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tv   The Context with Christian Fraser  BBC News  May 10, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. prince charles sits in for the queen as the government sets out its agenda for the next parliament. the prime minister says its economic growth, not government spending that will tackle the cost—of—living crisis. however great our compassion and ingenuity, we cannot simply spend our way out of this problem. we need to grow out of this problem. it's the latest chapter in a pathetic response to the cost—of—living crisis. where there should've been support, it's been tax rise after tax rise on working people. stalemate in northern ireland — the irish taoiseach urges borisjohnson to stick with negotiation on the northern ireland protocol.
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the dup says it will not return to power—sharing until the protocol is ditched. further attacks in the port city of odesa — ukraine's president calls for the end to the blockade in the black sea, which he says will lead us into a globalfood crisis. tonight with the context, former cabinet office special adviser anita boateng and former adviser to hillary clinton, amanda renteria. hello, welcome to the programme. this queen's speech will mostly be remembered as the speech the queen did not deliver. in her place today was prince charles, who seemed to reflect in his demeanour the sombre mood of the country. not just for the absence of the monarch, but also the enormous challenges the government must now grip. the problem for borisjohnson is that the biggest issue facing the country, the cost—of—living
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crisis, is not one that can be solved by legislation alone. the real solutions must come from the treasury, with the clamour for an emergency budget growing on all sides of the house. the speech included 38 new bills, a slew of reforms the prime minister said would help grow the british economy. we can't spend our way out of trouble, he told mps, but we can create the conditions for growth and prosperity. by urgently pressing on with our mission to create the high—wage, high—skilljobs that will drive economic growth across the united kingdom, the whole united kingdom. that is the long—term sustainable solution to ease the burden on families and businesses. that is the way to get our country back on track after the pandemic, to unite and level up across our whole country exactly as we promised. that is what this queen's speech delivers. so, what sort of measure were included in this parliament's legislative programme?
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after two years of covid, the government is in catch—up mode, with an 80—seat majority, perhaps boris johnson's last chance to deliver on his manifesto commitments. on levelling up, the prime minister is giving mayors and local councils new powers to to regenerate their areas. going forward, there will be a legal duty on the government to produce an annual progress report. also included, new police powers in a public order bill that will make it easier to prosecute those who lock themselves to buildings, objects or other people. post—brexit, the government wants to "take back control of the rules that govern how public money is spent". there will be new uk laws to replace european rules on financial regulation and how data is handled. there's a bill on energy security with plans for up to eight nuclear power stations. and in line with its cop26 commitments, the government will commit to more wind and solar energy. the opposition said the country needed more than what this government is offering. the queen's speech, said keir starmer, had fallen well short of what was needed.
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we need a government of the moment, with the ideas that meet the aspirations of the british public. this thin address, bereft of ideas or purpose, without a guiding principle or a road map for delivery, showsjust how far this government is from that. too out of touch to meet the challenges of the moment, too tired to grasp the opportunities of the future, their time has passed. also joining alsojoining us for the also joining us for the front half of the programme... let's bring in context panellist professor anand menon, director of uk in a changing europe. let's start with you, anita, did this meet the moment? i
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let's start with you, anita, did this meet the moment? i think this will be determined _ this meet the moment? i think this will be determined by _ this meet the moment? i think this will be determined by one - this meet the moment? i think this will be determined by one thing - this meet the moment? i think this| will be determined by one thing and that is_ will be determined by one thing and that is the _ will be determined by one thing and that is the economy. _ will be determined by one thing and that is the economy. this _ will be determined by one thing and that is the economy. this speech. will be determined by one thing and i that is the economy. this speech was about— that is the economy. this speech was about recognising _ that is the economy. this speech was about recognising brexit_ that is the economy. this speech was about recognising brexit and - that is the economy. this speech was about recognising brexit and makingl about recognising brexit and making real some _ about recognising brexit and making real some of— about recognising brexit and making real some of the _ about recognising brexit and making real some of the leveling _ about recognising brexit and making real some of the leveling up - real some of the leveling up ambitions _ real some of the leveling up ambitions in _ real some of the leveling up ambitions in the _ real some of the leveling upi ambitions in the government real some of the leveling up - ambitions in the government has but there _ ambitions in the government has but there is— ambitions in the government has but there is this — ambitions in the government has but there is this looming _ ambitions in the government has but there is this looming thing _ ambitions in the government has but there is this looming thing in- ambitions in the government has but there is this looming thing in the - there is this looming thing in the resin _ there is this looming thing in the resin which — there is this looming thing in the resin which is _ there is this looming thing in the resin which is the _ there is this looming thing in the resin which is the bank _ there is this looming thing in the resin which is the bank of - there is this looming thing in thel resin which is the bank of england predictions — resin which is the bank of england predictions of 2% _ resin which is the bank of england predictions of 2% inflation, - predictions of 2% inflation, expected _ predictions of 2% inflation, expected hikes— predictions of 2% inflation, expected hikes and - predictions of 2% inflation, expected hikes and energyj predictions of 2% inflation, - expected hikes and energy bills to come _ expected hikes and energy bills to come in _ expected hikes and energy bills to come in the — expected hikes and energy bills to come in the autumn _ expected hikes and energy bills to come in the autumn and _ expected hikes and energy bills to come in the autumn and so- expected hikes and energy bills to come in the autumn and so some i expected hikes and energy bills to i come in the autumn and so some of that wiii— come in the autumn and so some of that will be — come in the autumn and so some of that will be addressed _ come in the autumn and so some of that will be addressed in _ come in the autumn and so some of that will be addressed in the - that will be addressed in the budget, _ that will be addressed in the budget, but— that will be addressed in the budget, but nevertheless, . that will be addressed in the l budget, but nevertheless, 38 that will be addressed in the - budget, but nevertheless, 38 bills, a lot of— budget, but nevertheless, 38 bills, a lot of ideas— budget, but nevertheless, 38 bills, a lot of ideas around _ budget, but nevertheless, 38 bills, a lot of ideas around whether - budget, but nevertheless, 38 bills, a lot of ideas around whether its i a lot of ideas around whether its police _ a lot of ideas around whether its police powers. _ a lot of ideas around whether its police powers, levelling - a lot of ideas around whether its police powers, levelling up, - a lot of ideas around whether its i police powers, levelling up, brexit, digital— police powers, levelling up, brexit, digital economy— police powers, levelling up, brexit, digital economy that _ police powers, levelling up, brexit, digital economy that bodes - police powers, levelling up, brexit, digital economy that bodes well- police powers, levelling up, brexit, digital economy that bodes well for| digital economy that bodes well for the conservative _ digital economy that bodes well for the conservative programme for. digital economy that bodes well forl the conservative programme for the second _ the conservative programme for the second half— the conservative programme for the second half of— the conservative programme for the second half of this _ the conservative programme for the second half of this parliament. - the conservative programme for the second half of this parliament. thel second half of this parliament. the critics say yes _ second half of this parliament. critics say yes there is some long—term provision in here that are welcome, especially in areas like levelling up, giving local authorities the power to improve the high street, etc, but it's all a little bit nebulous when you consider the challenge of the cost of living as anita says. here is the
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boss of tesco today setting out what he hears in markets. people on lowest incomes, the hardest pressed, it's much, much more serious and much more difficult to cope with than those on higher incomes. so, i was in some stores on friday and i was hearing for the first time for many years of customers saying to check—out staff, "stop when you get to £40 or something. i don't want to spend a penny over that," as opposed to having everything checked out and settling the bill at the end. i think action to help people to cope with the very, very sharp increase in energy prices. it's harder for people to mitigate energy than it is with food. and i think there's an overwhelming case for a windfall tax on profits from those energy producers fed back to those most in need of help. they said today they are employing five people to field calls from families who are panicking about their energy bills. this is that here in the now and did you see
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anything in the queen's speech that we have people who were going under? not particularly. there are a lot of good _ not particularly. there are a lot of good medium—term ambitions, the savaht_ good medium—term ambitions, the savant levelling up make sense and you cannot — savant levelling up make sense and you cannot do it without devolving powers _ you cannot do it without devolving powers but as we just heard them of the real— powers but as we just heard them of the real issue is the here and now, the real issue is the here and now, the cost—of—living process and particularly what the government is going _ particularly what the government is going to do for those on the lowest incomes _ going to do for those on the lowest incomes. there is a difficult conversation that number ten needs to have _ conversation that number ten needs to have with the treasury about whether— to have with the treasury about whether or not the purse strings can be released — whether or not the purse strings can be released slightly to either raise benefits or increase help for those nrost _ benefits or increase help for those nrost in _ benefits or increase help for those most in need because all the signals are the _ most in need because all the signals are the cost—of—living crisis is simply— are the cost—of—living crisis is simply going to get worse over the course _ simply going to get worse over the course of— simply going to get worse over the course of the next 6—8 months and that wiii— course of the next 6—8 months and that will have the worst off disproportionately. a that will have the worst off disproportionately.- that will have the worst off disproportionately. a very british sto in disproportionately. a very british story in one _ disproportionately. a very british story in one sense _ disproportionately. a very british story in one sense but _ disproportionately. a very british story in one sense but of- disproportionately. a very british story in one sense but of coursel disproportionately. a very british i story in one sense but of course the problem not entirely unique to the uk and if that one that bedeviled joe biden and he spoke on inflation in the last few hours and let's listen. i understand what it feels like. i come from a familyl where when the price of gas or food went up,
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we felt it. _ it was a discussion i at the kitchen table. i want every american to know that i am taking inflation very seriouslyl and it's my top domestic priority. they are all taking it very seriously, but he faces the same issue that borisjohnson bases, and thatis issue that borisjohnson bases, and that is there is a lot of debt and the cost of borrowing is giving up. he does not have a war chest of sort of the problem. he does not have a war chest of sort of the problem-— of the problem. that's right. and ou will of the problem. that's right. and you will hear— of the problem. that's right. and you will hear him _ of the problem. that's right. and you will hear him talking - of the problem. that's right. and you will hear him talking a - of the problem. that's right. and you will hear him talking a lot - of the problem. that's right. and i you will hear him talking a lot more about what he can do on the petroleum reserve and what he can do on bringing back policies on lowering prescription drugs, child care expenses, more and more of that you will hear from him care expenses, more and more of that you will hearfrom him and care expenses, more and more of that you will hear from him and what was interesting about his comments today was he put out there and administration put out that the republicans are talking about inflation but they don't have a plan. that really sets up a conversation knowing that inflation is something that is going to be difficult to tackle, who has a plan and who does not in the midterm cycle and so i agree with the
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statement earlier that the economy is the main issue on the line even as abortion rights of women's riser in the scene committee will see those gas prices and particularly in the us today were they are the highest they've ever been. bill highest they've ever been. all governments in the moment are tinkering around the edges trying to find innovative ways to ease the burden for families but the clamour on all three sides of the house now really starting to grow for an emergency budget. do you think the chancellor understands the gravity of the situation? {iii chancellor understands the gravity of the situation?— chancellor understands the gravity of the situation? of course he does come in the — of the situation? of course he does come in the chancellor _ of the situation? of course he does come in the chancellor has - of the situation? of course he does come in the chancellor has been i come in the chancellor has been talking _ come in the chancellor has been talking about the threat and challenge of inflation for about a year and — challenge of inflation for about a year and a — challenge of inflation for about a year and a half at least. i would say alnrost _ year and a half at least. i would say almost two years now looking at what was happening in the us and let's not— what was happening in the us and let's not forget that increased government spending increases inflation — government spending increases inflation or is inflationary is welconre _ inflation or is inflationary is welcome as they are not a lot of good _ welcome as they are not a lot of good options and i think the thing i would _ good options and i think the thing i would say— good options and i think the thing i would say that is it's very clear that— would say that is it's very clear that it's — would say that is it's very clear that it's difficult to determine how
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the picture is going to evolve. of course _ the picture is going to evolve. of course we — the picture is going to evolve. of course we have predictions but the conflict _ course we have predictions but the conflict in — course we have predictions but the conflict in ukraine has been a huge thing _ conflict in ukraine has been a huge thing that— conflict in ukraine has been a huge thing that has massively impacted things— thing that has massively impacted things such as food prices, global issues _ things such as food prices, global issues around supply chains it may also be _ issues around supply chains it may also be emerging or exacerbated one for my— also be emerging or exacerbated one for my china and how they are approaching covid—19 so there are lots of— approaching covid—19 so there are lots of factors that are... but approaching covid-19 so there are lots of factors that are. . .- lots of factors that are... but he could us and _ lots of factors that are... but he could us and is _ lots of factors that are... but he could us and is coming - lots of factors that are... but he could us and is coming and - lots of factors that are... but he could us and is coming and he . lots of factors that are... but he i could us and is coming and he put taxes up anyway and he is not rented to other european countries who have put in place a windfall tax on the enormous permits that energy companies have made. how long will the weight on the issues with my on the question of energy, fundamentally the government is very committed to the tradition to net zero and there needs to be a certificate investment from energy companies in things such as nuclear and offshore wind in order to make that a reality. but and offshore wind in order to make that a reality-— that a reality. but on this question. _ that a reality. but on this question, what _ that a reality. but on this question, what i'm - that a reality. but on this| question, what i'm saying that a reality. but on this i question, what i'm saying is that a reality. but on this - question, what i'm saying is there are challenges that have yet to come and it— are challenges that have yet to come and it difficult now to predict how that is— and it difficult now to predict how that is going to turn out but as such— that is going to turn out but as such the — that is going to turn out but as such the chancellor is almost always
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reserving _ such the chancellor is almost always reserving his firepower and has invested — reserving his firepower and has invested in things it really matter post covid—19 such as rising taxes in order— post covid—19 such as rising taxes in order to — post covid—19 such as rising taxes in order to get the nhs backlog in order— in order to get the nhs backlog in order lrut— in order to get the nhs backlog in order but there are other challenges coming down the track and i think he probably— coming down the track and i think he probably does not make sense to react _ probably does not make sense to react to those once we know the full extent _ react to those once we know the full extent of— react to those once we know the full extent of the challenge. quite react to those once we know the full extent of the challenge.— extent of the challenge. quite a few bills went by — extent of the challenge. quite a few bills went by the _ extent of the challenge. quite a few bills went by the wayside, _ extent of the challenge. quite a few bills went by the wayside, the - extent of the challenge. quite a few bills went by the wayside, the soak| bills went by the wayside, the soak barnacle bill that was knocked out a note housing bill in there and we have a housing crisis. i note housing bill in there and we have a housing crisis.— note housing bill in there and we have a housing crisis. i mean the queen's speech _ have a housing crisis. i mean the queen's speech are _ have a housing crisis. i mean the queen's speech are very - have a housing crisis. i mean the queen's speech are very political events— queen's speech are very political events in— queen's speech are very political events in the _ queen's speech are very political events in the government - queen's speech are very political events in the government has i queen's speech are very political i events in the government has chosen to highlight _ events in the government has chosen to highlight the — events in the government has chosen to highlight the things _ events in the government has chosen to highlight the things it _ events in the government has chosen to highlight the things it wants - events in the government has chosen to highlight the things it wants to i to highlight the things it wants to stress _ to highlight the things it wants to stress as— to highlight the things it wants to stress as political— to highlight the things it wants to stress as political priorities. i to highlight the things it wants to stress as political priorities. so i stress as political priorities. so there _ stress as political priorities. so there is— stress as political priorities. so there is a — stress as political priorities. so there is a very— stress as political priorities. so there is a very big _ stress as political priorities. so there is a very big agenda i stress as political priorities. so i there is a very big agenda there, so i don't _ there is a very big agenda there, so idon't think— there is a very big agenda there, so idon't think i— there is a very big agenda there, so i don't think i would _ there is a very big agenda there, so i don't think i would necessarily i i don't think i would necessarily criticise — i don't think i would necessarily criticise government _ i don't think i would necessarily criticise government for - i don't think i would necessarily criticise government for not i i don't think i would necessarily i criticise government for not having hi-h criticise government for not having high enough — criticise government for not having high enough ambitions _ criticise government for not having high enough ambitions but - criticise government for not havingi high enough ambitions but suppose listening _ high enough ambitions but suppose listening to — high enough ambitions but suppose listening to the _ high enough ambitions but suppose listening to the queen's _ high enough ambitions but suppose listening to the queen's speech i i listening to the queen's speech i wonder— listening to the queen's speech i wonder whether— listening to the queen's speech i wonder whether or— listening to the queen's speech i wonder whether or not— listening to the queen's speech i | wonder whether or not everything they have — wonder whether or not everything they have got _ wonder whether or not everything they have got there _ wonder whether or not everything they have got there it _ wonder whether or not everything they have got there it is - wonder whether or not everything they have got there it is doable i they have got there it is doable within— they have got there it is doable within what— they have got there it is doable within what could _ they have got there it is doable within what could be _ they have got there it is doable within what could be only- they have got there it is doable within what could be only a i they have got there it is doable i within what could be only a couple of years _ within what could be only a couple of years to be _ within what could be only a couple of years to be honest _ within what could be only a couple of years to be honest other - within what could be only a couple of years to be honest other than l of years to be honest other than wishing there _ of years to be honest other than wishing there was _ of years to be honest other than wishing there was more. - of years to be honest other than wishing there was more. the. of years to be honest other than wishing there was more. the much romised wishing there was more. the much promised measures _ wishing there was more. the much promised measures to _ wishing there was more. the much promised measures to improve i promised measures to improve workers' rights, they were absent as well and we were told of the manifesto ) there'll be new
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protections against pregnancy discrimination. there are 7 million cameras in the uk who have borne the brunt of covid—i9 who wanted more flexible ways of working and none of thatis flexible ways of working and none of that is there. again that does make a real difference to people amid the cost living crisis. it a real difference to people amid the cost living crisis.— cost living crisis. it does but i think rrot _ cost living crisis. it does but i think not to the _ cost living crisis. it does but i think not to the same - cost living crisis. it does but i l think not to the same extent as the actual— think not to the same extent as the actual cost— think not to the same extent as the actual cost of— think not to the same extent as the actual cost of living _ think not to the same extent as the actual cost of living crisis _ actual cost of living crisis does and i_ actual cost of living crisis does and i think— actual cost of living crisis does and i think you _ actual cost of living crisis does and i think you get _ actual cost of living crisis does and i think you get the - actual cost of living crisis does i and i think you get the impression that attention _ and i think you get the impression that attention is _ and i think you get the impression that attention is very— and i think you get the impression that attention is very firmly - that attention is very firmly focused _ that attention is very firmly focused in government i that attention is very firmly focused in government on i that attention is very firmly i focused in government on this that attention is very firmly - focused in government on this and that there — focused in government on this and that there is — focused in government on this and that there is something _ focused in government on this and that there is something of- focused in government on this and that there is something of a - focused in government on this and i that there is something of a debate going _ that there is something of a debate going on— that there is something of a debate going on in— that there is something of a debate going on in the _ that there is something of a debate going on in the houses— that there is something of a debate going on in the houses of— that there is something of a debate i going on in the houses of government about— going on in the houses of government about what— going on in the houses of government about what to — going on in the houses of government about what to do _ going on in the houses of government about what to do about _ going on in the houses of government about what to do about this _ about what to do about this because quite frankly— about what to do about this because quite frankly whilst _ about what to do about this because quite frankly whilst things _ about what to do about this because quite frankly whilst things like i quite frankly whilst things like discrimination— quite frankly whilst things like discrimination measures i quite frankly whilst things like discrimination measures are l discrimination measures are inrportant. _ discrimination measures are important. at— discrimination measures are important, at the _ discrimination measures are important, at the moment. discrimination measures are i important, at the moment and particularly _ important, at the moment and particularly over— important, at the moment and particularly over the _ important, at the moment and particularly over the next i important, at the moment and particularly over the next six . particularly over the next six nronths _ particularly over the next six months according _ particularly over the next six months according to - particularly over the next six i months according to operations, particularly over the next six - months according to operations, the one big _ months according to operations, the one big issue — months according to operations, the one big issue is— months according to operations, the one big issue is going _ months according to operations, the one big issue is going to— months according to operations, the one big issue is going to be - months according to operations, the one big issue is going to be the i one big issue is going to be the cost of— one big issue is going to be the cost of living. i— one big issue is going to be the cost of living. ithink— one big issue is going to be the cost of living. i think this - cost of living. i think this government— cost of living. i think this government like - cost of living. i think this government like many. cost of living. i think this i government like many others cost of living. i think this - government like many others if scratching _ government like many others if scratching his _ government like many others if scratching his head _ government like many others if scratching his head thinking - government like many others ifl scratching his head thinking how best to — scratching his head thinking how best to we — scratching his head thinking how best to we do _ scratching his head thinking how best to we do this? _ scratching his head thinking how best to we do this? how- scratching his head thinking how best to we do this? how do - scratching his head thinking how best to we do this? how do we i scratching his head thinking how. best to we do this? how do we deal with the _ best to we do this? how do we deal with the problem _ best to we do this? how do we deal with the problem of— best to we do this? how do we deal with the problem of sluggish - best to we do this? how do we deal| with the problem of sluggish growth plus rising _ with the problem of sluggish growth plus rising inflation? _ with the problem of sluggish growth plus rising inflation? without- plus rising inflation? without necessarily— plus rising inflation? without necessarily leading _ plus rising inflation? without necessarily leading us - plus rising inflation? without necessarily leading us into. necessarily leading us into resent him of doing _ necessarily leading us into resent him of doing things _ necessarily leading us into resent him of doing things on _ necessarily leading us into resent him of doing things on increasing| him of doing things on increasing interest— him of doing things on increasing interest rates— him of doing things on increasing interest rates too _ him of doing things on increasing interest rates too quickly. - interest rates too quickly.
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interesting _ interest rates too quickly. interesting the _ interest rates too quickly. interesting the parallels l interest rates too quickly. i interesting the parallels we interest rates too quickly. - interesting the parallels we look at the american economy, there are more vacancies in a record vacancies in thejob market, record numbers employed in their almost two jobs for every person when you put people across the us, they think the economy is it a case of in america? know, the truth is you cannot see the gas prices going up when you go to the grocery store, your bill is higher. that is real even though you might have a job or you might be looking for a newjob that might pay a little bit more, there are couple of things. one is base wages have a not necessarily kept up. so even though you were getting a salary and have a job, if milk is more gas is more, you actually feel that. in the thing here is at least in the us is people are beginning to now get out of their house and go to events and think about summer travel, gas prices are a bigger deal in terms of being able to have the freedom they used to have before the pandemic. and so is even more poignant to a lot of families right now as they
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are just lot of families right now as they arejust beginning to emerge lot of families right now as they are just beginning to emerge from being close and shut down because the pandemic. nothing in the queen's speech today about the northern ireland protocol, but plenty of speculation the government is about to introduce a bill that would override it. the irish taioseach who spoke to borisjohnson today said any uniltaral decision to change post—brexit trade agreements would be hugely destabilising. the prime minister has called for changes to the protocol, after the dup warned it would not return to the power—sharing executive so long as the protocol is in place. sinn fein, now the largest party in northern ireland, said the decision of the electorate must be respected. here's chris page with a quick explanation of what the northern ireland protocol is. the northern ireland protocol means certain goods such as some food shipments are inspected when they arrive here from great britain. the arrangement was put in place to keep open the border with the republic of ireland. it's the only land frontier the uk and the eu, and brussels wants to prevent any products which aren't in line with eu standards from reaching the european single market.
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maros sefcovic, the vice president of the eu commission, said today... and the european leaders are lining up behind him. the german chancellor, olaf scholz, has raised his concerns, as did the belgian prime minister. i honestly think that not respecting that would create a big problem in the internal, in the single market. and to us, the single market is paramount. as a small, open economy, the functioning of the european internal market is the most important thing. so, our message is quite clear. don't touch this. this is something we agreed on, and agreement needs to be respected. let's speak to neale richmond,
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spokesperson on european affairs for fine gael, part of the irish coalition government. welcome to the programme. you listening speculation today and plenty of it here in london that the government is about to introduce the discussion that would override a key part to the protocol and what would happen to that point?— happen to that point? member you cannot legislate _ happen to that point? member you cannot legislate massively - happen to that point? member you cannot legislate massively to - cannot legislate massively to override _ cannot legislate massively to override international- cannot legislate massively to override international law - cannot legislate massively toi override international law and cannot legislate massively to - override international law and such an act— override international law and such an act by— override international law and such an act by the — override international law and such an act by the government - override international law and such an act by the government which i override international law and such an act by the government which is| an act by the government which is been _ an act by the government which is been threat many _ an act by the government which is been threat many times _ an act by the government which is been threat many times as - an act by the government which is been threat many times as a - an act by the government which isi been threat many times as a string article _ been threat many times as a string article 16— been threat many times as a string article 16 would _ been threat many times as a string article 16 would be _ been threat many times as a string article 16 would be extremely- article 16 would be extremely damaging _ article 16 would be extremely damaging and _ article 16 would be extremely damaging and destabilising . article 16 would be extremely. damaging and destabilising and article 16 would be extremely- damaging and destabilising and with her when _ damaging and destabilising and with her when the — damaging and destabilising and with her when the question _ damaging and destabilising and with her when the question the _ damaging and destabilising and with her when the question the long - damaging and destabilising and with her when the question the long runi her when the question the long run implementation _ her when the question the long run implementation talks— her when the question the long run implementation talks the _ implementation talks the commissioner— implementation talks the commissioner and - implementation talks the commissioner and the i implementation talks the - commissioner and the fourth or implementation talks the _ commissioner and the fourth or terry been holding — commissioner and the fourth or terry been holding over— commissioner and the fourth or terry been holding over the _ commissioner and the fourth or terry been holding over the past— commissioner and the fourth or terry been holding over the past months, i been holding over the past months, talks of— been holding over the past months, talks of love — been holding over the past months, talks of love resolution _ been holding over the past months, talks of love resolution and - been holding over the past months, talks of love resolution and it's - been holding over the past months, talks of love resolution and it's in l talks of love resolution and it's in progress — talks of love resolution and it's in progress and _ talks of love resolution and it's in progress and we _ talks of love resolution and it's in progress and we have _ talks of love resolution and it's in progress and we have seen - talks of love resolution and it's in progress and we have seen that i talks of love resolution and it's in . progress and we have seen that you attege _ progress and we have seen that you attege leading — progress and we have seen that you attege leading to _ progress and we have seen that you allege leading to ensure _ progress and we have seen that you allege leading to ensure access - progress and we have seen that you allege leading to ensure access to l allege leading to ensure access to medicines— allege leading to ensure access to medicines from _ allege leading to ensure access to medicines from great _ allege leading to ensure access to medicines from great ireland - allege leading to ensure access to medicines from great ireland and| allege leading to ensure access to i medicines from great ireland and we to the _ medicines from great ireland and we to the european— medicines from great ireland and we to the european commission - to the european commission conrnrission— to the european commission commission really— to the european commissioni commission really responding to the european commission - commission really responding to the concerns— commission really responding to the concerns of— commission really responding to the concerns of northern _ commission really responding to the concerns of northern irish _ commission really responding to the concerns of northern irish businessi concerns of northern irish business and agriculture _ concerns of northern irish business and agriculture leaders _ concerns of northern irish business and agriculture leaders and - concerns of northern irish business and agriculture leaders and i- concerns of northern irish business and agriculture leaders and i thinki and agriculture leaders and i think
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that's— and agriculture leaders and i think that's where — and agriculture leaders and i think that's where the _ and agriculture leaders and i think that's where the real _ and agriculture leaders and i think that's where the real solutions - and agriculture leaders and i think| that's where the real solutions lot, not an arbitrary _ that's where the real solutions lot, not an arbitrary unilateral - not an arbitrary unilateral decisions _ not an arbitrary unilateral decisions to— not an arbitrary unilateral decisions to please - not an arbitrary unilateral decisions to please petty| not an arbitrary unilateral - decisions to please petty political interest _ decisions to please petty political interest in— decisions to please petty political interest in westminster. - decisions to please petty political interest in westminster. let- decisions to please petty political interest in westminster.- decisions to please petty political interest in westminster. let it take that apartment _ interest in westminster. let it take that apartment just _ interest in westminster. let it take that apartment just was _ interest in westminster. let it take that apartment just was about - that apartment just was about solutions first of all equipment with the brakes negotiator is planning or suggesting is separate red and green lane for goods travelling to northern ireland and ireland, so i scheme for holler scary ghost northern ireland infinity for those importing guns to the republic there the remaining northern ireland and on the service that all sounds sensible so where is the problem for the eu? trio. that all sounds sensible so where is the problem for the eu?— that all sounds sensible so where is the problem for the eu? no, that is somethin: the problem for the eu? no, that is something that is _ the problem for the eu? no, that is something that is externally - something that is externally complicated _ something that is externally complicated and _ something that is externally complicated and bring - something that is externally complicated and bring to - something that is externallyi complicated and bring to risk something that is externally - complicated and bring to risk into the europeans— complicated and bring to risk into the europeans in— complicated and bring to risk into the europeans in the _ complicated and bring to risk into the europeans in the market - complicated and bring to risk intol the europeans in the market there was agreement— the europeans in the market there was agreement about _ the europeans in the market there was agreement about the - the europeans in the market there was agreement about the british l was agreement about the british government— was agreement about the british government and _ was agreement about the british government and the _ was agreement about the british government and the european . was agreement about the british - government and the european union a lon- government and the european union a long time _ government and the european union a long time ago — government and the european union a long time ago that _ government and the european union a long time ago that simply _ government and the european union a long time ago that simply was - government and the european union a long time ago that simply was not - long time ago that simply was not going _ long time ago that simply was not going to _ long time ago that simply was not going to happen _ long time ago that simply was not going to happen. with— long time ago that simply was not going to happen. with the - long time ago that simply was not. going to happen. with the frankham of the _ going to happen. with the frankham of the protocol— going to happen. with the frankham of the protocol has _ going to happen. with the frankham of the protocol has been _ going to happen. with the frankham of the protocol has been agreed, - going to happen. with the frankham of the protocol has been agreed, it i of the protocol has been agreed, it is largely— of the protocol has been agreed, it is largely working _ of the protocol has been agreed, it is largely working and _ of the protocol has been agreed, it is largely working and in _ of the protocol has been agreed, it is largely working and in fact - is largely working and in fact presents _ is largely working and in fact presents a _ is largely working and in fact presents a huge _ is largely working and in fact presents a huge met - is largely working and in fact - presents a huge met opportunity for businesses — presents a huge met opportunity for businesses in — presents a huge met opportunity for businesses in northern— presents a huge met opportunity for businesses in northern ireland - presents a huge met opportunity fori businesses in northern ireland where there will— businesses in northern ireland where there will be — businesses in northern ireland where there will be like _ businesses in northern ireland where there will be like to _ businesses in northern ireland where there will be like to see _ businesses in northern ireland where there will be like to see is— businesses in northern ireland where there will be like to see is an - businesses in northern ireland where there will be like to see is an eu - businesses in northern ireland where there will be like to see is an eu — i there will be like to see is an eu — uk stop the — there will be like to see is an eu — uk stop the agreement _ there will be like to see is an eu — uk stop the agreement which - uk stop the agreement which would remove _ uk stop the agreement which would remove the need _ uk stop the agreement which would remove the need for— uk stop the agreement which would remove the need for checks -
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uk stop the agreement which would remove the need for checks on - uk stop the agreement which would remove the need for checks on anyi remove the need for checks on any 85% of— remove the need for checks on any 85% of goods— remove the need for checks on any 85% of goods overnight _ remove the need for checks on any 85% of goods overnight and - remove the need for checks on any 85% of goods overnight and we - remove the need for checks on any. 85% of goods overnight and we want to see _ 85% of goods overnight and we want to see the _ 85% of goods overnight and we want to see the level— 85% of goods overnight and we want to see the level discussions - 85% of goods overnight and we want to see the level discussions that - to see the level discussions that habit— to see the level discussions that habit happening _ to see the level discussions that habit happening between- to see the level discussions that habit happening between the . habit happening between the officials _ habit happening between the officials in _ habit happening between the officials in the _ habit happening between the officials in the limitation - habit happening between the| officials in the limitation body habit happening between the - officials in the limitation body as was agreed _ officials in the limitation body as was agreed to _ officials in the limitation body as was agreed to within _ officials in the limitation body as was agreed to within the - officials in the limitation body as was agreed to within the britishl was agreed to within the british government— was agreed to within the british government making _ was agreed to within the british government making up - was agreed to within the british government making up their. was agreed to within the british i government making up their own decisions — government making up their own decisions without— government making up their own decisions without consultation i government making up their own decisions without consultation or| decisions without consultation or partners — decisions without consultation or partners because _ decisions without consultation or partners because that _ decisions without consultation or partners because that is - decisions without consultation or partners because that is totally i partners because that is totally forgotten — partners because that is totally forgotten two _ partners because that is totally forgotten two of _ partners because that is totally forgotten two of the _ partners because that is totally forgotten two of the brexit - partners because that is totally - forgotten two of the brexit process is that _ forgotten two of the brexit process is that is— forgotten two of the brexit process is that is not— forgotten two of the brexit process is that is not about _ forgotten two of the brexit process is that is not about the _ forgotten two of the brexit process is that is not about the internal - is that is not about the internal machinations— is that is not about the internal machinations of— is that is not about the internal machinations of westminster l is that is not about the internal| machinations of westminster or whitehall, — machinations of westminster or whitehall, is— machinations of westminster or whitehall, is agreement - machinations of westminster or. whitehall, is agreement between machinations of westminster or- whitehall, is agreement between the eu and _ whitehall, is agreement between the eu and the _ whitehall, is agreement between the eu and the uk — whitehall, is agreement between the eu and the uk. the _ whitehall, is agreement between the eu and the uk-_ eu and the uk. the british government _ eu and the uk. the british government is _ eu and the uk. the british government is accusing i eu and the uk. the british| government is accusing for eu and the uk. the british - government is accusing for the situational viral of the truth is a dup never agreed to the protocol all the way back to when theresa may was negotiating it initially. and they would say that the good friday agreement is about protecting the rights of all communities and the rights of all communities and the rights of all communities and the rights of the minority in northern ireland and they are now the minority and was a seat in the protocol is a threat to northern ireland's delegate is additional status of the biz that you understand that and does it need to bring the dup into the room to find a way through this? let’s bring the dup into the room to find a way through this?— a way through this? let's the frankham of _ a way through this? let's the frankham of the dupree - a way through this? let's the frankham of the dupree did l a way through this? let's the i frankham of the dupree did not a way through this? let's the - frankham of the dupree did not -- frankham of the dupree did not —— did not— frankham of the dupree did not —— did not agree — frankham of the dupree did not —— did not agree to— frankham of the dupree did not —— did not agree to the _ frankham of the dupree did not —— did not agree to the good - frankham of the dupree did not —— did not agree to the good friday i did not agree to the good friday agreement and _ did not agree to the good friday agreement and they— did not agree to the good friday agreement and they pushed - did not agree to the good friday agreement and they pushed thej did not agree to the good friday -
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agreement and they pushed the heart for breath— agreement and they pushed the heart for breath without _ agreement and they pushed the heart for breath without any _ agreement and they pushed the heart for breath without any consideration l for breath without any consideration of the _ for breath without any consideration of the difficulties _ for breath without any consideration of the difficulties that _ for breath without any consideration of the difficulties that it _ for breath without any consideration of the difficulties that it would - of the difficulties that it would cost to — of the difficulties that it would cost to the _ of the difficulties that it would cost to the good _ of the difficulties that it would cost to the good friday - of the difficulties that it would - cost to the good friday agreement and the _ cost to the good friday agreement and the very— cost to the good friday agreement and the very delicate _ cost to the good friday agreement and the very delicate relationship i and the very delicate relationship on the _ and the very delicate relationship on the island _ and the very delicate relationship on the island. this _ and the very delicate relationship on the island. this is _ and the very delicate relationship on the island. this is less- and the very delicate relationship on the island. this is less we - and the very delicate relationship on the island. this is less we can| on the island. this is less we can be socked — on the island. this is less we can be socked a clear— on the island. this is less we can be socked a clear majority- on the island. this is less we can be socked a clear majority of- on the island. this is less we can| be socked a clear majority of mls look at _ be socked a clear majority of mls look at the — be socked a clear majority of mls look at the assembly _ be socked a clear majority of mls look at the assembly you - be socked a clear majority of mls look at the assembly you are - be socked a clear majority of mls look at the assembly you are in l look at the assembly you are in favour — look at the assembly you are in favour of — look at the assembly you are in favour of the _ look at the assembly you are in favour of the protocol _ look at the assembly you are in favour of the protocol and - look at the assembly you are in favour of the protocol and the l look at the assembly you are in i favour of the protocol and the dup had six _ favour of the protocol and the dup had six years— favour of the protocol and the dup had six years of— favour of the protocol and the dup had six years of solutions - favour of the protocol and the dup. had six years of solutions presented to them _ had six years of solutions presented to them to — had six years of solutions presented to them to the — had six years of solutions presented to them to the problems _ had six years of solutions presented to them to the problems they - had six years of solutions presented i to them to the problems they created and it— to them to the problems they created and it turned — to them to the problems they created and it turned them _ to them to the problems they created and it turned them all— to them to the problems they created and it turned them all doubtful- to them to the problems they created and it turned them all doubtful so - and it turned them all doubtful so that also— and it turned them all doubtful so that also power— and it turned them all doubtful so that also power in _ and it turned them all doubtful so that also power in westminster. and it turned them all doubtful sol that also power in westminster for two years— that also power in westminster for two years and _ that also power in westminster for two years and they _ that also power in westminster for two years and they lost _ that also power in westminster for two years and they lost 5% - that also power in westminster for two years and they lost 5% of - that also power in westminster for two years and they lost 5% of the i two years and they lost 5% of the polls _ two years and they lost 5% of the polls and — two years and they lost 5% of the polls and lost _ two years and they lost 5% of the polls and lost mls _ two years and they lost 5% of the polls and lost mls and _ two years and they lost 5% of the polls and lost mls and lost - two years and they lost 5% of the polls and lost mls and lost to - polls and lost mls and lost to leaders — polls and lost mls and lost to leaders in _ polls and lost mls and lost to leaders in the _ polls and lost mls and lost to leaders in the space - polls and lost mls and lost to leaders in the space of- polls and lost mls and lost to leaders in the space of a - polls and lost mls and lost to l leaders in the space of a couple polls and lost mls and lost to - leaders in the space of a couple of months in — leaders in the space of a couple of months in the _ leaders in the space of a couple of months in the dup _ leaders in the space of a couple of months in the dup need _ leaders in the space of a couple of months in the dup need to - leaders in the space of a couple of months in the dup need to come i leaders in the space of a couple of. months in the dup need to come into the room _ months in the dup need to come into the room and — months in the dup need to come into the room and the _ months in the dup need to come into the room and the denominator- months in the dup need to come intoi the room and the denominator deputy first minister — the room and the denominator deputy first minister to— the room and the denominator deputy first minister to the _ the room and the denominator deputy first minister to the executive - the room and the denominator deputy first minister to the executive and - first minister to the executive and need _ first minister to the executive and need to drop — first minister to the executive and need to drop all _ first minister to the executive and need to drop all the _ first minister to the executive and need to drop all the redlines - first minister to the executive and need to drop all the redlines and i need to drop all the redlines and actually— need to drop all the redlines and actually have _ need to drop all the redlines and actually have discussions - need to drop all the redlines and actually have discussions to - need to drop all the redlines and i actually have discussions to provide solutions _ actually have discussions to provide solutions for— actually have discussions to provide solutions for all— actually have discussions to provide solutions for all the _ actually have discussions to provide solutions for all the people - actually have discussions to provide solutions for all the people of - solutions for all the people of northern— solutions for all the people of northern ireland _ solutions for all the people of northern ireland and - solutions for all the people of northern ireland and the - solutions for all the people of northern ireland and the veryj northern ireland and the very considerable _ northern ireland and the very considerable growing - northern ireland and the very considerable growing other. northern ireland and the very- considerable growing other elements beside _ considerable growing other elements beside union— considerable growing other elements beside union and _ considerable growing other elements beside union and national. _ considerable growing other elements beside union and national. inihtzn - considerable growing other elements beside union and national.— beside union and national. when you sa cominu beside union and national. when you say coming of _ beside union and national. when you say coming of the — beside union and national. when you say coming of the room, _ beside union and national. when you say coming of the room, do - beside union and national. when you say coming of the room, do you - beside union and national. when youl say coming of the room, do you mean directly into the room? the say coming of the room, do you mean directly into the room?— directly into the room? the appeal or call members _ directly into the room? the appeal or call members of— directly into the room? the appeal or call members of the _ directly into the room? the appeal or call members of the executive l directly into the room? the appeal i or call members of the executive and all parties have — or call members of the executive and all parties have a _ or call members of the executive and all parties have a direct _ or call members of the executive and all parties have a direct say- or call members of the executive and all parties have a direct say in the - all parties have a direct say in the limitation process. _ all parties have a direct say in the limitation process. the _ all parties have a direct say in the limitation process. the ark- all parties have a direct say in the . limitation process. the ark asserted and the _ limitation process. the ark asserted and the commissioner— limitation process. the ark asserted and the commissioner visited - and the commissioner visited northern— and the commissioner visited northern ireland _ and the commissioner visited northern ireland repeatedly. and the commissioner visited i northern ireland repeatedly and and the commissioner visited - northern ireland repeatedly and what we want _ northern ireland repeatedly and what we want to _ northern ireland repeatedly and what we want to see — northern ireland repeatedly and what we want to see is _
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northern ireland repeatedly and what we want to see is ministers— we want to see is ministers nominated _ we want to see is ministers nominated to _ we want to see is ministers nominated to the _ we want to see is ministersj nominated to the executive we want to see is ministers. nominated to the executive to we want to see is ministers- nominated to the executive to serve the people _ nominated to the executive to serve the people of— nominated to the executive to serve the people of northern _ nominated to the executive to serve the people of northern ireland - nominated to the executive to serve the people of northern ireland and i the people of northern ireland and allow— the people of northern ireland and allow for— the people of northern ireland and allow for all— the people of northern ireland and allow for all the _ the people of northern ireland and allow for all the institutions - the people of northern ireland and allow for all the institutions of- allow for all the institutions of the good _ allow for all the institutions of the good friday— allow for all the institutions of the good friday agreement i allow for all the institutions of the good friday agreement to allow for all the institutions of- the good friday agreement to come back and _ the good friday agreement to come back and to — the good friday agreement to come back and to allow _ the good friday agreement to come back and to allow northern - the good friday agreement to come back and to allow northern ireland i back and to allow northern ireland have a _ back and to allow northern ireland have a direct — back and to allow northern ireland have a direct say _ back and to allow northern ireland have a direct say in _ back and to allow northern ireland have a direct say in their— back and to allow northern ireland have a direct say in their own - have a direct say in their own future — have a direct say in their own future and _ have a direct say in their own future and what _ have a direct say in their own future and what we _ have a direct say in their own future and what we have - have a direct say in their own future and what we have now have a direct say in their own . future and what we have now is have a direct say in their own - future and what we have now is a dup holding out _ future and what we have now is a dup holding out and — future and what we have now is a dup holding out and saying _ future and what we have now is a dup holding out and saying we _ future and what we have now is a dup holding out and saying we are - holding out and saying we are not getting _ holding out and saying we are not getting evolved _ holding out and saying we are not getting evolved into _ holding out and saying we are not getting evolved into what - holding out and saying we are not getting evolved into what we - holding out and saying we are not| getting evolved into what we want holding out and saying we are not i getting evolved into what we want is put forward — getting evolved into what we want is put forward in — getting evolved into what we want is put forward in the _ getting evolved into what we want is put forward in the dup _ getting evolved into what we want is put forward in the dup i— getting evolved into what we want is put forward in the dup i don't thinkl put forward in the dup i don't think actually know— put forward in the dup i don't think actually know what _ put forward in the dup i don't think actually know what they _ put forward in the dup i don't think actually know what they want - actually know what they want and they never made _ actually know what they want and they never made it _ actually know what they want and they never made it clear, - actually know what they want and they never made it clear, they . actually know what they want and l they never made it clear, theyjust have _ they never made it clear, theyjust have said no — they never made it clear, theyjust have said no to— they never made it clear, theyjust have said no to everything. - they never made it clear, theyjust have said no to everything. let’s l they never made it clear, they “ust have said no to everything. let's go to ou have said no to everything. let's go to you and — have said no to everything. let's go to you and i — have said no to everything. let's go to you and i a _ have said no to everything. let's go to you and i a you — have said no to everything. let's go to you and i a you follow— have said no to everything. let's go to you and i a you follow this - have said no to everything. let's go to you and i a you follow this very i to you and i a you follow this very closely, jonathan powell is no fan of rex ignore any fan of boris johnson said this weekend there will be a border somewhere and no one has come up with a better idea than the irish sea but it does affect unionist identity and therefore you have to ameliorate the impact of it. he is suggesting and what he is saying that the eu also has to make a significant compromise. i saying that the eu also has to make a significant compromise.— a significant compromise. i think that's true _ a significant compromise. i think that's true in _ a significant compromise. i think that's true in that _ a significant compromise. i think that's true in that you _ a significant compromise. i think that's true in that you just - a significant compromise. i think that's true in that you just have i a significant compromise. i think. that's true in that you just have to make it from us and as he was saying that you may confirm as the medicines and i think any kind of landing zone is going to hinge on their ability and willingness to do
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that for other goods as well. there are issues about parcels and issues about being able to take pets over the border and ways in which technical solutions can be come up with but that requires two things. i think on the eu side, the fear is a british government can only be trusted and i think on the british side, the question is whether this government is willing to sit down and negotiate the technicalities or rather whether as a lease today indicate they have got fed up with try to negotiate technicalities in more dramatic legal action and my suspicion is if the british government tries to legislate to deal with the protocol, then all the kind of potentials for technical fixes it might make the protocol work as is will be taken off the table quite quickly and we will end up with some kind of impasse with the prospect on the line of a trade war they will help me decide. that's the oint war they will help me decide. that's the point was _ war they will help me decide. that's the point was it _ war they will help me decide. that's the point was it a _ war they will help me decide. that's the point was it a little _ the point was it a little calculation is simple and can i get more of what i need by the 50 from the deal they from sticking to it? in if we seven leaders are pretty
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adamant that you cannot. and in if we seven leaders are pretty adamant that you cannot.- adamant that you cannot. and i think that we had — adamant that you cannot. and i think that we had a — adamant that you cannot. and i think that we had a speech _ adamant that you cannot. and i think that we had a speech today _ adamant that you cannot. and i think that we had a speech today where . adamant that you cannot. and i think| that we had a speech today where the government made it clear that it's not planning to take drastic what is i’ili'it not planning to take drastic what is right of— not planning to take drastic what is right of action on this and i think that realty— right of action on this and i think that really the interactions in northern ireland over this weekend have really underscored the level of impasse _ have really underscored the level of impasse in — have really underscored the level of impasse in northern ireland and the government is attempting to and i think— government is attempting to and i think quite rightly kick start the conversation began with a degree of earnestness and seriousness and with a sense _ earnestness and seriousness and with a sense of— earnestness and seriousness and with a sense of urgency and flexibility on both— a sense of urgency and flexibility on both sides in order to get a functioning government in place of the people of northern ireland deserve — the people of northern ireland deserve. i do think that the government is obviously going to make _ government is obviously going to make it _ government is obviously going to make it clear that they will keep all options on the table but nevertheless i think the spirit of continuing to discuss and negotiate lives continuing to discuss and negotiate tives very— continuing to discuss and negotiate lives very much and whitehall. there are irish-americans _ lives very much and whitehall. there are irish-americans in _ lives very much and whitehall. there are irish-americans in congress - lives very much and whitehall. it” are irish—americans in congress who can and will make political capital of this and the reality is the timing is not great. in terms of the
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relationship that we have packed up somewhat with the eu in recent months of the damage that it does to the rules —based order can bejust when there is a big war on that very issue. . , ., , . , issue. right and you will see a very careful navigation _ issue. right and you will see a very careful navigation by _ issue. right and you will see a very careful navigation by joe _ issue. right and you will see a very careful navigation by joe biden - issue. right and you will see a very careful navigation by joe biden but| careful navigation byjoe biden but you witt— careful navigation byjoe biden but you will see — careful navigation byjoe biden but you will see harassment _ careful navigation byjoe biden but you will see harassment and - careful navigation byjoe biden but. you will see harassment and o'neill has a _ you will see harassment and o'neill has a comment— you will see harassment and o'neill has a comment about _ you will see harassment and o'neill has a comment about it _ you will see harassment and o'neill has a comment about it but - you will see harassment and o'neill has a comment about it but that - you will see harassment and o'neill has a comment about it but that is. has a comment about it but that is backed _ has a comment about it but that is backed off— has a comment about it but that is backed off and _ has a comment about it but that is backed off and they— has a comment about it but that is backed off and they are _ has a comment about it but that is backed off and they are waiting - has a comment about it but that is backed off and they are waiting for joe biden— backed off and they are waiting for joe biden to — backed off and they are waiting for joe biden to do _ backed off and they are waiting for joe biden to do on _ backed off and they are waiting for joe biden to do on a _ backed off and they are waiting for joe biden to do on a more - backed off and they are waiting for joe biden to do on a more broad . joe biden to do on a more broad basis, _ joe biden to do on a more broad basis, so — joe biden to do on a more broad basis, so i — joe biden to do on a more broad basis, so i do _ joe biden to do on a more broad basis, so i do think— joe biden to do on a more broad basis, so i do think that really. basis, so i do think that really some space _ basis, so i do think that really some space is _ basis, so i do think that really some space is here _ some space is here forjoe biden carson— some space is here forjoe biden carson ketiy— some space is here forjoe biden carson kelly navigating - some space is here forjoe biden carson kelly navigating and - some space is here forjoe biden carson kelly navigating and he . some space is here forjoe biden . carson kelly navigating and he was some space is here forjoe biden - carson kelly navigating and he was a ship and _ carson kelly navigating and he was a ship and things — carson kelly navigating and he was a ship and things really— carson kelly navigating and he was a ship and things really good - carson kelly navigating and he was a ship and things really good place - ship and things really good place and even — ship and things really good place and even behind—the—scenes- and even behind—the—scenes repticants— and even behind—the—scenes replicants will— and even behind—the—scenes replicants will even- and even behind—the—scenes replicants will even admit. and even behind—the—scenes. replicants will even admit that, and even behind—the—scenes- replicants will even admit that, so i replicants will even admit that, so i don't _ replicants will even admit that, so i don't see — replicants will even admit that, so idon't see him _ replicants will even admit that, so i don't see him moving _ replicants will even admit that, so i don't see him moving too - replicants will even admit that, soi i don't see him moving too quickly on idon't see him moving too quickly on this— i don't see him moving too quickly on this and — i don't see him moving too quickly on this and i— i don't see him moving too quickly on this and i think _ i don't see him moving too quickly on this and i think it _ idon't see him moving too quickly on this and i think it will— i don't see him moving too quickly on this and i think it will be - i don't see him moving too quickly on this and i think it will be a - on this and i think it will be a cautious navigation - cautious navigation because everything _ cautious navigation because everything going _ cautious navigation because everything going on. - cautious navigation because everything going on.- cautious navigation because everything going on. cautious navigation because eve hinu auoin on. �* ., . everything going on. before we leave this issue a cross-border _ everything going on. before we leave this issue a cross-border trade - everything going on. before we leave this issue a cross-border trade with l this issue a cross—border trade with the european union, i know that you put out last weekend a new study on exports and imports into the european union and the wake of rex and it showed the volume of exports has pretty much recovered since the
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tca was introduced injanuary and one the grass appear on screen so the one of the left is pretty amazing because two things jump out to me, one that we are approaching a watermark in terms of exports which is surprising and the other is that imports are drastically down even though the uk have to lay the introduction of many customs checks. this is by thomas sampson and his collaborators and it is counterintuitive to get that you say the eu has put all the checks that the eu has put all the checks that the dca necessitates in place from day one in the uk has not seen you would expect that imports from the european union would hold up better than exports to the european union but what i would say is speculation is that what is happening is the eu firms the export to the uk decided that actually why take the risk of paperwork down the line, the uk is an important market maybe not the most but one suggestion is the eu
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firms have anticipated problems ahead. but when it comes to exports of the phenomenal port is while the aggregate numbers have gone up to levels they were predict pandemic, the nature of that trade is changed in the evidence suggests that large numbers of small companies have stopped trading or exporting to the european union because they don't have the resources or the wherewithal or the compliance department or the lawyers are customs advisers that large companies have so whilst aggregate figure is the same camp of the deposition of our exports to the european union have changed quite differently. european union have changed quite differentl . . ~ european union have changed quite differentl . . ,, , ., ., european union have changed quite differentl. . ,, ., european union have changed quite differentl . . ,, ., . differently. thank you to you and also to anna _ differently. thank you to you and also to anna and _ differently. thank you to you and also to anna and anita _ differently. thank you to you and also to anna and anita and - differently. thank you to you and | also to anna and anita and before let you go, i saw you on the green earlierfrom wes mr, do let you go, i saw you on the green earlier from wes mr, do you want to pass any comment on this, the minute black look? i pass any comment on this, the minute black look? ., ., . black look? i forgot that these classes black look? i forgot that these glasses change colour - black look? i forgot that these glasses change colour in - black look? i forgot that these glasses change colour in the i black look? i forgot that these l glasses change colour in the sun black look? i forgot that these - glasses change colour in the sun and i want to make that mistake again, i promise. i want to make that mistake again, i romise. ., . . , promise. not a neutraliser in your ocket. promise. not a neutraliser in your pocket- it's _ promise. not a neutraliser in your pocket- it's a _ promise. not a neutraliser in your pocket. it's a striking _ promise. not a neutraliser in your pocket. it's a striking look- promise. not a neutraliser in your pocket. it's a striking look in - promise. not a neutraliser in your pocket. it's a striking look in my l pocket. it's a striking look in my life new image. thank you both very
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much and do with us and we will talk more about ukraine and the imminent decision pending in sweden and finland over nato membership. stay with us for that. some rain on the way for many parts of the uk in the next 2a hours. it has been particularly dry in recent weeks across england and wales. certainly the gardens will be grateful for it. quite unsettled through the end of the week, often breezy because we'll have low pressure to the north of the uk. it's this little low centre running into the southwest that we are going to be looking at all wednesday, bringing rain into the southwest of england and wales. it will start to edge in by the end of the night. further north, with the low in place, we will keep showers feeding into scotland, particularly heavy one of the course of the night, and more through day of the course of the night, and more through the day on wednesday, sweeping further south into northern ireland and northern england. the biggest question is just how far north this area of rain
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will push on wednesday. at the moment, it looks perhaps not that much gets up into lancashire or yorkshire, but i think we will see weather pushing into lincolnshire through the afternoon. it starts in wales, and then some rain around during the evening for the southeast of england. perhaps 15 mm for some areas, best part of half an inch, but it could be quite scant by the time it heads across the southeast of england through the latter part of wednesday. all but gone for thursday, high pressure will start to build from the south yet again and england and wales will move into another spell of fine weather. we do keep weather fronts running through to the north of the uk through thursday and friday. some wetter weather still around for western scotland. we've seen some pretty wet weather so far this week and so those totals really mounting up for the week as a whole across the western isles and the highlands. brighter spells across northern ireland, england and wales, temperatures heading into the high teens. more the way of sunshine
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to the south on friday. a little warmer, we are looking at highs of around 20 or 21 degrees. still for western scotland, with that weather front close by, outbreaks of rain feeding in. it takes until the start of the weekend for high pressure to push far enough north to take more settled weather into scotland. end of the weekend, we could start to hook in much warmer air from the continent. but there could be the risk of the odd thundery downpour on sunday.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. the us is warning that russia is preparing for a long war in ukraine. their missile attack on the key port of odesa is fuelling fears that ukraine will not be able to export its grain, disrupting global food supplies. in light of russia's war, finland is widely expected to begin the process ofjoining nato this week — we speak to a former prime minister. and twitter�*s prospective new owner elon musk says he would reverse former president trump's ban from the platform. tonight with the context, former cabinet office special adviser anita boateng and former adviser to hillary clinton, amanda renteria.
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welcome back to the programme. it's widely expected that finland and sweden will announce in the coming week that they are joining nato. a decision would significantly redraw the security map of europe and will be seen in moscow as a hostile act. stopping ukraine from joining nato was one of the principle reasons vladimir putin invaded ukraine, his "special operation" part of a broader plan to scare other nations from joining the treaty. but it may have backfired spectacularly. nato membership was never seriously considered in stockholm and helsinki until russian forces attacked ukraine. now it is seems almost inevitable. finland brings f35 fighterjets, sweden patriot missile batteries. both, of course, are experts in arctic warfare, training intensively to fight and survive in the frozen forests of scandinavia. from finland, our special correspondent allan little sent this report. archive: little finland is putting up such a savage defence - as the modern world has rarely seen.
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finland's thinking about defence is still shaped by this, an attempt by the soviet union to invade and occupy the country in 1939. finland's resistance then is an echo of ukraine today. among the wreckage, the finns found propaganda films, which were to have been shown in helsinki after the russians had taken the capital. finland's border with russia is 800 miles long. its accession to nato would strengthen the alliance's military might, right on russia's doorstep. the trees beyond the frozen lake are in russia. on the other side of this frontier, this further advance of nato will be seen as more evidence of malign western intent, as a direct threat to the security of russia itself. finland's army is already compatible with nato. this is a british tank taking part injoint training exercises on finnish soil already. for finland was once part of the russian empire and the spectre of a resurgent russian imperialism has driven finland into full alignment
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with the western military alliance and is redrawing the security map of europe. allan little, bbc news, finland. so what next for finland and sweden? and what would joining nato mean for europe? a little earlier, i spoke with former finnish prime minister alex stubb. and i asked him how quickly timeline could be pushed through. —— how quick the timeline. i think it begins on thursday morning, with an announcement by the president, followed by the prime minister. the government takes an official decision over the weekend, and then a joint decision with sweden next week. so you would expect sweden to join at the same time? definitely. i think it's going to be quite a fast track procedure, so we'll see the nato council take an issue with the two applications by the end of the month, and then it's up to the member states to ratify finnish and swedish nato membership, hopefully within a few months. as you say, it's a seismic decision and it will undoubtedly affect finland's relationship with russia going forward.
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why is the government not putting it to a public referendum? well, first of all, the latest opinion poll was 76% in favour. secondly, it would probably be a security risk. i mean, we all know about russian information warfare, and it can be quite lethal at times. and i think the decision on security is just so steadfast at the moment. it all changed on the 24th of february and there's no point to put it to a referendum. and tell us, do you see an immediate security threat on your border? not really. we'll get hybrid threats, which basically means cyber and information. so, cyber, we're going to get some attacks on our home pages. we saw that when zelensky was speaking in the finnish parliament a few weeks back. the home page of the defence ministry and the foreign ministry were down. we had some violations of finnish airspace, and then we'll get a lot of disinformation about finland, in russia, in finland and, actually, also in the uk, so be aware. in the case of finland,
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there's been a form of military integration going on for some time. i mean, the systems are pretty closely aligned with the nato systems. but what would change immediately, in terms of the command structure, in terms of what happens at the border? nothing radical. so the biggest sort of upside for us is article 5 — collective defence. the biggest upside for nato is a reserve of 900,000 men, mobilisation of 280,000, 62 fat and 64 f355 and a very strong artillery. so it's very much a win—win proposition for finland, sweden, the baltic sea region and the alliance. that's why i think the alliance will welcome us with open arms. so there would be a bigger presence in finland, a nato presence, almost immediately? well, we've had it already, in terms of training exercises over the years. so we've had a lot of joint exercises with nato, and actually, on top of that, we've participated in almost
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all nato operations around the world, including the balkans and afghanistan. has there been...? i know the prime minister was in germany last week. given that there is a risk that russia lashes out, has this decision had to be...? has there been an effort to square it with the likes of the german chancellor, the french president? are there some within the nato alliance who are nervous about this? i don't think so. so nato has 30 member states, and the finnish and swedish governments began subtle diplomacy immediately when the war began and basically got themselves what we would call security assurances, both for the so—called grey period, from when we apply to when we actually become full members, but also secondlyjust to make sure that there are not going to be any glitches in the process. and i can quite safely say that we're not going to have any. alexander stubb, it's very good to talk to you tonight. thank you for your time.
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anita, we had the former intelligence officer christopher steele on last night, he said the recommendations had already begun about the war. you heard him there say it change for them on the 24th of february. there is a growing confidence in nato membership within them than the, there is a growing confidence within nato. this them than the, there is a growing confidence within nato._ confidence within nato. this is a reinvigoration _ confidence within nato. this is a reinvigoration of _ confidence within nato. this is a reinvigoration of the _ confidence within nato. this is a reinvigoration of the alliance, i confidence within nato. this is a reinvigoration of the alliance, ofi reinvigoration of the alliance, of what _ reinvigoration of the alliance, of what data — reinvigoration of the alliance, of what data stands for. and they will be practical benefits, and essential doubting _ be practical benefits, and essential doubling of the kind of nato border, because _ doubling of the kind of nato border, because finland borders russia, and of course _ because finland borders russia, and of course what we are seeing is europe. — of course what we are seeing is europe, via _ of course what we are seeing is europe, via nato, freely taking a tong-term — europe, via nato, freely taking a long—term view about the strategic threat _ long—term view about the strategic threat russia poses and seeking to build moral authority, clarity of purpose. — build moral authority, clarity of purpose, as well as stretching the
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alliance _ purpose, as well as stretching the attiance in— purpose, as well as stretching the alliance in more practical ways. i think— alliance in more practical ways. i think this — alliance in more practical ways. i think this is _ alliance in more practical ways. i think this is quite a landmark moment— think this is quite a landmark moment for nato at a positive thing for the _ moment for nato at a positive thing for the 30 _ moment for nato at a positive thing for the 30 countries or so that are members — for the 30 countries or so that are members of nato._ for the 30 countries or so that are members of nato. some will see it as a ositive, members of nato. some will see it as a positive. but — members of nato. some will see it as a positive, but there _ members of nato. some will see it as a positive, but there are _ members of nato. some will see it as a positive, but there are voices, - a positive, but there are voices, amanda, who say president putin is right somewhat the nato's expansion to its border has failed to take into account sentiment in moscow, it hasn't taken as the russians, and this will presumably be used in moscow to legitimise the or in ukraine... audio loss you might be on mute. are you on mute? i you might be on mute. are you on mute? . ~ . you might be on mute. are you on mute? . ,, , ., mute? i am! i think putin is on mute a little bit here, _ mute? i am! i think putin is on mute a little bit here, because people - a little bit here, because people are beginning to see what is happening on the ground, and i think all of these concerns that folks had any past, you are beginning to see them die down as you see what things look like on the ground and more and
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more the us is leaning into the alliance, lean into, what do we need to do to get things in a better place? to do to get things in a better lace? . sticking with the war in ukraine, officials in the port city of odesa say seven missiles struck a shopping centre and a warehouse, killing at least one person. there is some evidence the russians used hypersonic missiles in the attack. it coincided with the visit of the european council president, charles michel, on a surprise visit to odesa, forcing him to take shelter. the city is currently under a curfew. odesa is a key port city along the ukrainian black sea coast, and if it was to fall to russian troops, it could cut off ukraine denying them access to world markets — something president zelensky says could be devastating for the global food supply. russia's invasion of ukraine has already substantially affected the prices of food, including vegetable oils, wheat and maize. before the war, ukraine and russia accounted for 28.9% of global wheat exports, according tojp morgan, and 60% of global sunflower supplies —
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a key ingredient in many processed foods. and guess where the un world food programme sourced more than half of its supplies for the hungry across the globe in 2021? ukraine. so they are warning it will be some of the most vulnerable countries whose food supplies will be hit the hardest. egypt, indonesia, bangladesh, turkey, yemen are among those countries importing millions of metric tonnes from ukraine — egypt gets a whopping 80% of its wheat imports from russia and ukraine. it's worth remembering that the last time food prices were this high — in 2008 and 2009 — it caused civil unrest all over the world. there were riots in haiti, south america and south asia, in the middle east — the price of bread was one spark for the arab spring. now in sri lanka, a country that relies on ukraine and russia for almost half its wheat, the price of a loaf of bread has doubled since the start of the war, compounding an already tense situation in the country that's lead to the pm resigning and huge riots.
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angus blair is cib professor of practice at the american university in cairo school of business. angus, we shared sometime in 2008 — 09, and i'm old enough to remember what it was like back then in cairo and what happened when the government struggled to provide subsidies for bread and struggle to provide bread to the people. tell us how many people in egypt are on this subsidised bread supply. thank how many people in egypt are on this subsidised bread supply.— subsidised bread supply. thank you. around 60 million _ subsidised bread supply. thank you. around 60 million people _ subsidised bread supply. thank you. around 60 million people in - subsidised bread supply. thank you. around 60 million people in the - around 60 million people in the publishing — around 60 million people in the publishing at _ around 60 million people in the publishing at large _ around 60 million people in the publishing at large about - around 60 million people in the publishing at large about 60% l around 60 million people in the| publishing at large about 60% of around 60 million people in the - publishing at large about 60% of the population. — publishing at large about 60% of the population. retying _ publishing at large about 60% of the population, relying on _ publishing at large about 60% of the population, relying on subsidies- directly at the moment. what do you think is happening _ directly at the moment. what do you think is happening in _ directly at the moment. what do you think is happening in egypt _ directly at the moment. what do you think is happening in egypt at - directly at the moment. what do you think is happening in egypt at the - think is happening in egypt at the moment? is there some panicking government, about the shock to their supplies that are coming? i government, about the shock to their supplies that are coming?— supplies that are coming? i think, as ou supplies that are coming? i think, as you have _ supplies that are coming? i think, as you have been _ supplies that are coming? i think, as you have been mentioning, - supplies that are coming? i think, | as you have been mentioning, this supplies that are coming? i think, i as you have been mentioning, this is as you have been mentioning, this is a global— as you have been mentioning, this is a global issue. — as you have been mentioning, this is a global issue, and _ as you have been mentioning, this is a global issue, and some _ as you have been mentioning, this is a global issue, and some countries. a global issue, and some countries will he _ a global issue, and some countries will he hit — a global issue, and some countries will be hit harder—
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a global issue, and some countries will be hit harder than— a global issue, and some countries will be hit harder than others. - a global issue, and some countries will be hit harder than others. wei will be hit harder than others. we have gtohat— will be hit harder than others. we have global inflation, _ will be hit harder than others. we have global inflation, food - will be hit harder than others. we have global inflation, food price l have global inflation, food price inflation — have global inflation, food price inflation in _ have global inflation, food price inflation in egypt. _ have global inflation, food price inflation in egypt. year- have global inflation, food price inflation in egypt. year on - have global inflation, food price inflation in egypt. year on yeari inflation in egypt. year on year inftation — inflation in egypt. year on year inflation is _ inflation in egypt. year on year inflation is coming _ inflation in egypt. year on year inflation is coming to— inflation in egypt. year on year inflation is coming to 13%. - inflation in egypt. year on yeari inflation is coming to 13%. that inflation in egypt. year on year. inflation is coming to 13%. that is coming _ inflation is coming to 13%. that is coming to— inflation is coming to 13%. that is coming to many— inflation is coming to 13%. that is coming to many countries. - inflation is coming to 13%. that is- coming to many countries. vegetable prices _ coming to many countries. vegetable prices are _ coming to many countries. vegetable prices are up— coming to many countries. vegetable prices are up try— coming to many countries. vegetable prices are up by 30%, _ coming to many countries. vegetable prices are up by 30%, in _ coming to many countries. vegetable prices are up by 30%, in some - coming to many countries. vegetable prices are up by 30%, in some casesi prices are up by 30%, in some cases slightly— prices are up by 30%, in some cases slightly more — prices are up by 30%, in some cases slightly more than _ prices are up by 30%, in some cases slightly more than that, _ prices are up by 30%, in some cases slightly more than that, but - prices are up by 30%, in some cases slightly more than that, but since i slightly more than that, but since you were — slightly more than that, but since you were here, _ slightly more than that, but since you were here, christian, - slightly more than that, but since you were here, christian, they. slightly more than that, but since | you were here, christian, they did very well, — you were here, christian, they did very well, the _ you were here, christian, they did very well, the fact _ you were here, christian, they did very well, the fact that _ you were here, christian, they did very well, the fact that the - very well, the fact that the ministry— very well, the fact that the ministry has— very well, the fact that the ministry has been- very well, the fact that the ministry has been beefed i very well, the fact that the i ministry has been beefed up, it very well, the fact that the - ministry has been beefed up, it is quite _ ministry has been beefed up, it is quite easy— ministry has been beefed up, it is quite easy to _ ministry has been beefed up, it is quite easy to make _ ministry has been beefed up, it is quite easy to make a _ ministry has been beefed up, it is quite easy to make a decision i ministry has been beefed up, it is| quite easy to make a decision that will trickte — quite easy to make a decision that will trickle through— quite easy to make a decision that will trickle through the _ quite easy to make a decision that will trickle through the economy l quite easy to make a decision that| will trickle through the economy at large _ will trickle through the economy at large what— will trickle through the economy at large what we _ will trickle through the economy at large. what we saw— will trickle through the economy at large. what we saw in— will trickle through the economy at large. what we saw in the - will trickle through the economy at large. what we saw in the covid i large. what we saw in the covid crisis _ large. what we saw in the covid crisis when _ large. what we saw in the covid crisis when it _ large. what we saw in the covid crisis when it started _ large. what we saw in the covid crisis when it started and - large. what we saw in the covid crisis when it started and then i crisis when it started and then earlier— crisis when it started and then earlier this _ crisis when it started and then earlier this year, _ crisis when it started and then earlier this year, was - crisis when it started and then earlier this year, was a - crisis when it started and then earlier this year, was a very. crisis when it started and then i earlier this year, was a very swift and i_ earlier this year, was a very swift and i have — earlier this year, was a very swift and i have to _ earlier this year, was a very swift and i have to say _ earlier this year, was a very swift and i have to say pretty- earlier this year, was a very swift and i have to say pretty efficienti and i have to say pretty efficient response — and i have to say pretty efficient response to _ and i have to say pretty efficient response to those _ and i have to say pretty efficient response to those external- and i have to say pretty efficient i response to those external stresses, and what _ response to those external stresses, and what it _ response to those external stresses, and what it meant— response to those external stresses, and what it meant internally- response to those external stresses, and what it meant internally for- and what it meant internally for repercussions, _ and what it meant internally for repercussions, but _ and what it meant internally for repercussions, but it— and what it meant internally for repercussions, but it is- and what it meant internally for repercussions, but it is a - and what it meant internally for repercussions, but it is a strain| repercussions, but it is a strain because — repercussions, but it is a strain because egypt— repercussions, but it is a strain because egypt is— repercussions, but it is a strain because egypt is the _ repercussions, but it is a strain because egypt is the richest. repercussions, but it is a strain i because egypt is the richest country in the _ because egypt is the richest country in the region. — because egypt is the richest country in the region, but— because egypt is the richest country in the region, but it _ because egypt is the richest country in the region, but it does _ because egypt is the richest country in the region, but it does have i in the region, but it does have pretty— in the region, but it does have pretty good _ in the region, but it does have pretty good governance - in the region, but it does have pretty good governance in i in the region, but it does have pretty good governance in the | pretty good governance in the ministry— pretty good governance in the ministry of— pretty good governance in the ministry of finance _ pretty good governance in the ministry of finance any- pretty good governance in the ministry of finance any central bank, — ministry of finance any central bank, and _ ministry of finance any central bank, and the _ ministry of finance any central bank, and the focus _ ministry of finance any central bank, and the focus on -
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ministry of finance any central. bank, and the focus on improving ministry of finance any central- bank, and the focus on improving the mystic— bank, and the focus on improving the mystic production, _ bank, and the focus on improving the mystic production, agricultural- mystic production, agricultural production. _ mystic production, agricultural production, has— mystic production, agricultural production, has been- mystic production, agricultural production, has been a - mystic production, agriculturali production, has been a priority mystic production, agricultural- production, has been a priority this year _ production, has been a priority this year the _ production, has been a priority this year. the pian— production, has been a priority this year. the plan is— production, has been a priority this year. the plan is to _ production, has been a priority this year. the plan is to move - production, has been a priority this i year. the plan is to move production of wheat— year. the plan is to move production of wheat to — year. the plan is to move production of wheat to 45% _ year. the plan is to move production of wheat to 45% domestic— year. the plan is to move production of wheat to 45% domestic —— - year. the plan is to move production i of wheat to 45% domestic —— domestic production _ of wheat to 45% domestic —— domestic production at— of wheat to 45% domestic —— domestic production. at the _ of wheat to 45% domestic —— domestic production. at the short—term - of wheat to 45% domestic —— domestic production. at the short—term hit, i production. at the short—term hit, as you _ production. at the short—term hit, as you mentioned, _ production. at the short—term hit, as you mentioned, will— production. at the short—term hit, as you mentioned, will be - as you mentioned, will be significant. _ as you mentioned, will be significant.— as you mentioned, will be siunificant. ., . . . significant. for that grain that it is growing. _ significant. for that grain that it is growing, does _ significant. for that grain that it is growing, does it _ significant. for that grain that it is growing, does it source i significant. for that grain that it is growing, does it source its i is growing, does it source its fertiliser from is growing, does it source its fertiliserfrom russia? is growing, does it source its fertiliser from russia? christian, it sopplies _ fertiliser from russia? christian, it sopplies a _ fertiliser from russia? christian, it supplies a lot _ fertiliser from russia? christian, it supplies a lot of _ fertiliser from russia? christian, it supplies a lot of his _ fertiliser from russia? christian, it supplies a lot of his own i it supplies a lot of his own fertiliser— it supplies a lot of his own fertiliser from _ it supplies a lot of his own fertiliser from its - it supplies a lot of his own fertiliser from its natural. it supplies a lot of his own i fertiliser from its natural gas sector, — fertiliser from its natural gas sector, so— fertiliser from its natural gas sector. so egypt— fertiliser from its natural gas sector, so egypt has- fertiliser from its natural gas sector, so egypt has a - fertiliser from its natural gas i sector, so egypt has a number of strength— sector, so egypt has a number of strength compared _ sector, so egypt has a number of strength compared to _ sector, so egypt has a number of strength compared to other- sector, so egypt has a number of- strength compared to other markets. inftation— strength compared to other markets. inflation is— strength compared to other markets. inflation is going _ strength compared to other markets. inflation is going be _ strength compared to other markets. inflation is going be with— strength compared to other markets. inflation is going be with us- strength compared to other markets. inflation is going be with us for- strength compared to other markets. inflation is going be with us for a i inflation is going be with us for a white _ inflation is going be with us for a white tonger, _ inflation is going be with us for a while longer, but _ inflation is going be with us for a while longer, but these - inflation is going be with us for a while longer, but these external| while longer, but these external stresses~~~ _ while longer, but these external stresses... you _ while longer, but these external stresses... you have _ while longer, but these external stresses... you have to- while longer, but these external. stresses... you have to remember, while longer, but these external- stresses... you have to remember, a very large _ stresses... you have to remember, a very large number— stresses... you have to remember, a very large number of— stresses... you have to remember, a very large number of russian- stresses... you have to remember, a very large number of russian and i very large number of russian and ukrainian — very large number of russian and ukrainian tourists— very large number of russian and ukrainian tourists provided - very large number of russian and ukrainian tourists provided the i ukrainian tourists provided the largest— ukrainian tourists provided the largest percentage _ ukrainian tourists provided the largest percentage of- ukrainian tourists provided the largest percentage of any- ukrainian tourists provided the i largest percentage of any region, in terms _ largest percentage of any region, in terms of— largest percentage of any region, in terms of tourists _ largest percentage of any region, in terms of tourists to _ largest percentage of any region, in terms of tourists to the _ largest percentage of any region, in terms of tourists to the red - largest percentage of any region, in terms of tourists to the red sea i terms of tourists to the red sea particutarty~ _ terms of tourists to the red sea particularly. the _ terms of tourists to the red sea particularly. the budget - terms of tourists to the red sea particularly. the budget will- terms of tourists to the red sea particularly. the budget will be i particularly. the budget will be hit, particularly. the budget will be hit. by— particularly. the budget will be hit. by i — particularly. the budget will be hit, by i assume, _ particularly. the budget will be hit, by i assume, $1 _ particularly. the budget will be hit, by i assume, $1 million- particularly. the budget will be| hit, by i assume, $1 million this year. _ hit, by i assume, $1 million this year. but — hit, by i assume, $1 million this
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year. but egypt _ hit, by i assume, $1 million this year, but egypt likely— hit, by i assume, $1 million this year, but egypt likely has - hit, by i assume, $1 million this year, but egypt likely has good| year, but egypt likely has good neighbours— year, but egypt likely has good neighbours in— year, but egypt likely has good neighbours in terms _ year, but egypt likely has good neighbours in terms of- year, but egypt likely has good. neighbours in terms of potential support~ — neighbours in terms of potential support. we _ neighbours in terms of potential support. we had _ neighbours in terms of potential support. we had this— neighbours in terms of potential support. we had this in- neighbours in terms of potential support. we had this in the i neighbours in terms of potential support. we had this in the last| support. we had this in the last month— support. we had this in the last month or— support. we had this in the last month or so _ support. we had this in the last month or so from _ support. we had this in the last month or so from saudi - support. we had this in the last month or so from saudi arabial support. we had this in the last i month or so from saudi arabia and from _ month or so from saudi arabia and from the _ month or so from saudi arabia and from the emirates, _ month or so from saudi arabia and from the emirates, to— month or so from saudi arabia and from the emirates, to be - month or so from saudi arabia and from the emirates, to be able i month or so from saudi arabia and from the emirates, to be able to l from the emirates, to be able to help. and — from the emirates, to be able to help. and it _ from the emirates, to be able to help. and it is— from the emirates, to be able to help. and it is a _ from the emirates, to be able to help, and it is a stress _ from the emirates, to be able to help, and it is a stress and i help, and it is a stress and inflation _ help, and it is a stress and inflation hurts— help, and it is a stress and inflation hurts everyone, i inflation hurts everyone, pa rticuta rty _ inflation hurts everyone, particularly the - inflation hurts everyone, particularly the poor. i inflation hurts everyone, | particularly the poor. but inflation hurts everyone, particularly the poor. inflation hurts everyone, articularl the oor. �* , particularly the poor. but as we see in sri lanka, _ particularly the poor. but as we see in sri lanka, finally _ particularly the poor. but as we see in sri lanka, finally in _ particularly the poor. but as we see in sri lanka, finally in this - particularly the poor. but as we see in sri lanka, finally in this issue, i in sri lanka, finally in this issue, a country hurt by this. you in sri lanka, finally in this issue, a country hurt by this.— a country hurt by this. you are riaht, a country hurt by this. you are right. but _ a country hurt by this. you are right, but there _ a country hurt by this. you are right, but there are _ a country hurt by this. you are right, but there are other i a country hurt by this. you are i right, but there are other elements in sri _ right, but there are other elements in sri lanka — right, but there are other elements in sri lanka and _ right, but there are other elements in sri lanka and peru _ right, but there are other elements in sri lanka and peru of— right, but there are other elements in sri lanka and peru of pretty- right, but there are other elements in sri lanka and peru of pretty badi in sri lanka and peru of pretty bad governance~ — in sri lanka and peru of pretty bad governance. i think— in sri lanka and peru of pretty bad governance. i think the _ governance. i think the situation here _ governance. i think the situation here is— governance. i think the situation here is that _ governance. i think the situation here is that the _ governance. i think the situation here is that the government i governance. i think the situation here is that the government is, i governance. i think the situationi here is that the government is, i have _ here is that the government is, i have to — here is that the government is, i have to say, _ here is that the government is, i have to say, pretty— here is that the government is, i have to say, pretty fast - here is that the government is, i have to say, pretty fast in - here is that the government is, i have to say, pretty fast in its i have to say, pretty fast in its responses _ have to say, pretty fast in its responses and _ have to say, pretty fast in its responses and looking - have to say, pretty fast in its responses and looking to i have to say, pretty fast in its i responses and looking to ensure have to say, pretty fast in its - responses and looking to ensure that payments _ responses and looking to ensure that payments and — responses and looking to ensure that payments and subsidies _ responses and looking to ensure that payments and subsidies are - responses and looking to ensure that payments and subsidies are going i responses and looking to ensure that payments and subsidies are going to| payments and subsidies are going to those _ payments and subsidies are going to those who— payments and subsidies are going to those who need _ payments and subsidies are going to those who need it _ payments and subsidies are going to those who need it most _ payments and subsidies are going to those who need it most as— payments and subsidies are going to those who need it most as quickly. payments and subsidies are going to| those who need it most as quickly as possible. _ those who need it most as quickly as possible. but— those who need it most as quickly as possible, but the _ those who need it most as quickly as possible, but the wider— those who need it most as quickly as possible, but the wider inflation i those who need it most as quickly as possible, but the wider inflation is i possible, but the wider inflation is hurting. _ possible, but the wider inflation is hurting. and— possible, but the wider inflation is hurting, and could _ possible, but the wider inflation is hurting, and could we _ possible, but the wider inflation is hurting, and could we go - possible, but the wider inflation is hurting, and could we go back- possible, but the wider inflation is hurting, and could we go back to i hurting, and could we go back to issues _ hurting, and could we go back to issues that— hurting, and could we go back to issues that we _ hurting, and could we go back to issues that we saw, _ hurting, and could we go back to issues that we saw, say, - hurting, and could we go back to issues that we saw, say, in i hurting, and could we go back to i issues that we saw, say, in 2008? possibly. — issues that we saw, say, in 2008? possibly. but — issues that we saw, say, in 2008? possibly. but i _ issues that we saw, say, in 2008? possibly, but i have _ issues that we saw, say, in 2008? possibly, but i have to _ issues that we saw, say, in 2008? possibly, but i have to say - issues that we saw, say, in 2008? possibly, but i have to say the i possibly, but i have to say the government _ possibly, but i have to say the government has learned - possibly, but i have to say the government has learned a i possibly, but i have to say the government has learned a lot| possibly, but i have to say the i government has learned a lot of lessons — government has learned a lot of lessons over— government has learned a lot of lessons over that _ government has learned a lot of lessons over that period, - government has learned a lot of lessons over that period, as i government has learned a lot of i lessons over that period, as again you know—
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lessons over that period, as again you know from _ lessons over that period, as again you know from 2011, _ lessons over that period, as again you know from 2011, 2013 - lessons over that period, as again i you know from 2011, 2013 onwards, to handle _ you know from 2011, 2013 onwards, to handle the _ you know from 2011, 2013 onwards, to handle the potential— you know from 2011, 2013 onwards, to handle the potential for— you know from 2011, 2013 onwards, to handle the potential for dissent. i handle the potential for dissent. but it_ handle the potential for dissent. but it is— handle the potential for dissent. but it is hurting _ handle the potential for dissent. but it is hurting and _ handle the potential for dissent. but it is hurting and this- handle the potential for dissent. but it is hurting and this is- but it is hurting and this is something _ but it is hurting and this is something i_ but it is hurting and this is something i think- but it is hurting and this is something i think we - but it is hurting and this is something i think we are i but it is hurting and this is- something i think we are probably going _ something i think we are probably going to _ something i think we are probably going to need _ something i think we are probably going to need to— something i think we are probably going to need to talk— something i think we are probably going to need to talk about - something i think we are probably going to need to talk about in - something i think we are probably going to need to talk about in a i something i think we are probably. going to need to talk about in a few months' _ going to need to talk about in a few months' time, _ going to need to talk about in a few months' time, a _ going to need to talk about in a few months' time, a year's— going to need to talk about in a few months' time, a year's time, - months' time, a year's time, depending _ months' time, a year's time, depending on— months' time, a year's time, depending on what _ months' time, a year's time, depending on what happensi months' time, a year's time, i depending on what happens in months' time, a year's time, - depending on what happens in ukraine and russia _ depending on what happens in ukraine and russia. . ., depending on what happens in ukraine and russia. . . ., ., , and russia. yeah, a lot of countries auoin to and russia. yeah, a lot of countries going to have _ and russia. yeah, a lot of countries going to have to — and russia. yeah, a lot of countries going to have to work _ and russia. yeah, a lot of countries going to have to work together. - going to have to work together. angus player, good to see you. thank you for that. amanda, just on the issue with ukraine, just before we finish with this, there is a rush to get these weapons to ukraine. joe biden re—enacted a provision yesterday, from 19 41, a land lease programme to send weapons to ukraine, and the reason he has done this is this £32 billion funding they want to centre the ukrainians, thatis they want to centre the ukrainians, that is still in the pipelines. congress has not passed that. that is riuht. congress has not passed that. that is right- there _ congress has not passed that. that is right. there is _ congress has not passed that. that is right. there is a _ congress has not passed that. twat is right. there is a vote to work through that, tomorrow, along with women's rights and abortion rights. this is the conversation. it was the big important moments to send over drjill biden on mother's day. that
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is the lead up to the vote that is happening tomorrow and you're going to see more of the conversation. what biden has to do is talk about ukraine and also move things forward on the floor, and they are doing that i'm having a lot of conversations on the floor right now, to prepare for that. 0k, ok, let's stay with american politics. whether you like him or not, donald trump still looms large over the republican party. he has endorsed well over 100 candidates for the upcoming midterm elections, turning the tide in some key republican primary ballots. his word, clearly, still carries big weight with republican voters, but he is also causing rifts in the party — even among those who in public have strongly supported him. take the house minority leader kevin mccarthy, for example. in january last year, he was telling republican colleagues the president should resign for the role he had played onjanuary 6. i know this is not fun, i know this is not great and obviously very tough, but what i want to do, especially through here,
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is i don't want to rush things. i want everybody to have all the information needed. i've had it with this guy. what he did is unacceptable. nobody can defend that and nobody should defend it. that recording, one of many in recent weeks released by the authors of a new book, this will not pass. they are the new york times reporters alex burns and jonathan martin. they are with us. so much reporting on your book, nice to have you on the programme. you set in the book kevin mccarthy pushed trump to resign afterjanuary 6. how do you explain, then, that they all reversed their position, jonathan? why is there this folly over the former american president? {line why is there this folly over the former american president? one word answer - polities! _ former american president? one word answer - politics! look, _ former american president? one word answer - politics! look, i— former american president? one word answer - politics! look, ithink- former american president? one word answer - politics! look, i think the - answer — politics! look, i think the fact is that once leaders like kevin mccarthy and mitch mcconnell saw where their voters were going, which was back to trump's arms, they made
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a pretty swift calculation that it was not worth confronting trump because their voters were not upset with trump forjanuary 6. they weren't upset with him, really, at all, and so i think that is what has shaped the leadership of the gop, notjust since january 6 but really for the last seven years, since trump came on the american political scene also repeatedly, republican leaders bowing to the preferences of their voters when it comes to donald trump. in part because, frankly, they are scared of those voters. yeah. alexander, you also report that mitch mcconnell, senate minority leader, whose principal goal is to win back control of the senate, has not spoken to donald trump since december. and around the time of generally six, he was quite clear he wanted democrats to impeach the former president. so where does that relationship go? and how important is it to the running of
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the provoking party? just important is it to the running of the provoking party?— the provoking party? just to be clear, the provoking party? just to be clear. they _ the provoking party? just to be clear, they have _ the provoking party? just to be clear, they have not _ the provoking party? just to be clear, they have not spoken . the provoking party? just to be i clear, they have not spoken since december— clear, they have not spoken since december 20 clear, they have not spoken since december20 20, clear, they have not spoken since december 20 20, two years ago. they spoke _ december 20 20, two years ago. they spoke bitterly after mitch mcconnell went to _ spoke bitterly after mitch mcconnell went to the senate floor and recognised joe biden as the 2020 election— recognised joe biden as the 2020 election winner. they have never had the kind _ election winner. they have never had the kind of— election winner. they have never had the kind of warm relationship that trump and — the kind of warm relationship that trump and kevin mccarthy have had for most _ trump and kevin mccarthy have had for most of— trump and kevin mccarthy have had for most of the last five or six years — for most of the last five or six years it — for most of the last five or six years. it was always a transactional on both sides. they never had a dose _ on both sides. they never had a close personal connection, and mcconnell and his wife elaine chao, who served — mcconnell and his wife elaine chao, who served in trump's cabinet, have been _ who served in trump's cabinet, have been candid — who served in trump's cabinet, have been candid for a long time, and been candid fora long time, and again— been candid for a long time, and again in— been candid for a long time, and again in private, about finding trump — again in private, about finding trumpe— again in private, about finding trump a pretty distasteful character, but where they find himself— character, but where they find himself today is entirely different, that this _ himself today is entirely different, that this is a breach that has not been _ that this is a breach that has not been repaired, it is not likely to be repaired. you alluded to the fact that mcconnell's principal goal is to retake — that mcconnell's principal goal is to retake the said majority and he
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made _ to retake the said majority and he made the — to retake the said majority and he made the bet afterjanuary 6 that he would _ made the bet afterjanuary 6 that he would not _ made the bet afterjanuary 6 that he would not have to personally confronts donald trump in which open war against— confronts donald trump in which open war against the former president because — war against the former president because if— war against the former president because if he ignored him, then trump _ because if he ignored him, then trump would lose altitude, lose relevance — trump would lose altitude, lose relevance on his own. that has augusti — relevance on his own. that has augusti not happened, and mcconnell is now— augusti not happened, and mcconnell is now looking at the very, very reat— is now looking at the very, very real possibility that it will be trump's _ real possibility that it will be trump's chosen candidate who wind up as the _ trump's chosen candidate who wind up as the nrost— trump's chosen candidate who wind up as the most important standard—bearers for republicans in the senate elections this fall. yeah, — the senate elections this fall. yeah, that is something to watch in the midterms. it is notjust republicans you drill into in the book. you have a lot of fresh boarding about president biden, and during the election and in the year and a half since. you say in the book that he has dedicated his belief that the presidency should betray information or, that it should be in competition with barack obama or fdr. do people around him think he has delivered on that? i think he has delivered on that? i think he has delivered on that? i think in the first month of think he has delivered on that? i think in the first month of 2021, when he was getting some really big
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victories, trump appeared to be in the rear—view mirror, and covid appeared to be also in the rear—view mirror, i think there was a feeling of hubris around this white house and around biden's inner circle, that not only could he went up barack obama but potentially have an fdr like legacy —— one up barack obama. biden held at 80 years old, conscious of his place in history, was really ambitious in this first months because he thought, if ijust served one term, i am going to have to build a pretty quickly here a lot of accomplishments, and i think that is why he moved so swiftly in 2021, the challenge was that he did so with basically an equally divided congress between democrats and republicans, hejust did not congress between democrats and republicans, he just did not have the votes to pursue a sweeping policy agenda, and that is why, in part, his numbers have sank. but you touched on an important point, and
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thatis touched on an important point, and that is he served with barack obama as his vice president for eight years, and there is this notion in the american press that they were good buddies, they became the closest of friends, and there is a macro that —— that is so overinflated. the fact is, the political partnership from day one, biden was very stunned that obama would not support his candidacy for president in 2016, instead backing hillary clinton, and he has not forgotten that. it is much more of a sibling rivalry that is a romance, to be candid somewhat interesting. let me bring in our panel on this, interesting. let me bring in our panel on this.— interesting. let me bring in our anel on this, , ., ., ~ panel on this, news from elon musk, who said in — panel on this, news from elon musk, who said in a — panel on this, news from elon musk, who said in a panel— panel on this, news from elon musk, who said in a panel it _ panel on this, news from elon musk, who said in a panel it was _ panel on this, news from elon musk, who said in a panel it was a - panel on this, news from elon musk, who said in a panel it was a mistakel who said in a panel it was a mistake to remove donald trump from twitter. probably those who have bent the knee are relieved they have not been excoriated on twitter in recent months, but there are other republicans as well that it is still in good stead for him to be off
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twitter. i in good stead for him to be off twitter. ~ . , in good stead for him to be off twitter. ~' . , , twitter. i think the reality is, it rives twitter. i think the reality is, it gives trump — twitter. i think the reality is, it gives trump a _ twitter. i think the reality is, it gives trump a voice, _ twitter. i think the reality is, it gives trump a voice, a - twitter. i think the reality is, it. gives trump a voice, a platform, twitter. i think the reality is, it- gives trump a voice, a platform, not only in— gives trump a voice, a platform, not only in these — gives trump a voice, a platform, not only in these midterm _ gives trump a voice, a platform, not only in these midterm elections, - gives trump a voice, a platform, not only in these midterm elections, but as you _ only in these midterm elections, but as you start— only in these midterm elections, but as you start to — only in these midterm elections, but as you start to see _ only in these midterm elections, but as you start to see the _ only in these midterm elections, but as you start to see the january - only in these midterm elections, but as you start to see the january 6 - as you start to see the january 6 hearings. _ as you start to see the january 6 hearings, he now— as you start to see the january 6 hearings, he now will— as you start to see the january 6 hearings, he now will very - as you start to see the january 6 hearings, he now will very muchj as you start to see the january 6 i hearings, he now will very much be in the _ hearings, he now will very much be in the discussion. _ hearings, he now will very much be in the discussion. 0n _ hearings, he now will very much be in the discussion. 0n the _ hearings, he now will very much be in the discussion. 0n the other- in the discussion. 0n the other hand. — in the discussion. 0n the other hand. as — in the discussion. 0n the other hand. as you _ in the discussion. 0n the other hand. as you go— in the discussion. 0n the other hand, as you go through - in the discussion. 0n the other hand, as you go through the l hand, as you go through the midterms. _ hand, as you go through the midterms, so _ hand, as you go through the midterms, so far— hand, as you go through the midterms, so far candidatesj hand, as you go through the - midterms, so far candidates are not backing _ midterms, so far candidates are not backing away — midterms, so far candidates are not backing away from _ midterms, so far candidates are not backing away from trump _ midterms, so far candidates are not backing away from trump positive . backing away from trump positive message — backing away from trump positive message anyway, _ backing away from trump positive message anyway, and _ backing away from trump positive message anyway, and so- backing away from trump positive message anyway, and so i- backing away from trump positive message anyway, and so i think. backing away from trump positive. message anyway, and so i think we could _ message anyway, and so i think we could end _ message anyway, and so i think we could end up — message anyway, and so i think we could end up setting _ message anyway, and so i think we could end up setting up— message anyway, and so i think we could end up setting up a _ message anyway, and so i think we could end up setting up a midtermi could end up setting up a midterm election that — could end up setting up a midterm election that feels _ could end up setting up a midterm election that feels a _ could end up setting up a midterm election that feels a lot _ could end up setting up a midterm election that feels a lot more - could end up setting up a midterm election that feels a lot more likei election that feels a lot more like a general— election that feels a lot more like a general election— election that feels a lot more like a general election —— _ election that feels a lot more like a general election —— trump's- a general election —— trump's message~ _ a general election —— trump's message. because _ a general election —— trump's message. because you - a general election —— trump's message. because you will. a general election —— trump's. message. because you will have a general election —— trump's- message. because you will have a very visible — message. because you will have a very visible trump _ message. because you will have a very visible trump national- message. because you will have a - very visible trump national message, and it— very visible trump national message, and it does— very visible trump national message, and it does look— very visible trump national message, and it does look like _ very visible trump national message, and it does look like his _ very visible trump national message, and it does look like his candidates i and it does look like his candidates are winning — and it does look like his candidates are winning at _ and it does look like his candidates are winning at the _ and it does look like his candidates are winning at the moment. - and it does look like his candidates are winning at the moment.- are winning at the moment. anita, jonathan and _ are winning at the moment. anita, jonathan and alex, _ are winning at the moment. anita, jonathan and alex, to _ are winning at the moment. anita, jonathan and alex, to finish - are winning at the moment. anita, jonathan and alex, to finish on - are winning at the moment. anita, jonathan and alex, to finish on a i jonathan and alex, to finish on a meditation on american democracy, trump has not left the american stage. you see in american policy what you have here, a debate over integrity, over moral, over standards. is there a problem at the moment? in our perspective democracies, is there a problem with
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the calibre of our politicians? i the calibre of our politicians? i think there is also another parallel around _ think there is also another parallel around these big and profound figures — around these big and profound figures that have parties essentially undergoing identity crises — essentially undergoing identity crises and the battle to emerge, and ithink— crises and the battle to emerge, and i think i_ crises and the battle to emerge, and i think i do— crises and the battle to emerge, and i think i do hesitate to draw too many— i think i do hesitate to draw too many parallels between the conservative party and the republican party, but i think boris johnson's — republican party, but i think boris johnson's creation of a new alignment of conservative voter can mirror— alignment of conservative voter can mirror some — alignment of conservative voter can mirror some of the move of the new wave _ mirror some of the move of the new wave of. _ mirror some of the move of the new wave of, whether mccullough trump's republican— wave of, whether mccullough trump's republican party or the republican making _ republican party or the republican making of trump, jd vance — there is a new— making of trump, jd vance — there is a new movement that has emerged —— whether— a new movement that has emerged —— whether we _ a new movement that has emerged —— whether we call it. it is seeking to appeal— whether we call it. it is seeking to appeal to — whether we call it. it is seeking to appeal to a — whether we call it. it is seeking to appeal to a new coalition. and whether— appeal to a new coalition. and whether that has longevity is something we will see evidence of any midterms and certainly into 2024 _ any midterms and certainly into 2024. certainly the propagation of that movement and electoral success trump _ that movement and electoral success trump had _ that movement and electoral success trump had in that crucial 2020 election— trump had in that crucial 2020 election is— trump had in that crucial 2020 election is going to have
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far—reaching consequences for the identity— far—reaching consequences for the identity of— far—reaching consequences for the identity of the republican party, which _ identity of the republican party, which is — identity of the republican party, which is still trying to reconcile how it — which is still trying to reconcile how it really understands and what direction _ how it really understands and what direction it— how it really understands and what direction it is going to go in. can i no real direction it is going to go in. can i go real fast? _ direction it is going to go in. (saw i go real fast? there is a reason we i go realfast? there is a reason we call the book this will not pass. this is an ongoing political crisis in american civic life. this deep polarisation. trump has not left the stage. i think we are seeing it play out in the midterms, but to see it play out in 2024 here, so that is the title of the book — this will not pass. this is a clinical crisis... it not pass. this is a clinical crisis- - -— not pass. this is a clinical crisis... . ., ~ crisis... it is a great read. a ureat crisis... it is a great read. a great read- _ crisis... it is a great read. a great read. we _ crisis... it is a great read. a great read. we are - crisis... it is a great read. a great read. we are out - crisis... it is a great read. a great read. we are out of i crisis... it is a great read. a - great read. we are out of time. jonathan martin, alex burns, amanda renteria, anita boateng, thank you for your time. some rain on the way for many parts of the uk in the next 24 hours. it has been particularly dry in recent weeks across england and wales.
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certainly the gardens will be grateful for it. quite unsettled through the end of the week, often breezy because we'll have low pressure to the north of the uk. it's this little low centre running into the southwest that we are going to be looking at all wednesday, bringing rain into the southwest of england and wales. it will start to edge in by the end of the night. further north, with the low in place, we will keep showers feeding into scotland, particularly heavy one of the course of the night, and more through day of the course and more through the day on wednesday, sweeping further south into northern ireland and northern england. the biggest question is just how far north this area of rain will push on wednesday. at the moment, it looks perhaps not that much gets up into lancashire or yorkshire, but i think we will see weather pushing into lincolnshire through the afternoon. it starts in wales, and then some rain around during the evening for the southeast of england. perhaps 15 mm for some areas, best part of half an inch, but it could be quite scant by the time it heads across the southeast of england through the latter part of wednesday.
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all but gone for thursday, high pressure will start to build from the south yet again and england and wales will move into another spell of fine weather. we do keep weather fronts running through to the north of the uk through thursday and friday. some wetter weather still around for western scotland. we've seen some pretty wet weather so far this week and so those totals really mounting up for the week as a whole across the western isles and the highlands. brighter spells across northern ireland, england and wales, temperatures heading into the high teens. more the way of sunshine to the south on friday. a little warmer, we are looking at highs of around 20 or 21 degrees. still for western scotland, with that weather front close by, outbreaks of rain feeding in. it takes until the start of the weekend for high pressure to push far enough north to take more settled weather into scotland. end of the weekend, we could start to hook in much warmer air from the continent. but there could be the risk of the odd thundery downpour on sunday.
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tonight at ten — history is made at the start of a new session of parliament at westminster. fanfare. for the first time the prince of wales took on the duty of unveiling the government's programme in the queen's absence — with a prominent pledge to tackle the impact of rising prices. her majesty's government's priority is to grow and strengthen the economy and help ease the cost of living for families. behind the smiles — a highly—charged fight to win the voters' trust on helping households and rebuilding the economy. it's the latest chapter in a pathetic response we cannot simply spend our way out of this problem, we need to grow out
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of this problem, we need to grow out of this problem, we need to grow out of this problem.

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