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tv   Context  BBC News  January 25, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. lethal aid to ukraine, troop movements in russia, military exercises in europe, the drumbeat is getting louder — but is war really inevitable? joe biden will present his offer to the russian president at the end of this week, as his administration plots the toughest sanctions, in reprisal for any invasion. the met police are now investigating a number of events held in downing street that may have breached lockdown rules. the prime minister says he welcomes their involvement. and a grand jury will sit in georgia to investigate donald trump's alleged inteference in the results of the 2020 election. tonight with the context, former labour mp and government minster, caroline flint, and mick mulvaney, who was donald trump's former chief
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of staff and the us special envoy to northern ireland. hello, and welcome. joe biden says he will talk to vladimir putin on friday, to try and persuade him to step back from conflict in ukraine. the united states is preparing to send 8,500 troops to eastern europe to bolster nato defences. on top of that, the administration has signalled it will retaliate by cutting energy exports to europe, should russia invade, and they will consider imposing santions on president putin himself. there will be enormous consequences if he were to go in and invade, as he could, the entire country. or a lot less than that, as well. for russia, not only in terms of
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economic consequences and clinical consequences, but enormous consequences, but enormous consequences worldwide — if he were to move in with others forces, it would be the largest invasion since world war ii. it would change the world. —— move in with those forces. let me bring you up to speed with some the other development. in the uk, the prime minister, borisjohnson, told mp�*s britain will also contribute to nato deployments. if russia moves into it ukraine, we would move in forces to protect our allies in europe. but if president putin where to choose the path of bloodshed and destruction, he must realise it would be both tragic and futile. ukraine itself has said it's arrested russian saboteurs who were plotting "a series of armed attacks" in kharkiv and zhytomyr, in the west of the country. kyiv said the attacks were being "coordinated by the russian special service". the pictures you see here were posted online by the ukrainian security service, the sbu. over the past week or so, the russian military have been carrying out drills in several areas along the border, including
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in the murmansk region in the far north of the country, and crimea, which it annexed from ukraine in 2014. meanwhile, the german newspaper bild has reported that the us is planning to block global exports of raw materials from russia if it invades. the newspaper reports us sanctions will target oil, gas and other raw material that will cost the russian economy more than $50 billion. and a third shipment containing equipment and munitions has arrived in ukraine, part of a new $200 million in security assistance directed to the country from us presidentjoe biden. caroline, when you put all that together, everything we are hearing in europe, you might think that war is inevitable. do you think it is? well, i hope not. i hope that the efforts are being made within nato and beyond to try and get some unity of action in regard to russia's aggressive intentions with ukraine
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are being heard at the heart of moscow. they do need to be tough voices, both in terms of what is unacceptable in terms of any military invasion, incursion into ukraine, but also the price you pay, as well, in terms of your economy. russia has enough on its plate, i would suggest, internally in terms of its own economy. it doesn't need to be put into a situation where their economy goes further into decline. but you've got to be tough with russia and, whatever anybody is saying, they have to mean what they are saying and be prepared to put it to action. what we have here is russian bullying, denying the right of self—determination of the people of self—determination of the people of ukraine, and that's what it's really all about. but of ukraine, and that's what it's really all about.— of ukraine, and that's what it's really all about. but the issue is that i see _ really all about. but the issue is that i see two _ really all about. but the issue is that i see two very _ really all about. but the issue is that i see two very weak - really all about. but the issue is - that i see two very weak governments in washington and london at the moment, and people will say that it suits them to shift the attention to ukraine and away from voting rights,
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build back better, inflation from parties bullying, islamaphobia. are they right to be cynical? right parties bullying, islamaphobia. are they right to be cynical?— they right to be cynical? right to be nical they right to be cynical? right to be cynical generally, _ they right to be cynical? right to be cynical generally, yes, - they right to be cynical? right to be cynical generally, yes, but. they right to be cynical? right to| be cynical generally, yes, but i'm not too _ be cynical generally, yes, but i'm not too concerned about a tail wagging — not too concerned about a tail wagging the dog situation here where they are _ wagging the dog situation here where they are trying to distract attention away from what's happening domestically. the biden administration has a tough challenge here - _ administration has a tough challenge here — they've spoken very aggressively, i don't know if they've _ aggressively, i don't know if they've laid the predicate here in they've laid the predicate here in the us— they've laid the predicate here in the us for— they've laid the predicate here in the us for military action. i think they— the us for military action. i think they probably have for economic action— they probably have for economic action and — they probably have for economic action and harsh economic repercussions for the russians if they do— repercussions for the russians if they do invade ukraine. but i do not believe the — they do invade ukraine. but i do not believe the biden administration has come _ believe the biden administration has come close to laying the predicate yet for _ come close to laying the predicate yet for anything close to military action, _ yet for anything close to military action, they haven't defined at the american — action, they haven't defined at the american interest well enough to where _ american interest well enough to where they would be justified at least _ where they would be justified at least in — where they would be justified at least in the eyes of the american public— least in the eyes of the american public of— least in the eyes of the american public of sending us troops. so even though— public of sending us troops. so even though it _ public of sending us troops. so even though it seems to be moving very quickly, there is a lot of work at least _ quickly, there is a lot of work at least from — quickly, there is a lot of work at least from the biden administration to do— least from the biden administration to do domestically before they sell
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this some — to do domestically before they sell this some point the reason i'm circumspect here is because there are circumspect here is because there ar z: z: z: z: circumspect here is because there ar 3:1: 1: z: z: ,, ., circumspect here is because there ar.’;~,:: :::::: ., are 130,000 troops on the borders of ukraine. are 130,000 troops on the borders of ukraine- but — are 130,000 troops on the borders of ukraine. but we _ are 130,000 troops on the borders of ukraine. but we put _ are 130,000 troops on the borders of ukraine. but we put a _ are 130,000 troops on the borders of ukraine. but we put a lot _ are 130,000 troops on the borders of ukraine. but we put a lot of- are 130,000 troops on the borders of ukraine. but we put a lot of weapons| ukraine. but we put a lot of weapons and they are, modern weapons, they've been trained by western troops. this is a very different prospect to what the russians did in crimea. 130,000 troops to go all the way from you came to —— ukraine to kyiv, it doesn't sound like they have enough troops to do that. i have enough troops to do that. i heard it today at the reports that ukrainians will not defend themselves. you here already of ordinary citizens prepared to defend themselves within the ukraine. if there's any entry by russians into ukraine, there will be bloodshed and loss of life. the question is, does russia want to do this, or is this
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another example of them basically beating their chest, putin beating his test and trying to extend the strength of russia and what it is prepared to do? —— beating his chest. in some ways we've been here before, but over the last week, the mounting tensions should give cause for worry. mounting tensions should give cause forworry. going mounting tensions should give cause for worry. going back to your earlier question about whether this is a distraction — on one level, as someone in the uk, i'd like to see us talking more about the big issues domestically or internationally. and i think is right that there time given to this amongst all the other things we are dealing with here in the uk, above some of the other stuff that is important. but this is also important, and there's been a danger in the last two years that a lot of issues have not gotten the attention they deserve. i lot of issues have not gotten the attention they deserve.- lot of issues have not gotten the attention they deserve. i want to talk about whether _ attention they deserve. i want to talk about whether europe - attention they deserve. i want to talk about whether europe is - attention they deserve. i want to - talk about whether europe is united, because clearly there are concerns in washington. the ukrainian deputy
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prime minister of european affairs said today, and this was the quote carried in the new york times, "i don't think germany can lead on the russian issue. it's been leading the normandy format over the last eight years.". .. do you think that germany is undermining european cohesion? i undermining european cohesion? i think there is the risk of that, certainly we are perceiving that to be the case here. we read with a great _ be the case here. we read with a great deat— be the case here. we read with a great deal of concern about the british— great deal of concern about the british flights that didn't overfly germany in order to get to ukraine and not _ germany in order to get to ukraine and not to— germany in order to get to ukraine and not to raise the issue with germans — and not to raise the issue with germans and put them in a difficult issue. _ germans and put them in a difficult issue. i_ germans and put them in a difficult issue, i think some non—lethal aid did fiv— issue, i think some non—lethal aid did fly but— issue, i think some non—lethal aid did fly but military aid did not. the simple fact that germany relies so heavily— the simple fact that germany relies so heavily on russia because of its
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reiiance _ so heavily on russia because of its reliance on — so heavily on russia because of its reliance on natural gas does change the equation here, and i think americans— the equation here, and i think americans are asking themselves, "look, _ americans are asking themselves, "look, if— americans are asking themselves, "look, if the germans are not wiiiing — "look, if the germans are not wiiiing to _ "look, if the germans are not willing to participate in a heavy economic— willing to participate in a heavy economic sanctions should the russians— economic sanctions should the russians invade ukraine, why are we doing _ russians invade ukraine, why are we doing this? _ russians invade ukraine, why are we doing this? this is so much closer to germany— doing this? this is so much closer to germany and clearly are in their national— to germany and clearly are in their national sphere of influence than ukraine — national sphere of influence than ukraine for the united states." i think— ukraine for the united states." i think it's — ukraine for the united states." i think it's a — ukraine for the united states." i think it's a real question europeans need _ think it's a real question europeans need to— think it's a real question europeans need to he — think it's a real question europeans need to be asking, are the germans iooking _ need to be asking, are the germans looking to _ need to be asking, are the germans looking to continue to have it both ways? _ looking to continue to have it both ways? they— looking to continue to have it both ways? they get the russian oil but they don't— ways? they get the russian oil but they don't take any difficult stances _ they don't take any difficult stances against russian aggression? it's a stances against russian aggression? it's a valid _ stances against russian aggression? it's a valid question being asked on both sides — it's a valid question being asked on both sides of the atlantic, and rightly— both sides of the atlantic, and rightly so. vasyl filipchuk is a ukrainian diplomat. he was the spokesperson for the ukrainian foreign ministry, and is the former director of the department for european integration. thank you for coming on the programme. i'm interested to know from your perspective, because our
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reporters don't see ukrainian troop movement or people moving to the front — does it feel to you, sitting there in kyiv, like we are on the brink of war?— there in kyiv, like we are on the brink of war? ., ., , , ., ., brink of war? no, absolutely not. to be frank, brink of war? no, absolutely not. to be frank. it's — brink of war? no, absolutely not. to be frank, it'sjust _ brink of war? no, absolutely not. to be frank, it'sjust paranoia _ brink of war? no, absolutely not. to be frank, it'sjust paranoia and - be frank, it'sjust paranoia and hysteria — be frank, it'sjust paranoia and hysteria in— be frank, it'sjust paranoia and hysteria in western _ be frank, it'sjust paranoia and hysteria in western media. - be frank, it'sjust paranoia and - hysteria in western media. people here have — hysteria in western media. people here have just— hysteria in western media. people here have just noticed _ hysteria in western media. people here have just noticed it. - hysteria in western media. people here have just noticed it. and - hysteria in western media. people here have just noticed it. and it i here have just noticed it. and it was only— here have just noticed it. and it was only last _ here have just noticed it. and it was only last week— here have just noticed it. and it was only last week when - here have just noticed it. and it was only last week when this i was only last week when this information— was only last week when this information reach— was only last week when this information reach kyiv- was only last week when this information reach kyiv and l was only last week when this - information reach kyiv and people started _ information reach kyiv and people started to — information reach kyiv and people started to worry. _ information reach kyiv and people started to worry. but _ information reach kyiv and people started to worry. but in _ information reach kyiv and people started to worry. but in reality, i information reach kyiv and peoplel started to worry. but in reality, we do not _ started to worry. but in reality, we do not see — started to worry. but in reality, we do not see anything _ started to worry. but in reality, we do not see anything which - started to worry. but in reality, we do not see anything which is- do not see anything which is described _ do not see anything which is described in— do not see anything which is described in western - do not see anything which is| described in western reports do not see anything which is- described in western reports because basically, _ described in western reports because basically, if— described in western reports because basically. ifyou— described in western reports because basically, if you check— described in western reports because basically, if you check the _ described in western reports because basically, if you check the number- basically, if you check the number of troops — basically, if you check the number of troops from _ basically, if you check the number of troops from the _ basically, if you check the number of troops from the russian - basically, if you check the number of troops from the russian side, i basically, if you check the number. of troops from the russian side,14, 16, 19, _ of troops from the russian side,14, 16, 19, 21_ of troops from the russian side,14, 16, 19, 21 - — of troops from the russian side,14, 16.19.21- it's— of troops from the russian side,14, 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, _ of troops from the russian side,14, 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, you - of troops from the russian side,14, 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, you can. 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, you can find— 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, you can find your— 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, you can find your own _ 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, you can find your own reports _ 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, you can find your own reports in _ 16, 19, 21 — it's the same, you can find your own reports in western. find your own reports in western institutions, _ find your own reports in western institutions, the _ find your own reports in western institutions, the uk— find your own reports in western institutions, the uk minister- find your own reports in western institutions, the uk minister of.
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institutions, the uk minister of defence — institutions, the uk minister of defence reported _ institutions, the uk minister of defence reported that - institutions, the uk minister of defence reported that it - institutions, the uk minister of defence reported that it was i institutions, the uk minister of- defence reported that it was 95,000 russian troops, _ defence reported that it was 95,000 russian troops, two _ defence reported that it was 95,000 russian troops, two years _ defence reported that it was 95,000 russian troops, two years ago - defence reported that it was 95,000 russian troops, two years ago it - defence reported that it was 95,000 russian troops, two years ago it was 100,000... — russian troops, two years ago it was 100,000... 50— russian troops, two years ago it was 100,000. - -— 100,000... so you are saying the russian troops _ 100,000... so you are saying the russian troops are _ 100,000... so you are saying the russian troops are normally - 100,000... so you are saying the i russian troops are normally there? what changed half a year ago or two weeks _ what changed half a year ago or two weeks ago. — what changed half a year ago or two weeks ago, there's _ what changed half a year ago or two weeks ago, there's no _ what changed half a year ago or two weeks ago, there's no infrastructure for an— weeks ago, there's no infrastructure for an attack — weeks ago, there's no infrastructure for an attack. there's _ weeks ago, there's no infrastructure for an attack. there's no _ weeks ago, there's no infrastructure for an attack. there's no hospital, . for an attack. there's no hospital, there's— for an attack. there's no hospital, there's no— for an attack. there's no hospital, there's no infrastructure - for an attack. there's no hospital, there's no infrastructure which - for an attack. there's no hospital, . there's no infrastructure which must be there _ there's no infrastructure which must be there i_ there's no infrastructure which must be there i spoke _ there's no infrastructure which must be there. ispoke to— there's no infrastructure which must be there. i spoke to a _ there's no infrastructure which must be there. ispoke to a former- there's no infrastructure which must be there. i spoke to a former chief. be there. i spoke to a former chief of staff— be there. ispoke to a former chief of staff for— be there. i spoke to a former chief of staff for ukrainian _ be there. ispoke to a former chief of staff for ukrainian army- be there. i spoke to a former chief of staff for ukrainian army who - be there. i spoke to a former chiefl of staff for ukrainian army who was in charge _ of staff for ukrainian army who was in charge until— of staff for ukrainian army who was in charge until 2014. _ of staff for ukrainian army who was in charge until 2014. i— of staff for ukrainian army who was in charge until 2014. i spoke - of staff for ukrainian army who was in charge until 2014. i spoke to- in charge until 2014. ispoke to the former— in charge until 2014. i spoke to the former head — in charge until 2014. i spoke to the former head of _ in charge until 2014. ispoke to the former head of military— in charge until 2014. i spoke to the| former head of military intelligence - they— former head of military intelligence - they are — former head of military intelligence - they are all— former head of military intelligence — they are all saying _ former head of military intelligence — they are all saying the _ former head of military intelligence — they are all saying the same - — they are all saying the same thing. — — they are all saying the same thing. and _ — they are all saying the same thing, and today— — they are all saying the same thing, and today are - — they are all saying the same thing, and today are defence i thing, and today are defence minister— thing, and today are defence minister reported _ thing, and today are defence minister reported that - thing, and today are defence i minister reported that nothing thing, and today are defence - minister reported that nothing has changed _ minister reported that nothing has changed compared _ minister reported that nothing has changed compared to _ minister reported that nothing has changed compared to one - minister reported that nothing has changed compared to one year- minister reported that nothing has. changed compared to one year ago, three _ changed compared to one year ago, three years — changed compared to one year ago, three years ago. _ changed compared to one year ago, three years ago, five _ changed compared to one year ago, three years ago, five years - changed compared to one year ago, three years ago, five years ago. - changed compared to one year ago, i three years ago, five years ago. why should _ three years ago, five years ago. why should we _ three years ago, five years ago. why should we expect _ three years ago, five years ago. why should we expect that _ three years ago, five years ago. why should we expect that today - three years ago, five years ago. why should we expect that today would l three years ago, five years ago. whyl should we expect that today would be when russia _ should we expect that today would be when russia attacked _ should we expect that today would be when russia attacked us? _ should we expect that today would be when russia attacked us?— when russia attacked us? looking at the arms sent _ when russia attacked us? looking at the arms sent in _ when russia attacked us? looking at the arms sent in by _ when russia attacked us? looking at the arms sent in by the _ when russia attacked us? looking at the arms sent in by the us _ when russia attacked us? looking at the arms sent in by the us this - the arms sent in by the us this evening, this is the third shipment — there's a debate here whether nato
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forces should be put in ukraine as a major determine. will that help or would that lead to a greater conflation?— would that lead to a greater conflation? �*, , ., . conflation? it's very collocated. we have security _ conflation? it's very collocated. we have security guarantees _ conflation? it's very collocated. we have security guarantees from - conflation? it's very collocated. we have security guarantees from the l conflation? it's very collocated. we i have security guarantees from the uk and us— have security guarantees from the uk and us -- _ have security guarantees from the uk and us -- it's— have security guarantees from the uk and us -- it's very— have security guarantees from the uk and us —— it's very complicated. - and us —— it's very complicated. most— and us —— it's very complicated. most countries— and us —— it's very complicated. most countries are _ and us —— it's very complicated. most countries are obliged - and us —— it's very complicated. | most countries are obliged since 1994 to — most countries are obliged since 1994 to help— most countries are obliged since 1994 to help ukraine _ most countries are obliged since 1994 to help ukraine defend - most countries are obliged since 1994 to help ukraine defend itsl 1994 to help ukraine defend its sovereignty— 1994 to help ukraine defend its sovereignty and _ 1994 to help ukraine defend its sovereignty and independence. j 1994 to help ukraine defend its - sovereignty and independence. they had to— sovereignty and independence. they had to be _ sovereignty and independence. they had to be here — sovereignty and independence. they had to be here in _ sovereignty and independence. they had to be here in 2014— sovereignty and independence. they had to be here in 2014 and help - sovereignty and independence. they had to be here in 2014 and help ouri had to be here in 2014 and help our army— had to be here in 2014 and help our army more — had to be here in 2014 and help our army more intensively _ had to be here in 2014 and help our army more intensively since - had to be here in 2014 and help our army more intensively since 2014. i army more intensively since 2014. whether— army more intensively since 2014. whether the — army more intensively since 2014. whether the troops— army more intensively since 2014. whether the troops would - army more intensively since 2014. whether the troops would help . army more intensively since 2014. i whether the troops would help here now, whether the troops would help here now. certainly— whether the troops would help here now, certainly not. _ whether the troops would help here now, certainly not. if— whether the troops would help here now, certainly not. if it _ whether the troops would help here now, certainly not. if it is _ whether the troops would help here now, certainly not. if it is a - whether the troops would help here now, certainly not. if it is a pr- now, certainly not. if it is a pr exercise. _ now, certainly not. if it is a pr exercise. it _ now, certainly not. if it is a pr exercise, it is _ now, certainly not. if it is a pr exercise, it is only— now, certainly not. if it is a pr exercise, it is only to - now, certainly not. if it is a pr exercise, it is only to irritate l exercise, it is only to irritate russians _ exercise, it is only to irritate russians to _ exercise, it is only to irritate russians to give _ exercise, it is only to irritate russians to give them - exercise, it is only to irritate i russians to give them pretence exercise, it is only to irritate - russians to give them pretence to attack _ russians to give them pretence to attack us — russians to give them pretence to attack us this _ russians to give them pretence to attack us. this should _ russians to give them pretence to attack us. this should be - russians to give them pretence to attack us. this should be done - attack us. this should be done discreetly. _ attack us. this should be done discreetly, quietly— attack us. this should be done discreetly, quietly — _ attack us. this should be done discreetly, quietly — if- attack us. this should be done discreetly, quietly — if you - attack us. this should be done i discreetly, quietly — if you help, this help — discreetly, quietly — if you help, this help should _ discreetly, quietly — if you help, this help should be _ discreetly, quietly — if you help, this help should be much- discreetly, quietly — if you help, this help should be much bigger and much _ this help should be much bigger and much more — this help should be much bigger and much more efficient, _ this help should be much bigger and
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much more efficient, and _ this help should be much bigger and much more efficient, and not- this help should be much bigger and much more efficient, and not this i much more efficient, and not this type of— much more efficient, and not this type of operation _ much more efficient, and not this type of operation. we _ much more efficient, and not this type of operation.— much more efficient, and not this type of operation. we were talking about if there _ type of operation. we were talking about if there was _ type of operation. we were talking about if there was any _ type of operation. we were talking about if there was any european i about if there was any european cohesion, whether europeans would stand behind the sanctions the us have put together. jeff concerns about germany particular, which has been highlighted today by the members of the ukrainian government? again, it's the difference in approaches _ again, it's the difference in approaches between - again, it's the difference in. approaches between germans again, it's the difference in- approaches between germans in the again, it's the difference in— approaches between germans in the us and uk _ approaches between germans in the us and uk germans— approaches between germans in the us and uk. germans have _ approaches between germans in the us and uk. germans have quite _ approaches between germans in the us and uk. germans have quite a - approaches between germans in the us and uk. germans have quite a good - and uk. germans have quite a good argument _ and uk. germans have quite a good argument for— and uk. germans have quite a good argument for or— and uk. germans have quite a good argument for or whether— and uk. germans have quite a good argument for or whether they- and uk. germans have quite a goodj argument for or whether they would significantly— argument for or whether they would significantly help _ argument for or whether they would significantly help us, _ argument for or whether they would significantly help us, or— argument for or whether they would significantly help us, or if— argument for or whether they would significantly help us, or if they - significantly help us, or if they would — significantly help us, or if they would give _ significantly help us, or if they would give pretence _ significantly help us, or if they would give pretence for- significantly help us, or if they i would give pretence for russians significantly help us, or if they - would give pretence for russians to attack _ would give pretence for russians to attack we — would give pretence for russians to attack we feel _ would give pretence for russians to attack. we feel a _ would give pretence for russians to attack. we feel a bit _ would give pretence for russians to attack. we feel a bit embarrassed i would give pretence for russians to. attack. we feel a bit embarrassed by the german— attack. we feel a bit embarrassed by the german behaviour— attack. we feel a bit embarrassed by the german behaviour over- attack. we feel a bit embarrassed by the german behaviour over the - attack. we feel a bit embarrassed by the german behaviour over the last i the german behaviour over the last weeks _ the german behaviour over the last weeks and — the german behaviour over the last weeks and month _ the german behaviour over the last weeks and month when _ the german behaviour over the last weeks and month when nordstrom| the german behaviour over the last - weeks and month when nordstrom two was enacted. _ weeks and month when nordstrom two was enacted, when _ weeks and month when nordstrom two was enacted, when some _ weeks and month when nordstrom two was enacted, when some members- weeks and month when nordstrom two was enacted, when some members ofl was enacted, when some members of the german— was enacted, when some members of the german government _ was enacted, when some members of the german government said - was enacted, when some members of the german government said very- the german government said very wrong _ the german government said very wrong things _ the german government said very wrong things about _ the german government said very wrong things about crimea. - the german government said very wrong things about crimea. yes, i wrong things about crimea. yes, europe _ wrong things about crimea. yes, europe should _ wrong things about crimea. yes, europe should really— wrong things about crimea. yes, europe should really be - wrong things about crimea. yes, europe should really be strongerj wrong things about crimea. yes, . europe should really be stronger in the ways— europe should really be stronger in the ways they _ europe should really be stronger in the ways they support _ europe should really be stronger in the ways they support ukraine, - europe should really be stronger inj
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the ways they support ukraine, but actually. _ the ways they support ukraine, but actually. the — the ways they support ukraine, but actually. the key— the ways they support ukraine, but actually, the key point _ the ways they support ukraine, but actually, the key point here - the ways they support ukraine, but actually, the key point here is- the ways they support ukraine, but actually, the key point here is that| actually, the key point here is that we all— actually, the key point here is that we all have — actually, the key point here is that we all have a — actually, the key point here is that we all have a feeling _ actually, the key point here is that we all have a feeling that - actually, the key point here is that we all have a feeling that there's i we all have a feeling that there's something — we all have a feeling that there's something now— we all have a feeling that there's something now going _ we all have a feeling that there's something now going on - we all have a feeling that there'sl something now going on between we all have a feeling that there's - something now going on between the us and _ something now going on between the us and russia. — something now going on between the us and russia, and _ something now going on between the us and russia, and where _ something now going on between the us and russia, and where us - us and russia, and where us europeans— us and russia, and where us europeans were _ us and russia, and where us europeans were away - us and russia, and where us europeans were away and . us and russia, and where usl europeans were away and not us and russia, and where us _ europeans were away and not engaged, not participating. — europeans were away and not engaged, not participating, and _ europeans were away and not engaged, not participating, and also— europeans were away and not engaged, not participating, and also this - not participating, and also this information— not participating, and also this information hysteria _ not participating, and also this information hysteria is - not participating, and also this information hysteria isjust- not participating, and also this information hysteria is just a l not participating, and also this - information hysteria isjust a cover what's _ information hysteria isjust a cover what's now — information hysteria isjust a cover what's now really— information hysteria isjust a cover what's now really happening - information hysteria isjust a cover. what's now really happening between the us— what's now really happening between the us and _ what's now really happening between the us and the — what's now really happening between the us and the russians. _ what's now really happening between the us and the russians. thank- what's now really happening between the us and the russians.— the us and the russians. thank you ve much the us and the russians. thank you very much for— the us and the russians. thank you very much for being _ the us and the russians. thank you very much for being with _ the us and the russians. thank you very much for being with us - the us and the russians. thank you very much for being with us on - the us and the russians. thank you very much for being with us on the l very much for being with us on the programme. that was a question tucker carlson made last night, echoing things you said about why russia is always the back like a bad guy. listen to what he said. wait a second, why is it disloyal to the side with russia, - but loyal to side with ukraine? they're both foreign - countries who don't care anything the united states. kind of strange. the reason we stand behind ukraine is that it's a democracy, and russia
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is that it's a democracy, and russia is not. is that right? it is that it's a democracy, and russia is not. is that right?— is not. is that right? it is, i think russia _ is not. is that right? it is, i think russia went on - is not. is that right? it is, i think russia went on to - is not. is that right? it is, 1 | think russia went on to say is not. is that right? it is, 1 - think russia went on to say that think russia went onto say that tucker— think russia went on to say that tucker went on to say that there are other— tucker went on to say that there are other places — tucker went on to say that there are other places around the world that are under— other places around the world that are under stress that we aren't talking — are under stress that we aren't talking about. tucker is an entertainer, but he's a very talented _ entertainer, but he's a very talented and bright guy. he was asking _ talented and bright guy. he was asking a — talented and bright guy. he was asking a very flamboyant question, and that— asking a very flamboyant question, and that what is the us interest in ukraine _ and that what is the us interest in ukraine was? the russians took crimea — ukraine was? the russians took crimea several years ago, we got our feathers— crimea several years ago, we got our feathers ruffled up about it but it didn't _ feathers ruffled up about it but it didn't really change american interests in the region. i think tucker— interests in the region. i think tucker is _ interests in the region. i think tucker is asking the same question. it tucker is asking the same question. it goes _ tucker is asking the same question. it goes back— tucker is asking the same question. it goes back to my point about the biden— it goes back to my point about the biden administration needing to do some _ biden administration needing to do some work here domestically on explaining to people why we might have to _ explaining to people why we might have to put sanctions on the russians. _ have to put sanctions on the russians, or we have to put sanctions on the russians. 0— have to put sanctions on the russians, o ., ., , russians, or we might have to send troo -s russians, or we might have to send tr00ps into — russians, or we might have to send troops into ukraine. _ russians, or we might have to send troops into ukraine. everyone - troops into ukraine. everyone assumes because it's russia and the old post—world war ii... assumes because it's russia and the old post-world war ii. . ._ old post-world war ii... everyone auainst old post-world war ii... everyone against them _ old post-world war ii... everyone against them is _ old post-world war ii... everyone against them is our _ old post-world war ii... everyone against them is our friend. - old post-world war ii... everyone against them is our friend. there l against them is our friend. there are some —
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against them is our friend. there are some old ways of thinking that tucker— are some old ways of thinking that tucker is _ are some old ways of thinking that tucker is calling on us to reconsider. it's a valid question to ask _ reconsider. it's a valid question to ask is— reconsider. it's a valid question to ask is there — reconsider. it's a valid question to ask. is there a specific interest that— ask. is there a specific interest thatjustifies american intervention? i'm curious to see how the biden— intervention? i'm curious to see how the biden ministration response. talks— the biden ministration response. talks will— the biden ministration response. talks will take place between vladimir putin and president biden on friday, we will watch what happens. this is context on the bbc. still to come... police launched an investigation into the allegations of multiple parties at downing street. let's look at some of the other stories making headlines today. a 15—year—old schoolboy has been airlifted to hospital after being stabbed at a school in cumbria this morning. the pupil suffered multiple stab wounds during the incident at walney school, near barrow—in—furness. he's now in a stable condition in hospital. cumbria police said they have arrested a 16—year—old boy. he's being questioned on suspicion of grievous bodily harm.
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mr beatty said the tweets were pretty horrific and he was deeply ashamed of them. however he has denied that he is a racist or misogynist. an investigation into the fire that destroyed glasgow school of art in 2018 has failed to find a cause. investigators spent more than three years probing the blaze, but said the damage was so bad that any possible evidence was lost. the fire broke out during a multi—million pound restoration of the world—renowned charles rennie mackintosh building following another fire four years before. the uk's metropolitan police has said it's now investigating multiple events at downing street and across government, to see whether there were breaches of covid restrictions. up until now, the met has taken no action — and has been criticised by some because of that. the commissioner of britain's biggest force, dame cressida dick, confirmed that her officers are now looking into potential rule—breaking as a result of information provided by civil servants,
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who are also compiling a report on what happened. i can confirm that the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years, in relation to potential breaches of covid—19 regulations. and this was the reaction from the prime minister in the house of commons. i welcome the met's decision - to conduct its own investigation, because i believe this - will help to give the public the clarity it needs and help to draw a line under matters. - the police investigation comes on top of the reporte by the civil servnat sue gray. there are reports that we could see her findings published as soon as tomorrow morning. earlier downing street said the report might have to be withheld.
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there's been a range of reaction from mps. borisjohnson's close allies in cabinet have supported him, but there have been renewed calls for him to resign. here's douglas ross, leader of the scottish conservatives. it's clearly damaging when these investigations are taking place, when the commissioner of the met police announces an investigation within downing street, this ongoing inquiry by sue gray — the whole thing is very damaging, and that's why i think we need clarity, but i've also said i've regretfully come to the position that the prime minister can't continue. it would seem that sue gray referred this to the police, which doesn't bode well for the prime minister, does it? it bode well for the prime minister, does it? . bode well for the prime minister, does it? , ., , , does it? it is undoubtedly giving him more of _ does it? it is undoubtedly giving him more of a _ does it? it is undoubtedly giving him more of a sleepless - does it? it is undoubtedly giving him more of a sleepless night i does it? it is undoubtedly giving i him more of a sleepless night then he may have had in the last week. there's just been one story after another coming out about what seems to be a flaunting of the rules that we were all meant to be abiding under in this last year or two. and no sooner has one reached its peak,
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another comes along. at the heart of all this with the british public is about fair play, really, and everybody across every community has really risen to the challenges that the pandemic brought to us. and they expect the same from the very top. it's about leadership, and i get that unlike many other workplaces, staff and downing street, in the cabinet office were working together, socially distanced provided they were in the same building. but whether that gave them the right to take the opportunity to bend the rules — that's open to question. at the time, it may have seemed, dare i say it, relatively trivial but when you look at the rear view mirror and see everything going on, people not allowed to attend the funerals of loved ones,
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not seeing your grandchildren — and everyone, a huge national effort to give to those rules, it leaves a sour taste in people's mouths. the truth of it is, if he's going to go, ultimately little bit —— it'll be his own side, it won't be the labour party. his own side, it won't be the labour pa . a, his own side, it won't be the labour pa . . his own side, it won't be the labour party. may be the backbenchers, the most important _ party. may be the backbenchers, the most important electorate _ party. may be the backbenchers, the most important electorate in - party. may be the backbenchers, the most important electorate in britain | most important electorate in britain at the moment. if you look at the pole at the moment, that number in the left, 62% think he should resign — that's up from 56% earlier. i mean, you've worked in communications, you were a former chief of staff. do you think when the public has turned this way, it can be salvaged was blue it can be salvaged. nothing can and a poetical career salvaged. nothing can and a poetical caree . . salvaged. nothing can and a poetical caree ., , ., .., career faster than getting caught in cross career faster than getting caught in gross hypocrisy. — career faster than getting caught in gross hypocrisy, the _ career faster than getting caught in gross hypocrisy, the do _ career faster than getting caught in gross hypocrisy, the do as - career faster than getting caught in gross hypocrisy, the do as i - career faster than getting caught in gross hypocrisy, the do as i say, i gross hypocrisy, the do as i say, not as— gross hypocrisy, the do as i say, not as i— gross hypocrisy, the do as i say, not as i do— gross hypocrisy, the do as i say, not as i do mentality is one thing
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that can — not as i do mentality is one thing that can even turn your staunchest supporters — that can even turn your staunchest supporters against you. we worried about— supporters against you. we worried about that — supporters against you. we worried about that all the time in the trumpet— about that all the time in the trumpet ministration. in order to save _ trumpet ministration. in order to save things, if you do get caught, the prime — save things, if you do get caught, the prime minster is doing everything he can — the only chance you have _ everything he can — the only chance you have is — everything he can — the only chance you have is pure transparency and possibly apologies at the end of it and throwing yourself at the mercy of public— and throwing yourself at the mercy of public opinion. people are willing — of public opinion. people are willing to tolerate mistakes as long as there's — willing to tolerate mistakes as long as there's some contrition, but this is a tough _ as there's some contrition, but this is a tough position for any politician to find themselves in. tough _ politician to find themselves in. tough position for the advisers to find themselves in as well. well, john mcternan was tony blair's director of political operations at the time. the pm himself was interviewed, his chief fundraiser, and a key number ten aide were arrested, welljohn mcternan
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did you remember this at the time, you went through something similar? i was interviewed by the police, i had eight — i was interviewed by the police, i had eight months _ i was interviewed by the police, i had eight months of— i was interviewed by the police, i had eight months of my- i was interviewed by the police, i had eight months of my life - i was interviewed by the police, i had eight months of my life and i i was interviewed by the police, i- had eight months of my life and that police investigation, _ had eight months of my life and that police investigation, which _ had eight months of my life and that police investigation, which in - had eight months of my life and that police investigation, which in the - police investigation, which in the end cleared _ police investigation, which in the end cleared us _ police investigation, which in the end cleared us of— police investigation, which in the end cleared us of all— police investigation, which in the| end cleared us of all wrongdoing. police investigation, which in the i end cleared us of all wrongdoing. i remember— end cleared us of all wrongdoing. i remember the _ end cleared us of all wrongdoing. i remember the tension _ end cleared us of all wrongdoing. i remember the tension and - end cleared us of all wrongdoing. ii remember the tension and isolation of it. _ remember the tension and isolation of it. having — remember the tension and isolation of it. having a — remember the tension and isolation of it, having a lot _ remember the tension and isolation of it, having a lot of— remember the tension and isolation of it, having a lot of lawyers, - remember the tension and isolation of it, having a lot of lawyers, not i of it, having a lot of lawyers, not talking _ of it, having a lot of lawyers, not talking to — of it, having a lot of lawyers, not talking to anybody _ of it, having a lot of lawyers, not talking to anybody about - of it, having a lot of lawyers, not talking to anybody about it, - of it, having a lot of lawyers, not talking to anybody about it, youl talking to anybody about it, you can't _ talking to anybody about it, you can't talk — talking to anybody about it, you can't talk to _ talking to anybody about it, you can't talk to your _ talking to anybody about it, you can't talk to your colleagues, i can't talk to your colleagues, friends — can't talk to your colleagues, friends or— can't talk to your colleagues, friends or family, _ can't talk to your colleagues, friends or family, only- can't talk to your colleagues, friends or family, only your. can't talk to your colleagues, i friends or family, only your lawyers and the _ friends or family, only your lawyers and the police _ friends or family, only your lawyers and the police in _ friends or family, only your lawyers and the police in the _ friends or family, only your lawyers and the police in the interviews i and the police in the interviews about— and the police in the interviews about the — and the police in the interviews about the ongoing _ and the police in the interviews about the ongoing case. - and the police in the interviews about the ongoing case. it's- and the police in the interviewsl about the ongoing case. it's still and the police in the interviews i about the ongoing case. it's still a bil about the ongoing case. it's still a big part of— about the ongoing case. it's still a big part of my— about the ongoing case. it's still a big part of my life, _ about the ongoing case. it's still a big part of my life, it— about the ongoing case. it's still a big part of my life, it was- about the ongoing case. it's still a big part of my life, it was a - big part of my life, it was a long time ago — big part of my life, it was a long time ago but _ big part of my life, it was a long time ago but it— big part of my life, it was a long time ago but it made _ big part of my life, it was a long time ago but it made a - big part of my life, it was a long time ago but it made a big i big part of my life, it was a long i time ago but it made a big impact on me. time ago but it made a big impact on me, ., , , time ago but it made a big impact on me. ., , , , time ago but it made a big impact on me. ,. . me. the absolutely big, crucial auestion me. the absolutely big, crucial question is. — me. the absolutely big, crucial question is, do _ me. the absolutely big, crucial question is, do you _ me. the absolutely big, crucial question is, do you tell- me. the absolutely big, crucial question is, do you tell people | me. the absolutely big, crucial. question is, do you tell people in me. the absolutely big, crucial- question is, do you tell people in a police investigation different things to what you would tell people in an internal government inquiry? you tell both parts of the inquiry the truth. — you tell both parts of the inquiry the truth, because _ you tell both parts of the inquiry the truth, because only- you tell both parts of the inquiry the truth, because only the i you tell both parts of the inquiry| the truth, because only the truth will set _ the truth, because only the truth will set you — the truth, because only the truth will set you free. _ the truth, because only the truth will set you free. but— the truth, because only the truth will set you free.—
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will set you free. but do you tell them the truth _ will set you free. but do you tell them the truth you _ will set you free. but do you tell them the truth you think - will set you free. but do you tell. them the truth you think they want to hear, as opposed to the police, you're just a little bit more careful? i you're just a little bit more careful? ., ., , ,, careful? i would always tell sue gra the careful? i would always tell sue gray the truth, _ careful? i would always tell sue gray the truth, as _ careful? i would always tell sue gray the truth, as opposed i careful? i would always tell sue gray the truth, as opposed to l careful? i would always tell sue i gray the truth, as opposed to the truth _ gray the truth, as opposed to the truth i _ gray the truth, as opposed to the truth i think— gray the truth, as opposed to the truth i think i— gray the truth, as opposed to the truth i think i get— gray the truth, as opposed to the truth i think i get away— gray the truth, as opposed to the truth i think i get away with. i gray the truth, as opposed to the truth i think i get away with. thei truth i think i get away with. the situation — truth i think i get away with. the situation when _ truth i think i get away with. the situation when you _ truth i think i get away with. the situation when you go _ truth i think i get away with. the situation when you go to - truth i think i get away with. the situation when you go to an i situation when you go to an interrogation _ situation when you go to an interrogation interview- situation when you go to an interrogation interview with situation when you go to an i interrogation interview with the police, — interrogation interview with the police, when _ interrogation interview with the police, when the _ interrogation interview with the police, when the door- interrogation interview with the police, when the door closes, l interrogation interview with the - police, when the door closes, there you, police, when the door closes, there you. your— police, when the door closes, there you, your solicitor— police, when the door closes, there you, your solicitor sat _ police, when the door closes, there you, your solicitor sat next - police, when the door closes, there you, your solicitor sat next to - police, when the door closes, there you, your solicitor sat next to you, i you, your solicitor sat next to you, and the _ you, your solicitor sat next to you, and the police _ you, your solicitor sat next to you, and the police have _ you, your solicitor sat next to you, and the police have got— you, your solicitor sat next to you, and the police have got binders- and the police have got binders indexed, — and the police have got binders indexed, cross—referenced, - and the police have got binders indexed, cross—referenced, set questions — indexed, cross—referenced, set questions they'll— indexed, cross—referenced, set questions they'll ask— indexed, cross—referenced, set questions they'll ask you. - indexed, cross—referenced, set. questions they'll ask you. they've -ot questions they'll ask you. they've got att— questions they'll ask you. they've got all the — questions they'll ask you. they've got all the information _ questions they'll ask you. they've got all the information of- questions they'll ask you. they've got all the information of who - questions they'll ask you. they've i got all the information of who knew what and _ got all the information of who knew what and when, _ got all the information of who knew what and when, who _ got all the information of who knew what and when, who said _ got all the information of who knew what and when, who said what - got all the information of who knew what and when, who said what and | what and when, who said what and when, _ what and when, who said what and when, what — what and when, who said what and when, what is _ what and when, who said what and when, what is the _ what and when, who said what and when, what is the timeline? - what and when, who said what and when, what is the timeline? theyi what and when, who said what and i when, what is the timeline? they are asking _ when, what is the timeline? they are asking you _ when, what is the timeline? they are asking you questions _ when, what is the timeline? they are asking you questions to _ when, what is the timeline? they are asking you questions to fill _ when, what is the timeline? they are asking you questions to fill in - asking you questions to fill in some of the _ asking you questions to fill in some of the blanks— asking you questions to fill in some of the blanks and _ asking you questions to fill in some of the blanks and put _ asking you questions to fill in some of the blanks and put you _ asking you questions to fill in some . of the blanks and put you somewhere in that— of the blanks and put you somewhere in that timeline. _ of the blanks and put you somewhere in that timeline. so _ of the blanks and put you somewhere in that timeline. so you've _ of the blanks and put you somewhere in that timeline. so you've only - of the blanks and put you somewhere in that timeline. so you've only got . in that timeline. so you've only got two choices— in that timeline. so you've only got two choices - — in that timeline. so you've only got two choices — one, _ in that timeline. so you've only got two choices — one, no— in that timeline. so you've only got two choices — one, no comment. in that timeline. so you've only got| two choices — one, no comment the whole _ two choices — one, no comment the whole way— two choices — one, no comment the whole way through, _ two choices — one, no comment the whole way through, or _ two choices — one, no comment the whole way through, or secondly, i two choices — one, no comment the | whole way through, or secondly, you whole way through, or secondly, you choose _ whole way through, or secondly, you choose to _ whole way through, or secondly, you choose to tell— whole way through, or secondly, you choose to tell the _ whole way through, or secondly, you choose to tell the truth. _ whole way through, or secondly, you choose to tell the truth. and - whole way through, or secondly, you choose to tell the truth. and that's l choose to tell the truth. and that's what you _ choose to tell the truth. and that's what you have _ choose to tell the truth. and that's what you have to— choose to tell the truth. and that's what you have to do. _ choose to tell the truth. and that's what you have to do. you - choose to tell the truth. and that's what you have to do. you can't -
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choose to tell the truth. and that's . what you have to do. you can't evade it — what you have to do. you can't evade it - tieceuse— what you have to do. you can't evade it — because everybody— what you have to do. you can't evade it — because everybody else - what you have to do. you can't evade it — because everybody else is - what you have to do. you can't evade it — because everybody else is being. it — because everybody else is being asked. _ it — because everybody else is being asked. as _ it — because everybody else is being asked. as welt, _ it — because everybody else is being asked, as well, i— it — because everybody else is being asked, as well, i don't _ it — because everybody else is being asked, as well, idon't know- it — because everybody else is being asked, as well, i don't know how. it — because everybody else is being| asked, as well, i don't know how big asked, as well, idon't know how big this het— asked, as well, idon't know how big this het witi— asked, as well, i don't know how big this het will go. _ asked, as well, i don't know how big this net will go, but _ asked, as well, i don't know how big this net will go, but you _ this net will go, but you can't stide — this net will go, but you can't stide awey— this net will go, but you can't slide away from _ this net will go, but you can't slide away from this. - this net will go, but you can't slide away from this. and - this net will go, but you can't slide away from this. and i. this net will go, but you can't i slide away from this. and i don't think— slide away from this. and i don't think anybody— slide away from this. and i don't think anybody in _ slide away from this. and i don't think anybody in number- slide away from this. and i don't think anybody in number ten - slide away from this. and i don't| think anybody in number ten will have _ think anybody in number ten will have tteen— think anybody in number ten will have been told _ think anybody in number ten will have been told or— think anybody in number ten will have been told or would - think anybody in number ten will have been told or would have - think anybody in number ten will- have been told or would have thought it was _ have been told or would have thought it was a _ have been told or would have thought it was a good — have been told or would have thought it was a good idea _ have been told or would have thought it was a good idea not _ have been told or would have thought it was a good idea not to _ have been told or would have thought it was a good idea not to tell - it was a good idea not to tell the sue gray— it was a good idea not to tell the sue gray inquiry— it was a good idea not to tell the sue gray inquiry the _ it was a good idea not to tell the sue gray inquiry the truth - it was a good idea not to tell the sue gray inquiry the truth of- it was a good idea not to tell the l sue gray inquiry the truth of what was going — sue gray inquiry the truth of what was going on _ sue gray inquiry the truth of what was going on— sue gray inquiry the truth of what was auoin on. ~ . . ., , was going on. meant, i want to bring ou on was going on. meant, i want to bring you on this — was going on. meant, i want to bring you on this because _ was going on. meant, i want to bring you on this because you _ was going on. meant, i want to bring you on this because you were - was going on. meant, i want to bring you on this because you were a - was going on. meant, i want to bring you on this because you were a partl you on this because you were a part of the impeachment inquiry into donald trump over ukraine and the payments to ukraine. did you feel that you wanted to talk, but did you just we also split on your loyalty to donald trump? hie. just we also split on your loyalty to donald trump?— just we also split on your loyalty to donald trump? no, you want to talk. especially — to donald trump? no, you want to talk, especially if _ to donald trump? no, you want to talk, especially if you _ to donald trump? no, you want to talk, especially if you don't - to donald trump? no, you want to talk, especially if you don't think l talk, especially if you don't think you've _ talk, especially if you don't think you've done anything wrong, you want to talk because if you don't tell your— to talk because if you don't tell your story, _ to talk because if you don't tell your story, someone else will for you _ your story, someone else will for you it's — your story, someone else will for you it's one _ your story, someone else will for you. it's one of the reasons that the prime — you. it's one of the reasons that the prime ministers doing the right thing _ the prime ministers doing the right thing and _ the prime ministers doing the right thing and welcoming this very aggressive and transparent investigation, because it's probably his best _ investigation, because it's probably his best chance to get all the facts out there — his best chance to get all the facts out there and not just the ones that make _ out there and not just the ones that make him _ out there and not just the ones that make him look bad. so if you have
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something — make him look bad. so if you have something to hide, then you start to worry— something to hide, then you start to worry about — something to hide, then you start to worry about allegiances and so forth — worry about allegiances and so forth but _ worry about allegiances and so forth. but if you feel you've done nothing _ forth. but if you feel you've done nothing wrong, you want to talk as many— nothing wrong, you want to talk as many people as you can.— nothing wrong, you want to talk as many people as you can. thank you all very much. _ many people as you can. thank you all very much, we'll _ many people as you can. thank you all very much, we'll be _ many people as you can. thank you all very much, we'll be right- many people as you can. thank you all very much, we'll be right stay i all very much, we'll be right stay with us. —— be right back. hello. it's been a largely cloudy, cold day out there across much of the uk. our weather watchers, though, have let us know where there's been a little bit of sunshine across parts of scotland in particular, though for many places, especially across wales and england, it's been scenes like this. though the weather is about to change, overall it's looking like a brighter day for tomorrow. we've got high pressure close by, but it's just going to decline southwards as low pressure moves to the north of us, increasing the breeze and allowing a lot of this cloud to start to break up. and in fact, you can see, as we go through the rest of the night, we've got more in the way of clear spells developing out there, just a little bit more of a breeze for now, mostly across northern areas of the uk. and it's from eastern scotland down through parts of wales and england, temperatures will fall close to freezing for a touch of frost
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here and there as tomorrow begins. another day with a lot of dry weather, but it looks different on the map here because there are breaks in the cloud allowing some sunny spells to come through here and there. the cloud increasing again in northern ireland and through western scotland. initially light and patchy rain will clearly turn much heavier on through the afternoon, especially across the northern and western isles, north west of the mainland, with gales around here. these are average wind speeds. gusts are going to be higher, but for many, it is a breezier day. and it's milder. temperatures back into double figures in northern ireland and scotland, certainly a lot higher than they've been for the past couple of days where it's been so grey and misty, especially for parts of wales and england. now, overnight into thursday, this area of rain will begin to move its way southwards. for a time, even severe gales in northern scotland before those winds ease a bit on thursday. well, cloud and a little patchy rain left on this weather system clearing south through wales and england on thursday. behind it, bright skies, a chance of catching a shower and temperatures just take a step backwards again in scotland on thursday, but more of wales
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and england getting into double figures before that front clears away. a chance of frost and fog with high pressure reaching back in as we start off on friday, but our weather system hanging around through friday, friday night and into saturday morning across the north and west of scotland allowing for some heavy, persistent rain and strong winds here before that weather front moves south and weakens on saturday. a windy, mild start to the weekend. it looks like it's going to be colder and wetter by the time we get to sunday. that's your latest forecast.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching context on bbc news. the district attorney and it led to investigating donna trump's efforts to overturn the 2020 election results in georgia will be allowed to see a special grand jury. the da will be given new powers to investigate the former president including the power to subpoena witnesses. 50,000 cancer patients in britain have gone missing in this pandemic. how do we find them and how do we get them on top of the an enormous backlog and health care system already stretched to the limit? do you word old? six letters in three months has become an internet sensation.
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a line of breaking news to bring you before we turn to events in georgia. 0r hearing from her bbc editor that sue gray report has not been handed to number ten this evening. it's not expected that it will be published at least before prime minister's questions tomorrow at lunch time although we do understand that the report is complete and is likely to be published later in the day. an important day coming up tomorrow with regards to soup gray report. we are still to hear whether it will be reported in full and some elements will be withheld for that will bring you more on that if and when we get it. we turn to events in georgia. donald trump is facing legal peril in georgia. the atlanta area district attorney has been given the green light to seat a special grand jury in her criminal investigation into the former president's attempts to overturn the 2020 election result in the statejoe biden won. it is currently the only criminal case that focuses squarely
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on the alleged inteference, and the da fanni willis says that she expects to decide whether to bring charges in the first half of this year. central to that investigation will be the phone call trump made to georgia secretary of state brad raffensperger while the recount was under way. you can't let it happen you are letting it happen. let's bring in michael moore, former us attorney in georgia. take us through this. it's important because it's the only criminal case and one would imagine a recording which starts will be central to it. it is starts will be central to it. it is important _ starts will be central to it. it is important and _ starts will be central to it. it is important and it's _ starts will be central to it. it is important and it's a _ starts will be central to it. it 3 important and it's a little bit unusual to have a special grand jury convened. it's not completely out of the ordinary but it's not everyday
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practice. the big distinction is of this grand jury will allow her to go for a longer period of time during the investigation. it will also allow for investigation as opposed to simply seeking indictment. a criminal grand jury here runs for about two months and has the authority to actually issue indictment. the grand jury that she's received permission bar will issue a report and recommendation. this will allow people to command, give sworn testimony, they'll be subpoenaed. is a interesting twist, one of the key figures that she wants to subpoena as a secretary of state. he is already written a book about this and he's given numerous television interviews and media appearances outlining what he thought about the phone call. plus we have the tape of the phone call which is really the best evidence of what went on. she could move forward with a very streamlined prosecution or simply go to a criminal grand jury. in this case it looks like she wants to expand, maybe look at some
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conspiracy allegation perhaps our ricoh that would be racketeering allegations to look at it in a broader picture to people that may have been involved or participated in an effort to commit election fraud. so that's what will be going onto the next few months if she has the power to subpoena subpoena the former president? de the power to subpoena subpoena the former president?— the power to subpoena subpoena the former president? de senator lindsey graham, former president? de senator lindsey graham. rudy — former president? de senator lindsey graham, rudy giuliani, _ former president? de senator lindsey graham, rudy giuliani, all— former president? de senator lindsey graham, rudy giuliani, all these - graham, rudy giuliani, all these that are featured in the january six inquiry? that are featured in the january six inrui ? ~ ., that are featured in the january six inrui ? ~ . ., , inquiry? well, that the order gives her the authority _ inquiry? well, that the order gives her the authority to _ inquiry? well, that the order gives her the authority to subpoena - her the authority to subpoena witnesses. you may remember that i wrote a letter back in december complaining about a telephone call that lindsey graham made at the time i suggested that he be investigated for his efforts to interfere with the election. she does have that authority. wanting to keep in mind though is that subpoena is just like, using it in washington play out almost on a daily basis with top subpoenas are challenged to stop she would have those issued to her by
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the judge that's been assigned to the judge that's been assigned to the case, maybe have a right to appeal those things on higher up if they do they will likely go to apple it courts which are frankly in this state at least, controlled —— applet. republican appointees that is if they're not good people, doesn't mean they can't try to set their opinion side but if you think about it, you could just look at the us supreme court and you can see the ideological divide and how things work. that's a battle that she will face going forward. it he work. that's a battle that she will face going forward.— work. that's a battle that she will face going forward. if he was found ruil face going forward. if he was found guilty in this _ face going forward. if he was found guilty in this case, what _ face going forward. if he was found guilty in this case, what is - guilty in this case, what is the ultimate sanction? it guilty in this case, what is the ultimate sanction?— guilty in this case, what is the ultimate sanction? it could very well be jail _ ultimate sanction? it could very well be jail time. _ ultimate sanction? it could very well be jailtime. i— ultimate sanction? it could very well be jailtime. i also - ultimate sanction? it could very well be jail time. i also think i ultimate sanction? it could very. well be jail time. i also think that may not be the case and for this reason, the former president still has the right to receive secret service protection for the remainder of his life. and after the former president to act. in a conviction doesn't do away with that. it logistically becomes almost impossible to think about itjudge sentencing him to the georgia penitentiary. that's a tough thing
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to see down the road. again, the question even before we get there is good a conviction survive if she's able to get one in front of a jury, that would mean all 12 jurors voted to invent. and we can think about the politics and art. could that conviction survive in applet court in the state and it's a unique position to bring criminal charges for activity done by an individual while he was a sitting president of the united states.— the united states. thank you very much for that. we _ the united states. thank you very| much for that. we appreciate your time. it doesn't sound to me for what michael is saying that there would be ultimately a conviction here. but what is happening is that the president is getting tied up in all sorts of legal issues in new york, the january six committee, we don't know at the washington district attorney will do an hour in georgia. does that complicate him running in 202a? it georgia. does that complicate him running in 2024?— running in 2024? it does and it doesn't. running in 2024? it does and it doesn't- l _ running in 2024? it does and it doesn't. i don't _ running in 2024? it does and it doesn't. i don't need _ running in 2024? it does and it doesn't. i don't need to - running in 2024? it does and it
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doesn't. i don't need to be - running in 2024? it does and it - doesn't. i don't need to be evasive but i think you can make the argument that it actually helps them. he could make the case, and i think quite effectively so that he's a political prisoner, he's being persecuted for his political views and could bake himself out to be the victim. he could actually develop a good deal of sympathy for folks if he handles it properly. 0n the flip side, if more information comes out that makes him look in a worse than that makes him look in a worse than that every could hurt his underlying chances to run for elected office. i think you have to look at this through the prism of everything in this country which is everything is politcised and it's hard to make the case that this action in georgia, especially in light of what you just heard mr moore say that the conviction is unlikely for the jail time is portably unheard of. why are they doing it? i think that opens a doorfor the president to make they doing it? i think that opens a door for the president to make the case that it's politically motivated and i could ultimately help them run for office again, which is probably exact opposite of what the folks in georgia had intended. fiur exact opposite of what the folks in georgia had intended. our systems are similar in _ georgia had intended. our systems are similar in some _ georgia had intended. our systems are similar in some ways _ georgia had intended. our systems are similar in some ways but - georgia had intended. our systems l are similar in some ways but they're very different when it comes to counting the vote. you
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very different when it comes to counting the vote.— very different when it comes to counting the vote. you don't have any elected _ counting the vote. you don't have any elected person _ counting the vote. you don't have any elected person anywhere - counting the vote. you don't have| any elected person anywhere near reading _ any elected person anywhere near reading the voting procedures at all. reading the voting procedures at all it— reading the voting procedures at all it is— reading the voting procedures at all. it is all done by a non—elected people _ all. it is all done by a non—elected people in— all. it is all done by a non—elected people in our town halls all around the country. that's for local elections, european elections, mayoral— elections, european elections, mayoral elections, elections for parliament as well. it's really alien— parliament as well. it's really alien to — parliament as well. it's really alien to us the idea that a candidate could bring up one of their— candidate could bring up one of their own — candidate could bring up one of their own party who happens to be in charge _ their own party who happens to be in charge of— their own party who happens to be in charge of overall oversight of an election— charge of overall oversight of an election and make that sort of call. i've election and make that sort of call. we heard — election and make that sort of call. we heard it— election and make that sort of call. i've heard it before but hearing it again. _ i've heard it before but hearing it again. it's — i've heard it before but hearing it again, it'sjust gob smacking. it�*s again, it's 'ust gob smacking. it's worth it again, it'sjust gob smacking. it's worth it to _ again, it'sjust gob smacking. it�*s worth it to say that brad reference berger is beyond reproach was obvious under immense pressure, he stood tall. ihla obvious under immense pressure, he stood tall. ., ., , stood tall. no doubt he did good. he's not stood tall. no doubt he did good. he's got the _ stood tall. no doubt he did good. he's got the public _ stood tall. no doubt he did good. he's got the public affirmation i stood tall. no doubt he did good. i he's got the public affirmation that regardless of a shared political party— regardless of a shared political party with donald trump, he stood firm _ party with donald trump, he stood firm~ and — party with donald trump, he stood firm. and clearly made the point that there — firm. and clearly made the point that there is no... we
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firm. and clearly made the point that there is no. . ._ that there is no... we are not a olitical that there is no... we are not a political appointee _ that there is no... we are not a political appointee may - that there is no... we are not a political appointee may be i that there is no... we are not a i political appointee may be donald trump would not have felt able to ring and abuse them. it trump would not have felt able to ring and abuse them.— ring and abuse them. it 'ust woman-t �* ring and abuse them. it 'ust wouldn't happen i ring and abuse them. it 'ust wouldn't happen in i ring and abuse them. it 'ust wouldn't happen in the i ring and abuse them. itjust wouldn't happen in the uk. | ring and abuse them. itjust i wouldn't happen in the uk. no elected — wouldn't happen in the uk. no elected official is near any of that — elected official is near any of that. , good point you make. we will move on. there are growing concerns in the uk and around the world that the covid pandemic is diverting resources and attention away from other important diseases. which means many people are dying from illnesses we can treat, including cancer. and the figures might shock you. the uk cancer charity macmillan estimates that there are roughly 50 thousand "missing" cancer patients in the uk, those who should have been diagnosed, and have not been. there are 24 thousand people in the uk who have had their treatment significa ntly delayed. separately the charity cancer research here in britain has a £300 million shortfall in funding, 400 us million dollars. funding which goes towards research, treatment, diagnosis. joining me now is steven mcintosh,
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executive director of advocacy at the macmillan cancer support organisation. thanks for being with us. 50,000 people. thanks for being with us. 50,000 --eole. ~ ., , ., thanks for being with us. 50,000 --eole. ~ . , ., ., people. where are they, how do we find them? — people. where are they, how do we find them? it _ people. where are they, how do we find them? it shocking _ people. where are they, how do we find them? it shocking and - people. where are they, how do we find them? it shocking and really i find them? it shocking and really worrying for any family that's affected by cancer. so these are people that because of the impacts of coronavirus may have felt worried about coming forward with cancer symptoms and might not to their gpa. so i really urge any viewers who is that a lumbar bumper unexplained pain or bleeding to make sure they get those symptoms checked out so that they get into the system, get those symptoms checked and get the treatment that they need. but this isn't just about a number of people who have been diagnosed, it's also disruption to cancer treatment and cancer surgery which we need uk governments to tackle as they planned for the recovery of her health services. his planned for the recovery of her health services.— planned for the recovery of her health services. his heart here in the uk, it— health services. his heart here in the uk, it will— health services. his heart here in the uk, it will be _ health services. his heart here in the uk, it will be people - health services. his heart here in| the uk, it will be people watching in the united states and around europe, people don't want to travel do not trouble to gps because they
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know how much pressure they're under. but unless to face you can't get diagnosis. it’s under. but unless to face you can't get diagnosis-— get diagnosis. it's been really challenging — get diagnosis. it's been really challenging in _ get diagnosis. it's been really challenging in every - get diagnosis. it's been really challenging in every stage i get diagnosis. it's been really challenging in every stage of| challenging in every stage of someone's journey through being diagnosed with cancer. people's reticence to come forward with cancer symptoms but then real pressure on diagnostic services. just recently received record numbers of people waiting to get suspected cancer symptoms checked out. but then we know that people are seeing a cancer surgery or treatment disrupted. and people gone through cancer treatment facing agonising waits for a test to see if the cancer may have come back. and to check they're still okay. and it's overlaid on a chronically understaffed set of health services at huge burn—out for and i of the government have got to demonstrate the capacity for health care services of really stretch health care services to catch up on those backlogs and address those underlying issues which means that cancer waiting times even before the pandemic were getting worse. mick. cancer waiting times even before the pandemic were getting worse. mick, i was lookin: pandemic were getting worse. mick, i was looking at — pandemic were getting worse. mick, i was looking at us _ pandemic were getting worse. mick, i was looking at us figures, _ pandemic were getting worse. mick, i was looking at us figures, us - was looking at us figures, us figures that were out last week,
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this is from the american cancer society. death rates where you are have fallen by a third since 1991, 30 2% have fallen by a third since1991, 30 2% drop in cancer deaths which is an incredible performance. what is it that america is doing that the uk is not? , is not? keep in mind, we saw the heavy dose _ is not? keep in mind, we saw the heavy dose of _ is not? keep in mind, we saw the heavy dose of the _ is not? keep in mind, we saw the heavy dose of the free _ is not? keep in mind, we saw the heavy dose of the free market i is not? keep in mind, we saw the i heavy dose of the free market here when it comes to providing healthcare. even though we had the affordable care act which we call 0bama care enacted a law about ten years ago, only about five or 6 million people are covered by that. most people continue to be covered by private health insurance through their employees. we have a circumstance here where we have a tremendous capacity within our health care system, in fact we can make the argument were over for capacity for healthcare. we have a surplus of beds in many states. we have plenty of health care available to folks. i think you're seeing the result in the outcomes where we give better cancer results in other places around the world that have different approach to healthcare. caroline, clearly we have issues here as just been explained. but the
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free market does bring a lot of investment into research which is expensive. do we need to find ways when we can from the nhs we are pouring money into it, do we need to find ways to help diagnose some of theseissues find ways to help diagnose some of these issues can treated? melt. find ways to help diagnose some of these issues can treated?— these issues can treated? well, i think there's _ these issues can treated? well, i think there's certainly _ these issues can treated? well, i think there's certainly a - these issues can treated? well, i l think there's certainly a discussion to be _ think there's certainly a discussion to be had — think there's certainly a discussion to be had about what we should be doing _ to be had about what we should be doing to _ to be had about what we should be doing to support people in terms of their own _ doing to support people in terms of their own health and well—being before _ their own health and well—being before they become ill. i'm very proud _ before they become ill. i'm very proud to— before they become ill. i'm very proud to have been a public health minister— proud to have been a public health minister that was part of helping others reduce the smoke three legislation in the uk and we know that is— legislation in the uk and we know that is had — legislation in the uk and we know that is had an impact. yes, we should — that is had an impact. yes, we should be _ that is had an impact. yes, we should be looking at how we provide our healthcare. i don't think a private — our healthcare. i don't think a private sector solution is the answer — private sector solution is the answer here but i think there is something about our primary care that needs — something about our primary care that needs to be addressed. tvs are try to _ that needs to be addressed. tvs are try to see _ that needs to be addressed. tvs are try to see as — that needs to be addressed. tvs are try to see as many people as possible — try to see as many people as possible but they are overwhelmed —— gps. possible but they are overwhelmed —— gps we _ possible but they are overwhelmed —— gps we do— possible but they are overwhelmed —— gps. we do need more focus because what happens to peoples health and
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well— being what happens to peoples health and well—being before what happens to peoples health and well— being before they end what happens to peoples health and well—being before they end up in hospital? — well—being before they end up in hospital? i wanted to ask, i was hearing — hospital? i wanted to ask, i was hearing that one of the reasons he warrant _ hearing that one of the reasons he warrant coming forward was actually they were _ warrant coming forward was actually they were frightened of action contracting covid in a gps surgery or if they— contracting covid in a gps surgery or if they wanted to hospital. is that the — or if they wanted to hospital. is that the case?— that the case? that's actually rirht. that the case? that's actually right- we _ that the case? that's actually right. we had _ that the case? that's actually right. we had a _ that the case? that's actually right. we had a range - that the case? that's actually right. we had a range of- that the case? that's actually| right. we had a range of fares that the case? that's actually i right. we had a range of fares from people _ right. we had a range of fares from people. the — right. we had a range of fares from people. the fear— right. we had a range of fares from people. the fear of _ right. we had a range of fares from people. the fear of covid _ right. we had a range of fares from people. the fear of covid in - right. we had a range of fares from| people. the fear of covid in medical settings _ people. the fear of covid in medical settings also — people. the fear of covid in medical settings. also many— people. the fear of covid in medical settings. also many people - people. the fear of covid in medical settings. also many people didn't . settings. also many people didn't want to— settings. also many people didn't want to bother— settings. also many people didn't want to bother the _ settings. also many people didn't want to bother the health - settings. also many people didn't want to bother the health service| want to bother the health service when _ want to bother the health service when there — want to bother the health service when there was _ want to bother the health service when there was a _ want to bother the health service when there was a strange - want to bother the health service . when there was a strange message that we _ when there was a strange message that we needed _ when there was a strange message that we needed to _ when there was a strange message that we needed to protect - when there was a strange message that we needed to protect the i when there was a strange message | that we needed to protect the nhs. the message — that we needed to protect the nhs. the message i_ that we needed to protect the nhs. the message i want— that we needed to protect the nhs. the message i want to _ that we needed to protect the nhs. the message i want to send - that we needed to protect the nhs. the message i want to send is i that we needed to protect the nhs. the message i want to send is put i the message i want to send is put yourself— the message i want to send is put yourself forward, _ the message i want to send is put yourself forward, don't _ the message i want to send is put yourself forward, don't pause, i the message i want to send is put l yourself forward, don't pause, don't delay, _ yourself forward, don't pause, don't delay, get— yourself forward, don't pause, don't delay, get cancer— yourself forward, don't pause, don't delay, get cancer symptoms - yourself forward, don't pause, don't| delay, get cancer symptoms checked out because — delay, get cancer symptoms checked out because the _ delay, get cancer symptoms checked out because the earlier— delay, get cancer symptoms checked out because the earlier we _ delay, get cancer symptoms checked out because the earlier we can- delay, get cancer symptoms checked out because the earlier we can catch| out because the earlier we can catch cancer the _ out because the earlier we can catch cancer the easier it— out because the earlier we can catch cancer the easier it is— out because the earlier we can catch cancer the easier it is to _ out because the earlier we can catch cancer the easier it is to treat and i cancer the easier it is to treat and the better— cancer the easier it is to treat and the better your— cancer the easier it is to treat and the better your chances _ cancer the easier it is to treat and the better your chances and - cancer the easier it is to treat and the better your chances and youri the better your chances and your outcomes — the better your chances and your outcomes are _ the better your chances and your outcomes are. that's _ the better your chances and your outcomes are. that's like - the better your chances and your- outcomes are. that's like government need to— outcomes are. that's like government need to put— outcomes are. that's like government need to put that — outcomes are. that's like government need to put that investment _ outcomes are. that's like government need to put that investment and - need to put that investment and support— need to put that investment and support ends _ need to put that investment and support ends up _ need to put that investment and support ends up getting - need to put that investment and support ends up getting peoplel need to put that investment and i support ends up getting people to come _ support ends up getting people to come forward _ support ends up getting people to come forward but _ support ends up getting people to come forward but also _ support ends up getting people to come forward but also making i support ends up getting people to| come forward but also making sure they can _ come forward but also making sure they can get — come forward but also making sure they can get urgent _ come forward but also making sure they can get urgent treatment i come forward but also making surei they can get urgent treatment when they can get urgent treatment when they needed — they can get urgent treatment when they needed you _ they can get urgent treatment when they needed. you not _ they can get urgent treatment when they needed. you not going - they can get urgent treatment when they needed. you not going to i they can get urgent treatment when they needed. you not going to do i they needed. you not going to do that without — they needed. you not going to do that without the _ they needed. you not going to do that without the health care - that without the health care workforce _ that without the health care workforce you _ that without the health care workforce you need. - that without the health care workforce you need. and i that without the health care i workforce you need. and were that without the health care - workforce you need. and were seeing too much _ workforce you need. and were seeing too much delay— workforce you need. and were seeing too much delay for— workforce you need. and were seeing too much delay for too _ workforce you need. and were seeing too much delay for too long - too much delay for too long government— too much delay for too long government is— too much delay for too long government is failing - too much delay for too long government is failing to i too much delay for too long |
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government is failing to live too much delay for too long i government is failing to live with it health — government is failing to live with it health care _ government is failing to live with it health care workforce, - government is failing to live with it health care workforce, we i government is failing to live withi it health care workforce, we need government is failing to live with i it health care workforce, we need to keep pace _ it health care workforce, we need to keep pace with _ it health care workforce, we need to keep pace with demand. _ it health care workforce, we need to keep pace with demand. the - it health care workforce, we need to keep pace with demand. the 3- it health care workforce, we need to i keep pace with demand. the 3 million people _ keep pace with demand. the 3 million people today — keep pace with demand. the 3 million people today living _ keep pace with demand. the 3 million people today living with _ keep pace with demand. the 3 million people today living with cancer - keep pace with demand. the 3 million people today living with cancer and i people today living with cancer and that will— people today living with cancer and that will rise — people today living with cancer and that will rise. unless _ people today living with cancer and that will rise. unless the _ that will rise. unless the government— that will rise. unless the government delivers- that will rise. unless the government delivers the j that will rise. unless the - government delivers the health that will rise. unless the _ government delivers the health care to match _ government delivers the health care to match the — government delivers the health care to match the growing _ government delivers the health care to match the growing patient - government delivers the health care| to match the growing patient needs, the grown _ to match the growing patient needs, the grown people _ to match the growing patient needs, the grown people with _ to match the growing patient needs, the grown people with cancer- to match the growing patient needs, the grown people with cancer two i the grown people with cancer two conditions — the grown people with cancer two conditions i — the grown people with cancer two conditions i cancer— the grown people with cancer two conditions i cancer may— the grown people with cancer two conditions i cancer may be - the grown people with cancer two conditions i cancer may be livingi the grown people with cancer two l conditions i cancer may be living on because _ conditions i cancer may be living on because of— conditions i cancer may be living on because of great— conditions i cancer may be living on because of great improvements i conditions i cancer may be living on because of great improvements in. because of great improvements in survival_ because of great improvements in survival outcomes. _ because of great improvements in survival outcomes. a _ because of great improvements in survival outcomes. a lot - because of great improvements in survival outcomes. a lot of us - because of great improvements in. survival outcomes. a lot of us again to be _ survival outcomes. a lot of us again to be able _ survival outcomes. a lot of us again to be able to — survival outcomes. a lot of us again to be able to the _ survival outcomes. a lot of us again to be able to the survival— survival outcomes. a lot of us again to be able to the survival we - to be able to the survival we needm _ to be able to the survival we need... ., ., need... coming back to the point, i'm not advocating _ need... coming back to the point, i'm not advocating for— need... coming back to the point, i'm not advocating for the - need... coming back to the point, i'm not advocating for the free - i'm not advocating for the free market, ijust want i'm not advocating for the free market, i just want to understand the issue. there isn't enough money and the system and recite cancer research which provides for diagnosis and research, they've got a $300 million shortfall. what do you do to find that ground—breaking research that can make a difference to people? research that can make a difference to --eole? , ., . research that can make a difference to eole? , ., . to people? every part of cancer care and treatment _ to people? every part of cancer care and treatment has _ to people? every part of cancer care and treatment has been _ to people? every part of cancer care and treatment has been effective. i and treatment has been effective. medical_ and treatment has been effective. medical research _ and treatment has been effective. medical research is _ and treatment has been effective. medical research is been - and treatment has been effective. | medical research is been affected, challenges — medical research is been affected, challenges in _ medical research is been affected, challenges in the _ medical research is been affected, challenges in the investment - medical research is been affected, challenges in the investment in. challenges in the investment in diagnostic— challenges in the investment in diagnostic care _ challenges in the investment in diagnostic care as _ challenges in the investment in diagnostic care as well- challenges in the investment in diagnostic care as well as - challenges in the investment in diagnostic care as well as the l diagnostic care as well as the treatment— diagnostic care as well as the treatment of— diagnostic care as well as the treatment of cancer. - diagnostic care as well as the treatment of cancer. we - diagnostic care as well as the | treatment of cancer. we have diagnostic care as well as the - treatment of cancer. we have seen progress _ treatment of cancer. we have seen progress in — treatment of cancer. we have seen progress in survival— treatment of cancer. we have seen progress in survival outcomes - treatment of cancer. we have seen progress in survival outcomes in i treatment of cancer. we have seeni progress in survival outcomes in the
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uk. progress in survival outcomes in the uk but— progress in survival outcomes in the uk but the — progress in survival outcomes in the uk but the uk_ progress in survival outcomes in the uk. but the uk is— progress in survival outcomes in the uk. but the uk is also— progress in survival outcomes in the uk. but the uk is also made - uk. but the uk is also made important _ uk. but the uk is also made important progress - uk. but the uk is also made important progress in - uk. but the uk is also made - important progress in considering the quality— important progress in considering the quality of— important progress in considering the quality of life _ important progress in considering the quality of life people - important progress in considering the quality of life people have - important progress in considering i the quality of life people have been livin- the quality of life people have been living with — the quality of life people have been living with cancer. _ the quality of life people have been living with cancer. 0ne _ the quality of life people have been living with cancer. one and - the quality of life people have been living with cancer. one and two - the quality of life people have been living with cancer. one and two of i living with cancer. one and two of us are _ living with cancer. one and two of us are going — living with cancer. one and two of us are going to— living with cancer. one and two of us are going to live _ living with cancer. one and two of us are going to live with _ living with cancer. one and two of us are going to live with cancer. us are going to live with cancer throughout— us are going to live with cancer throughout our— us are going to live with cancer throughout our lifetime. - us are going to live with cancer throughout our lifetime. this l us are going to live with cancer| throughout our lifetime. this is us are going to live with cancer. throughout our lifetime. this is no longer— throughout our lifetime. this is no longer a _ throughout our lifetime. this is no longer a condition— throughout our lifetime. this is no longer a condition where - throughout our lifetime. this is no longer a condition where you - throughout our lifetime. this is no longer a condition where you get i throughout our lifetime. this is no| longer a condition where you get it and you're — longer a condition where you get it and you're either— longer a condition where you get it and you're either treated - longer a condition where you get it and you're either treated and - longer a condition where you get it| and you're either treated and cured of you _ and you're either treated and cured of you die — and you're either treated and cured of you die quickly _ and you're either treated and cured of you die quickly. many— and you're either treated and cured of you die quickly. many of - and you're either treated and cured of you die quickly. many of us, - and you're either treated and cured of you die quickly. many of us, all. of you die quickly. many of us, all of you die quickly. many of us, all of our— of you die quickly. many of us, all of our families— of you die quickly. many of us, all of our families will— of you die quickly. many of us, all of our families will be _ of you die quickly. many of us, all of our families will be affected - of you die quickly. many of us, all of our families will be affected by| of our families will be affected by cancer _ of our families will be affected by cancer we — of our families will be affected by cancer. we need _ of our families will be affected by cancer. we need to _ of our families will be affected by cancer. we need to learn - of our families will be affected by cancer. we need to learn how- of our families will be affected by| cancer. we need to learn how you live well— cancer. we need to learn how you live well with _ cancer. we need to learn how you live well with cancer. _ cancer. we need to learn how you live well with cancer. it's - cancer. we need to learn how you live well with cancer. it's not - cancer. we need to learn how you live well with cancer. it's not justl live well with cancer. it's not just about _ live well with cancer. it's not just about whether _ live well with cancer. it's not just about whether you _ live well with cancer. it's not just about whether you get _ live well with cancer. it's notjustj about whether you get treatment live well with cancer. it's not just - about whether you get treatment and survive. _ about whether you get treatment and survive. it's— about whether you get treatment and survive, it's probably— about whether you get treatment and survive, it's probably your— about whether you get treatment and survive, it's probably your quality- survive, it's probably your quality of life. _ survive, it's probably your quality of life. quality— survive, it's probably your quality of life, quality of— survive, it's probably your quality of life, quality of care _ survive, it's probably your quality of life, quality of care you - survive, it's probably your quality of life, quality of care you get - of life, quality of care you get both — of life, quality of care you get both of— of life, quality of care you get both of you _ of life, quality of care you get both of you targeted - of life, quality of care you get both of you targeted to - of life, quality of care you get both of you targeted to live . of life, quality of care you get . both of you targeted to live that without — both of you targeted to live that without health _ both of you targeted to live that without health care _ both of you targeted to live that without health care workforce . both of you targeted to live that . without health care workforce that could _ without health care workforce that could deliver— without health care workforce that could deliver the _ without health care workforce that could deliver the care _ without health care workforce that could deliver the care and - without health care workforce that . could deliver the care and treatment you need _ could deliver the care and treatment ou need. ., , ., . ~ ., you need. lovely to talk to you. thank you _ you need. lovely to talk to you. thank you for— you need. lovely to talk to you. thank you for coming _ you need. lovely to talk to you. thank you for coming on - you need. lovely to talk to you. thank you for coming on the - you need. lovely to talk to you. - thank you for coming on the program. do take his advice if you think you've got a problem, go and get checked out. you're watching context. still to come on the program. everyone's playing it, even me from today. the new word puzzle game taking the internet by storm.
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the chairman of the cricket club has apologises up his remarks were described as painful and outdated by the ex—england player. he said football and rugby become much more attractive to the afro—caribbean community and cricket was sometimes secretary two secondary for players. he said to cricket place to tackle racism in sport. english cricket south asian action plan, one initiative the ecb was keyed to highlight today in front of the select committee. but we came to explain the barriers to diversity in the professional game, the chair of middlesex county cricket club said this. ., ., ,., middlesex county cricket club said this. ., ., ,. . _ ., this. the football and rugby world becomes much _ this. the football and rugby world becomes much more _ this. the football and rugby world becomes much more attractive i this. the football and rugby world becomes much more attractive toj this. the football and rugby world - becomes much more attractive to the afro—caribbean community and in terms of the south asian community, there is a moment where we are finding that they do not want necessarily to commit the same time thatis
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necessarily to commit the same time that is necessary to go to the next step because they prefer they sometimes refer to go into other educational fields.— educational fields. four international _ educational fields. four international chairs - educational fields. four international chairs the | educational fields. four . international chairs the ace foundation to a addressed declining black but to sing. she said... these outdated user why were in his position. he apologised for what he described as his lack of clarity. as he and rafik accepted the apology but with deep concerns.— he and rafik accepted the apology but with deep concerns. clearly the counties in — but with deep concerns. clearly the counties in the _ but with deep concerns. clearly the counties in the game _ but with deep concerns. clearly the counties in the game are _ but with deep concerns. clearly the counties in the game are still- but with deep concerns. clearly the counties in the game are still very| counties in the game are still very much in denial and it's a big worry. for the cricketer who experienced in and supposed racism in your shirt today's events revealed a long road still to travel. the
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today's events revealed a long road still to travel. right, hold onto your hats, we are going to talk cancel culture. first up, the author kate clanchy who this week has parted company with her publisher pan macmillan following widespread criticism last summer of her book some kids i taught and what they taught me. the readers took to twitter and goodreads to highlight ablist and racial tropes in her orwell prize—winning book — for which she issued an apology. in august, she said her publisher had given her room to rewrite sections that offended. but it seems the weight of attacks became too much for the publisher and she has been cancelled. this weekjamie oliver announced that he employed �*offence advisers�* to vet his recipe books, after being accused on several occasions of cultural appropriation. recenly he has sparked controversy with his own versions of recipes that replace traditional ingredients. what happened to the premise that if you apologise and retract for something wrong the world can move
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on? ., . , . . on? the world has changed, it actually has- _ on? the world has changed, it actually has. i— on? the world has changed, it actually has. i think _ on? the world has changed, it actually has. i think you're - on? the world has changed, it - actually has. i think you're looking at a situation in our social media has become the roman mob and were living in an atmosphere varies similar to the east german police was that i think we need to ask ourselves, is all of this cancelled culture bringing us together or ripping us apart? i think the truth is it's doing the latter.— is it's doing the latter. caroline, what has happened _ is it's doing the latter. caroline, what has happened is _ is it's doing the latter. caroline, what has happened is a - is it's doing the latter. caroline, what has happened is a sad - is it's doing the latter. caroline, what has happened is a sad tale j is it's doing the latter. caroline, i what has happened is a sad tale for our ages. what she right to ditch the author when she apologised and it already offered her an opportunity to rewrite sections of the book? i rewrite sections of the book? i think they were wrong and i agree with sonya — think they were wrong and i agree with sonya is an analysis and a piece — with sonya is an analysis and a piece is — with sonya is an analysis and a piece is really interesting. she said nuance is completely gone and this which— said nuance is completely gone and this which i— said nuance is completely gone and this which i think is a real issue.
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also, _ this which i think is a real issue. also, someone like this author takes on board _ also, someone like this author takes on board the criticism, actually owns _ on board the criticism, actually owns it — on board the criticism, actually owns it and says actually, it may be the language are used, the way i reference — the language are used, the way i reference things was clumsy, unhelpful and because offence and i'm unhelpful and because offence and i'm going — unhelpful and because offence and i'm going to look at it. that to be continued — i'm going to look at it. that to be continued to be prorated.- i'm going to look at it. that to be continued to be prorated. where is redemption — continued to be prorated. where is redemption and _ continued to be prorated. where is redemption and that? _ continued to be prorated. where is redemption and that? this - continued to be prorated. where is redemption and that? this is - continued to be prorated. where is redemption and that? this is still. redemption and that? this is still the night is this elaborate issue? the governor of virginia who was elected given parent choice, this is what he said just yesterday about what they are teaching in class. have a listen. for parents to send us any— have a listen. for parents to send us any instances _ have a listen. for parents to send us any instances where _ have a listen. for parents to send us any instances where they- have a listen. for parents to send us any instances where they feel. us any instances where they feel that their— us any instances where they feel that their fundamental— us any instances where they feel that their fundamental rights - us any instances where they feelj that their fundamental rights are being _ that their fundamental rights are being violated, _ that their fundamental rights are being violated, the _ that their fundamental rights are being violated, the children- that their fundamental rights are being violated, the children not. being violated, the children not being _ being violated, the children not being respected, _ being violated, the children not being respected, where - being violated, the children not being respected, where there l being violated, the children not. being respected, where there are inherited — being respected, where there are inherited divisive _ being respected, where there are inherited divisive practices- being respected, where there are inherited divisive practices in- being respected, where there are inherited divisive practices in the| inherited divisive practices in the school— inherited divisive practices in the school and — inherited divisive practices in the school and we _ inherited divisive practices in the school and we are _ inherited divisive practices in the school and we are asking - inherited divisive practices in the school and we are asking for- inherited divisive practices in the. school and we are asking for input right— school and we are asking for input right from — school and we are asking for input right from parents _ school and we are asking for input right from parents to _ school and we are asking for input right from parents to make - school and we are asking for input right from parents to make sure l school and we are asking for input. right from parents to make sure that we can— right from parents to make sure that we can go— right from parents to make sure that we can go right— right from parents to make sure that we can go right to— right from parents to make sure that we can go right to the _ right from parents to make sure that we can go right to the source - right from parents to make sure that we can go right to the source was. right from parents to make sure that we can go right to the source was upj we can go right to the source was up holy moly. _ we can go right to the source was up holy moly. ring _ we can go right to the source was up holy moly. ring us _ we can go right to the source was up holy moly, ring us about _ we can go right to the source was up holy moly, ring us about your - holy moly, ring us about your teacher, _ holy moly, ring us about your teacher, report _ holy moly, ring us about your teacher, report your- holy moly, ring us about your teacher, report your teacheri holy moly, ring us about your -
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teacher, report your teacher there's anything _ teacher, report your teacher there's anything you — teacher, report your teacher there's anything you suspect _ teacher, report your teacher there's anything you suspect to _ teacher, report your teacher there's anything you suspect to be - teacher, report your teacher there's anything you suspect to be critical. anything you suspect to be critical race theory — anything you suspect to be critical race theory-— anything you suspect to be critical race theory-- l _ anything you suspect to be critical race theory.- i think - anything you suspect to be critical race theory.- i think it's i race theory. really? ithink it's unusual, race theory. really? ithink it's unusual. l— race theory. really? ithink it's unusual, ithink— race theory. really? ithink it's unusual, i think you _ race theory. really? ithink it's unusual, i think you have i race theory. really? ithink it's unusual, i think you have to i race theory. really? i think it's| unusual, i think you have to put that in context given the name of the show. the local education was a very big issue in the virginia election. actually his opponent actually uttered the words that parent should not be involved in their children's education when they went to public school in the state of virginia. i think there's some context to that, because you're actually right. we are now to the point where were falling over each other to the point where were falling over each other determine our friends and neighbours and family members in of cancelled culture. . . ., family members in of cancelled culture. . . . . , culture. yeah. what about this example? _ culture. yeah. what about this example? we've _ culture. yeah. what about this example? we've got _ culture. yeah. what about this example? we've got neil- culture. yeah. what about this. example? we've got neil young culture. yeah. what about this i example? we've got neil young who wrote to his manager and his label and said pull all my music from sparta five because they're carrying joe rogan spot —— in which he is pushing anti—vax conspiracy theory. they can have broken our young but not both. that's a pretty extreme response to something you might not like or agree with. where is freedom of speech? in like or agree with. where is freedom of seech? ,.,
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like or agree with. where is freedom ofseech? , like or agree with. where is freedom ofseech? �*, of speech? in some ways he's not den in: of speech? in some ways he's not denying the _ said i do want to be on the same platform — said i do want to be on the same platform i— said i do want to be on the same platform. i suppose 01 level, if you don't _ platform. i suppose 01 level, if you don't like what you hear and you have _ don't like what you hear and you have the — don't like what you hear and you have the right to walk away. i think within— have the right to walk away. i think within this — have the right to walk away. i think within this debate there is a real danger— within this debate there is a real danger that from left and right we are getting really polarised views which ultimately say, we can't have a different — which ultimately say, we can't have a different opinion. an opinion has responsibility that comes with it. free _ responsibility that comes with it. free speech has responsibility that comes— free speech has responsibility that comes with it. but this shutting down _ comes with it. but this shutting down i — comes with it. but this shutting down i don't think it helps us. and it stops— down i don't think it helps us. and it stops listening and that's the worst— it stops listening and that's the worst thing possible to happen. 0kay~ _ i have a confession to make, i did not know anything about wordle until this morning. i know. i have been living in a hole. but i havejoined the human race today and i am addicted. for those of you still deep underground this is the new daily word game on line that challenges you to guess a five—letter word in six tries. so here's mine from today.
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you could see a colour tale indicates how closely you are to guessing the answers. the green tells you the letter is correct and in the right place the yellows says it's the right letter but you gotta put it somewhere on the bottom way. do you play wordle? ihla. put it somewhere on the bottom way. do you play wordle?— do you play wordle? no. i'm old school. i never— do you play wordle? no. i'm old school. i never heard _ do you play wordle? no. i'm old school. i never heard of - do you play wordle? no. i'm old school. i never heard of it. i i do you play wordle? no. i'm old school. i never heard of it. i wasj school. i never heard of it. i was in the _ school. i never heard of it. i was in the hole — school. i never heard of it. i was in the hole with you you've got out, i'm in the hole with you you've got out, i'm still— in the hole with you you've got out, i'm still in— in the hole with you you've got out, i'm still in whole. i'm old school. i'm scrabble, i'm risk. i like a game— i'm scrabble, i'm risk. i like a game of— i'm scrabble, i'm risk. i like a game of risk. i'm a board game person — game of risk. i'm a board game person. not that i'm boring but i'm a board _ person. not that i'm boring but i'm a board game present. nick mulvaney... i don't need my kindle, i mulvaney... i don't need my kindle, i like _ mulvaney... i don't need my kindle, i like books, — mulvaney... i don't need my kindle, i like books, i— mulvaney... i don't need my kindle, i like books, i like to feel books and read them. i'm waving the flag for old _ and read them. i'm waving the flag for old on — and read them. i'm waving the flag for old on this one. nick mulvaney, are ou a for old on this one. nick mulvaney, are you a word list _ for old on this one. nick mulvaney, are you a word list or _ for old on this one. nick mulvaney, are you a word list or a _ for old on this one. nick mulvaney, are you a word list or a scrambler? | are you a word list or a scrambler? i'm a scrambler. i would living in the same hole as the two of you. as carolyn will tell you, any decent scrambler will tell you it's the two letter words and the seven letter but no words not the five letter words that are the key to happiness.
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well, we've wordle all the way through the program. thank you for being with us. we will be back tomorrow. hello. 0ur weather is set to turn more active and eventful as we see out the month. not as dramatic, though, as the weather they've been seeing in greece — this is a view of the acropolis in athens. look at all this snow and temperatures barely above freezing. and it's not every day you see some of your favourite greek island holiday resorts covered in snow as well. this is the island of mykonos. some severe winter weather has been impacting eastern parts of the mediterranean. notjust in greece, as well, for wednesday, some more heavy snow is pushing further east across turkey. we've got high pressure, so it's been very quiet of late, but this area of low pressure just moving to the north of scotland is increasing the breeze for wednesday and it does mean, as high pressure is squeezed away, where things have been really grey and cold,
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it is looking like a brighter day. still, for much of the uk, large areas of cloud around, but there will be holes in that cloud allowing some bright or sunny spells to come through on what will be a breezier day. the winds strengthening more across north—west scotland, some heavy and persistent rain setting in here to the northern and western isles as well. temperatures rebounding into double figures in scotland and northern ireland, but it's milder elsewhere, some rain reaching into northern ireland too. the low pressure system will drive a weather front with a weakening area of rain southwards on wednesday into thursday. behind it initially some severe gales in the northern isles, for orkney, for example, overnight on wednesday night. here's the area of cloud and little rain left clearing away from wales and england during thursday, brighter skies following on behind, the chance of catching a shower, a colderfeeling day again in scotland at this stage. high pressure ridging back in behind this weather front on thursday night will allow some frost and fog to develop in places, particularly close to that high pressure where winds are lighter. there is another weather front, though, on friday
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approaching scotland, so look, again, how it turns wetter here. in fact for the next several days, there is quite a bit of rain to come, particularly across western, especially north—western, areas of scotland. temperatures are heading back up again here on friday, despite the rain and wind. now, as we go into the weekend, it'll take some time, heavy rain overnight and into saturday morning again in western scotland, but then another weather front, this cold front moves south during saturday. again, you'll notice the rain weakening as it does so, so the further south you are, not much rain left on this weather front, brighterskies and a scattering of showers following on behind what will be a mild but very blustery start to the weekend. and something to play for in the detail on sunday. this is now the ecmwf computer model, the european forecasting model, looks at it and has an area of low pressure sitting in this position, however, if we look at the american gfs computer model, the low pressure's here, but it's further north. the difference in position of the area of low pressure on sunday has an impact on what sort
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of weather we can expect on sunday. so with the ec computer model here, it could well be because it's further south that it engages with some colder air, and brings in some rain, but the potential for some snow out of this, especially to the higher ground of northern england and scotland, but if the low pressure was further north like the gfs model, any snowfall would be confined more to northern areas, especially into scotland again, mainly over the hills. so there's a lot to play for again on sunday's weather. we'll keep you updated. the start of next week, behind that area of low pressure system, a chilly north—westerly breeze, sunshine and showers, then high pressurejust sliding back towards us again, turning the wind later next week to a milder westerly. we'll, as ever, and keep you updated.
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borisjohnson says he welcomes a police investigation into gatherings held in downing street and whitehall during lockdown. it comes after details were passed from the senior civil servant — who's conducting her own inquiry — to the police. the met is now investigating a number of events that took place at downing street and whitehall in the last two years. downing street said that borisjohnson didn't think he had broken the law. i welcome the met's decision i to conduct its own investigation, as i believe this will help to give the public the clarity it needs i and help to draw a line under these matters. i rhe— under these matters. the under these matters. prime the underthese matters. prime minister the under these matters. prime minister faces pressur from the prime minister faces pressure from the — the prime minister faces pressure from the police, his own party, and from _ from the police, his own party, and from an— from the police, his own party, and from an official inquiry which could emerge _ from an official inquiry which could emerge as early as tomorrow.

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