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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 26, 2022 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... scientists say they've found "compelling evidence" that wuhan's seafood and wildlife market was at the centre of the covid—19 outbreak. it casts more doubt on claims it came from a lab. the international monetary fund has warned that the world could be teetering on the brink of the worst recession for half a century if the effects of the ukraine war and high inflation go unchecked. russia has said it will withdraw from the international space station after 2024, ending two decades of cooperation with the united states and other countries. it said it would build its own orbiting station instead. england are through to the final of the women's european football championship after beating sweden 4—0 in sheffield. they'll take on either germany
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or france at wembley on sunday. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are benjamin butterworth, who's a late editor and senior reporter at the i newspaper, and martin bentham, the home affairs editor for the evening standard. let's ta ke let's take a look at tomorrow's front pages. the i leads with the conservative leadership debate, which ended abruptly after presenter kate mccann fainted during the live programme. talk tv have said she's recovered, but followed medical advice not to continue. the express stays with the tory leadership, saying liz truss
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will set new targets for police to cut serious crime by 20%. whilst the times says rishi sunak has pledged to scrap vat on energy bills next year if he wins the race to be the next conservative party leader. the guardian says a report by the public accounts committee has found the government acted "fast and loose" with more than £700 a committee of government advisers has warned air pollution is likely to be a cause of dementia, according to the daily mail, which says there is finally enough evidence to show a link between dirty air and brain damage. tomorrow's rail strike leads on the metro front page. the paper says just a fifth of trains are due to run on half the network, with more strikes expected next month. the financial times says some of the world's biggest companies, including unilever, coca—cola, and mcdonald's are warning of price rises as global inflation rates push up prices. and ending with sport — the guardian has england's a social media trend which sees
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people fake disabilities so they can skip cues at airports has caused delays, according to the boss of heathrow airport. and ending with sport — the guardian has england's 4—0 win over sweden. it's the women's teams first major tournament final since 2009. let's begin and bring in our guests, and we'll start with the telegraph's page, this pledge by rishi sunak — a screeching u—turn on tax cuts. what are they highlighting here? this screeching u-turn on tax cuts. what are they highlighting here?- are they highlighting here? this is the promise _ are they highlighting here? this is the promise tonight _ are they highlighting here? this is the promise tonight by _ are they highlighting here? this is the promise tonight by sunak- are they highlighting here? this is the promise tonight by sunak to i are they highlighting here? this is. the promise tonight by sunak to cut vat, remove it from energy bills from october if he becomes the next conservative leader, the next prime minister of this country. it is something he's resisted doing in the past, arguing it benefits only the wealthy people most and not the most
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effective way of tackling the cost—of—living crisis. clearly he's decided to change tack, and the reason for that clearly — he's being attacked by liz truss supporters of doing a screeching u—turn, and it's clearly driven too by the pressure he's under by the dust from the tory leadership race to look like he's doing something to address the cost of living crisis people are facing when he stop against liz truss, whose promising what rishi sunak argues are unaffordable tax cuts, reversing the national insurance rise. he's under pressure because that's obviously an appealing political message she's conveying, and he is responding with this offer of a vat cut from october on energy bills — clearly in a sense, it slightly undermines his own reputation for consistency and so on, but he obviously believes it's
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worth the gamble of slightly tarnishing his record in that respect to try to galvanise more support for him in what appears at the moment to be a losing fight with liz truss. �* . �* , liz truss. ben'amin, it's interesting _ liz truss. benjamin, it's interesting because - liz truss. benjamin, it's interesting because if i liz truss. benjamin, it's i interesting because if he'll liz truss. benjamin, it's - interesting because if he'll go liz truss. benjamin, it's _ interesting because if he'll go down this track, how can he then credibly attack liz truss's tax—cutting plans without her then turning around at the next debate and saying, "hang on, your plan is to cut taxes just as much as i am." on, your plan is to cut taxes 'ust as much as i am."fi on, your plan is to cut taxes 'ust as much as i am." planning to cut different taxes. _ as much as i am." planning to cut different taxes. liz _ as much as i am." planning to cut different taxes. liz truss - as much as i am." planning to cut different taxes. liz truss hasn't . different taxes. liz truss hasn't said she'd — different taxes. liz truss hasn't said she'd get rid of vat on energy bills as _ said she'd get rid of vat on energy bills as sunak has said — she says she get rid — bills as sunak has said — she says she get rid of a green levy, a different tax on energy bills. sunak is clearly— different tax on energy bills. sunak is clearly behind on the bowls and yougov puts them at 39% compared to her 50% _
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yougov puts them at 39% compared to her 50% among tory party members. it's clear— her 50% among tory party members. it's clear that one of liz truss's appeals — it's clear that one of liz truss's appeals amongst tory members is her tax-cutting _ appeals amongst tory members is her tax—cutting agenda, it's like a fight — tax—cutting agenda, it's like a fight between thatcher wright and thatcher _ fight between thatcher wright and thatcher light. yet his whole persona _ thatcher light. yet his whole persona is, "i am the solid candidate, the consistent chancellor, i've been ruling for the last couple — chancellor, i've been ruling for the last couple years over the money and i'll last couple years over the money and iii continue _ last couple years over the money and i'll continue in that way, it's the way out" — i'll continue in that way, it's the way out" it _ i'll continue in that way, it's the way out." it all sounds a bit like the remain _ way out." it all sounds a bit like the remain campaign, but things he's been saying — be aware of these forecasts, — been saying — be aware of these forecasts, what will happen to the interest— forecasts, what will happen to the interest rates if i don't get the joh _ interest rates if i don't get the joh yet— interest rates if i don't get the job. yet now, he seems to have changed — job. yet now, he seems to have changed his mind on vat and energy bills _ changed his mind on vat and energy bills if we _ changed his mind on vat and energy bills. if we roll backjust a couple months. — bills. if we roll backjust a couple months, he describes such a cut to vat as— months, he describes such a cut to vat as silly. — months, he describes such a cut to vat as silly, saying as martin quoted, — vat as silly, saying as martin quoted, it _ vat as silly, saying as martin quoted, it would benefit the wealthiest people more. so we've got lots of— wealthiest people more. so we've got lots of allies of liz truss in the papers — lots of allies of liz truss in the papers today saying, "actually why is he _
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papers today saying, "actually why is he making these u—turns?" the telegraph— is he making these u—turns?" the telegraph has an ally of liz truss saying. _ telegraph has an ally of liz truss saying, "has rishi sunak finally woken — saying, "has rishi sunak finally woken up — saying, "has rishi sunak finally woken up to the need to help people with the _ woken up to the need to help people with the rising cost of living?" that _ with the rising cost of living?" that is — with the rising cost of living?" that is fighting talk, and i think it suggests there's not much love lost between these two candidates, and they— lost between these two candidates, and they are basically calling rishi sunak— and they are basically calling rishi sunak a _ and they are basically calling rishi sunak a by doing this. it�*s and they are basically calling rishi sunak a by doing this.— sunak a by doing this. it's the story that _ sunak a by doing this. it's the story that leads _ sunak a by doing this. it's the story that leads on _ sunak a by doing this. it's the story that leads on the - sunak a by doing this. it's the story that leads on the front l sunak a by doing this. it's the - story that leads on the front page of the digital version of the independent. i suppose the difficulty for rishi sunak is that people could easily turn to him and say, if you wanted to cut vat on bills to help people, you've had plenty of opportunity, why didn't you do it before? to plenty of opportunity, why didn't you do it before?— you do it before? to be fair to rishi sunak, _ you do it before? to be fair to rishi sunak, there _ you do it before? to be fair to rishi sunak, there are - you do it before? to be fair to rishi sunak, there are two - you do it before? to be fair to i rishi sunak, there are two points you do it before? to be fair to - rishi sunak, there are two points to be made. the first is about the question you asked previously, the sums that he's talking about a vat cut will be a lot different, a lot
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smaller than just cut will be a lot different, a lot smaller thanjust a one cut will be a lot different, a lot smaller than just a one off and as opposed to liz truss cancelling the corporation tax rise in reversing the national insurance rise which, from all we know, will be permanent changes. the amount of money he's forgoing by ditching the vat on energy bills will be much, much more than the amount of money liz truss is forgoing by not having those tax increases that she's planning to get rid of, to affect cut taxes as she would characterise it. so there's a difference there. so that's the first point, and i think secondly, to be fair to rishi sunak, he's always said, and he did say before that he would wait — when he was still chancellor, he said he would wait until october when the next price cap level comes in, and we know exactly what the price cap what the gas price at that point will be,
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then make a decision at what extra help you might be prepared to give. so he's always held over the prospect that he might do something at that point, and now he's saying, "i'm not waiting until october, i can see price rises, with gas prices going up by 20% in the last two days because of the russian gas supply coming into germany being cut." so he would argue he's always held out that prospect, that this is one measure he will do. but clearly it is a charge against him that he could have done it before, he hasn't, and it's inconsistent with what his position on the specific measure has been in the past the it's not a great thing for him but it's a different thing to the list cut dump —— liz truss tax cuts. this
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cut dump -- liz truss tax cuts. this is also on — cut dump -- liz truss tax cuts. this is also on the _ cut dump —— liz truss tax cuts. this is also on the front page of the times, we will move on from it, i just want to show it, really clear that the cost of living crisis is affecting so many households already and will be very high on the to do list for whoever emerges as the next prime minister. but in the meantime, let's move on to the story leading the mirror — this from the rmt boss mick lynch, who's describing a war on workers, presumably referring to the idea of enabling agencies being brought in to minimise the effect of strikes like the ones we will see tomorrow on the railways? that's riaht, i tomorrow on the railways? that's right. i suspect — tomorrow on the railways? that's right, i suspect this _ tomorrow on the railways? that's right, i suspect this is _ tomorrow on the railways? that's right, i suspect this is also - tomorrow on the railways? that's right, i suspect this is also aimed at the _ right, i suspect this is also aimed at the leadership candidates as well, _ at the leadership candidates as well, so — at the leadership candidates as well, so mick lynch who is the boss of the _ well, so mick lynch who is the boss of the rmt — well, so mick lynch who is the boss of the rmt which represents a lot of real workers but not train drivers— that's— real workers but not train drivers—
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that's a _ real workers but not train drivers— that's a different union — the rmt isn't affiliated to the labour party. — isn't affiliated to the labour party, it's its own beast. now mick lynch _ party, it's its own beast. now mick lynch has — party, it's its own beast. now mick lynch has been quite a popular figure — lynch has been quite a popular figure in— lynch has been quite a popular figure in the past couple months amongst — figure in the past couple months amongst a pot the leader of this union— amongst a pot the leader of this union has— amongst a pot the leader of this union has said the tories have been waging a _ union has said the tories have been waging a war on workers and people must _ waging a war on workers and people must fight _ waging a war on workers and people must fight back. i wasn't around in the 70s _ must fight back. i wasn't around in the 70s but — must fight back. i wasn't around in the 70s but it has echoed of what i've the 70s but it has echoed of what i've read — the 70s but it has echoed of what i've read at — the 70s but it has echoed of what i've read at that times of the language. as we mentioned earlier, the government, both rishi sunak and liz truss— the government, both rishi sunak and liz truss say they'll introduce so agency — liz truss say they'll introduce so agency workers can replace union workers — agency workers can replace union workers. that will drive mick lynch up workers. that will drive mick lynch up wall— workers. that will drive mick lynch up wall because that removes people's— up wall because that removes people's right to strike. the power of coalescing and being unionis? will he _ of coalescing and being unionis? will be removed, and i think a lot of people will say that's not so fair because so many people are feeling the cost of living pinch at
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the moment. but i think will be interesting is how this pans out, because — interesting is how this pans out, because when these strikes were first announced, the first set a couple — first announced, the first set a couple of _ first announced, the first set a couple of weeks or months ago now, grant _ couple of weeks or months ago now, grant shapps, the transport secretary for now, leaned in big on the fact— secretary for now, leaned in big on the fact that this would be unpopular — and it wasn't particularly unpopular, pulling put it about _ particularly unpopular, pulling put it about even between support and opposition. sol it about even between support and opposition. so i think what we might be seeing _ opposition. so i think what we might be seeing the start of with comments like on _ be seeing the start of with comments like on the _ be seeing the start of with comments like on the front of the daily mirror— like on the front of the daily mirror is— like on the front of the daily mirror is a lot of unionsjoining, fighting — mirror is a lot of unionsjoining, fighting the so—called war on workers _ fighting the so—called war on workers. we know many of where there's _ workers. we know many of where there's the micro others like in the education — there's the micro others like in the education sector, teachers are looking — education sector, teachers are looking at— education sector, teachers are looking at striking, so you wonder if that— looking at striking, so you wonder if that will— looking at striking, so you wonder if that will be the start of a domino— if that will be the start of a domino effect.— if that will be the start of a domino effect. ., ., domino effect. turning to the front .ae. domino effect. turning to the front -a~e of domino effect. turning to the front page of the — domino effect. turning to the front page of the daily — domino effect. turning to the front page of the daily star, _ domino effect. turning to the front page of the daily star, perhaps - domino effect. turning to the frontj page of the daily star, perhaps you can kick us off with this one because this will make the blood boil of anyone who's missed a flight been stuck in a long security queue at an airport — this idea, this
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suggestion that people are faking injuries so they can be taken to the boarding gate in a wheelchair and jump boarding gate in a wheelchair and jump the queue. this boarding gate in a wheelchair and jump the queue-— boarding gate in a wheelchair and jump the queue. this was from the boss of heathrow _ jump the queue. this was from the boss of heathrow today, _ jump the queue. this was from the boss of heathrow today, saying - jump the queue. this was from the | boss of heathrow today, saying that was one of the causes. 0bviously was one of the causes. obviously it's not the only cause, there's been criticism of him and his airport for its failings in respect to this. but one of the things he was claiming as a cause was this social media inspired trend, as he described it, how to characterise it for some people who masquerade as being disabled because... so we do use that, and of course it does get you faster through check ins and so on, quite often or at least helps you get on the platform if you're going on a train, for example. and
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he's suggesting people are abusing this to actually just he's suggesting people are abusing this to actuallyjustjump the queue — clearly that's reprehensible if thatis — clearly that's reprehensible if that is the case. how widespread it is, ijust don't know. but clearly if it is happening, it shouldn't be happening and those people should frankly be ashamed of themselves, and perhaps they might need to... well, it's difficult to ask someone to prove it, it won't show you if you need assistance because not everybody with a blue badge will necessarily need that type of mobility assistance. it's a bad trend, clearly.— mobility assistance. it's a bad trend, clearly. and i suppose it toes trend, clearly. and i suppose it goes against — trend, clearly. and i suppose it goes against our _ trend, clearly. and i suppose it goes against our sense - trend, clearly. and i suppose it goes against our sense of- trend, clearly. and i suppose it goes against our sense of fair. trend, clearly. and i suppose it- goes against our sense of fair play, doesn't it? and if everyone is facing delay, why should some people dishonestly skip to the front when they've got no reason to? it
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dishonestly skip to the front when they've got no reason to? it does, i wrote this for _ they've got no reason to? it does, i wrote this for tomorrow's _ they've got no reason to? it does, i wrote this for tomorrow's paper, i l wrote this for tomorrow's paper, i looked _ wrote this for tomorrow's paper, i looked it— wrote this for tomorrow's paper, i looked it up— wrote this for tomorrow's paper, i looked it up on tiktok and there was one video _ looked it up on tiktok and there was one video of— looked it up on tiktok and there was one video of a man openly saying he was pretending to have injured his le- was pretending to have injured his leg to— was pretending to have injured his leg to get— was pretending to have injured his leg to get in a wheelchair, and it had a _ leg to get in a wheelchair, and it had a quarter of a million views, which _ had a quarter of a million views, which is — had a quarter of a million views, which is a — had a quarter of a million views, which is a lot. i couldn't find many examples — which is a lot. i couldn't find many examples of people doing this and displaying it as videos on tiktok to be honest — displaying it as videos on tiktok to be honest. now heathrow airport has seen a _ be honest. now heathrow airport has seen a 20%_ be honest. now heathrow airport has seen a 20% rise in the number of people _ seen a 20% rise in the number of people requesting assistance — it's understandable that's quite a surprise _ understandable that's quite a surprise since the end of covid, but it might _ surprise since the end of covid, but it might have to do more with people who really— it might have to do more with people who really weren't able to get away during the — who really weren't able to get away during the pandemic period because they have _ during the pandemic period because they have disability. also the boss of heathrow said people were taking too much _ of heathrow said people were taking too much makeup, and that was a cause _ too much makeup, and that was a cause with — too much makeup, and that was a cause with the cues.— too much makeup, and that was a | cause with the cues.- taking cause with the cues. sorry? taking too much makeup— cause with the cues. sorry? taking too much makeup and _ cause with the cues. sorry? taking j too much makeup and that's why it was taking — too much makeup and that's why it was taking so long to get their baggage checks, they weren't having enough _ baggage checks, they weren't having enough bags and not category using
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it correctly — enough bags and not category using it correctly. i feel like this is the ceo _ it correctly. i feel like this is the ceo of heathrow trying to make excuses for what is a pretty shoddy situation _ excuses for what is a pretty shoddy situation. the prophets have lost £320 _ situation. the prophets have lost £320 million in the last quarter, they are — £320 million in the last quarter, they are in — £320 million in the last quarter, they are in quite a serious situation, _ they are in quite a serious situation, they've got airline bosses — situation, they've got airline bosses furious because of the cap on flights— bosses furious because of the cap on flights that _ bosses furious because of the cap on flights that can go through there at the moment. ithink flights that can go through there at the moment. i think he's got much bigger— the moment. i think he's got much bigger problems then 1—2 viral tiktok— bigger problems then 1—2 viral tiktok videos of people doing stupid and dodgy things in wheelchairs. let's _ and dodgy things in wheelchairs. let's turn — and dodgy things in wheelchairs. let's turn to the financial times, which we touched on earlier, the cost—of—living crisis — but this is the real effect of it, and the effect of inflation, higher costs for companies to make products and transport them around, and some of the biggest consumer names now warning that we could see prices rise — among them unilever, coca—cola, mcdonald's, all warning they may have to put costs or prices
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up. this will resonate with people, and we heard in the last day or so the amazon prime is increasing its subscription rate by £1 a month. it may not sound like enough, but if people are struggling to pay their bills and put food on the table, that might tip the edge over and they say that's no longer a luxury they say that's no longer a luxury they can afford. flat they say that's no longer a luxury they can afford.— they say that's no longer a luxury they can afford. not having amazon rime is they can afford. not having amazon prime is rrot — they can afford. not having amazon prime is not the _ they can afford. not having amazon prime is not the end _ they can afford. not having amazon prime is not the end of _ they can afford. not having amazon prime is not the end of the - they can afford. not having amazon prime is not the end of the world, l prime is not the end of the world, but it's a big difference in not having the proper amount of food and so on, so there are different categories of things you have to tighten your belts and cope without, clearly. but what's interesting about that story, unilever cell mayonnaise, and it's just interesting mayonnaise, and it'sjust interesting that when you're talking about price rises, all sorts of things, clearly there are costs that go into them, transport, feed for
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animals if it's to do with dairy cattle, for example, producing stuffer mayonnaise, for example — all those things, it doesn't mean things will be expensive, like gas, it's also the knock on effects of the general rise in commodity prices, transport costs as you said that bush is a cross in all sorts of items that will immediately be affected desk push across, as a general inflationary cost. it's just more evidence of the inflationary pressures that are there certainly at the moment, and unfortunately may be with us for some time if we aren't careful.— aren't careful. and that is the wor , aren't careful. and that is the worry. that — aren't careful. and that is the worry, that this _ aren't careful. and that is the worry, that this will _ aren't careful. and that is the worry, that this will become i worry, that this will become something that continues beyond the end of this year, i think in the uk there are predictions from the bank
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of england that inflation will hit the double digits. this is something that many people have not experienced before. it looks inevitable _ experienced before. it looks inevitable that _ experienced before. it looks inevitable that inflation - experienced before. it looks inevitable that inflation will| experienced before. it looks- inevitable that inflation will make the double digits, and the financial times— the double digits, and the financial times reports that the increase in costs _ times reports that the increase in costs of— times reports that the increase in costs of lots of unilever's products are fairly _ costs of lots of unilever's products are fairly basic things like stuff democrat of shampoo, increasing ii~2% _ democrat of shampoo, increasing ii~2% in _ democrat of shampoo, increasing 11.2% in the second quarter of this year~ _ 11.2% in the second quarter of this year~ there — 11.2% in the second quarter of this year. there are lots of elements going _ year. there are lots of elements going into — year. there are lots of elements going into this, you've got the effect — going into this, you've got the effect of— going into this, you've got the effect of china continuing to have very strict — effect of china continuing to have very strict lockdown rules, which has meant — very strict lockdown rules, which has meant that lots of products have been more _ has meant that lots of products have been more expensive and far fewer leaving _ been more expensive and far fewer leaving china. you've got oil and -as leaving china. you've got oil and gas in _ leaving china. you've got oil and gas in russia being cut off to the rest of the — gas in russia being cut off to the rest of the world because of the war in ukraine, — rest of the world because of the war in ukraine, driving the cost up which — in ukraine, driving the cost up which affectsjust about in ukraine, driving the cost up which affects just about everything. ukraine _ which affects just about everything. ukraine has thankfully signed this deal recently so hopefully more of its grain— deal recently so hopefully more of its grain will come out. that's had a big _ its grain will come out. that's had a big effect— its grain will come out. that's had a big effect on lots of positives and basics people can get. you've
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-ot and basics people can get. you've got these — and basics people can get. you've got these inflationary effects coming — got these inflationary effects coming in from different directions. the only— coming in from different directions. the only good thing to look at is all three — the only good thing to look at is all three of those that were just mentioned are things that can be fixed, _ mentioned are things that can be fixed, that they are geopolitical effects — fixed, that they are geopolitical effects of decisions being made. the problem _ effects of decisions being made. the problem is _ effects of decisions being made. the problem is when you have an 11% rate of inflation, _ problem is when you have an 11% rate of inflation, or at least 9% as it is now. — of inflation, or at least 9% as it is now, you've got people wanting those _ is now, you've got people wanting those price — is now, you've got people wanting those price rises — and it's what we talked about — those price rises — and it's what we talked about in the daily mirror, it's mick— talked about in the daily mirror, it's mick lynch fighting for workers. when people can't afford the basics. — workers. when people can't afford the basics, you risk getting into an inflationary— the basics, you risk getting into an inflationary cycle. at the same time if you _ inflationary cycle. at the same time if you don't— inflationary cycle. at the same time if you don't give people a pay rise, they've _ if you don't give people a pay rise, they've got — if you don't give people a pay rise, they've got no money to spend and their businesses go up. —— go under. ithink— their businesses go up. —— go under. i think we _ their businesses go up. —— go under. i think we are — their businesses go up. —— go under. i think we are in a serious catch—22 at the _ i think we are in a serious catch—22 at the moment and it will be solved this year~ _ at the moment and it will be solved this year. i think it will probably take a _ this year. i think it will probably take a couple of years if we're lucky~ — take a couple of years if we're luc . . , take a couple of years if we're luc . ., , ., �* take a couple of years if we're luc . ., , lucky. certainly won't solve it in one addition _ lucky. certainly won't solve it in one addition of— lucky. certainly won't solve it in one addition of the _ lucky. certainly won't solve it in one addition of the papers. - lucky. certainly won't solve it in l one addition of the papers. thank you both for your thoughts for this evening. i know what you're
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thinking, we haven't spoken of the 4-0 thinking, we haven't spoken of the 4—0 england victory over sweden — the good news is we talk about in the previous edition of the papers, it's there on iplayer, have a look. that's it for the papers this hour. dojoin us then if you can, but for now, goodnight. hello, i'm marc edwards with your sport. it's been a night of history—making for england, as they put in an extraordinary second—half performance to thrash the tournament's top—ranked side sweden 4—0, and go through to the final of the women's european championship. the lionesses breaking their semifinal hoodoo, having lost in the last four at each of their last three major tournaments. 0ur correspondent natalie pirks was at bramall lane. under a heavy sheffield sky, the lionesses arrived to a growing weight of expectation.
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fans of all ages were dreaming of a night to remember. it'll be a tough game against sweden, but i reckon, on the last game, we've got the skills to do it, don't you? yeah. yeah, why not? they're going to go i all the way, so yeah, i think they're going to smash it. why are you so confident? because we've got tickets - for the final, so i'm hoping they're going to be there on sunday, so that's the plan. _ but sweden are ranked second in the world — and from the off, they were intent on showing why. earps forced into a very early save. england again starting with the same 11 that sarina wiegman had put her faith in throughout. within four minutes, top scorer beth mead almost repaid that trust. this was a frantic start — a blur of ponytails were bearing down on mary earps. heart—in—mouth moments.
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england's goalkeeper kept busier than in all previous matches. england needed to take a breath — and with calm heads came the breakthrough. mead — she's done it again! england lead in the semifinal! the ecstatic gasps of 30,000 england supporters inhaling the ball into the net for mead's sixth of the tournament. half—time brought a welcome respite and a chance to remind each other to leave no regrets on the bramall lane pitch. lucy bronze got the memo. luzy bronze strikes gold for england! the dreaded var check meant an anxious wait. finally, confirmation came of how close it was — var once again sweden's nemesis. ellen white had played her part. the dynamic crowd favourite alessia russo came on, hoping to make another impact. she would get her chance, but not before england once again had to be on alert.
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it wasn't a clean shot, but the save needed to be perfection. mary earps, take a bow. from one goalkeeper�*s pleasure to an absolute howler. russo was a menace, but this audacious backheel was surely just wishful thinking. oh, my — lindahl will never want to see that again. but if she thought it was over, she was wrong — england's march to the wembley arch was becoming a cantor, and fran kirby's mastery reaped the rewards she so deserved. delirium inside bramhall lane! when the final whistle blew, the semifinal hoodoo had been banished, the emotions could finally come out. in sarina they trust — not even a year in the job, the impact wiegman's had is clear. it had been 13 years since the lionesses were last in a major final. who would bet against them now? natalie pirks, bbc news, sheffield.
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it's crazy, i think. i'm so excited, i'm just soaking it all in and enjoying every day, every game, and just can't wait for the final now. i'll be honest, my eyes have always been on the trophy from the very beginning. i've obviously had to take each game as it comes. but i don't think i'll be truly happy unless we get our hands on that trophy over the weekend. the finale at wembley on sunday. to cycling — and cecilie ludwig has won stage three of the inaugural tour de france femmes, from reims to epernay. the dane crashed yesterday and lost almost two minutes to race leader marianne vos, but she came back strongly over the 83—mile stage this afternoon in the french champagne region, surging in the final climb to take the stage by two seconds. that moved her up into the top ten — second place enough for vos to retain the overall lead. the commonwealth games get under way on thursday in birmingham. diverjack laugher and weightlifter
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emily campbell have been announced as england's flag—bearers. campbell won bronze at the last commonwealth games in 2018, before becoming the first woman to win an olympic weightlifting medalfor team gb, with silver at tokyo 2020. while diver laugher has five commonwealth gold medals, along with an olympic gold from rio in 2016. it's so hard to make these games, and to represent your country is always an honour. but to carry the flag and lead a team out, you know, i don't think words can describe it, it's so special. and to do it with jack, as well, he's an absolute legend and pioneer of his sport. so for us to do that together will be a really special moment. i've done four games, and i've seen some unbelievable people carry the flag from before me, for team england and team gb. but to be mentioned among those names is a massive honour, and something that i'm extremely privileged and — ijust feeljust so excited, i want to get out there, wave the flag, and represent team england in front of an english crowd. and finally, it's been announced today that england will host
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the women's 2026 t20 world cup. more on that and all our stories on the bbc website. but from me, marc edwards, and the rest of the sport today team, that's all your sport for now, bye—bye. hello there. it felt rather cool for the time of year on tuesday across much of the country, particularly in the north and the west, where we also had 1—2 heavy showers around. we've got high pressure dominating the scene — it will slowly be pushing towards the east, and that'll allow some slightly warmer air to move up from the south. so, we start off largely dry with plenty of sunshine around, as we head into wednesday, but its centre will be pushing towards the east of the country — and that means gradually, we'll start to import air from the south. always a slightly warmer direction, so it'll feel a touch warmer i think across the country on wednesday. we start off dry and sunny, but through the afternoon, cloud will tend to build, many places will turn quite grey, and we could see a few
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showers sparking off, particularly northern england in towards scotland. temperatures a bit higher — 19—20 celsius in the north, and around 20—23 celsius across england and wales, and winds will remain light. now through wednesday night, we continue with this slightly warmer southerly airflow. quite a bit of cloud around, some splashes of rain here and there, particularly through central areas. and temperatures no lower than around 13—15 celsius in the south, still a few cooler spots in the north. so, it is warming up as we end the week. for all areas, but in particular for england and wales, it won't be wall—to—wall sunshine, there will be quite a bit of cloud around, and also some showers again, affecting more northern and western areas. thursday, our area of high pressure is very weak, out towards the north sea, bringing south southeasterly winds — these weather fronts slowly encroaching into the far west of the country later in the day. so, it'll going to be a pretty benign day, light winds, variable clouds, some sunshine around — the best of the sunshine across central and southern areas, thicker cloud across northern england and scotland, where we could see some splashes of rain here or there. but it'll feel warmer, up to 21 celsius in the central belt of scotland, maybe 2a—25 celsius across the southeast. similar story on friday — probably a chance of seeing some showery rain through central and northern parts.
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best of the sunshine in the south with the highest temperatures. but we'll start to see these weather fronts encroaching into the west of scotland, northern ireland later in the day. again, a warm day — up to 22 celsius in scotland, perhaps up to 27—28 in the southeast. beyond friday into the weekend, it looks like low pressure could bring more substantial rain to the north and the west of the country. very little rainfall getting into the southeast, where we really do need it. so, it'll stay quite warm into the weekend, though, with low pressure nearby, certainly to the north, we're likely see the rain here, and there will be quite a bit of cloud around at times, too.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... the evidence is compelling — say scientists. covid—19 did start in an animal market in china's wuhan province. teetering on the world intercession. —— world recession. russia says it will withdraw from the international space station and build its 0wn — ending decades of cooperation with the us and other countries. and england beat sweden 4—0 in the women's euros semi final — giving them a chance to win a first ever major women's tournament. live from our studio in singapore.

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