point you could trust to run the economy. now we have the labour party 16 points ahead on that question when we ask
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it. it has been an incredibly negative response. in terms of whether this u—turn will change things, it is worth noting that the starting position was the public not wanting the tax to be cut, 66% of people thought it was a bad idea, just 20% of people thought it was a good idea, so they would certainly support a change in direction but i don't think it will go very far to undo a lot of that damage because that was really to do with the conservative party looking competent and i don't think they have looked particularly competent on the economy this week.— particularly competent on the economy this week. they have been interestin: economy this week. they have been interesting finding _ economy this week. they have been interesting finding is _ economy this week. they have been interesting finding is in _ economy this week. they have been interesting finding is in the - economy this week. they have been interesting finding is in the last - interesting finding is in the last couple of weeks. give a slightly longer since liz truss started saying he was going to put the emphasis on growth and do anything about growth and that's not be so concerned about other issues and said there was too much focus on it in the past. the public are not enthusiastic about this as far as the polling suggests.— enthusiastic about this as far as the polling suggests. what we have asked in particular _ the polling suggests. what we have asked in particular is, _ the polling suggests. what we have asked in particular is, here - the polling suggests. what we have asked in particular is, here is- the polling suggests. what we have asked in particular is, here is a - asked in particular is, here is a list of issues to do with the
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economy, which do you think is most important? economic growth has tended to come second on that, behind responding to the cost—of—living crisis and dealing with this much bigger problem right now of inflation. when it liz truss first set out on that growth mission, you can see why she did because while in many of these economic questions labour already had a lead, the conservatives have consistently held a lead on the question of economic growth. that was true just before she did the mini budget but it is not true now. what about the implications of this longer term? we havejust over two years until there has to be a general election, december 20 2041 think is the absolute deadline, five years after borisjohnson won the conservatives their big majority. the comparison i was wondering about was 1990 to one pound hits such is on black wednesday and the conservatives lost five years later. they had quite a lot of time to potentially recover from it. they had quite a lot of time to potentially recoverfrom it. the conservatives have less time now.
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what about the basics? is there stuff that should give them... is there room for them to be positive about this? is there evidence that perhaps on some of the other issues that they have public support? filth. that they have public support? oh, ve little that they have public support? oh, very little in _ that they have public support? oh, very little in any — that they have public support? oi very little in any of that they have public support? i>i, very little in any of the that they have public support? iii, very little in any of the opinion polls for them to be positive about. it doesn't really matter what question you ask people at the moment, they are much more likely to give a positive answer about the labour party and they are about the conservative party. there are a few little bits that i think... this does generally feel like that moment in the 1990s. we do have to remember that history doesn't always repeat itself. we have to remember that the electorate is historically volatile at the moment, so they are up a lot more likely tojump at the moment, so they are up a lot more likely to jump around in response to events. we have to remember that the election is still two years away. polling is only ever a snapshot of where the public are right now and there is still a lot of room for liz truss to change, not least of course if she ends up
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growing the economy. she has set herself this challenge, i will put in place measures that end up growing the economy. i think if she is successful in doing that, the public might be willing to give her a second chance.— a second chance. chris curtis at 0pinium. _ a second chance. chris curtis at opinium, thank _ a second chance. chris curtis at opinium, thank you. _ aubrey allegretti, political correspondent with the guardian, joins us now from birmingham. thank you very much for breaking off from talking to delegates to talk to us about the mood. how would you characterise it? do you get a sense of relief today? ilat characterise it? do you get a sense of relief today?— characterise it? do you get a sense of relief today? not quite. this was obviously a — of relief today? not quite. this was obviously a move _ of relief today? not quite. this was obviously a move that _ of relief today? not quite. this was obviously a move that was - of relief today? not quite. this was| obviously a move that was intended to soothe the thorny relations within the conservative party with michael gove for example doing a tour of the fringes yesterday, dripping poison into various people's ears about the government. and then that hasn't exactly paid off. the mood amongst conservative mps still remains with that gallows humour. there is a feeling that from the people who wanted the u—turn,
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the people who wanted the u—turn, the one good thing they thought she had, which was that she was persistent, ideological and that she herself said she was willing to be a popular, that has now gone, as well. they see that really this is probably just the first step in a series of potential u—turns the government might be forced to make on the mini budget and over the next two months and longer in regards to the medium growth. i two months and longer in regards to the medium growth.— two months and longer in regards to the medium growth. i don't know... i was raising — the medium growth. i don't know... i was raising this _ the medium growth. i don't know... i was raising this question _ the medium growth. i don't know... i was raising this question earlier, - the medium growth. i don't know... i was raising this question earlier, i i was raising this question earlier, i don't know if you have had any luck getting to the bottom of this. has anyone in government been able to explain to you why if this didn't generate very much money, not scrapping it won't make much difference, they say, to the overall package... if that was the case, why do it, given that it was politically so risky, and everyone knew it was because people perceive it as saying you are helping the wealthiest at a time when you might have to make
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other structural measures that makes a mean reduction in public spending? the new liz truss government was under huge pressure to do something drastic, radical, to prevent it essentially falling into electoral decline and being punished, come the next election. and so there was this bid for growth which seemed to go slightly too far. not necessarily on the economic side. most politicians you speak to today are reallyjust saying that the economic arguments stack up. actually it is about the political optics, something liz truss has brushed aside before, but that you can't ignore in the face of, as chris was talking about before, the polling we have seen showing how unpopular some of the measures in the mini budget are and how unpopular the party is. don't forget that the first thing conservative mps care about is their seats and i think it is quite telling that the scale of unrest hasn't yet been completely quelled. you have people like the conservative tees valley mayor who said that the cap on bankers bonuses
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being lifted should also be reversed because he thinks that is not playing very well and you also have people like mel stride, the conservative mp, the chair of the treasury select committee, saying that this very small amount of spending, 2 billion as it was, is just a drop in the pool and there are other measures, he thinks, in the mini budget which may have to be unwound because they are proving so unpopular and because of the conservative government's new approach to putting everything on the credit card for the next generation. all of the attempts to soothe the party, get mps on the same page, haven't paid off yet. the ruestion i same page, haven't paid off yet. the question i suppose in terms of this now for the government, it has a big majority but borisjohnson had a big majority but borisjohnson had a big majority and it didn't stop him facing parliamentary defeats. 0pinium had a survey out this week suggesting that 23% of people who voted for conservatives at the last election were now prepared to vote labour. when you put those things
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together and the vulnerability of some mps, given the size of their majorities, how difficult will it be to manage the parliamentary party, a party whose members hadn't originally been that enthusiastic in backing liz truss at the start of the leadership campaign? ministers have been wringing _ the leadership campaign? ministers have been wringing their— the leadership campaign? ministers have been wringing their hands - the leadership campaign? ministers have been wringing their hands of. have been wringing their hands of the last 48 hours and saying for example that they fully expect to lose their seats at the next general election and asking why the government didn't do more, both this and the last one, with the 80 seat majority is inherited in 2019. there is a real sense of frustration among the. as regards to how we go forward to the next election and the unruly nature of the parliamentary backbenches, they have an appetite for it under borisjohnson that has not been taken away from them quickly enough by the new whip's office. if it didn't happen now, this u—turn, it would have happened in three or four months. it was sensible the government saw the writing on that wall and acted relatively swiftly because otherwise this debate would have dragged on
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until the finance bill had been presented to parliament which could have been as late as march or the springtime. it headed up the problem here much earlier than it could have done, although it still has some criticism for taking nearly a week to get there, but the conservative backbenchers now are completely unruly, they are so frustrated at not being listened to. they really say, we would like to have made this work if the government had brought us in but we were shunned and it doesn't seem they feel like liz truss' apology and this promise she has listened will be followed through. has listened will be followed throu~h. . , , has listened will be followed throu~h. , , . ., through. aubrey allegretti from the guardian newspaper _ through. aubrey allegretti from the guardian newspaper in _ through. aubrey allegretti from the | guardian newspaper in birmingham, thank you very much. let me take you to dunfermline. we have some pictures just to dunfermline. we have some picturesjust coming to to dunfermline. we have some pictures just coming to us of the king. the king along with the queen consort, camilla. this is their first day of official engagements. they have been in dunfermline abbey and they are in edinburgh, as well. the first day of official
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engagements because there is a period of mourning after the death of the previous monarch and so although charles became king immediately when his mother died, apart from all of the funeral arrangements, the period of official mourning continued last week. a chance for them to have a rest, frankly, after the flurry of activity over the previous weeks. he is now beginning again the round of engagements, the sorts of things he will have to do now, as monarch. some of the things he never had to do before, one of them is that the palace has announced today that the first state banquet hosted by the king will be in honour of the president of south africa and his wife, who i think are coming next month, so they will be the first official guests that the new king and queen consort have received. prince charles has close relations with south africa, he has been a regular visitor and i think it is fair to say he will welcome any
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opportunity for discussions with the president of south africa. let's move on now to what is happening in brazil, south america's guest country. its biggest democracy. the result is on a knife edge. round one of the presidential election did not see a decisive result. it will be a run—off with a choice between the two candidates, the far right incumbentjair bolsonaro and his radical left—wing challenger luiz inacio lula da silva. with almost all the votes counted, lula has won 48% against bolsonaro, who did better than opinion polls suggested, and got 43%. it was not the walkover that some had predicted. as our south america correspondent katy watson reports, voters now have four weeks to decide which of the two men should lead the country.
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cheering. there were cheers for lula as well as tears. but this wasn't the outright victory that his supporters had hoped for. polls had predicted a 14 percentage point gap between him and bolsonaro. but they vastly underestimated the support for the right wing leader. after the results, lula said there would be no let up in campaigning. translation: i've never won an election in the first round. | it's like destiny wants me to work a bit more. we are going to win the election again. it's just a question of time. meanwhile, bolsonaro had this to say. translation: i know there's a desire to change from people, _ but there are certain changes that will end up worse. and we tried to show that during the campaign, but clearly that didn't get through to the most important part of society. these elections were seen as the most important since brazil returned to democracy in the 1980s.
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11 candidates were running, but only two were realistic options. a leftist former leader with a legacy of corruption, or a far right president criticised for his democratic record. the queues on sunday showed people cared about the outcome. this weekend, bolsonaro fans paraded their candidate ahead of what they saw as a guaranteed win. they don't believe the polls, they wanted a first round victory, too, and they won't give up their fight. why not believe in democracy? it's time to change, let's change, but let change peacefully. "there's going to be beautiful blood spilt in this city," this man tells me, "i'm prepared to kill all the socialists and communists in the world. after sunday's results, lula fans remained upbeat. i'm not disappointed, actually, because i already expected that we wouldn't win in the first term, but at least we are ahead
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in the overall results. bolsonaro said that polls are a lie. do you think that he's got a point? i think he will... i think he will be a big loser. i think he will be a bad loser. what do you make of the result? we were expecting to make it on the first term. we were expecting to make it on the first turn. but we are very happy that it's a win. and we are really, really happy and the second time it's going to be lula. and we can't stand bolsonaro any more, like, i'm an lgbt person and we want our rights and we want our people to have our voice in this country. it's actually much more of a relief than a victory parade. the race for the presidency is far from over. the next few weeks will see intense campaigning which is bound to become much more personal. two political foes now going head to head to lead latin america's biggest nation. there's concern this race could also get violent. katy watson, bbc news, in sao paolo.
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ukraine's president, volodymyr zelensky, says his forces have made advances near the southern city of kherson — seizing two villages. on saturday, ukrainian soldiers were able to raise their flag in the town of lyman, in the donetsk region — after pushing russian forces out. the town had been annexed by russia the previous day. it was an internationally condemned the move. an amazing show of the northern lights has been seen in northumberland. the light show happens when atoms in the earth's high—altitude atmosphere collide with charged particles from the sun. and it is absolutely beautiful stop
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i'm not sure if nick miller can promise anything quite as spectacular but maybe we don't want spectacular but maybe we don't want spectacular when it comes to the weather. hello. we're all going to see some rain at some stage of the week ahead. windy at times, too — particularly on wednesday. now, a northwest/southeast split out there this afternoon. parts of northern ireland and western scotland have been seeing some rain, whereas for much of england and wales, it's dry. a lot of cloud, some hazy brightness, especially towards the east and south—east of england, closer to this retreating area of high pressure. closer to low pressure, northern ireland and through scotland, here we have a lot of cloud, and we're seeing some rain in northern ireland easing this afternoon. still maybe a few spots of light rain from the cloud. turning wetter more widely through western scotland — some of that rain pushing in towards northern and central areas of scotland, too — accompanied by strong winds, so the western isles could see some gusts approaching 60 miles an hour or so. whereas for much of england and wales it will continue to be dry, a few showers perhaps in towards the southwest and, after what was a fairly chilly start to the day, it's a mild afternoon. so, into tonight, we're already starting the night with outbreaks of rain in scotland. we'll see another pulse of heavy rain pushing across northern ireland
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overnight and into western scotland. very wet start to tuesday here — could amass around 30 to 50 millimetres of rain, so that could cause some disruption first thing tomorrow. dry through england and wales on what is a milder night. tomorrow, the rain on the move southwards. so gradually clearing scotland and northern ireland, in towards northern, western, then central areas of england, across wales, too. east anglia and the southeast likely to stay largely dry during daylight hours. still a bit of hazy brightness on a mild day. scotland and northern ireland will feel fresher behind the early rain. sunny spells and a few blustery showers — particularly in northwest scotland. a more wet and windy weather to come on wednesday. it looks like we'll see a developing area of low pressure move now. now, still some uncertainty about the detail. looks as if on wednesday it'll will be a very wet start through northern and western areas, as a band of squally rain and gusty winds move east across england during the afternoon, followed by sunny spells and scattered heavy and blustery showers, some of which could be thundery. focus on winds on wednesday — these are average speeds,
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but some gusts could be 60 to 70 miles an hour in northern areas. more likely to be less than that, but there is certainly potential for disruptive winds on wednesday, so we'll have to keep you updated about that. once that system is out of the way, then for thursday and for friday, well, it's still quite windy out there. there'll be some drier, brighter moments. there'll also still be a few heavy and blustery showers out there.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the government performs a u—turn on its tax cut for higher earners. the chancellor has backtracked on the plan just ten days after announcing it. it comes after growing opposition from fellow tory mps. intervention on energy, a strong package of intervention for people on tax cuts generally, and we decided not to proceed. the uk faces a "significant risk" of gas shortages this winter, according the energy regulator 0fgem. it could lead to supplies being cut to power stations which use gas to generate electricity. a man's been remanded in custody after appearing in court
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charged with the murder of nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel. thomas cashman, who's 34, is due to stand trial in march. king charles and the queen consort visit dunfermline on their first official engagment since the period of royal mourning came to an end. and, coming up, we meet the man from kent who makes his living from doodling and has covered his whole house in drawings. the chancellor kwasi kwarteng is preparing to face the conservative party conference
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this afternoon — after being forced into a dramatic u—turn over his plan to scrap the 45 pence top rate of income tax. the decision to ditch the policy — a decision which mr kwarteng confirmed this morning — came less than 24 hours after the prime minister liz truss had publicly defended it. in a statement, mr kwarteng said the 45p tax plan had become a "huge distraction" and that the government had "listened" to people's concerns. yesterday — on the bbc — the prime minister said she was �*absolutely committed' to the policy and that she would not abandon it. the move would have benefitted those earning more than £150,000 a year, a number of conservative mps had suggested that they were likely to vote against it in the house of commons. 0ur political correspondent ione wells reports from the political conference in birmingham it was meant to be the chancellor's
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big day, his chance to outline to in birmingham outline in a speech his vision for growing the economy, but the focus was all wrong. too many conservative mps were uneasy at plans to scrap the top rate of tax for the highest earners. former cabinet ministers like michael gove and grant shapps warned the government would lose a vote on their plans but it didn't stop the prime minister doubling down on them yesterday. are you absolutely committed to abolishing the 45p tax rate for the wealthiest people in the country? yes. the chancellor was planning to say today that we must stay the course but last night senior ministers here were ringing around worried mps to try to win hearts and minds. it didn't work. we talked to lots and lots of people up and down the country, we talked to lots of... not only colleagues, mp colleagues but also people, voters, constituents, crucially people in the country and i felt that the 45p rate was a huge distraction on what was a very strong set of measures. the energy intervention,
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for example, that essentially meant that the average household bill for energy will be £2500. the move has been welcomed by some tory mps. we have a plan for growth and it's going ahead. if you're borrowing money to cut taxes for people - who are already better off, - then the public, who for example, one constituent said, - i'm taking on extra shifts because mortgage rates- are going up because inflation has to be fought but also - because you are borrowing money to be fought but also because you are - in order to run these tax cuts and that is a combination - borrowing money in order to fund these tax cuts and that is a - that doesn't work. combination that doesn't work. hopefully, moving on from the 45p rate conversation allows you to get back into the growth and funding public services and what it's all meant to be about. i think it's the correct decision. have been talking about over the last week or so, which is the tens of billions of pounds the government is spending to support families and businesses
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through this energy price crisis. but the move has blindsided some ministers. the lib dems are calling for the chancellor to resign. the snp, who were never going to cut the tax in scotland, said his u—turn showed utter ineptitude, and labour say it's come too late. it was obvious they weren't going to get this through the house of commons. they were forced into this screeching u—turn. but so much damage has already been done, with higher government borrowing costs and huge worries for people about how they're going to afford their mortgages. yesterday, seniorfigures in government couldn't quite tell me what the narrative was. how were they going to sell cutting tax for the highest earners while hinting that benefits and public services might get squeezed. ministers hope this u—turn will give them room to sell the policies like their energy support package that were getting lost, but it's left the chancellor and prime minister politically wounded just weeks into their premiership. after a morning of all the worst headlines for him, kwasi kwarteng hopes to use his big speech today to draw people's minds back to his other ideas for growing the economy.
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ione wells, bbc news, birmingham. leila nathoo is at the conservative conference for us. leila what are we now expected to hear from the chancellor? irate leila what are we now expected to hear from the chancellor? we have received a draft _ hear from the chancellor? we have received a draft of _ hear from the chancellor? we have received a draft of the _ hear from the chancellor? we have received a draft of the speech - hear from the chancellor? we have received a draft of the speech we i received a draft of the speech we were briefed on the normal way that is why it was on the front pages, no mention of the decision to drop the plans for cutting the 45p tax rate 46p in scotland. he is going to have to address that isn't he? yes 46p in scotland. he is going to have to address that isn't he?— to address that isn't he? yes you could expect _ to address that isn't he? yes you could expect that _ to address that isn't he? yes you could expect that speech - to address that isn't he? yes you could expect that speech to - to address that isn't he? yes you could expect that speech to have j could expect that speech to have been hastily rewritten the speech that we are due to hear about an hour or so, the trailfor that we are due to hear about an hour or so, the trail for that speech was that they are sticking to their guns and the policies were going ahead, but what you can expect to hear is a lot of focus on the other mentions of the budget which is what they want to draw attention to, indeed that was the whole justification for dropping the 45p
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—— abolishing the 45p rate they wanted to draw the sport and back to bills and other tax cuts which will if everybody else. i think we will hear a lot about that and also the contrition that kwasi kwarteng was trying to get across earlier today. saying look we've been listening we understand the discontent. yesterday the mood was very fractious here, with tory mp after tory mp going public with their concerns. i think that rattled the chancellor and the prime minister, thinking that the conference is going to be dominated by the disagreement they decided to try and stem the discontent by reversing on this policy. but i don't think the disagreements within the party will stop here, now tory mps sense that they can put pressure on the government and the government will change its mind. remember this is a very divided party, liz truss does not have the support of all her mps by any means and she is
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embarking on a huge programme of tax cuts and economic measures which many tory members do not like. there are many battles ahead, we are hearing an inkling of that already yesterday liz truss refusing to confirm that benefits would lot rise in line with inflation for instance. that would be a real terms cut in the incomes of people receiving benefits, and tory mp estimate vague, formal work and pensions secretary, saying that would be a disaster. you can see the sense of the political disagreements to come, a lot more tussles in the weeks and months to come as liz truss and the government will set out further measures that they say will similar growth. measures that they say will similar urowth. ., , ., , , growth. that is really interesting. perha -s growth. that is really interesting. perhaps the _ growth. that is really interesting. perhaps the views _ growth. that is really interesting. perhaps the views of _ growth. that is really interesting. perhaps the views of somebody i growth. that is really interesting. i perhaps the views of somebody like michael gove or grant chaps would not be terribly surprising, they being on these social liberal wing
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of the party. esther mcveigh is somebody who might be sympathetic, and yet she too is speaking out. you have to keep the coalition within your party together, to have a chance of getting your measures through but winning an election or losing it but holding onto a decent number of seats? liz losing it but holding onto a decent number of seats?— number of seats? liz truss is embarking — number of seats? liz truss is embarking on _ number of seats? liz truss is embarking on this _ number of seats? liz truss is embarking on this huge - number of seats? liz truss is - embarking on this huge programme, number of seats? liz truss is _ embarking on this huge programme, we are told there is going to be a huge series of measures in the coming weeks. supply—side, deregulation a lot of things like childcare and immigration reforms. there are going to be lots of flashpoints, lots of battlegrounds. as you say, the benefits one is exactly one of that. spending cuts, people are worried about a lot of things and liz truss
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is waking up to that political reality of having to fight battles on so many fronts with sony different groupings of tory mps, and i think you're getting a sense of just how divided the party is. this is day two of the party conference, with a new prime minister a new government, it should be a rallying cry for her government. there is still room for the chancellor to turnit still room for the chancellor to turn it around in his speech, there is still room for liz truss to make a unifying speech here, you get the sense that things are going out of their control. they have managed to fight this battle and quell this descent, but there is a lot more to come and there is also the economic credibility aspects, it is worth just noting that there was disagreement on this budget from within the tory party on two counts, one in terms of politicaljudgments signalling that they were favouring the very wealthy over the rest of the very wealthy over the rest of the population, and the other that the population, and the other that the whole economic credibility of the whole economic credibility of the scale of the tax cuts and the
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refusal set out how they were going to be paid for actually reversing the abolition of the 45p rate doesn't do much in terms of generating revenue. still an argument to be had over economic credibility, embattled is often used words when premises are in trouble but you do get the sense of that is how liz truss is at the moment. i think it is quite extraordinary on day two of the conference just weeks since he took over as leader. later thank you- — since he took over as leader. later thank you. going _ since he took over as leader. later thank you. going to _ since he took over as leader. later thank you. going to be _ since he took over as leader. later thank you. going to be joining my thank you. going to bejoining my colleaguejo coburn is in westminster for politics live at four o'clock in the chancellor is expected to speakjust before that so please stay with us for that. critics of the chancellor original plan have welcomed today's u—turn, roy greenslade and the i said that
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it allows the government to go forward with good reforms. of course the slight issue is over borrowing costs for the government. they have improved slightly on where they were last week. with his analysis of where the move leaves the chancellor's plans, here's our economics correspondent andy verity. the new rate will be 50% and will come in from april next year. ever since the formula chancellor alistair darling brought in, the top rate for top earners has been a political dividing line. in 2013, george osborne cut it from 50p to 45p. it is paid by those earning more than £150,000 a year. that is around 660,000 people. scrapping it would have saved them, on average, £10,000 a year. this was the smallest measure from a fiscal point of view, not a political point of view, in the mini budget. it is about 5% of the tax cuts
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to the extent that what we saw a couple of weeks ago was leading to fiscal unsustainability. nothing really has changed. this is now 43 billion as opposed to a £45 billion tax giveaway, it remains. after the record falls in the price of uk government bonds last week in reaction to the mini budget, there was some relief the government was adapting its plans. but traders are still worried that kwasi kwarteng's plans are not credible. this is the chart we want to watch, which is the cost of borrowing money at a fixed rate of interest over five years and it is that that determines the cost of a five year fixed—rate mortgage. this is the dayjust before the mini budget was announced and it shoots up. it has come down just a little bit this morning, but it is still much higher.
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this chart shows the cost of insuring against government default. the markets still see this fiscal package as inflationary with not enough taxes being raised elsewhere to fund this deficit for essentially the future. this means that monetary policy side, the bank of england will have to act to contain inflation. this fiscal polish unleashes inflation even more and the bank has to offset that which is leading to higher mortgage rates and higher cost of borrowing. to try to curb the mini budget�*s inflationary effect, city traders expect the bank of england official rate, currently 2.25%, to rise by more than a percentage point to 3.4% next month and then to 4.4% in december and 5.5% by march. andy verity, bbc news.
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let me bring you some breaking news. you may remember almost 50 years ago now. ~ i. ., you may remember almost 50 years ago now. ~ ., �* ., ., ., now. when marlon brando did not turn u . now. when marlon brando did not turn u- to his now. when marlon brando did not turn up to his win — now. when marlon brando did not turn up to his win for— now. when marlon brando did not turn up to his win for his _ now. when marlon brando did not turn up to his win for his oscar _ now. when marlon brando did not turn up to his win for his oscar in _ now. when marlon brando did not turn up to his win for his oscar in the - up to his win for his 0scar in the godfather instead he sense as their native american to disk to decline the oscar on his behalf and here she is being interviewed about that and it was a very uncomfortable moment that back in march of 1973 when sacheen littlefeather accepted though declined the oscar on marlon brando's behalf. sacheen littlefeather arrived on stage dressed in her traditional native
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american clothes, held up her right hand to decline the statue, read out a statement which went down extremely badly at the ceremony. charlton heston forgive me, john wayne had to be physically restrained from going on stage to remove her, and she said that her career suffered as a result. for more on that i would recommend going to bbc sound and the series the winner is by paul gambaccini. sacheen littlefeather who died yesterday at the age of 75. the uk is facing a significant risk of gas shortages this winter. there is a possibility of a supply emergency. this would lead to supplies being cut there is a to power stations possibility of a supply emergency. to power stations
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which use gas to generate the country's electricity. millions of people were encouraged to check their metres across britain and here it is in black—and—white from of gem than people who generate regulate the markets —— 0fgem are saying there is a significant risk of gas shortages this winter. britain could enter a gas supply emergency, and if that happens supplies will be cut to the largest gas users, that means plain and simply less gas to make electricity for us to consume in our businesses are in our homes. its inherited advisory letter today. sse has a concern notjust advisory letter today. sse has a concern not just for advisory letter today. sse has a concern notjust for its consumers, but also for itself because of it
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can't get the gas to make the electricity it faces the prospect of sizeable million pound fines on a daily basis. sizeable million pound fines on a daily basis-— daily basis. and we have already seen companies _ daily basis. and we have already seen companies in _ daily basis. and we have already seen companies in france - daily basis. and we have already seen companies in france being| daily basis. and we have already - seen companies in france being taken over by the state because they were to all intents and purposes insolvent our costs being too high and being unable to supply the service and get the money back from people who can't for bills? that service and get the money back from people who can't for bills?— people who can't for bills? that is sse's concern _ people who can't for bills? that is sse's concern caught _ people who can't for bills? that is sse's concern caught in _ people who can't for bills? that is sse's concern caught in the - people who can't for bills? that is | sse's concern caught in the middle between this geopolitical crisis and the obligation to supply its confuse consumers. president macron of france encouraging people to reduce their consumption, we have not had anything as prescriptive as that from liz truss, during the leadership campaign she ruled out rationing. we may have had it from
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conservative party chairmanjake berry over the weekend saying when those bills land on desks or doorsteps the choice of people is a simple one. consume less or get a higher paying job. a man's been remanded in custody after appearing in court — charged with the murder of nine—year—old 0livia pratt—korbel. thomas cashman — who's 34 — is due to stand trial in march. much of the discussion for legal reasons cannot be repeated, but i think the opening remarks of the judge when he started talking to the court are interesting he said for obvious reasons i'm familiar with the circumstances of this case, and many people across the uk and around the world will be familiar with the awful circumstances around the death of olivia pratt—korbel shot dead after her mother opened the door after hearing a commotion outside.
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the gunman was chasing a man, and shots were fired and since then a police investigation has been underway here in merseyside to try and track down who was responsible for that. there were a number of arrests over that period and since then about 11 arrests, and it was the arrest in the middle of last week that has led to these two men appearing in court today. the other man, paul russell, 43 years old, was charged with assisting an offender, he appeared before magistrates this morning and has been remanded in custody to appear before liverpool crown court at the end of this month. this afternoon's hearing was exclusively focusing on thomas cashman, the 34—year—old who is accused of murdering 0livia. and there was some discussion in court about the timetable of where things go from now on. a trial date was set for the 6th of march next year, with a four—week trial expected, there will be another significant hearing in this case about how it
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goes forward in january next year. but for now, thomas cashman has been remanded in custody, he will stay in custody from now on, he has been taken out from the courtroom after the hearing which lasted just under a quarter of an hour here at liverpool crown court. he is accused of one count of murder, two counts of attempted murder and possession of a firearm with intent to endanger life. possession of two weapons. some breaking news we now have a statement from 0fgem, in which it concerns —— confirms its concerns about gas prices this winter. it says we need to be concerned about this winter as a response 0fgem is putting in places with the national
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grid and gas operators, remember a lot of gas is used to generate electricity, as well as the government to make sure that the uk is fully prepared for the winter. what it does not say, is what those contingency measures are. as soon as we get anything further on that and government reaction we will bring it to you here on bbc news. the election in brazil is on a knife edge. the incumbent zaire bolsonaro and luis ignacio lula to silver the forformer president are and luis ignacio lula to silver the for former president are the front runners the voters now have four
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weeks to decide which of the two men should leave the country for the next five years. there were cheers for lula as well as tears. but this was not the outright victory that his supporters had hoped for. polls had predicted a 14 percentage point gap between him and bolsonaro, but they had vastly underestimated the support for the right leader. after the results lula said there would be no letup in campaigning. translation:— no letup in campaigning. translation: , , ., , , no letup in campaigning. translation: , , ., , translation: distant destiny wants me to work more _ translation: distant destiny wants me to work more it's _ translation: distant destiny wants me to work more it'sjust _ translation: distant destiny wants me to work more it'sjust a _ translation: distant destiny wants me to work more it'sjust a question | me to work more it's just a question of time. me to work more it's 'ust a question of time. i ., 1, ,., ., ., me to work more it's 'ust a question of time. i ., 1, ., ., ., of time. meanwhile bolsonaro had this to say translation: - of time. meanwhile bolsonaro had this to say translation: certain | this to say translation: certain chances this to say translation: certain changes will _ this to say translation: certain changes will end _ this to say translation: certain changes will end up _ this to say translation: certain changes will end up worse, - this to say translation: certain changes will end up worse, we i this to say translation: certain | changes will end up worse, we try this to say translation: certain i changes will end up worse, we try to show that during the campaign that did not get through to the most important of society.—
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important of society. these elections — important of society. these elections were _ important of society. these elections were seen - important of society. these elections were seen as - important of society. these elections were seen as the | important of society. these - elections were seen as the most important since brazil returned to democracy in the 1980s, 11 candidates running in only to realistic options. a leftist former leader with a legacy of corruption, or a far right president are under five his debt human rights record the result on sunday show that people cared about the outcome. this weekend, bolsonaro fans paraded their candidates ahead of what they saw as a guaranteed win. they wanted a first round to, and they won't give up theirfight a first round to, and they won't give up their fight it's like to change that's changed, we like change that's changed, we like change peacefully. translation: there is going to be beautiful blood in this city i'm going to kill all the communists in this city. lula fans remained _ the communists in this city. lula fans remained upbeat. i-
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the communists in this city. lula fans remained upbeat. i already| fans remained upbeat. i already exected fans remained upbeat. i already expected that — fans remained upbeat. i already expected that we _ fans remained upbeat. i already expected that we would - fans remained upbeat. i already expected that we would not - fans remained upbeat. i already expected that we would not win | fans remained upbeat. i already - expected that we would not win the first time, — expected that we would not win the first time, but at least we are having — first time, but at least we are having the overall results. bolsonaro said that the polls slides do you think he's got a point? i think he will be a bad loser. do you think he's got a point? i i think he will be a bad loser. what do ou think he will be a bad loser. what do you make _ think he will be a bad loser. what do you make of — think he will be a bad loser. what do you make of the _ think he will be a bad loser. what do you make of the results? - think he will be a bad loser. what do you make of the results? we i think he will be a bad loser. what i do you make of the results? we are ve ha - do you make of the results? we are very happy that _ do you make of the results? we are very happy that it's _ do you make of the results? we are very happy that it's a _ do you make of the results? we are very happy that it's a win, _ do you make of the results? we are very happy that it's a win, and - do you make of the results? we are very happy that it's a win, and in i very happy that it's a win, and in the second — very happy that it's a win, and in the second run— very happy that it's a win, and in the second run it's _ very happy that it's a win, and in the second run it's going - very happy that it's a win, and in the second run it's going to - very happy that it's a win, and in the second run it's going to be i very happy that it's a win, and in i the second run it's going to be lula and you _ the second run it's going to be lula and you can'l— the second run it's going to be lula and you can't have _ the second run it's going to be lula and you can't have olsen _ the second run it's going to be lula and you can't have olsen narrow. the second run it's going to be lulal and you can't have olsen narrow any more _ and you can't have olsen narrow any more i_ and you can't have olsen narrow any more lam — and you can't have olsen narrow any more lam an — and you can't have olsen narrow any more. i am an lgbt— and you can't have olsen narrow any more. i am an lgbt person, - and you can't have olsen narrow any more. i am an lgbt person, and - and you can't have olsen narrow any more. i am an lgbt person, and we| more. i am an lgbt person, and we want— more. i am an lgbt person, and we want our— more. i am an lgbt person, and we want our rights — more. i am an lgbt person, and we want our rights and _ more. i am an lgbt person, and we want our rights and we _ more. i am an lgbt person, and we want our rights and we want - more. i am an lgbt person, and we i want our rights and we want everyone to have _ want our rights and we want everyone to have a _ want our rights and we want everyone to have a in _ want our rights and we want everyone to have a in this— want our rights and we want everyone to have a in this country. _ want our rights and we want everyone to have a in this country. the - to have a in this country. the atmosphere _ to have a in this country. the atmosphere is _ to have a in this country. the atmosphere is more - to have a in this country. atmosphere is more of to have a in this country. the atmosphere is more of a to have a in this country.- atmosphere is more of a relief to have a in this country— atmosphere is more of a relief than victory parade, the election is far from over the campaigning is about to become much more personal. two political foes now head to heads,
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looking to lead latin america's biggest nation. well pedro borges is editor of a publication that deals with racial issues and joins us now thank you for being with us how much of a surprise was this?— of a surprise was this? thank you very much _ of a surprise was this? thank you very much for— of a surprise was this? thank you very much for inviting _ of a surprise was this? thank you very much for inviting me. - of a surprise was this? thank you very much for inviting me. all- of a surprise was this? thank you very much for inviting me. all ofl very much for inviting me. all of the previous polls were indicating a different picture. some of the polls were considering that lula could win in the first round. bolsonaro got close to lula, and we're going to have a tough and hard second round here in brazil. i believe that we cannot predict the brazilian election, lula has a bigger shot to win but bolsonaro is still in the game. win but bolsonaro is still in the name. ., i . , , win but bolsonaro is still in the name. ., i. , , ., win but bolsonaro is still in the lame. ., ' . , , ., , game. how difficult is this month is likel to game. how difficult is this month is likely to be. — game. how difficult is this month is likely to be, given _ game. how difficult is this month is likely to be, given that _ game. how difficult is this month is likely to be, given that politics - game. how difficult is this month is likely to be, given that politics in i likely to be, given that politics in brazil notjust
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likely to be, given that politics in brazil not just this likely to be, given that politics in brazil notjust this year but for several years now, has been really polarised? several years now, has been really olarised? , «i ., ., polarised? yes i think that we are deafint polarised? yes i think that we are dealing with _ polarised? yes i think that we are dealing with a _ polarised? yes i think that we are dealing with a really _ polarised? yes i think that we are dealing with a really tough - polarised? yes i think that we are i dealing with a really tough moment here in brazil in our history. i think that most of the democrats want to defeat bolsonaro, but to defeat bolsonaro is really different to defeat the extremists. brazil is dealing with the extreme right wing group, people who are not embarrassed to say that they do not like black and brown people. so i think that lula is victory is important to start to overcome this scenario but it is still not enough. we try to win the federal legislature. if lula wins, lula will have a really strong opposition. black people wills to continue to
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have a really hard life in brazil. it is probably fair to say that during lula's long time in office he had a good track record in trying to reduce some of these racial divisions and financial inequalities. bolsonaro has been doing the financial part in recent years, but this question of the polarisation of politics, in part it seems to be a reaction to the levels of corruption there were when he was in office and that legacy is still dragging his prospects now, isn't it? ., , dragging his prospects now, isn't it? . 1 ., ., ., dragging his prospects now, isn't it? the many attacks that lula has received, throughout _ it? the many attacks that lula has received, throughout the - it? the many attacks that lula has| received, throughout the campaign was about the corruption cases and the workers party. bridget brazilian justice had judged lula, and lula now is able to run. some of the
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cases have been shown not to be true about him. lula is going to deal with a really strong and bad legacy that his legacy that his presidency had about corruption. bolsonaro has also some cases of corruption, and people do not talk about this you know? i think it is really important to show that both of them have some cases of corruption, but we are only talking about lula is a case of corruption, and it is really important to remember that bolsonaro had a really bad position during the pandemic, brazilwas had a really bad position during the pandemic, brazil was one of the worst cases of how to deal with the pandemic situation that all of the world faced.
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pandemic situation that all of the world faced-— pandemic situation that all of the world faced. ., �* ., , ., «i , ., world faced. pedro borges thank you ve much world faced. pedro borges thank you very much for— world faced. pedro borges thank you very much for talking _ world faced. pedro borges thank you very much for talking to _ world faced. pedro borges thank you very much for talking to us. - world faced. pedro borges thank you very much for talking to us. now- world faced. pedro borges thank you very much for talking to us. now let| very much for talking to us. now let me bring you some breaking news, the director—general of the the international atomic energy agency, he has as you can see on screen now if you look on screen has put out a statement confirming that the director general of ukraine's zaporizhzhia nuclear power plants, who you may remember was detained on fridayjust who you may remember was detained on friday just after moscow announced that it had annexed four regions including the one in which zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant is placed, there were real concerns about his safety, raphael's grossly has confirmed that he has been released and returned his family
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safely and has welcomed this. you may remember that the iaea left some of its inspectors there, according to the ukrainians at least mr moore rush of had been —— murashov he had been under pressure to answer to moscow not to care. now he is the weather with nick miller. hello. spells of wet and windy weather on the way as we go through this week. today it's northern ireland and western scotland that have been seeing some rain so far, and that rain pushing across more of scotland as the afternoon goes on. easing from northern ireland — still a bit of patchy,
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light rain out there from a lot of cloud. a lot of cloud through england and wales, as well, but it's thin enough to allow some hazy brightness to come through on a mild afternoon. one or two showers towards southwest england — perhaps northern england, as well. now into tonight, we start with outbreaks of rain across parts of scotland. another dose of rain then spreads across northern ireland into western scotland — very wet start to tuesday here — 30 to 50 millimetres is possible, so that could cause some disruption early on. and with the rain both today and into tonight towards the northwest of the uk, it's very windy, as well. tomorrow, that rain starts to move southwards across wales, hello this is bbc news. the headlines: the chancellor is preparing to address the conservative party conference — just hours after announcing a u—turn on tax policy. this morning, he abandoned his plan to cut the top rate of tax for the highest earners. we felt that the 45p issue was
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drowning out a strong package of intervention on energy, strong intervention on energy, strong intervention on energy, strong intervention on tax cuts for people generally, and we decided not to proceed. generally, and we decided not to proceed. the uk faces a �*significant risk�* of gas shortages this winter — according the energy regulator ofgem. it could lead to supplies being cut to power stations — which use gas to generate electricity a man�*s been remanded in custody after appearing in court — charged with the murder of nine—year—old olivia pratt—korbel. thomas cashman — who�*s 34 — is due to stand trial in march. king charles and the queen consort visit dunfermline on their first official engagment since the period of royal mourning came to an end. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here�*s holly.
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. hello yes we will be starting up that draw, _ . hello yes we will be starting up that draw, with _ . hello yes we will be starting up that draw, with arsenal - . hello yes we will be starting up that draw, with arsenal set - . hello yes we will be starting up that draw, with arsenal set to i . hello yes we will be starting up i that draw, with arsenal set to face current title holder that draw took place a little earlier and jane dougall was watching. arsenal are in irou dougall was watching. arsenal are in a-rou c dougall was watching. arsenal are in group c and — dougall was watching. arsenal are in group c and they _ dougall was watching. arsenal are in group c and they will— dougall was watching. arsenal are in group c and they will play _ dougall was watching. arsenal are in group c and they will play the - group c and they will play the current— group c and they will play the current holders, and also the record holding _ current holders, and also the record holding a _ current holders, and also the record holding a time champions lyon. that would _ holding a time champions lyon. that would be _ holding a time champions lyon. that would be a _ holding a time champions lyon. that would be a difficult match. every season _ would be a difficult match. every season then's main ambition is to win the _ season then's main ambition is to win the league. arsenal have started the domestic season well. they came a close _ the domestic season well. they came a close second last season. the other— a close second last season. the other teams will be fearing them because, — other teams will be fearing them because, don't forget, arsenal are still the _ because, don't forget, arsenal are still the only british women's team to win _ still the only british women's team to win this— still the only british women's team to win this competition in 2007. chelsea — to win this competition in 2007. chelsea more straightforward for them? , ., ., , , chelsea more straightforward for them? , ., , ., ., them? chelsea was the first team out
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ofthe them? chelsea was the first team out of the drawer- — them? chelsea was the first team out of the drawer. they _ them? chelsea was the first team out of the drawer. they will _ them? chelsea was the first team out of the drawer. they will play - them? chelsea was the first team out of the drawer. they will play paris - of the drawer. they will play paris saint—germain, runners—up in the french_ saint—germain, runners—up in the french league. always a difficult side to— french league. always a difficult side to play. they will also play real madrid, who finished third in the spanish league. scotland possible... chelsea also take on the first albanian team to get the last 16. first albanian team to get the last to they— first albanian team to get the last 16. they won the double in their league — 16. they won the double in their league so — 16. they won the double in their league so that will be fascinating. we can— league so that will be fascinating. we can take a look at the four groups— we can take a look at the four groups of— we can take a look at the four groups of four. last seasons runners—up... they will come up against — runners—up... they will come up against georges stanwyck of bayern munich _
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against georges stanwyck of bayern munich. , ., against georges stanwyck of bayern munich. . ., ,., ., ., munich. jane dougall earlier. scheduling — munich. jane dougall earlier. scheduling has _ munich. jane dougall earlier. scheduling has been - munich. jane dougall earlier. i scheduling has been criticised... the world number one had planned to represent poland in the finals, which begin in glasgow next month. the three—time glantz grand slam champion said the schedule was taking its top. the champion said the schedule was taking its top-— champion said the schedule was takin: its to -. , ., ., , taking its top. the situation we put in is not comfortable. _ taking its top. the situation we put in is not comfortable. it _ taking its top. the situation we put in is not comfortable. it would - taking its top. the situation we put in is not comfortable. it would be i in is not comfortable. it would be great _ in is not comfortable. it would be great if _ in is not comfortable. it would be great if they could cooperate next year because it also happened last year~ _ year because it also happened last year~ this — year because it also happened last year. this is mainly because of covid _ year. this is mainly because of covid and _ year. this is mainly because of covid and the changes in schedule. i 'ust covid and the changes in schedule. i just don't— covid and the changes in schedule. i just don't think it will help us to perform — just don't think it will help us to perform well and to make a good show. _ perform well and to make a good show, which is the goal of tennis, to entertain — show, which is the goal of tennis, to entertain people. i don't like it.
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to entertain people. idon't like it in— to entertain people. i don't like it. _ ., ., ., it. in rugby union, england have met for a mini training _ it. in rugby union, england have met for a mini training camp _ it. in rugby union, england have met for a mini training camp as _ it. in rugby union, england have met for a mini training camp as part - it. in rugby union, england have met for a mini training camp as part of. for a mini training camp as part of the trainings for the internationals. the side will face argentina, japan and new zealand, and the world champions south africa. less than a year out from the world cup. much of the talk in rugby union has been around finances. the worcester warriors currently suspended and in administration. tom currie has addressed the issue and says today is a difficult time for the sport. it is horrible, isn�*t it? there are it is horrible, isn't it? there are no other— it is horrible, isn't it? there are no other words to describe it. i think— no other words to describe it. i think the — no other words to describe it. i think the sports team society will have to _ think the sports team society will have to look at the personal circumstances and it is a horrible situation — circumstances and it is a horrible situation to — circumstances and it is a horrible situation to be in, especially something out of their control. if they were — something out of their control. if they were to bump into a couple of players. _ they were to bump into a couple of players. — they were to bump into a couple of players. it— they were to bump into a couple of players, it is more likely the unknowh — players, it is more likely the unknowh a _ players, it is more likely the unknown. a lot of sympathy for them.
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and that _ unknown. a lot of sympathy for them. and that is _ unknown. a lot of sympathy for them. and that is all the sport for now. there will be more throughout the day. there will be more throughout the da . ., «i , ., there will be more throughout the da. .,«i there has been a rally on the pound against the dollar. it rose 1.1 sent in the last hour or so. overall scepticism has been expressed about the budget, so most observers think the budget, so most observers think the chancellor has some way to go to restore confidence fully. that is some good news on sterling. the issue of borrowing is perhaps the most significant. it is also a decision that has to be taken in the first week of november by the monetary policy committee, on whether or not to raise interest rates again, and by how much. analysts suggest that the move might not be as big next month, as it would otherwise have been if this
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controversy had continued over the budget. they made that calculation at the last minute. the pound rallying slightly. it is up 1.1% from this morning. we will keep our eyes on that. the chancellor announced his u—turn this morning by saying: "we get it and we have listened" — so what�*s been the reaction to the news? our correspondent duncan kennedy has been talking to voters in the tory—held seat of winchester. home to 130,000 people and plenty of strong views on the chancellor�*s tax decision this morning. we came across cassie, an independent business owner, aaron, who�*s on universal credit, and deborah, who�*s a pensioner. cassie white owns the projects, which is part cafe, part antique shop and part giftware.
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she says the government should never have considered cutting the 45p tax rate as it�*s simply unfair on lower earners. it�*s a bit of a joke, maybe, in my opinion, but i don�*t think it actually has a huge effect on me and my business and what i do. it�*s definitely going to cause our new prime minister some problems and possibly some trust in her may be difficult. aaron wiffen is on universal credit. he�*s been a conservative voter but he believes today�*s u—turn is politically damaging, especially for the chancellor. i think it's damaged them quite a lot. i think, really i think the chancellor should go because of all the uproar about it. it�*s that serious? yes, it's that serious, yeah. deborah bennett is a pensioner who�*s also voted conservative. she believes the government was right to act swiftly by reversing the 45p tax change.
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i'm glad they changed their mind but they shouldn't have - done it in the first place. i feel that all they're concernedj about is making the rich people richer and the poor people poorer. this is only one location but the government�*s decision to alter its tax policy has brought about strong reactions from all sides of this community. let�*s discuss this with patrick english , what is the polling in the last ten days been telling you? good afternoon- — days been telling you? good afternoon. the _ days been telling you? good afternoon. the polling - days been telling you? good afternoon. the polling has i days been telling you? i£r>r>c afternoon. the polling has been telling us over the last 18 months, that the public has lost confidence with the conservatives, and now with
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the new government under liz truss to manage the economy. that is why we are seeing these huge leads, somewhere between 19 and 30 points. many people simply don�*t have much reason to vote for the conservatives. they style themselves as being in control, managing the economy and peoples finances. the public don�*t share that view, so they are suffering in the polls. i5 they are suffering in the polls. is it fair to say this as a consequence of the budget, or a longer term trend? it of the budget, or a longer term trend? , , . ., ., trend? it is very much a longer term trend. we picked _ trend? it is very much a longer term trend. we picked up _ trend? it is very much a longer term trend. we picked up on _ trend? it is very much a longer term trend. we picked up on it _ trend? it is very much a longer term trend. we picked up on it last - trend. we picked up on it last summer, that the public had become concerned with the rates of inflation, and the shortages, and the public began to point the finger of blame at the government. that has been slowly evolving into a general pattern, where we find public don�*t trust the conservative party on the economy. they are looking at dealing
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with the cost of living and are not convinced by anything offered by borisjohnson of liz convinced by anything offered by boris johnson of liz trust. convinced by anything offered by borisjohnson of liz trust. looking at the narrative around this, was very costly in the polls.- at the narrative around this, was very costly in the polls. what are the prospects — very costly in the polls. what are the prospects that _ very costly in the polls. what are the prospects that the _ very costly in the polls. what are i the prospects that the government will bounce back from this? some of this dramatic unpopularity has been fuelled by the budget. might there be some benefit to the government doing this? be some benefit to the government doin: this? ., , , , . doing this? certainly the public don't tend _ doing this? certainly the public don't tend to _ doing this? certainly the public don't tend to mind _ doing this? certainly the public don't tend to mind if— doing this? certainly the public don't tend to mind if there - doing this? certainly the public don't tend to mind if there is i doing this? certainly the public don't tend to mind if there is a | don�*t tend to mind if there is a u—turn, if they think the idea was bad. howeverthey u—turn, if they think the idea was bad. however they don�*t tend to forgive governments for having bad ideas. what i don�*t think the u—turn will see a dramatic change in the fortunes, it will certainly stop some of the rot. we stop in the policy will go down well well with
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the public. will it be recovery for the public. will it be recovery for the conservatives? i don�*t think so. when the public makes up its mind, it takes a long time for fortunes to be reversed. i think it will take a series of very serious measures that give people money in their pockets to pay bills coming through their doors, to start trusting the conservatives again.- doors, to start trusting the conservatives again. we're seeing some pictures _ conservatives again. we're seeing some pictures of _ conservatives again. we're seeing some pictures of kwasi _ conservatives again. we're seeing some pictures of kwasi kwarteng, j conservatives again. we're seeing - some pictures of kwasi kwarteng, the chancellor, beginning the long walk to the podium in the conference centre. he is not you are in for another half hour but has come into the building. he will obviously be expected to sit in the hall and listen during this debate. one more brief thought. you say that it can take a long time. is that the
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worrying thing for the conservatives, that theyjust have over two years? john major had five years to discover from black wednesday. he didn�*t manage it. yes. wednesday. he didn't manage it. yes, i think so. this— wednesday. he didn't manage it. yes, i think so. this is _ wednesday. he didn't manage it. yes, i think so. this is an _ wednesday. he didn't manage it. isis, i think so. this is an issue wednesday. he didn't manage it. isis i think so. this is an issue the conservatives will think about for the next few days. do they have enough time to turn this around? they have opportunities. there is a crisis, and if they are seen to be solving it, and convince the public they can solve the problems it will start giving them a boost in the pulse. two years is not a long time, and the public to remember these things. they do remember shambolic budgets and they do punish governments when they create economic problems. two years might be enough, but there are so many other issues plaguing the conservative party, there is no quick fix. conservative party, there is no cuick fix. . w' conservative party, there is no cuick fix. . a , conservative party, there is no auickfix. . , ., ~ quick fix. patrick english, thank ou ve quick fix. patrick english, thank you very much- _
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quick fix. patrick english, thank you very much. at _ quick fix. patrick english, thank you very much. at four- quick fix. patrick english, thank you very much. at four o'clockl quick fix. patrick english, thank i you very much. at four o'clock will joinjo coburn and the team at politics live to carry us through the that chancellor's speech, at the conservative party conference. he starting at 20 past four and i expect will speak for about ten minutes. we'll hear from jo and her team just afterfour minutes. we'll hear from jo and her team just after four o'clock. a search has been renewed for the remains of a teenager from northern ireland, who was murdered and secretly buried by the ira in 1975. columba mcveigh, who was 19, is one of the victims who became known as 'the disappeared'. investigators have recovered the remains of 13 people, but four remain missing. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page
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is in bragan bog in county have been five searches, but never before has this area of land been searched. investigators are focusing on an area of two acres. you can see two mechanical diggers. they have begun this work. investigators led by an independent commission, are convinced that columbo was killed and buried here. as you can see, it is a very big area of land. it is very remote, and where a few miles from the border. we are a number of miles from the nearest village. the technology as these searches have
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continued, has evolved. archaeologists are involved and other scientists are too, but it is quite an operation. investigators think this search could potentially take a few weeks. it all depends partially on the weather, but they are hopeful, and so is the family, that this could provide a breakthrough after so many years. it was from county to rome and was murdered in 1975. the first search here was back in 1999. the family have been here through a number of searches. each time they have been disappointed. the commission have said that there is a credible reason to restart the search. the commission doesn'tjust search commission doesn't just search speculatively, commission doesn'tjust search speculatively, it bases its operations on information it receives, often from former paramilitaries. it can't say any
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details, it has the belief that it is worthwhile ranting this search once again. investigators are at work and the family has been here. his brother said hejust wanted work and the family has been here. his brother said he just wanted to give his him a christian burial. it is certainly a time of renewed hope for the family, but they will wait anxiously over the next few weeks. i guess they hope the weather conditions remain helpful to the process of trying to recover the body. can you give us a sense of how people regard this? northern ireland never had a reconciliation process. this is an important example of where it isn't possible to move on for some families, where it isn't possible to move on forsome families, because where it isn't possible to move on for some families, because they still have this uncertainty.- still have this uncertainty. yes, the story of _ still have this uncertainty. yes, the story of the _
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still have this uncertainty. yes, the story of the disappeared i still have this uncertainty. isis the story of the disappeared is one of the most poignant, the most shocking aspects of the conflict. there have been a number of families the commission has worked with over the commission has worked with over the years. so far the commission has found the bodies of 13 people who were secretly buried decades ago. four of the disappeared haven't been found. that list of the disappeared has changed over the years as victims have been added to the original list. all this fits into the overall picture of how northern ireland does deal with its troubled past. currently the government is putting legislation through parliament which would mean that there are no more prosecutions, no more inquests, no more civil court cases, connected to the conflict. many victims groups are opposed to that and are calling for the government to change course. for now, the focus... his case was
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simply so tragic, 19 and abducted. his body has still not been found. police are investigating after a significant quantity of what's thought to be cocaine was found washed—up on a beach in ceredigion, west wales. a large number of black bags — tied to buoyancy aids — were found on tan—y—bwlch beach near aberystwyth by passers—by on saturday morning — from where craig duggan sent this report. it was on this beach, a mile south of aberystwyth, where passers—by found this bundle. it has been described by police as a significant quantity of what is thought to be cocaine. a photo on social media site shows a large number of parcels, wrapped in bin bags, and tied to buoyancy aids. it is thought to be cocaine but we haven't had
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that confirmed by the police. it is quiet on this beach today. we have seen a police boat moored in aberystwyth harbour, but locals say it was very busy. there were a lot of police on land and at sea yesterday. people say they believe this bundle may have been anchored out at sea, but the stormy weather and high winds towards the end of last week may have loosened it, pleading for it to be washed up on the beach. no arrests have been made, and the precise quantity of the suspected cocaine is yet to be established.— established. that report from ceredigion — established. that report from ceredigion in _ established. that report from ceredigion in west _ established. that report from ceredigion in west wales. - established. that report from ceredigion in west wales. we established. that report from - ceredigion in west wales. we are going to birmingham at four o'clock, live at the party conference. this
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is the picture at the conference centre. the afternoon session has broken, before the big event of the day. the chancellor announced he was scrapping one of the measures from the fiscal event. kwasi kwarteng will be explaining in half an hour's time. stay with us for full coverage. imagine doodles covering every inch of your home — this is the reality for mr doodle, who, as his name suggests. he's covered everything — from his bedding to his microwave — with doodle art. it's a labour of love that's taken two years, 400 cans of spray paint and more than 2—thousand pen nibs. tim muffett reports. hello, there! mr doodle here.
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it started when he doodled on his parents�* furniture. since then, sam cox — or mr doodle, as he's known — has turned something some of us might do if we're bored into a very successful career. when i first started playing video games and reading comic books, when i was much younger, i really sort of fell in love with the characters. i would ask my parents if i could draw on, like, this table or something like that, and they'd eventually let me, after a bit of persuading, turning these 3d objects into sort of works of doodle art. and today i'm going to doodle a wormy—type thing. with a huge following on social media, mr doodle�*s videos get millions of views. when you're doodling, what's going through your mind? it's just such a great process. you feel almost like an out—of—body experience. you're just indulging yourself in this free—flowing state of creation, and it'sjust the best thing anyone can do, i think. i've just bought this house.
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sam's childhood dream was to live in a completely doodled home. bzz, bzz, bzz! big buzzes of doodles! almost three years after he bought it, it's mission accomplished. the bedroom is actually the first room that i started when i began doodling over the house. all the drawings in this room are themed around lots of sleepy characters. so you're going to wake up every morning and see this? yeah! yeah. i mean, this is sort of paradise for me. so you're actually going to cook on this? well, i'd like to, but i'm not actually sure that any of this is workable after we've painted a doodle on it. right. does your wife know that? she's not totally aware of that yet. that's where you'll be eating your pot doodle. yeah, absolutely! in fact, it might even make your head spin — but the popularity of mr doodle�*s
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work has soared internationally. in 2020, he was the world's fifth most successful artist aged under a0 at auction — one of his pieces sold forjust under $1 million us. and some people have spoken about you in the same breath as banksy. what's that like? i really love banksy�*s work, but i try to be different to him in a way, because i don't want my work to have any political meaning. it's meant to just be joyous, fun, happy, non—political doodles. a home like no other. a unique approach to diy... doodle it yourself!
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the conservative party conference in just a few minutes' time. the camera is desperately searching for him, but has not found him. i think the public won't be rushing to be seen on camera untiljust before his speech. not least, because the more time he gives journalists, speech. not least, because the more time he givesjournalists, the more time he givesjournalists, the more time there is for them to shout questions at him. he wants to focus on his speech. he would have hoped that this would be a rallying event, but there is a cert... he says he feels humility, for what looks like a mistake now. he has reversed course on the top rate of income tax. we will be there with the politics live team. i talked earlier
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about the native american actress who died over the weekend. she rejected the oscar on marlon brando's behalf, for the godfather. i mentioned that her career was pretty much ended by that experience. it is fair to say that the oscars did apologise to her. only in the last few months they put out a statement acknowledging what had happened, and that it was wrong she'd been treated badly. more on that and all the other stories at five, when ben brown will be here. hello. we're all going to see some rain at some stage of the week ahead. windy at times, too — particularly on wednesday.
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a lot of cloud, some hazy brightness, especially towards the east and south—east of england, closer to this retreating area of high pressure. closer to low pressure, northern ireland and through scotland, here we have a lot of cloud, and we're seeing some tomorrow the rain starts with southwards. behind it northern ireland and scotland are turning drier and brighter through the day. still a few blustery showers and a mild day.
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it's monday the 3rd of october, this is politics live from the conservative party conference in birmingham where in around 15 minutes — after his u—turn on the 45p tax rate this morning — kwasi kwarteng will deliver his conference speech. joining me today, whitehall editor of the financial times.
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iceland chief executive, richard walker. former cabinet minister andrea leadsom.

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