Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 26, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

9:00 am
i'm ben brown, live in downing street on another difficult day for the prime minister. sue gray's inquiry into lockdown parties at downing street is believed to be complete, and could be released today. the government says number 10 has not received the report yet. we need to look at the results and fix the issues there are. but that shouldn't diminish the fantastic work that has been done under this government and under this prime minister. borisjohnson is due to face mps in the commons this lunchtime, as backbenchers wait to decide whether to submit votes of no confidence in the prime minister's leadership. and i'm annita mcveigh with the rest of the day's stories — one of the uk's biggest covid
9:01 am
studies reveals two—thirds of people recently infected with omicron say they have had the virus before. pcr tests of about 100,000 volunteers in the react study also showed that1 in 23 people had covid in the first three weeks of january. the uk and us threaten sanctions against russia, if president putin decides to invade ukraine. and in northern ireland, proof of covid—19 status to enter bars, restaurants and cinemas will be scrapped later today as restrictions begin to ease. and also coming up this hour.... the siblings who have been separated while in the care system — calls for a new law to keep them together. i'm ben brown live in downing street.
9:02 am
the official inquiry into gatherings at downing street and in whitehall during lockdown is believed to be complete — and could be submitted to number 10 within hours. it's understood the senior civil servant, sue gray, has evidence including photographs and whatsapp messages, and wants the report to be published in full. borisjohnson is due in the commons later for prime minister's questions and has also pledged to respond to the report in front of mps once it is published. it comes after the metropolitan police has announced it is launching its own investigation. our first report today comes from our political correspondent, ione wells. can the prime minister bounce back from this? reporter: are you going to have to resign? - for many tory mps, their answer depends on what's in sue gray's reports into parties that took place behind these doors, and across whitehall, during coronavirus restrictions. yesterday, confirmation some evidence she has found was enough to warrant a police investigation.
9:03 am
i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years. previously, the police had said they don't tend to use resources to investigate retrospective breaches of covid rules. so why now? cressida dick said there were three key factors. evidence those involved knew, or ought to have known, what they were doing was an offence. not investigating would significantly undermine the legitimacy of the law. and where there was little ambiguity around the absence of any reasonable defence. the prime minister welcomed the police investigation. i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. but as a police investigation into government parties opens, the bbc understands the civil servant sue gray's is now complete. after it gets sent to number 10,
9:04 am
opposition parties want it published in full. we already know that she's concluded that there's evidence of potential criminal offences. that's why she's passed it to the metropolitan police. so we know that much already. we already know the metropolitan police have decided that it's serious enough and flagrant enough for them to investigate. number 10 hadn't received the report last night, but the prime minister is due to give a statement in the house of commons after they do. with speculation mounting over timings of this, opposition parties raised concerns they would not get enough notice to digest the report before he does. the government will behave entirely properly in terms of any statement, and the usual courtesies that are extended to the opposition. two weeks ago, you told us on newsnight that borisjohnson enjoyed the unanimous support of his cabinet. can you put your hand on your heart and say that's the case tonight? do you wish me to? yes. the backing of other tory mps, though, is still in question. while some spent yesterday
9:05 am
trying to shore up support for the prime minister, others feel sue gray's report may give them the cover they need to call for him to go. ione wells, bbc news. at one stage we were getting reports that downing street might get sight of the _ that downing street might get sight of the report last night. that didn't— of the report last night. that didn't happen. from our political correspondent adam fleming... in what form are we going to get the report? if in what form are we going to get the re ort? ., , ~' ,, in what form are we going to get the reort? ., , ~ ,, , ._ report? if only we knew. sue gray, it's her decision _ report? if only we knew. sue gray, it's her decision when _ report? if only we knew. sue gray, it's her decision when she - report? if only we knew. sue gray, it's her decision when she hands i report? if only we knew. sue gray, l it's her decision when she hands the report to number ten which has not happened yet, not last night and not this morning. then the prime minister will have to do a few things. he will have to digest the report, work on a statement to give to parliament because he has
9:06 am
committed to talk to mps, he will make decisions about his own staff and whether they have to leave because they have broken the lockdown rules that requires their departure. then he will make a decision about how much or little of this report will be put in the public domain. that is quite a lot of processes that will take time which is why i think the chances of as getting anything before, during or after prime minister's questions at noon seems small. we are talking about the afternoon at the earliest before we hear from the prime minister and the decision to publish the report could happen earlier so we could be in a multistage process. they will be a lot of news.— they will be a lot of news. there was a bit of _ they will be a lot of news. there was a bit of confusion _ they will be a lot of news. there was a bit of confusion because . they will be a lot of news. there l was a bit of confusion because we were not sure whether with the police investigation being launched whether we get the sue gray report or parts of it. whether we get the sue gray report or parts of it— or parts of it. there was a big back and forth yesterday _
9:07 am
or parts of it. there was a big back and forth yesterday between - or parts of it. there was a big back and forth yesterday between the l and forth yesterday between the police, the government and the media whether the new investigation would mean it could not publish the report at all or sections of the report or incidents. we now understand that sue gray, the author, wants it all to be out there and the prime minister will will be under huge pressure to put it all out there. 0pposition parties and mps are looking at parliamentary procedure to see what techniques they could use to ensure they are not bounced into having to read the report and respond to quickly and what techniques they can use to get all the information in their hands because there is talk of whether there are parts which are redacted and names grossed out or annexes that no one gets to see. we are in a bizarre situation where senior members of the cabinet like the foreign secretary who are going on television and know no more than we do. there clearly needs to be a change in culture.
9:08 am
the prime minister has said that mistakes were made, he has apologised for what has happened, we need to get the results of the report, we need to look at the results and fix the issues there are. but that shouldn't diminish the fantastic work that has been done under this government and under this prime minister. the foreign secretary personally very loyal to the prime minister and suggest other people will have to change as a result of this. lats suggest other people will have to change as a result of this.- change as a result of this. lots of speculation _ change as a result of this. lots of speculation about _ change as a result of this. lots of speculation about what _ change as a result of this. lots of speculation about what is - change as a result of this. lots of speculation about what is in - change as a result of this. lots of speculation about what is in the l speculation about what is in the report including allegedly photos of the prime minister in close proximity to bottles of wine but we do not know about that. in terms of timing, you don't think we are going to get it necessarily before prime minister's questions because that would be difficult for the prime minister and then there is the question of what tory backbenchers are going to do, how they will react
9:09 am
and depending on the contact —— content of the report, sending letters to the 1922 committee and a vote of no confidence in the prime minister. ~ , ., minister. why would the prime minister. why would the prime minister publish _ minister. why would the prime minister publish a _ minister. why would the prime minister publish a report - minister. why would the prime minister publish a report and i minister. why would the prime i minister publish a report and then go into prime minister's questions where he could be criticised but not have given his verdict or a version of the events. i imagine there will be a publication of the report will logically come after prime minister's questions but i am speculating. your point is key, so many mps have said to us, to you, privately, publicly, that they will make a judgment about the prime minister's leadership of the country and the party once they get the report. they will no longer have the excuse potentially in a few hours' time, although i suspect some of them will say, actually, there is still a police investigation under way, will they be swayed by the
9:10 am
arguments of the prime minister's allies means a change of prime minister means a general election and puts constituencies at risk, and fewer people will stick the knife in than expected. the key number is 5a. that is the number of letters that have to be received by the chair of the backbench1922 committee to trigger a vote of confidence. recent precedent suggests it could happen very quickly. it was the next day after the threshold was reached that theresa may won her a vote of confidence. that process could move very quickly if that process is one that starts. very quickly if that process is one that starte— that starts. good to talk to you. our chief political _ that starts. good to talk to you. | our chief political correspondent that starts. good to talk to you. i our chief political correspondent at 0ur chief political correspondent at westminster. joining me now is mo hussein, former conservative special adviser to amber rudd, and chief press officer at number 10 under david cameron... the question is how perilous is the
9:11 am
position of the prem minister this morning? it position of the prem minister this mornin: ? , , position of the prem minister this morninu? , , , ., , morning? it is very perilous. the mate police _ morning? it is very perilous. the mate police investigation - morning? it is very perilous. the mate police investigation has i mate police investigation has blindsided a few people. and that is really damaging that the highest office in the land is being investigated by the met police. for the conservative party prides itself on being the party of law and order. the government sets laws for the country that they expect people to comply with. the authority and credibility around that... it is powerless and we will see people supportive of the prime minister trying to make the case about now is not the time for change, lots of other things should be focused on. it may be a fair point, there are other things we should focus on, the ukraine, but the government cannot deal effectively with this if this issueis deal effectively with this if this issue is resolved properly. theoretically we could have a
9:12 am
prospect of the prime minister being interviewed under caution by detectives or he could be interviewed as a witness. we do not know yet. all of that is potentially damaging for borisjohnson. yes. know yet. all of that is potentially damaging for boris johnson. yes, it reall is. damaging for boris johnson. yes, it really is- if — damaging for boris johnson. yes, it really is- if you _ damaging for boris johnson. yes, it really is. if you are _ damaging for boris johnson. yes, it really is. if you are an _ damaging for boris johnson. yes, it really is. if you are an mp - damaging for boris johnson. yes, it really is. if you are an mp who i damaging for boris johnson. yes, it really is. if you are an mp who is i really is. if you are an mp who is wavering, and perhaps you have to keep your powder dry like many have waiting for the report, i think this changes things, there will be a lot of cool constituents getting in touch, people remembering simply by scrolling through the telephone and looking at pictures of on what they were doing on certain key dates, it is not something far removed from people, it is something that everybody can relate to. they can recall it. the damage, a lot of the damage has already been done and has been done for the last few weeks due to the mishandling of the spite number ten in terms of the changing narrative. there is nothing to see here. an ever expanding
9:13 am
investigation by sue gray and now a police investigation. the way that has been mishandled has not helped. in any crisis, the key thing is to be transparent as early as possible. it may not make it more pretty but it helps to keep some trust. and then you set out what you would do differently and what changes you are going to make but you have to do it quickly rather than being dragged to do it. . ~ quickly rather than being dragged to do it. ., ~' ., quickly rather than being dragged to do it. ., ~ ., ., ., do it. talking about the narrative of downing _ do it. talking about the narrative of downing street, _ do it. talking about the narrative of downing street, one - do it. talking about the narrative of downing street, one of- do it. talking about the narrative of downing street, one of the i of downing street, one of the difficult questions for the prime minister is what he has told the commons in recent weeks which is essentially he was assured that all of the guidance was followed all of the time. one of the allegations depending on the report and the police investigation could be that he misled the house of commons. there are lots of things that are now in the prime minister's control,
9:14 am
the there could be more evidence coming out which is not in the public domain yet and there could be something that comes out once the report has concluded which would be extremely damaging. then you have the mate police investigation and what that brings. there are many risks down the line and you will hear the government trying to talk about a change narrative, trying to buy some time and political cover in terms of the change in culture in number ten, talking about is this really a proportionate response. they will be a lot of focus on the cake, a strategy to make it sound trivial and normalise it, but it is not about the cake, it is about a series of events that happened when they should not have happened and now it is being subject to the police and criminal investigation. there is a lot of noise. it is important to step back and see what
9:15 am
the content of the report comes out with. the damage has already been done to a large extent.— done to a large extent. thank you very much — done to a large extent. thank you very much indeed. _ thank you very much indeed. joining me now is bridget phillipson, labour's shadow education secretary. let me ask you whether you think all of this is in proportion because the government has been saying, we have heard it from various ministers is that we have a cost of living crisis and the potential russian invasion of the ukraine and we have to keep the alleged party gate story an perspective. it is not the most important thing happening in the world now. ., ., ._ , important thing happening in the world now. ., ., , , ., , world now. there are always serious events in the — world now. there are always serious events in the world _ world now. there are always serious events in the world but _ world now. there are always serious events in the world but the - events in the world but the government is distracted from the cost of living crisis because they
9:16 am
are mired in scandal. he has lost authority and he has lied and the british people know that and it is time he did the decent thing and resigned. decency and integrity in public life really matter. they are values that the british people hold dear and to have a prime minister who is completely going against all of those traditions that we have in our country does serious damage and serious damage to understanding international too. serious damage to understanding internationaltoo. i serious damage to understanding international too. i also think the conservative mps and cabinet ministers who defend the indefensible with a growing litany of ridiculous excuses need to look themselves in the eye and consider whether they are going to have such little self—respect that they allow the prime minister to continue or whether they will finally bring the matter to a conclusion. you whether they will finally bring the matter to a conclusion.— whether they will finally bring the matter to a conclusion. you say he should resign _ matter to a conclusion. you say he should resign but _ matter to a conclusion. you say he should resign but surely _ matter to a conclusion. you say he should resign but surely we - matter to a conclusion. you say he should resign but surely we should wait to see what the sue gray report says about him. we may only have a few hours to do that. and the police
9:17 am
investigation now that the metropolitan police are investigating the allegations. we want to investigating the allegations. - want to see the report but the government should not hide behind it. the british people can see for themselves exactly what the prime minister has done. he has lied. to a point which the british people that everything that was asked of them during the lockdown, staying at home, nhs workers, school staff, trying to keep the children learning, in downing street, however, with the prime minister at the helm, they were organising parties and wheeling in suitcases of boos, he is taking people forfools if they cannot see what has gone on and that they themselves have not reached a conclusion as to the fact that he is completely not fit and has demonstrated himself to be unfit to be prime minister and then the sorry spectacle of the metropolitan police investigating events in downing street and the actions of a
9:18 am
prime minister. it is completely wrong and calls the system of politics into question which is why it matters that we restore the trust at the prime minister does the decent thing and resign. you want him to resign. _ decent thing and resign. you want him to resign, but _ decent thing and resign. you want him to resign, but political - him to resign, but political analysts see the labour party does not want him to resign because they want a wounded leader in charge than a new tory leader who could give the party and the government a new lease of life. i party and the government a new lease of life. . . party and the government a new lease of life. ., ., , , , ., of life. i want what is best for the country and _ of life. i want what is best for the country and what _ of life. i want what is best for the country and what is _ of life. i want what is best for the country and what is best - of life. i want what is best for the country and what is best is i of life. i want what is best for the country and what is best is that i of life. i want what is best for the i country and what is best is that the prime minister goes because he has lost all standing. he is making as an international laughing stock. shameful and embarrassing that we have been reduced to this is a country. i am concerned when facing these cost of living pressures, electricity bills are skyrocketing, prices are going up for the basics
9:19 am
in a difficult winter, there is no serious plan from the government because they are distracted with all of this. labour have got a serious plan and happen for some time to provide the support families desperately need, to cut vat on electricity bills and make sure we are giving families the backing they need to get through this winter. the government are spending all of their time by infighting, kiosk, this terrible situation, the prime minister should go, but the gap cabinet ministers should ask themselves exactly what on earth they are allowing their party and our country to be reduced to. finally, a technical question about the sue gray report, do you as the labour party believe it should be published and released in full, every word, because the foreign secretary said there might be security issues and concerns that may not every word could be published or put in the public
9:20 am
domain. we published or put in the public domain. ~ ., , ., domain. we need to see a full report from sue gray. _ domain. we need to see a full report from sue gray, the _ domain. we need to see a full report from sue gray, the last _ domain. we need to see a full report from sue gray, the last thing - domain. we need to see a full report from sue gray, the last thing i i from sue gray, the last thing i think the british people will expect to see is a document published that discovered in thick black marks because so much has been redacted. if that is what the government intend to do, there will be taking the british people for fools. intend to do, there will be taking the british people forfools. we need to see the full detail of what has been going on. sue gray will set out the facts but they should not hide behind her, we need the full report but we can all see what has gone on here. report but we can all see what has gone on here-— report but we can all see what has gone on here. thank you very much. we have got — gone on here. thank you very much. we have got prime _ gone on here. thank you very much. we have got prime minister's - we have got prime minister's questions coming up today and we do not know when we are going to get the sue gray report. it could be in the sue gray report. it could be in the next few hours or it could be tomorrow or after that. that's it from me, back to annita in the studio. the headlines on bbc news...
9:21 am
another difficult day for the prime minister, as sue gray's inquiry into lockdown parties at downing street is believed to be complete, and could be released today. borisjohnson is due to face mps in the commons this lunchtime, as backbenchers wait to decide whether to submit votes of no confidence in the prime minister's leadership. one of the uk's biggest covid studies reveals two thirds of people recently infected with 0micron say they have had the virus before. advisors from russia, ukraine, germany and france are meeting in paris this morning, as tensions continue to rise over fears of a russian invasion of ukraine. president macron is preparing to speak to president putin on friday to talk about a way to de—escalate the crisis. russia has reacted angrily to warnings from washington
9:22 am
of personal sanctions on mr putin — saying the us and nato had flooded ukraine with weapons and western advisors. foreign secretary liz truss has been speaking this morning about some of the sanctions that russia could face we are looking at very tough economic sanctions. we are working with our allies and partners including europe and the united states. so what might they be? we are about to legislate to be able to introduce even tougher sanctions on russia should they stage and incursion. what might they be? the type of sanctions we are talking about, they target individuals within the elite, they target financial institutions and they target important companies. let's go to our kyiv correspondent james waterhouse in the ukraine capital. as we come to you, i can see some news saying the ukraine foreign
9:23 am
minister says russia has not amassed enough troops to launch a full—scale offensive on the ukraine but may do it later. saint russia wants to spread panic in the ukraine. what do you think ukraine is hoping for in this meeting in paris? you mention sanctions, ministers _ this meeting in paris? you mention sanctions, ministers here _ this meeting in paris? you mention sanctions, ministers here have i this meeting in paris? you mention| sanctions, ministers here have long been calling for those to arrive now to boot russia of doing anything. they have long said it only works if it is in response to something. the president has repeated his message for the ukrainians to stay calm and not to panic. he does not know if there is going to be a war or not but he has been keen to make the point that the ukraine army is stronger than it was in 2014 when russia first annexed crimea and
9:24 am
western allies are more united on what any potential response could be. inside ukraine ministers are very keen for people to stay calm but the war of words between the us, nato and russia continues to heat up. the question will be whether those words trickle into day—to—day life here. those words trickle into day-to-day life here. , , ., life here. some news 'ust arriving, s-ueakin life here. some news 'ust arriving, speaking on h life here. some news 'ust arriving, speaking on a h life here. some newsjust arriving, speaking on a number _ life here. some newsjust arriving, speaking on a number of _ life here. some newsjust arriving, speaking on a number of foreign . speaking on a number of foreign policy issues and russia, we are hearing that moscow is not ready to find room for the eu in talks around ukraine and if we do not receive a constructive answer from the west on our security demands, moscow will take appropriate measures. lots of discussion around appropriate measures, consequences without spelling out precisely what those will be. is there space amongst the
9:25 am
rhetoric and the language is ramping up, to find a way to de—escalate this that will allow both sides to save face?— this that will allow both sides to saveface? , ., , ., , save face? expectations have been low throughout _ save face? expectations have been low throughout this. _ save face? expectations have been low throughout this. it _ save face? expectations have been low throughout this. it is _ save face? expectations have been low throughout this. it is fair i save face? expectations have been low throughout this. it is fair to i low throughout this. it is fair to say they could be getting smaller the reason being advisers have been meeting from russia, ukraine, france and germany. but what ukraine really wants is for the respective presidents to be at the table, for something concrete to come out of this. the us has said it is on track to deliver ideas and present them to russia, this week, on these ongoing talks in response to the demand from russia that nato scales back its military presence and ukraine is never going to be allowed to join nato. 0n never going to be allowed to join nato. on that point, nato has been increasing its activity in eastern
9:26 am
europe, jets and warships being sent by member states to eastern europe, do we know what is going to happen? we do not. both sides are seeing who is going to offer what which is doing nothing to defuse tensions on the russian border. there have been 100,000 russian troops on the south—east and north, russia has mobilised 15,000 other troops for long planned military exercises. the language of president biden, any military action by vladimir putin will be the first of its kind since the second world war and that would be catastrophic for the wider world. the language being used, there is no doubt, continue discussions that gives optimism but it is very faint. does ukraine feel listened to with
9:27 am
russia and the us primarily to the waist and the us talking about there being nosed is other than ukraine deciding on its future direction. does it feel listened to in the middle of this?— does it feel listened to in the middle of this? , ., , ~ , middle of this? the phrase we keep hearin: , middle of this? the phrase we keep hearing. no — middle of this? the phrase we keep hearing, no future _ middle of this? the phrase we keep hearing, no future of— middle of this? the phrase we keep hearing, no future of ukraine i hearing, no future of ukraine without ukraine. it welcomes the ongoing support, the defensive package offered by the us, the uk, but in the absence of troops on the ground, it has no option but to do that because nato and the us have ruled out troops coming here. the uk said it would support nato allies but what does that mean? going to poland? lithuania? latvia? it does not mean ukraine in the event of an invasion. that is what ukraine would like but in the meantime it is
9:28 am
welcoming any support at this stage. thank you very much for that update. there have been �*unprecedented' levels of covid in england this month, according to one of the country's largest infection studies. research from react suggests one in 23 people had the virus in the first three weeks of january. two thirds of them said they'd already had covid before. 0ur health correspondent anna collinson reports. the rapid emergence of the 0micron variant at the end of last year saw coronavirus rocket. now scientists behind one of england's largest infection studies say the start of 2022 has seen unprecedented levels of covid. the react study collected more than 100,000 swabs from volunteers during the first couple of weeks in january. its findings suggest around one in 23 people in england would have tested positive for covid at that time — the highest rate ever recorded. researchers also found around two in three people, or 65%, who had recently been infected said
9:29 am
they had already had coronavirus before. it seems certain groups may be more at risk of this happening, including key workers and those who live with children or in larger households. but more work is needed to understand how many of the cases in this study were true re—infections. we find in our data that people who self—report having previously had covid—19, or had the infection, there is a high proportion of those who test positive in our study, which might reflect the fact that they are more likely to be the types of people who are meeting other people and who might get infected. coronavirus infections have slowed recently, but are still high, particularly amongst children and younger teenagers. as measures are gradually eased across the uk, health officials say vaccination remains the best form of protection. anna collinson, bbc news. northern ireland will ease
9:30 am
a number of its coronavirus restrictions later, meaning nightclubs will re—open and concerts will be allowed to take place. proof of covid status will no longer be legally required in restaurants and bars, but the system will remain in place for nightclubs and certain indoor events. people are still being advised to work from home where possible. this relaxation was approved after health advisers told the northern ireland executive that the peak had passed, but a number of pieces of guidance remain.— guidance remain. ministers in the devolved government _ guidance remain. ministers in the devolved government here i guidance remain. ministers in the devolved government here have i guidance remain. ministers in the i devolved government here have the good news while also political leaders and scientific adviser stressed that the pandemic is not over and people should still continue to exercise a degree of caution. ., ., ., continue to exercise a degree of caution. ., ._ ., ' continue to exercise a degree of caution. ., ., '
9:31 am
caution. today from 12 o'clock if ou caution. today from 12 o'clock if you change _ caution. today from 12 o'clock if you change is — caution. today from 12 o'clock if you change is kept _ caution. today from 12 o'clock if you change is kept in _ caution. today from 12 o'clock if you change is kept in the i you change is kept in the hospitality industry, night clubs will be able to reopen this evening for the first time since christmas, indoor standing events will be allowed again so that mainly affects events like concerts but if you want to go to a nightclub or an indoors event you still have to provide proof of your covid—19 status, proof of vaccination, proof you have had covid—19 in the last 180 days or proof of a negative lateral flow test result. that requirement to show your covert that is being lifted in bars, restaurants and cinemas from today. the hospitality, those businesses are saying this will hopefully enable them to operate more freely, more smoothly and the very much welcome those changes. the welsh government is cutting the minimum self—isolation period from seven to five days, bringing wales into line with england and northern ireland.
9:32 am
to end isolation, two negative tests will be required on days five and six. the change will take effect on friday. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. good morning. fairly gloomy of light across southern and western areas. a better chance of sunshine today, not quite as chilly. that is because the breeze is picking up. windiest in north and west of scotland today where, later across the highlands and islands, we will see heavy bursts of rain, the odd splash further south, but most places dry. even though there is lots of cloud, there is a better chance of sunshine and the strengthening south—west winds puncture more holes in the cloud. temperatures up a few degrees. tonight, as the rain pushes to scotland and northern ireland and into england and wales this evening, the winds will strengthen. 0rkney and caithness could see costs up to 60, 70 mph, so and caithness could see costs up to 60,70 mph, so the
9:33 am
and caithness could see costs up to 60, 70 mph, so the strength of the wind stops across from forming. a lot more sunshine for many areas tomorrow. we start the morning with plenty of cloud and central parts of southern —— scotland and wales, confined to the english channel late in the afternoon. a few showers in the north of scotland. and after a brief lift in temperatures, it will feel cooler late in the day. thank ou ve feel cooler late in the day. thank you very much- _ sport and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. news of the australian open? yes, british success in the australian open, he would have thought it? good morning. at the australian open, britain's alfie hewett and gordon reid have won their wheelchair doubles final againstjapan's shingo kunieda and argentina's gustavo fernandez. they took the first set 6—2, but lost the seccond. it went into a match tie—break, and then the players had to leave the court because of rain, with hewett and reid 5—4 up at the time. it was an agonising wait, but they returned to the court
9:34 am
and tied up the victory10—7 in the tie—break. britain's joe salisbury and american partner rajeev ram have reached their third consecutive australian open doubles semi—final, with victory over simone bolelli and fabio fognini. they've yet to drop a set and won 6—3, 6—2. in the men's singles draw, stefanos tsitsipas is into the semi—finals for the third time in his career, after a dominant straight—sets win overjannik sinner. the 23—year—old, who was beaten at the semi—final stage in 2019 and 2021, won 6—3, 6—4, 6—2 and will face the winner of daniil medvedev or felix auger—aliassime in the last four. that match is currently in the first set. daniil medvedev is the highest seeded player in the draw. that match still ongoing, three break points so far in the first set and we will keep you posted on the results of that match throughout the
9:35 am
morning. in the women's draw, we now know the four semi—finalists. american danielle collins is through to the last four for the second time in her career. the 27th seed beat france's alize cornet fairly comfortably in straight sets. and she'll face polish seventh seed iga swiatek, after she came through a marathon match with estonia's kaia kanepi. it lasted more than three hours, with swaitek eventually taking the match in three sets. roy hodgson is back in the premier league. waford confirmed him as their new manager last night. hodgson had been out of work since leaving crystal palace at the end of last season, but he returns to the dugout for another relegation scrap, as the hornets sit 19th, just two points from safety. hodgson is the pozzo's 15th managerial appointment since they took over in 2012. now, questions are being raised
9:36 am
about the concussion protocols at the africa cup of nations, following senegal�*s 2—0 win over cape verde. there was a worrying moment involving liverpool's sadio mane. he suffered a concussion after a nasty clash of heads with their keeper, who was subsequently sent off. mane actually appeared to be briefly knocked out. however, just ten minutes later, he scored senegal�*s first goal. but after celebrating, he lay down and was led off the field. well, mane had to go to hospital after the game. senegal manager aliou cisse said his "head was spinning and he felt faint". and mane later posted this picture on social media from his hospital bed of himself and vozinha, the cape verde goalkeeper, saying that everything was well. it's been a fairly dreary ashes series for england women so far — they lost the first t20 by nine wickets, and then the next two matches
9:37 am
were abandoned because of rain. but later will see the start of the only test in the series. it begins at the manuka 0val in canberra at 11 o'clock tonight. australia lead the multi—format series 4—2, so a victory for them will guarantee they retain the ashes, as england would only be able to secure a draw. captain heather knight's been frustrated so far. just looking forward to getting into this ashes series, to be honest. it's obviously been a very strange one with that first game and then the other two rained off. but, yeah, they're so excited, we love playing test cricket. and we've got the opportunity to get back in the series if we can be successful in this test. what a great position we'll be in — 6—4 going into those 0dis — and that's what we've got to look to try and do. that's all the sport for now. more from the bbc sport centre throughout the day. thank you very much. my colleague
9:38 am
ben brown is in downing street waiting to find out when that official inquiry into gatherings at downing street will be submitted to the prime minister. we downing street will be submitted to the prime minister.— downing street will be submitted to the prime minister. we are, indeed, we are waiting- _ the prime minister. we are, indeed, we are waiting. it _ the prime minister. we are, indeed, we are waiting. it could _ the prime minister. we are, indeed, we are waiting. it could be _ the prime minister. we are, indeed, we are waiting. it could be in - the prime minister. we are, indeed, we are waiting. it could be in the i we are waiting. it could be in the next few hours, but who knows? in recent weeks, we have heard that name a lot, sue gray, pretty rare for a civil servant to become pretty much a household name in the country, but who exactly is sue gray? bbc northern ireland political correspondent gareth gordon has interviewed her in the past and has this profile of the woman who has been investigating downing street. they used to call sue gray the most powerful civil servant you've never heard of. not any more. and all i ask is that sue gray be allowed to complete her inquiry. the inquiry taking place by sue gray. well, sue gray... sue gray... sue gray, who people in northern ireland, many of them will know well. so, who is she and what makes her tick? well, for a start, she's the only whitehall civil servant who's ever
9:39 am
run a pub in newry — though it's now a nursery — with her husband, country and western singer bill conlon. # it's a slow road that winds through the sweet wicklow pines # it makes me want to stop along the way...# he hated the pub and, actually, most of the customers didn't like him either because he was quite miserable in it. so, after six to eight weeks, it was making him a bit fed up, so i sent him back to london and i carried on running the bar on my own. she returned to run the department of finance in belfast, but the job she really wanted was head of the northern ireland civil service. why didn't i get the job? i'm not sure i'll ever quite know, but i suspect, you know, i suspect people may have thought that i'm perhaps too much of a challenger, or a disruptor. i am both. and perhaps i would bring about...
9:40 am
you know, perhaps there was going to be too much change. and now, she has a much biggerjob, so how will she cope? we asked the man who knows her from his time as tony blair's official spokesman. i think she will find this very, very uncomfortable. she is not the sort of person who, as you know, enjoys being in the spotlight. but she will think it is her duty — and those are four very important letters for her, her duty — to do this honestly, to the best of her ability, and to present the truth. but might she be limited in what she can do, given she's investigating her own boss? she is somebody who, as a civil servant, is about as close - to being independent i as it is possible to get. mainly because she's - at the end of her career now, so she's not worried about climbing the ladder any further, _ and also because she has so much experience, so much clout. - she has been at the heart of power ifor so long that she will be a veryl difficult and a very risky person for anyone to treat improperly. there was only one other
9:41 am
question for sue gray, which could not be avoided. i've even had someone put it to me that you are a spy. i know you've had that put to you and, er, i think if i was a spy, i'd be a pretty poor spy if people are talking about me being a spy. i think people here have put a lot of trust in me and they've put a lot of faith in me and, er, you know, we have worked really well together, and i didn't think i'd be working externally in the way i am. and had you got that big job as head of the civil service, would you ever consider leaving? no. but she did, and now the political world awaits what she'll do next. gareth gordon, bbc newsline. let's cross to belfast and speak to gareth. fascinating insight into sue gray. how did you meet her, how did that interview come about?— interview come about? when i first met sue gray. _ interview come about? when i first met sue gray. l — interview come about? when i first met sue gray, i did _ interview come about? when i first met sue gray, i did so, _ interview come about? when i first met sue gray, i did so, i _ interview come about? when i first met sue gray, i did so, i have i interview come about? when i first met sue gray, i did so, i have to i met sue gray, i did so, i have to
9:42 am
say, with a certain amount of trepidation. after all, say, with a certain amount of trepidation. afterall, it say, with a certain amount of trepidation. after all, it is not everyday you meet deputy god. i am not sure what i was expecting, but sue gray certainly was not it. she is quite disarming, quite down to earth, she is good fun. as we say in this part of the world, she is good craic and we got on pretty well stop for a woman who spent most of her life avoiding publicity, she is aware she does have a colourful story and i think she was happy somebody told it. i had already told a profile of sue gray before she arrived to be the permanent secretary at the department of finance at stormont. a lot of speculation as to why someone with her status would want to come down the pay grade to become part of a small northern ireland department, a lot of speculation about that. she likes the profile, she is aware of the fact, she's probably as she said to me once with a certain amount of
9:43 am
understatement, the only senior whitehall civil servant who has ever run a pub near the irish border. she's not kidding about that. then there is a country and western singing husband bill conlon and those allegations are some claims that she was in fact a spy, which i took my life in my hands and i put that to her at the end of the interview and as you hear, she took the question on the chin and she didn't quite deny it.— didn't quite deny it. yes. and a very different _ didn't quite deny it. yes. and a very different background i didn't quite deny it. yes. and a very different background from j didn't quite deny it. yes. and a i very different background from most civil servants, shall we say? and the idea that she might be any kind a pushover in terms of this crucial inquiry, well, certainly if you have run a pub in newry, i don't think you are going to be a pushover, are you? you are going to be a pushover, are ou? ~ ,, , you? well, sue gray, i get the impression _ you? well, sue gray, i get the impression and _ you? well, sue gray, i get the impression and i _ you? well, sue gray, i get the impression and i only - you? well, sue gray, i get the impression and i only know i you? well, sue gray, i get the| impression and i only know her superficially, i don't know the sue gray from the one who strikes the fear into the lives of civil servants and perhaps the prime minister today, servants and perhaps the prime ministertoday, i servants and perhaps the prime minister today, i don't know that sue gray. i only know the one that i met. i think she is her own woman,
9:44 am
she knows what she wants to do and she knows what she wants to do and she is not scared to do it. that interview had sort of been boiling for a while now, she has never done a television interview before. as far as i know, that is the only one she has ever done. with good luck of the day she got herjob in the cabinet office, it was in the papers, i was presenting the good morning ulster programme in radio ulster and we had fun with it during the paper review. sue gray is listening, i said the paper review. sue gray is listening, isaid in the paper review. sue gray is listening, i said in that review, she has promised me an interview and i haven't had it yet. and sue gray was listening and she got in touch with me later on and she said, i will do that interview. and she did that interview the day she left belfast. she had, i didn't know what she was going to say. but she had something to say, she was very aggrieved at not being made head of the northern ireland civil service. and she went for it during that interview. she said she was a challenge and a disrupter and perhaps people didn't like that. and i know she knew what she was saying,
9:45 am
and there was certainly a lot of ruffled feathers, i know, in the department when she went. so i she knew think what she was doing. and she has a big job ahead of her now and she has come of this is a big day if the report comes out today. i am told by people who know her very well she will do her duty and then it is up to judge. well she will do her duty and then it is up to judge-— it is up to 'udge. indeed. gareth gordon, it is up tojudge. indeed. gareth gordon, thank— it is up tojudge. indeed. gareth gordon, thank you _ it is up tojudge. indeed. gareth gordon, thank you so _ it is up tojudge. indeed. gareth gordon, thank you so much, i it is up to judge. indeed. gareth i gordon, thank you so much, really fascinating insight into sue gray and as gareth was suggesting, many people really do think she has the fake of the prime minister potentially in her hands, that is gareth gordon, our northern ireland political correspondent. we understand sue gray is pushing for her report to be published in full whenever it comes out, whether it is the next few hours or the next few days, we don't know when that will be. we have already had the labour party, though, bridget phillipson talking to me in the last hour saying that the country shouldn't have to wait for that sue gray report, that borisjohnson should resign now. labour are saying he has
9:46 am
lost all moral authority and he has made britain an international laughing stock. we will hear more from the prime minister at prime minister's questions at noon. for now, from downing street, back to you. thank you very much. brothers and sisters separated by the care system have told the bbc of the trauma of not seeing their siblings, in some cases, for years. figures obtained from uk local authorities through freedom of information requests have revealed that around half of sibling groups in care are currently split up. the law says brothers and sisters should be placed together and, where this is not possible, contact should be prioritised when it's right for each child. ashleyjohn—baptiste, who also grew up in care, has this report.
9:47 am
vetera n veteran foster carer karen morrison is trying to unite the siblings. it didn't take long for us to realise, you know, that these children are going into the care system and they are not going to the same place together. in fact, they don't even know when they are going to see each other again. just imagine that trauma, it must be awful. siblings reunited is _ trauma, it must be awful. siblings reunited is a _ trauma, it must be awful. siblings reunited is a charity _ trauma, it must be awful. siblings reunited is a charity providing i trauma, it must be awful. siblings reunited is a charity providing a i reunited is a charity providing a safe place for split up groups and care to meet up every few months. how excited have you guys been to meet today? ten how excited have you guys been to meet today?— how excited have you guys been to meet today?_ ten i how excited have you guys been to i meet today?_ ten out meet today? ten out of ten. ten out of ten? meet today? ten out of ten. ten out often? 9,000. _ meet today? ten out of ten. ten out often? 9,000. 9,000. _ meet today? ten out of ten. ten out often? 9,000. 9,000. for- meet today? ten out of ten. ten out often? 9,000. 9,000. for karen, | meet today? ten out of ten. ten out| of ten? 9,000. 9,000. for karen, it is not only — of ten? 9,000. 9,000. for karen, it is not only about _ of ten? 9,000. 9,000. for karen, it is not only about sibling _ is not only about sibling relationships, but about creating better chances in life. we relationships, but about creating better chances in life.— relationships, but about creating better chances in life. we are not only making _ better chances in life. we are not only making a — better chances in life. we are not only making a difference - better chances in life. we are not only making a difference now, i better chances in life. we are not| only making a difference now, but fast forward to when they leave the care system and imagine if they had each other. ., ., ., ., .,
9:48 am
each other. freedom of information revuests each other. freedom of information requests sent _ each other. freedom of information requests sent to _ each other. freedom of information requests sent to over _ each other. freedom of information requests sent to over 200 - each other. freedom of information requests sent to over 200 uk i each other. freedom of information requests sent to over 200 uk locall requests sent to over 200 uk local authorities have revealed that more than 12,000 looked after children are not living with at least one of their siblings. are not living with at least one of theirsiblings. in are not living with at least one of their siblings. in manchester, 24—year—old saskia has recently become a social worker. in their adoptive home, saskia and her two brothers suffered physical abuse and neglect for a decade. when they went back into council care, they were separated across different areas. i lost such a key part of myself, i think. _ lost such a key part of myself, i think, because it was those three against _ think, because it was those three against the world, it always has been _ against the world, it always has been and _ against the world, it always has been. and so being so far away from them, _ been. and so being so far away from them, its— been. and so being so far away from them, it's like, oh, i been. and so being so far away from them, it's like, oh, lam not strong any more — them, it's like, oh, lam not strong any more. sometimes, siblings is all you've _ any more. sometimes, siblings is all you've got _ any more. sometimes, siblings is all you've got left. and if you take those — you've got left. and if you take those away, you're taking the last thing _ those away, you're taking the last thing the — those away, you're taking the last thing the way. the last bit of hope. yes, _ thing the way. the last bit of hope. yes. yes, _ thing the way. the last bit of hope. yes, yes, the last bit of your identity _ yes, yes, the last bit of your identi . �* , ., identity. an independent review of the england _
9:49 am
identity. an independent review of the england care _ identity. an independent review of the england care system _ identity. an independent review of the england care system is - identity. an independent review of i the england care system is currently under way, with findings and recommendations expected to be published later this year. in scotland, new laws will give siblings more control over their relationships. for these brothers, however, it's time to say goodbye for now. �* , with me isjerome harvey—agyei. he grew up in care with his younger brother and sister. when he was 12, they were split up. their foster carer became ill. theirfoster carer became ill. we can also speak tojerome's half—sister. melaina pecorini. they found each other around six years ago and met up for the first time just before christmas. it is good to have you both with us. jerome, you are 32 and went into care with a very —— at a young age with the younger brother, what happened from there? this with the younger brother, what happened from there?- with the younger brother, what
9:50 am
happened from there? as we came out ofthe happened from there? as we came out of the system. — happened from there? as we came out of the system. i _ happened from there? as we came out of the system, i was _ happened from there? as we came out of the system, i was with _ happened from there? as we came out of the system, i was with my _ happened from there? as we came out of the system, i was with my younger. of the system, i was with my younger brother and we were in a few different places, but because of the circumstances of the system, what happened was my mum had more kids and all of us were separated in some sense. with my carer at the age of about 12, she became ill. so my sister and my brother had to move on. and then my sister returned, but my brother didn't. so that created that kind of sense of loss, another loss again. because me and my brother went through a lot of the primary traumas together, so we had that kind of connection, even to this day, we have that solid heart connection as i call it. but as time went on, you start to learn about your other siblings and it is all about, because you don't have the normal family, about, because you don't have the normalfamily, when about, because you don't have the normal family, when you are going through the system, and you are hearing your friends talk about different families, your identity is
9:51 am
slightly intact —— in tatters because you don't know who you truly are and you can't understand the idea of family. so for me, it is about having the quality of connection that allows for natural giving to meet everyone's needs. and when i say that, it's about having that connection to your brothers and sisters so all their needs can be met so they understand who they are and they have a sense of pride in terms of theirfamily. and they have a sense of pride in terms of their family. but obviously, the system is in a place where they can't meet the needs of siblings because there are many homes that cater to probably more than two young people. i just homes that cater to probably more than two young people.— than two young people. i 'ust want to no than two young people. i 'ust want to to back than two young people. i 'ust want to go back to h than two young people. i 'ust want to go back to that i than two young people. i 'ust want to go back to that point i than two young people. ijust want to go back to that point where i than two young people. ijust want to go back to that point where you | to go back to that point where you and your brother were separated. did you get opportunities to meet up with each other and what sort of impact do you think, different impacts potentially, did that separation at that point have on you both? , ., .,
9:52 am
both? yes, at the time, he felt a sense of rejection. _ both? yes, at the time, he felt a sense of rejection. so _ both? yes, at the time, he felt a sense of rejection. so he - both? yes, at the time, he felt a sense of rejection. so he went i sense of rejection. so he went missing and the system basically was just trying to meet his needs. he was then labelled as kind of hard to reach or difficult to engage with. but actually, if you think about it, he has just lost his three hearts again. his plays, his person and his objects. that's what we explain to people. —— his place. when you lose that sense of connection, it is really hard to engage and it is on us as professionals or parents and society to lead those connections. so for me, it was really heartbreaking because this was the person that i went through lots of different trauma with. and when it came to actually dealing with the situation, we had an unspoken bond. and that really, it traumatised me, but it actually, i think it had more of an impact on him because if i stayed in the home that he was removed from, so that sense of rejection will be hit deeper than it
9:53 am
did with me because i still had that quality of connection with my carer at the time. quality of connection with my carer at the time-— quality of connection with my carer at the time. melaina can grew up in devon with — at the time. melaina can grew up in devon with your _ at the time. melaina can grew up in devon with your mum, _ at the time. melaina can grew up in devon with your mum, you - at the time. melaina can grew up in devon with your mum, you haven'tl devon with your mum, you haven't beenin devon with your mum, you haven't been in care. there was this connection, reconnection with your brother, jerome, tell us how that came about. 50 seven years ago. it was in my first year of university, actually. and i received — year of university, actually. and i received a — year of university, actually. and i received a facebook message from jerome _ received a facebook message from jerome. just going, hey, i'm your brother! — jerome. just going, hey, i'm your brother! and i was like, oh, 0k. cool! _ brother! and i was like, oh, 0k. cool! �* . brother! and i was like, oh, 0k. cool! ., ., ., ., cool! and you had no idea that you had a brother _ cool! and you had no idea that you had a brother out _ cool! and you had no idea that you had a brother out there? _ cool! and you had no idea that you had a brother out there? well, i cool! and you had no idea that you had a brother out there? well, sol cool! and you had no idea that you i had a brother out there? well, so my mum was like. _ had a brother out there? well, so my mum was like, she _ had a brother out there? well, so my mum was like, she had _ had a brother out there? well, so my mum was like, she had inklings i had a brother out there? well, so my mum was like, she had inklings thatl mum was like, she had inklings that i mum was like, she had inklings that i had _ mum was like, she had inklings that i had other— mum was like, she had inklings that i had other siblings, but she wasn't entirely— i had other siblings, but she wasn't entirely sure. so ijust thought that was— entirely sure. so ijust thought that was like a part of my life that i that was like a part of my life that lwouldn't — that was like a part of my life that i wouldn't experience or get to know — i wouldn't experience or get to know it — i wouldn't experience or get to
9:54 am
know. it was going to be a mystery. yes. _ know. it was going to be a mystery. yes. and _ know. it was going to be a mystery. yes. and i_ know. it was going to be a mystery. yes, and ijust kind of like dealt with— yes, and ijust kind of like dealt with that — yes, and ijust kind of like dealt with that. but then he messaged me and we _ with that. but then he messaged me and we were like, so hi, we are related — and we were like, so hi, we are related i— and we were like, so hi, we are related. i was like, wow! and we were like, so hi, we are related. iwas like, wow! this and we were like, so hi, we are related. i was like, wow! this is amazing! — related. i was like, wow! this is amazing! so he kind of got in contact — amazing! so he kind of got in contact with me because he was looking — contact with me because he was looking for our father. he wasjust basically— looking for our father. he wasjust basically saying, when he finds him, would _ basically saying, when he finds him, would i_ basically saying, when he finds him, would i want to reconnect with him? and i_ would i want to reconnect with him? and i was. _ would i want to reconnect with him? and i was. of— would i want to reconnect with him? and i was, of course, that's something that i want to do. but then— something that i want to do. but then time — something that i want to do. but then time went on and it sort of fizzled — then time went on and it sort of fizzled out. but thenjerome got in contact _ fizzled out. but thenjerome got in contact with me again just fizzled out. but thenjerome got in contact with me againjust kinda before _ contact with me againjust kinda before lockdown happens. and he said that he _ before lockdown happens. and he said that he had _ before lockdown happens. and he said that he had found him and that he wasn't _ that he had found him and that he wasn't very— that he had found him and that he wasn't very well. but you're welcome to see _ wasn't very well. but you're welcome to see him _ wasn't very well. but you're welcome to see him when you can.—
9:55 am
to see him when you can. sorry to interrupt- — to see him when you can. sorry to interrupt. learning _ to see him when you can. sorry to interrupt. learning about - to see him when you can. sorry to interrupt. learning about the i interrupt. learning about the different experience thatjerome had growing up compared to your experience, that must have been quite difficult to hear, i imagine, very difficult to hear?— quite difficult to hear, i imagine, very difficult to hear? yes, it was. because i very difficult to hear? yes, it was. because i am _ very difficult to hear? yes, it was. because i am very _ very difficult to hear? yes, it was. because i am very thankful - very difficult to hear? yes, it was. because i am very thankful for i very difficult to hear? yes, it was. i because i am very thankful for what i because i am very thankful for what i had _ because i am very thankful for what i had growing up. you know, my mum was always— i had growing up. you know, my mum was always there and i had a strong father— was always there and i had a strong father figure. was always there and i had a strong fatherfigure. my was always there and i had a strong father figure. my grandma and things — father figure. my grandma and things. so knowing that someone who, you know. _ things. so knowing that someone who, you know. is _ things. so knowing that someone who, you know, is sort of part of me has gone _ you know, is sort of part of me has gone through a completely different experience and quite a traumatic experience, it kind of makes you 'ust experience, it kind of makes you just and — experience, it kind of makes you just and think about what you have and made — just and think about what you have and made me appreciate what i had more _ and made me appreciate what i had more. which is nice, but then also, you know. —
9:56 am
more. which is nice, but then also, you know, like, i've feela more. which is nice, but then also, you know, like, i've feel a lot for what _ you know, like, i've feel a lot for whatjerome has gone through. and so many— whatjerome has gone through. and so many other— whatjerome has gone through. and so many other children are going through— many other children are going through the same thing and it is so upsetting _ through the same thing and it is so upsetting that people are being broken — upsetting that people are being broken apart by this. it is interesting, _ broken apart by this. it is interesting, isn't - broken apart by this. it is interesting, isn't it, i broken apart by this. it is interesting, isn't it, howl broken apart by this. it 3 interesting, isn't it, how are —— our reporter has used his experience of being in care to tell stories about people in care to try and highlight issues and you, jerome, you now work with children in care so you are giving back to young kids who were in your position as well. i just wonder what changes you would like to see in the law, what could be done differently to ensure, as far as is possible, sibling groups can stay together or stay connected? i think the first thing you have to do is be able to see young people and have the quality of time to meet their needs. but also, the system needs to enable better quality relationships. i think we have been
9:57 am
hanging on about it and i know that banging on about it and i know that children in england are looking into the welfare state and how we make relationships fundamental. but when you speak to young people in care and you speak about what they are going through, they always talk about the quality of relationships and having a social worker that listened to me or went above and beyond, and that was just being a human, just hearing me, responding to my needs, informing me of where i am at now. who am i? simple things like getting to know who i? doing that little family tree exercise where someone can understand who theirfamilies are. where someone can understand who their families are. whether it is positive or negative, it is about them knowing and i think a lot of people are scared of being upfront about what is trauma and also it helps them to rebuild. 0k, about what is trauma and also it helps them to rebuild. ok, i have had this trauma, experience that in the past, how do i move forwards, how do i turn this trauma into post—traumatic growth instead of disorders? so it isjust giving ourselves access to fruitful and
9:58 am
more trauma informed therapeutic approaches and that is all about seeing people, the quality relationships, giving people back their time. relationships, giving people back theirtime. not relationships, giving people back their time. not this fear —based system we have at the moment, where if i don't do this, then i will get in trouble. it is very fear based. it needs to be love based. if i do this, what will this mean for a child 18 years down the line? jerome and melaina. — child 18 years down the line? jerome and melaina. a _ child 18 years down the line? jerome and melaina, a pleasure _ child 18 years down the line? jerome and melaina, a pleasure to - child 18 years down the line? jerome and melaina, a pleasure to speak- child 18 years down the line? jerome and melaina, a pleasure to speak to | and melaina, a pleasure to speak to both of you today, best wishes to you both and thank you very much for telling us your stories. jerome and his sister melaina. you can watch ashleyjohn—baptiste�*s documentary, split up in care: life without siblings, on the bbc iplayer. let's look at the weather with matt. frosty weather cloud has broken, but how big is possible today in england
9:59 am
and where is. not huge amounts for some. some will stay fairly cloudy, but overall, brighter and milder than we have seen in recent days. different scotland and northern ireland into the afternoon, cloud returns more abundantly and wet across the highlands and islands. 11 or 12 degrees and strengthening south—westerly winds which could touch gale or severe gale force in caithness and orkney this evening, helping the cloud and rain to push southwards. not a huge amount of rain for england and wales tonight, mainly across western areas, helps keep the temperature is up and any frost fairly limited. tomorrow, we stop and lots of cloud, to the south of england and wales, slowly brightening up here through the afternoon, clouding over in the channel islands and most places see good sunny spells, with the odd shower in northern ireland and north—west england in particular. cooler late in the day after a relatively mild start. goodbye for
10:00 am
now. i'm ben brown, live in downing street on another difficult day for the prime minister sue gray's inquiry into lockdown parties at downing street is believed to be complete, and could be released today. the government says they will act on the findings — but labour says they shouldn't hide behind the report. we need to look at the results and fix the issues there are. but that shouldn't diminish the fantastic work that has been done under this government and under this prime minister. the prime minister is taking the british people for fools if he thinks that they can't see exactly what has gone on and that they themselves haven't already reached a conclusion as to the fact that he is completely unfit and has demonstrated himself to be completely unfit to be prime minister.

61 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on