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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 24, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm GMT

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today at five — borisjohnson orders an inquiry into an mp's claims that her muslim faith was given as a reason for her sacking as a minister in 2020. it is something i take personally, extremely seriously, i took it very seriously 18 months ago. we must wait and see what the investigation produces. thank you and goodbye. more trouble for the pm this afternoon — a minister publicly resigns over the government's handling
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of fraudulent covid business loans. people arriving in england will no longer need to take people arriving in england a covid lateral flow test, if they have been double vaccinated. we promise we wouldn't keep these measures in place a date longer than was necessary. it's obvious to me now that vaccinated travellers has outlived its usefulness. the prime minister warns russia that invading ukraine would be a "disastrous step" — as the uk withdraws staff from its embassy there. the founder of wikileaks — julian assange — wins the first stage of his legal bid — to appeal against the decision to extradite him to the united states. and how well do you know the new rules of the road? the highway code�*s been rewritten to make it safer for cyclists. also coming up this hour — overcoming scorching heat, sleep deprivation, and being trailed by sharks — a british all—women crew including a woman with incurable cancer — break the world record for rowing across the atlantic.
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borisjohnson has ordered a cabinet office inquiry into claims made by a muslim mp who says her religion was given as a reason for her sacking as a minister in 2020. the mp, nusrat ghani, has welcomed the inquiry, saying all she wanted was for the matter to be taken seriously. the government's chief whip, mark spencer, who has stated that the allegations refer to him, says the claims are completely false. it comes at the beginning of what is likely to be a difficult week for the prime minister, with the expected publication of a report into parties on government premises that took place when coronavirus restrictions were in place. and this afternoon there was further turmoil for the government — with the public resignation in the house of lords of one of its treasury ministers. from westminster, here's ione wells.
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as one inquiry into parties here is about to draw to a close, another one is about to open. this time into claims made by the tory mp nusrat ghani, who's said this weekend that she had been told by a party whip that her muslimness was a reason she was sacked as a transport minister. claims strongly denied by the chief whip mark spencer, who said he was the whip in question and called her claims defamatory. miss ghani said she raised the issue with the prime minister in 2020 and urged him to start an inquiry, but that he had told her to complain to the tory party instead. but this morning no ten have said there will be an investigation. we take these allegations extremely seriously, i took them seriously when they were raised with me 18 months ago. very glad this an investigation taking place now. on sunday night cabinet ministers, including the health secretary sajid javid
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and education secretary nadhim zahawi were amounge those calling for her claims to be investigated. these are you know really serious allegations and you know no one makes those easily, it takes a lot of bravery for somebody to stand up and say this and make these allegations, which is why we have to look at this quickly, but thoroughly, which is why the prime minister has made the right decision to get the cabinet office to look at this. but the conservative party peer baroness sayeeda warsi said this inquiry is only a start. it has to go much deeper than that. this is somebody who was a government minister who, was told that herjob came to an end, because of protected characteristics is actually against the law. it's not yet clear who will be fronting this new inquiry. labour's deputy leader angela rayner said the prime minister's independent ethics adviser lord geidt should be put in charge, claiming that the chief whip mark spencer could have broken the ministerial code. now, this all comes at a time
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when mark spencer and other government whips are under pressure and facing allegations for blackmailing tory mps into supporting the prime minister, claims which no ten say they don't recognise, but which the conservative mp william wragg said he will be taking up with the police. it's a bruising week ahead, as another major report into behaviour in government is about to drop. sue gray's investigation into parties across whitehall during covid restrictions. the prime minister's former top aide, dominic cummings said he has answered her questions in writing. reporter: have you spoken - to to sue gray today, mr cummings? he's already claimed the prime minister was warned one party in may 2020 should not go ahead, which borisjohnson denies. for many mps, this report will help them decide whether it is time to end johnson's leadership. and with a fresh inquiry announced today, he'll be hoping he can win back their support. and the bbc has learned that
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conservative mp william wragg has met with the metropolitan police this morning to discuss those claims of intimidation and blackmail. a racy quality think tank, hello to you. the allegations that she has made about what was said to her, can you just described what they mean in a legal sense? if there proved to be true, have laws been broken here? these allegations show, if they are true a flagrant disregard for equality legislation. she left her posed allegedly as a result of being discriminated against her characteristics. we are extremely concerned of equality legislation
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and labour laws. that concerned of equality legislation and labour laws.— concerned of equality legislation and labour laws. . , ., . and labour laws. that term protected characteristic. _ and labour laws. that term protected characteristic, not _ and labour laws. that term protected characteristic, not everybody - and labour laws. that term protected characteristic, not everybody will - characteristic, not everybody will of come across a phrase, what does that mean exactly?— that mean exactly? protective characteristics _ that mean exactly? protective characteristics mean - that mean exactly? protective characteristics mean things i that mean exactly? protective i characteristics mean things that that mean exactly? protective - characteristics mean things that you will face barriers brought forth as a result of who you are. whether it's racial discrimination, gender discrimination, otherforms of discrimination, otherforms of discrimination, these are things that may mean there are barriers in place in society that you will face as a of them. place in society that you will face as a of them-— place in society that you will face as a of them. and this from nmp alleauin as a of them. and this from nmp alleging that _ as a of them. and this from nmp alleging that this _ as a of them. and this from nmp alleging that this happened - as a of them. and this from nmp| alleging that this happened within her party and possibly within government, this is part of her point that it's not necessarily a conservative party issue but at a time where the issue of islamic phobia has been under the spotlight in west minister.— in west minister. absolutely. these alle . ations in west minister. absolutely. these allegations must _ in west minister. absolutely. these allegations must be _ in west minister. absolutely. these allegations must be seen _ in west minister. absolutely. these allegations must be seen against i in west minister. absolutely. these l allegations must be seen against the backdrop of islamic phobia in the conservative party but also across the political and media establishment. let's not forget, this is allegedly one of the deeply
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ingrained instances of islamic phobia in the conservative party which had gone on largely without consequences. whether it's comments from the prime minister likening women like bank robbers or evidence of posting races in islamic phobic material online, these are instances which may be doing that need to be taken which may be doing that need to be ta ken externally which may be doing that need to be taken externally seriously and it gone largely without consequence. we have to talk about what's going on more broadly as well, this isn't just a political issue, we know that over half of media coverage in the uk focusing on british muslims are negative. we know in a survey of over 200,000 newspapers that a third used the word islamic in junction with the word terror. these are issues that are deeply ingrained within art media and political establishments and must be dealt with and paid attention to now. you keep across — with and paid attention to now. you keep across these things, the claims that she has made that allegedly, it was said to her that people felt
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uncomfortable about having a muslim woman minister. and many will feel incredulous at hearing those words. does this strike true to you, have you heard of this thing being said in west minister before? it is utterly shocking. _ in west minister before? it is utterly shocking. it's - in west minister before? it 3 utterly shocking. it's unbearable to see for so many people of colour up and down this country who feel they too can resonate with these experiences of workplace discrimination. let's not forget that over a third of women of colour in the workplace are said to be passed over for at work because of racial discrimination. these issues embedded in our political system, we know that there is huge discrimination facing candidates at all levels and now allegations at the very top of high office. but also up in country. i think the people of colour, looking at this,
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engaging with these real issues, they may not feel surprised however shocking it seems. trier? they may not feel surprised however shocking it seems.— they may not feel surprised however shocking it seems. very good to talk to ou. as we heard earlier, there was more embarrassment for the government this afternoon, when the minister responsible for cross—government efficiency publicly announced his resignation in the house of lords, over efforts to tackle fraud relating to a coronavirus business loan scheme. lord agnew — a minister at the cabinet office and treasury — said "a combination of arrogance, indolence and ignorance" was "freezing the government machine". let's see what happened. my my lords, you can see it's my deeply held conviction that the current set of affairs is not acceptable. given on the minister of accounting fraud orfeel on the minister of accounting fraud or feel somewhat dishonest to stay on in that role of him incapable of doing it properly let alone defending our track record. it is for this reason that i sadly decide to tender my resignation as a
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minister across the treasury and cabinet office with immediate effect. i would be grateful of my noble lord will pass this letter onto the prime minister at his earliest convenience. it is worth saying that none of this relates to a far more dramatic political events being played out across west minister. this is not an attack on the prime minister and i'm sorry for the prime minister and i'm sorry for the inconvenience it will cause. indeed, i think any prime minister should be able to reasonably expect that the levers of government were are actually connected to delivering services to our citizens. i hope it's a virtually unknown minister beyond this post, giving my career up beyond this post, giving my career up might prompt others more important than me to get behind us and sorted out. it matters for all the obvious reasons but there is a penny of income tax waiting to be claimed to if we just woke up. total for road loss two fraud loss is estimated at 29 building 2 billion a yearfor the book or estimated at 29 building 2 billion a year for the book or sorrel can estimated at 29 building 2 billion a yearfor the book or sorrel can be stopped. but arrogance, yearfor the book or sorrel can be stopped. butarrogance, indolence and ignorance freezes the government. action taken today will
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give this government a sporting chance of cutting income tax before a likely may 2a election. if my removal because that to happen it will be worth it. believe me to thank the lord for his courteous and tentative rose, my shadow minister and to thank noble friends, many of whom i know will carry on with the scrutiny of this important area. thank you and goodbye. the treasury minister lord agnew, stepping out of the house of lords, having resigned from the government over how the fraudulent covid and as you saw applause from his fellow peers. as you uk move to withdraw staff from its embassy in ukraine. it follows a similar move by the us and an announcement by the western alliance nato that it's sending more ships and fighter jets to member states in eastern
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europe. russia has amassed 100,000 troops near its borders with ukraine. although it denies plans for military action. but president putin has demanded that ukraine, formerly part of the soviet union, neverjoins nato, forfear russia's security would be threatened. here's our diplomatic correspondent james landale. russia denies its planning an invasion but is on the borders. conducting large—scale exercises leaving some western powers to feel the worst. —— fear. this morning some of the diplomats at work here at the british embassy and the capital of kyiv are going to return home with their families. in a tweet it said... the british embassy remains open and will continue to carry out essential work. the intelligence _ carry out essential work. the intelligence is _ carry out essential work. the intelligence is very _ carry out essential work. tue: intelligence is very clear carry out essential work. tte: intelligence is very clear that there are 60 russian battle groups
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about to threaten, on the border of ukraine. the plan for a likely war that could take out kyiv is one that everybody can see. we need to make it very clear to the kremlin, to russia... would be disastrous step. officials at the florida office of the decision was a response to the growing risk of a russian incursion, not the result of a specific threat against british diplomats. the families of us diplomats who work at its embassy and gf have also been ordered home and some nonessential staff of been given the option to leave. t staff of been given the option to leave. ., ., leave. i have no higher responsibility - leave. i have no higher responsibility than - leave. i have no higher responsibility than the | leave. i have no higher- responsibility than the safety leave. i have no higher— responsibility than the safety and well—being of the folks who work for the state department and who are under my care in a sense. we are tracking this very, very closely. ukraine's foreign mila's to eight ministry was not impressed. translation: we respect the right of foreign _ translation: we respect the right of foreign states to ensure the security— foreign states to ensure the security of the diplomatic missions but we _ security of the diplomatic missions but we consider such a step to be
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premature — but we consider such a step to be premature. and a display of excessive caution. in premature. and a display of excessive caution. in brussels eu foreian excessive caution. in brussels eu foreign ministers _ excessive caution. in brussels eu foreign ministers decided - excessive caution. in brussels eu foreign ministers decided to - excessive caution. in brussels eu foreign ministers decided to give| excessive caution. in brussels eu l foreign ministers decided to give £1 billion in financial aid to ukraine but said for now, eu diplomats would not follow the uk and us lead. we are not to not follow the uk and us lead. - are not to do the same thing because we don't know any specific reasons. but they will inform us. i don't think we headed on a device was up but ukrainian civil defence forces conducted their own exercises nato announced that it was bolstering its presence in eastern europe with various member states preparing to send extra ships and warplanes to the region. the foreign secretary liz truss has said it's important the uk "prepares for any eventuality in ukraine" as russia continues to mass soldiers near the country's border. well, we have a full operation in ukraine. our embassy is operating and doing all the work it needs to do.
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but it's important that we prepare for any eventuality and there are very worrying signs about what could happen. the uk is absolutely at the fore front of providing support to the ukraine in terms of defence of weapons, in terms of supporting ukraine with economics and trade and also we have a very strong package of sanctions ready should russia stage an incursion onto ukraine. you just come back from australia, given all that's been going on last week, do you think you were in the wrong hemisphere when all this was happening? what we are facing is a serious global issue of aggressors seeking to advance and challenge freedom and democracy. it is very important we work with all our allies around the world. because if there was an incursion into ukraine, that would have implications not just for europe but also more widely, globally.
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just on what you released over the weekend about russia trying to set up a puppet government in ukraine, what was the basis of that intelligence, waited to come from? well, i can't go into the details of how we procure our intelligence, the reason we put that out in the public domain is we are going to call out every instance of russia trying to influence democracy, trying to subvert ukraine, false flag operations and sabotage and we will call that out. stay with me now is the former united states charge d'affaires ad interim to ukraine ambassador williamtaylor. interim to ukraine ambassador williamt aylor. ambassdor taylor is currently the vice president of russia and europe at the us institute of peace. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. a very tense situation, how serious would you say it is? this is very serious- _ serious would you say it is? this is very serious- it — serious would you say it is? this is very serious. it is _ serious would you say it is? this is very serious. it is serious - serious would you say it is? this is very serious. it is serious because| very serious. it is serious because of what the russians have both said and done. they've been talking about
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what actions they would take, they been hinting very clearly that military actions are possible if they don't get what they want. and they've done a lot to indicate that they've done a lot to indicate that they've got the capability to do that. they have indicated as your report indicates, they've massed truth two troops on three borders of ukraine. they are moving warships in the area of the black sea. they are doing these things that are having to do with planting russian operatives in ukraine. working with ukrainian pro—russian people to possibly do some damage to the government. the russians have both said and done things that make this a very tense time. mit? said and done things that make this a very tense time.— said and done things that make this a very tense time. why is ukraine so im ortant a very tense time. why is ukraine so important to russia _ a very tense time. why is ukraine so important to russia and _ a very tense time. why is ukraine so important to russia and why - a very tense time. why is ukraine so important to russia and why is - a very tense time. why is ukraine so important to russia and why is it - important to russia and why is it important that this did not at this particular time? important that this did not at this particulartime? tt’s important that this did not at this particular time ?_ particular time? it's a very good question- _ particular time? it's a very good question- why _ particular time? it's a very good question. why is _ particular time? it's a very good question. why is it _ particular time? it's a very good question. why is it so _
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particular time? it's a very good question. why is it so important particular time? it's a very good i question. why is it so important to russia? russia has lived with members of nato on its borderfor years and years without a problem. we know of the baltic states, estonia, lithuania, poland is on the border so it's not clear what the big problem is that president putin sees with ukraine. this may be an issue that is for him personal. for him, he wants to be seen as a great russian leader. he is about to be seen as a failed dictator who killed many people if he starts this war. many russians will die, many ukrainians and civilians will die and he will go down with dictators who did that in the last century as well. ., . .,
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well. you heard the uk foreign ministerjust— well. you heard the uk foreign ministerjust before _ well. you heard the uk foreign ministerjust before you - well. you heard the uk foreign ministerjust before you who i well. you heard the uk foreign i ministerjust before you who was talking about a very important package of sanctions that's ready and waiting. is that likely to be a deterrent, will that work?- deterrent, will that work? that's the intent- _ deterrent, will that work? that's the intent. the _ deterrent, will that work? that's the intent. the uk, _ deterrent, will that work? that's the intent. the uk, the - deterrent, will that work? that's the intent. the uk, the pn, - deterrent, will that work? that's the intent. the uk, the pn, the| the intent. the uk, the pm, the americans, others have put together a package of very harsh, very harsh sanctions on russia if mr putin makes the decision to invade, to put military troops across the border. this is not the only deterrent. the other determinant of course is the ukrainian military. ukrainian military is much stronger than it was in 2014 when the russians invaded the first time, much stronger. better equipped, better morale, the weapons are high quality. the deterrent is there. and if mr putin decides to invade, all
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that capability will yet further increase. the uk is been sending weapons, the americans have been sending weapons, wejust weapons, the americans have been sending weapons, we just heard about other european members of nato sending weapons, warships, planes, there is a deterrent there that ought to be evident to mr putin put up ought to be evident to mr putin put up if he hasn't made up his mind and i think he probably hasn't, then he should consider all of the damage that will accrue to him if he makes that will accrue to him if he makes that bad decision. you that will accrue to him if he makes that bad decision.— that will accrue to him if he makes that bad decision. you heard these sliuhtl that bad decision. you heard these slightly preempted _ that bad decision. you heard these slightly preempted my _ that bad decision. you heard these slightly preempted my next - that bad decision. you heard these i slightly preempted my next question, do you think the complex is inevitable given the russian build—up of troops? inevitable given the russian build-up of troops? expected still to -la build-up of troops? expected still to play for- _ build-up of troops? expected still to play for. rita. _ build-up of troops? expected still to play for. rita, i _ build-up of troops? expected still to play for. rita, i do. _ build-up of troops? expected still to play for. rita, i do. i— build-up of troops? expected still to play for. rita, i do. ithink- build-up of troops? expected still to play for. rita, i do. i think he l to play for. rita, i do. i think he hasn't made up his mind to go in, i hope he hasn't made up his mind to go in. if has in all of this is a show. as far were concerned, it's not a show. the sanctions are real, military capabilities are real. if he has not decided and he still
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thinking about it than he has on his conscience the lives of hundreds of thousands of people. again, history will not be kind to president putin if he makes this bad decision. thank ou ve if he makes this bad decision. thank you very much _ if he makes this bad decision. thank you very much for — if he makes this bad decision. thank you very much for that. _ if he makes this bad decision. thank you very much for that. ambassador william taylor, former ambassador to ukraine. people arriving in england from abroad will no longer have to take covid tests if they are fully vaccinated, the government has confirmed. speaking in the commons earlier, the transport secretary grant shapps, said the changes will be introduced in time for the half term break. from 4am on the 11th of february and in time for the half term break, eligible, fully vaccinated passengers arriving in the uk will no longer have to take a post arrival lateral flow test. that means that after months of predeparture testing, post arriving testing, self isolation,
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additional expense, all fully vaccinated people will have to do when they travel to the uk is to verify their status via a passenger locator form. mr speaker, we promised we wouldn't keep these measures in place a date longer than was necessary it is obvious to be now that the border testing for vaccinated travellers has outlived its usefulness. we are therefore scrapping all travel tests of vaccinated people. for vaccinated people. not only making travel much easier but also saving about £100 per family on visits abroad. providing certainties to passengers, to carriers and vital tourism sector for the spring and the summer seasons. there was also changes anounced to the rules for unvaccinated travellers entering the uk — as our business correspondent theo leggett explains. those who don't qualify as fully vaccinated will no longer be required to isolate at home as is the case now. they will only have to take a test two days after arriving
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in this country rather than on day two and day eight. they will still have to take a test before they set off on theirjourney. but these are some quite significant changes and very significant as well that grant shapps said border testing for vaccinated travellers has outlived its usefulness, that's quite a strong statement because we don't know what can happen on a line. over the past year and a half there have been lots of changes to the border regime. and as the covid situation has fluctuated, most recently the new restrictions that were brought in with omicron. what's going to happen if another variant crops up that turns out to be very infectious? the way grant shapps was talking today he was suggesting that the government wants to move away from the blanket clamp downs that we've seen and onto a more civic sophisticated targeting regime. but can they do that if there is another big outbreak? those of the questions which the opposition are already asking and those are questions that
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will be asked more widely as well. but for the moment, we're seeing more of a turn to normality, i think. the metropolitan police have apologised and paid for derogatory and sexual language when she was strip—searched. i'm joined now by our home with correspondent daniel sanford. tell our home with correspondent daniel sanford. , ., ., , sanford. tell us more. the doctor is now in assistant _ sanford. tell us more. the doctor is now in assistant professor— sanford. tell us more. the doctor is now in assistant professor at - now in assistant professor at nottingham university. but when these events happened back in 2013 she was a music student in london and she's our 15—year—old boy being stopped and searched on the street. she decided to try and help them and give them a little cart about what his rights were when he was being arrested. the police took objection to that, they arrested her for obstruction, she took the decision to assistance, she went limp and they carry her to the police station. on arrival at the police station. on arrival at the police station the custody sergeant decided because she wasn't cooperating, she would give her name, she did like they did know what she was carrying that they would authorise a strip
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search. so the female police officers were told to cut her clothes off her. that all went to a disciplinary tribunal. actually, in 2018 the police officer concern was cleared of her strip—searched. at that point not all of the cctv from the police station had been obtained by the doctor. she then managed to get hold of what happened next at the police station and it's not what you see but it's what you hear. what you see but it's what you hear. what you hear is the police officers talking about what they are doing. the one point the custody sergeant said she's resisting, resisting is futile, treat her like a terrorist, i don't care. then you hear the officersjoking i don't care. then you hear the officers joking about her, joking about her body hair, joking about her close, laughing about her underwear. and it's because of that that the metropolitan police have now offered a fulsome apology and
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say they sincerely apologise for the sexes, derogatory and unacceptable language that was used while she was being strip—searched in the police station in northeast london. the metropolitan _ station in northeast london. the metropolitan police have had a series of very damaging news stories like this in recent months, haven't the ? , ., , ., like this in recent months, haven't the ? , ., ., they? they have. if you spoke to that focuses _ they? they have. if you spoke to that focuses specifically - they? they have. if you spoke to that focuses specifically on - they? they have. if you spoke to that focuses specifically on the l that focuses specifically on the female aspect it was absolutely devastating fact that one of their officers had abducted and murdered sarah everard. there've been other issues around misogyny, a police officer that's been arrested and is to stand trial for multiple rates. this is obviously a historical case, it goes back to 2013. but it's a terrible coming together of stories like this come about metropolitan police which seem to paint a picture of a force in which notjust one but many officers have got a problem in how they are dealing with women.
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obviously that's very damaging for the force. they have said now that following the settlement of the claim there is going to be another referral to the director of professional and the police and will be investigating the language used was up at some point it may be that there will be another disciplinary hearing around the language that was used as opposed to the strip—searched itself. used as opposed to the strip-searched itself. time for a look at the weather, has been. a very good evening to you. it's been dry for the vast majority today but for some very, cloudy indeed. underneath that cloud across part submits two temperatures of struggle to arrive at the above freezing for the eastern scotland we've been up around 11 degrees, very different feel to the weather in those sunnier spots. through tonight many of us will keep hold of a lot of cloud. the letters guys do clear a part part of note and then we could see fog patches and temperatures getting low enough for a touch of frost if it stays cloudy
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where you are, it will stay a little bit milder. into tomorrow we keep extensive cloud across many parts of england and wales. a few brightest bells may be for north wales up at the northeast england. northern ireland and scotland should see a bit more sunshine but we will see a band of patchy rain into the northwest of scotland later. it will be turning increasingly breezy across northern areas for the further south which is great with light winds while, temperatures will only get up to around three or 4 degrees at best. it is set to turn a little milder as we move through wednesday and thursday. while there will be some rain particularly in the north at times they will also be a bit more in the way of sunshine.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: borisjohnson orders an inquiry into an mp's claims that her muslim faith was given as a reason for her sacking as a minister in 2020.
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thank you and goodbye. more trouble for the pm this afternoon — a minister publicly resigns over the government's handling of fraudulent covid business loans. the prime minister warns russia that invading ukraine would be a "disastrous step" — as the uk withdraws staff from its embassy there. people arriving in england will no longer need to take a covid lateral flow test, if they have been double vaccinated. the founder of wikileaks — julian assange — wins the first stage of his legal bid to appeal against the decision to extradite him to the united states. and how well do you know the new rules of the road? the highway code's been rewritten to make it safer for cyclists. sport — and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's jane dougall. some breaking news to bring you. the
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last few minutes, the bbc has learned that watford have sacked their head coach afterjust over three months in charge. there had been speculation over his future at the club which intensified after their 3—0 loss to relegation rivals norwich on friday. that loss leaves watford in 18th place in the league, just three points off the bottom of the table. in fact, he only won seven points in his time in charge at vicarage road. his dismissal means watford are now searching for their third permanent head coach of their third permanent head coach of the season so far. it is only january. watford will hope to have a replacement in time for their trip to bottom club burnley. cloudier ranieri memorably won the league with leicester in 2016. breaking news this work that watford have sacked ranieri. brentford manager thomas frank has extended his contract at the club until the end of the 2024—25 season. the dane led the club to promotion to the premier league last season —
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ending a 74 year wait for top flight football. frank took over as brentford manager in 2018 after stepping up from his role as assistant to dean smith. derby county's administrators are expected to hold talks with the english football league tomorrow. it follows "positive developments" over the championship club's future, with the wealthy us—based binnie family submitting a bid in the region of £28 million to buy the club on friday. the first of today's fixtures round of 16 in the africa cup of nations is under way and there has been a goal in the last few minutes. gambia taking the lead against guinea. the surprise team of the tournament comoros are having to face the hosts cameroon later without a recognised goalkeeper. comoros keeper ali ahamada missed training and will miss the last—16 tie, despite testing negative for covid—19 this morning. ahamada has not fulfilled tournament protocols, which state a player who tests positive must isolate for five days before taking another pcr test 48 hours before his side's next match.
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two tennis. after an epic battle over five sets, stefanos tsitsipas is through to the quarter finals of the australian open after beating american taylor fritz. the greek is one of the favourites to take the men's title. as is daniil medvedev, who beat american maxime cressy in four sets, playing for a mamouth three and a half hours. the russian is the top seed remaining in the men's draw. and two—time grand slam winner simona halep is out. the 14th seed lost in three sets to france's alize cornet, who makes the quarter—finals of a major at the 63rd time of trying. very emotional at the end. i had ihada i had a little birthday present, i had a cake from the tournament. the cheesecake was amazing. i think that is why i had so much energy. that cheesecake was amazing. i think that is why i had so much energy.- is why i had so much energy. that is wh ou is why i had so much energy. that is why you want! _ is why i had so much energy. that is why you want! i _ is why i had so much energy. that is why you want! i have _ is why i had so much energy. that is why you want! i have energy - is why i had so much energy. that is why you want! i have energy for- why you want! i have energy for weeks from _ why you want! i have energy for weeks from the _ why you want! i have energy for
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weeks from the cheesecake! . why you want! i have energy for. weeks from the cheesecake! good why you want! i have energy for- weeks from the cheesecake! good for her. and in rugby union, george ford is set to replaced injured captain owen farrell in england's six nations squad. with farrell out of the opener against scotland, head coach eddiejones will turn to ford after leaving him out of the initial 36—man squad. despite his outstanding club form, ford has been overlooked since the autumn with marcus smith starring at number 10. tyson fury will face either oleksandr usyk in a fight for the undisputed heavyweight title next or defend his wbc crown against mandatory challenger dillian whyte. fury�*s promoters have been pushing for whyte to agree terms, but simultaneously speaking to anthonyjoshua's team about stepping aside so fury can fight usyk next. an agreement for either fight is expected to be reached by wednesday. team gb have named their 50th and final memberfor the winter olympics. ellia smeding will be the first female long track speed skater to represent britain for 42 years at beijing 2022.
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smeding called it a "dream come true" and will race in the 1,000m and 1500m, having recently set new national records in three distances in december. the games start on february the fourth. a reminder that the match between keeperless comoros a reminder that watford have sacked their head coach ranieri. there will be more details on the bbc sport website. goodbye for now. ina in a moment we'll be talking to a top officialfrom nato in a moment we'll be talking to a top official from nato about the situation in ukraine. i want to bring you a cheat or tweet by the chancellor, this is in relation to the resignation of a minister responsible for cross government efficiency who has resigned over efforts to tackle fraud relating to a covid business loan scheme. as you can see, rishi sunak seeing lord agnew has served the treasury with diligence and commitment. i want to
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thank him for his dedicated service and tireless work during the pandemic. lord agnew resigned quite dramatically in the chamber at the house of lords and left it to the sound of applause. let's get more now on the prime minister warning russia that an invasion of ukraine would be a "painful, violent and bloody business" — as the uk moved to withdraw staff from its embassy in ukraine. it follows a similar move by the us and an announcement by the western alliance nato that it's sending more ships and fighterjets to member states in eastern europe. russia has amassed 100,000 troops near its borders with ukraine. joining me now is rose gottemoeller, a former us diplomat who served as deputy secretary general of nato. hello to you. thank you so much for joining us on bbc news. this is a very serious situation, isn't it? it seems to be more serious by the day,
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with a greater build—up on both sides of trips and armaments. t sides of trips and armaments. i think it is extraordinary now that russia has over 100,000 troops. they have been bringing forces from the russian far east, thousands and thousands of kilometres away, as well as heavy weaponry, missile systems that are very capable, so they are taking i would say every step to build up their forces against ukraine, not only to the east of ukraine but also in belarus. this has been the real game changer over the past week, this build—up of troops in belarus. over the past week, this build-up of troops in belarus.— troops in belarus. natal's response has been to — troops in belarus. natal's response has been to send, _ troops in belarus. natal's response has been to send, to _ troops in belarus. natal's response has been to send, to deploy - troops in belarus. natal's responsel has been to send, to deploy military provisions to member nato states in eastern europe. adding to the build—up. is that the right thing to be doing? i build-up. is that the right thing to be doinu ?
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build-up. is that the right thing to bedoinu? , build-up. is that the right thing to bedoint? , , be doing? i saw the reports this mornin: be doing? i saw the reports this morning that — be doing? i saw the reports this morning that president - be doing? i saw the reports this morning that president biden i be doing? i saw the reports this morning that president biden is| morning that president biden is considering sending troops to nato member states in the eastern part of the alliance, but from the reports i have seen he is talking about sending several thousand troops, this is not 100,000 troops, this is not the first division as we used to send over for the cold war era exercises. that were called re—forgery. these are a few thousand troops. i think it is a judicial build—up, but it is a defence build—up. i want to note also that the uk, the us and other nato member states have been sending material and equipment to ukraine, as well as trainers, to help the ukrainians be prepared to use this equipment that is being sent. so i do think that is a positive step. 50. is being sent. so i do think that is a positive step-— is being sent. so i do think that is a positive step. so, the us and the uk are now — a positive step. so, the us and the uk are now telling _ a positive step. so, the us and the uk are now telling people - a positive step. so, the us and the uk are now telling people to - a positive step. so, the us and the uk are now telling people to leave | uk are now telling people to leave their embassies. is this a sign that they really do believe that conflict is imminent? i they really do believe that conflict is imminent?— they really do believe that conflict is imminent? ~ ,., ,, ., is imminent? i think both the us and the uk are taking _
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is imminent? i think both the us and the uk are taking these _ is imminent? i think both the us and the uk are taking these warning - the uk are taking these warning signs very seriously, and so asking their... the families of embassy employees, diplomats to leave, so thatis employees, diplomats to leave, so that is important. it is also important that this is not an emergency evacuation. they are asking people to leave... abbey is the us diplomats are being asked to send theirfamilies out the us diplomats are being asked to send their families out on commercialflights. all send their families out on commercial flights. all the airports are open, this is not an emergency situation. we hope it remains that way. we hope that negotiations can soon begin to bring the temperature down. d0 soon begin to bring the temperature down. , ., soon begin to bring the temperature down. ,, . soon begin to bring the temperature down. i. ., ., soon begin to bring the temperature down. ., ., ., ., down. do you have an opinion as to why president _ down. do you have an opinion as to why president putin _ down. do you have an opinion as to why president putin is _ down. do you have an opinion as to why president putin is moving - down. do you have an opinion as to why president putin is moving in i why president putin is moving in this way at this interview he said that russia has lived for quite some time with members of nato right on its doorstep, so why this build—up against ukraine now? the doorstep, so why this build-up against ukraine now? the other odd thin about against ukraine now? the other odd thing about this _ against ukraine now? the other odd thing about this build-up _ against ukraine now? the other odd thing about this build-up is - against ukraine now? the other odd thing about this build-up is that i against ukraine now? the other odd thing about this build-up is that he l thing about this build—up is that he himself was instrumental in establishing a close nato— russia working relationship when he signed
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the so—called declaration in 2002. he himself was an enthusiast at some point for cooperation with nato. but i do think over the years she has served on the relationship, particularly after 2008 when nato promised both ukraine and georgia that they would become members of nato in future. this really seems to have gotten under vladimir putin's skin, so i think part of the reason for the build—up is that frustration has built and he has decided that this is the moment to make his move. what about the country of ukraine itself, the one at the centre of this? ~ ., itself, the one at the centre of this? ~ . ., , ., , this? ukraine has now been independent _ this? ukraine has now been independent for _ this? ukraine has now been independent for 30 - this? ukraine has now been independent for 30 years i this? ukraine has now been i independent for 30 years and is taking a lot of steps to move toward the west. one of the precipitating reasons for the tension and recent years is that back in 2014, ukraine signed an agreement with the eu to begin to move closer to the eu, closer into the eu's orbit and to cooperate further. that means a lot
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of heavy lifting by ukraine to get the financial and economic reforms, as well as to fight against corruption. but the bottom line is ukraine is moving to the west. they are not looking east. that is also what is very much getting under vladimir putin's skin. [30 what is very much getting under vladimir putin's skin.— what is very much getting under vladimir putin's skin. do you think conflict is inevitable _ vladimir putin's skin. do you think conflict is inevitable or _ vladimir putin's skin. do you think conflict is inevitable or can - vladimir putin's skin. do you think conflict is inevitable or can it i vladimir putin's skin. do you think conflict is inevitable or can it be i conflict is inevitable or can it be averted? i conflict is inevitable or can it be averted? ., , conflict is inevitable or can it be averted? . , ., averted? i have been heartened in recent days _ averted? i have been heartened in recent days by _ averted? i have been heartened in recent days by the _ averted? i have been heartened in recent days by the conversations, | recent days by the conversations, particularly the conversation between the minister of foreign affairs lavrov and secretary of state blinken on friday where they indicated that this is an important step along the road, that we have further meetings coming forward, as long as they are planning to keep top ten, i think that is the most important thing. other indicators out of moscow are that the russian diplomats are preparing for further serious discussions with both the united states and nato. i think that is a good sign, but the continuing trip build—up is very worrisome, i have to say. we trip build-up is very worrisome, i have to say-— have to say. we have to leave it there. thank _
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have to say. we have to leave it there. thank you _ have to say. we have to leave it there. thank you very _ have to say. we have to leave it there. thank you very much. i have to say. we have to leave it| there. thank you very much. the former deputy secretary general of nato. thank you so much. the founder of the wikileaks website julian assange has won the first stage of his bid to appeal against extradition to the united states. he'll now take his case to the supreme court. mr assange faces charges over the publication of hundreds of thousands of leaked documents relating to the afghanistan and iraq wars. our correspondent greg mckenzie is at the high court in central london. today a high courtjudge has asked for the supreme court to expedite a decision in relation to the appeal following the extradition request of julian sands. he has been held on remand at belmarsh prison since april of 2019, awaiting that decision in relation to his expedition. outside court this morning, his fiancee spoke to the media. she says today is a victory
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forjulian assange.— media. she says today is a victory forjulian assange. make no mistake we won today _ forjulian assange. make no mistake we won today in _ forjulian assange. make no mistake we won today in court. _ forjulian assange. make no mistake we won today in court. but - forjulian assange. make no mistake we won today in court. but let's i forjulian assange. make no mistake we won today in court. but let's not| we won today in court. but let's not forget that every time we win, as long as this case is not dropped, as long as this case is not dropped, as long as this case is not dropped, as long asjulian is not freed, julian continues to suffer. long as julian is not freed, julian continues to suffer.— continues to suffer. now, julian assanae continues to suffer. now, julian assange is _ continues to suffer. now, julian assange is wanted _ continues to suffer. now, julian assange is wanted in _ continues to suffer. now, julian assange is wanted in the i continues to suffer. now, julian | assange is wanted in the states, they want to extradite him to america to face charges. up to 18 counts accusing him of hacking into military computers and exposing or leaking thousands of documents pertaining to the afghanistan and iraq war. now, if he is expedited and put on trial in the states, he could be sentenced to 170... you could be sentenced to 170... you could be sentenced to 170... you could be sentenced to 175 years. now, his camp have always said that
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that should be extradited to the states and held in a super max prison if convicted, he would simply take his own life. these appeals, really, it goes against his human rights in terms of the appeals and why they are getting these appeals. they are seeing his human rights are infringed if he is extradited and therefore would potentially commit suicide if held at a super max jail in the states. the headlines on bbc news: borisjohnson orders an inquiry into an mp's claims that her muslim faith was given as a reason for her sacking as a minister in 2020. thank you and goodbye. more trouble for the pm this afternoon — a minister publicly resigns over the government's handling of fraudulent covid business loans. the prime minister warns russia that invading ukraine would be a "disastrous step" — as the uk withdraws staff from its embassy there.
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let's return to borisjohnson ordering a cabinet office inquiry into claims made by a muslim mp who says her religion was given as a reason for her sacking as a minister in 2020. the mp, nusrat ghani, has welcomed the inquiry. the government's chief whip, mark spencer, says the allegations refer to him, but that the claims are completely false. let's get more from our political correspondent, chris mason. chris, borisjohnson chris, boris johnson has chris, borisjohnson has also had a minister resigning, he has got the civil servant sue grey�*s report which is ongoing, he has had an mp go to the police today with allegations of blackmail. you must feel that it never rains but it pours. you macro that is absolutely right. it is the latest case study in the conduct and competence of boris johnson's in the conduct and competence of borisjohnson's government. we in the conduct and competence of boris johnson's government. we have seen several — boris johnson's government. we have seen several examples _ boris johnson's government. we have seen several examples of _ boris johnson's government. we have seen several examples of it _
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boris johnson's government. we have seen several examples of it today. i seen several examples of it today. apparently unconnected, but all of which, particularly in the context of this countdown to the report into all of the parties that happened in westminster when parties were banned during the earlier stages of the pandemic, add up to that big question around conduct and competence. then weighing very heavily in the minds of conservative mps as to what to do about it. whether all of this adds up to a ledger, if you like, that leads to conservative mps, for they are the most important electorate in the country at the moment in determining the prime minister's feet, deciding in the coming days, weeks, that perhaps it is time they would be better off with someone else as their leader and as our prime minister. the barriers that exist between where we are now and at that point coming about are still significant. reaching that magical number of 54 letters to sir graham brady, the conservative backbencher demanding a vote of no confidence, then a significant number of conservative mps, significantly more than that being willing to vote to get rid of borisjohnson. whether
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you look at this particular question around news that gary or the resignation of a minister, and connecting connection with the pandemic —— nusrat ghani. then the question around the parties, and in the medium term the public enquiry into the pandemic, the huge amount of questions that have over the prime minister now, well, are significant and seem to get bigger certainly by the day and almost by the hour. , , ., _, , ., certainly by the day and almost by the hour, , ., _, , ., ., the hour. just a couple of more... let's the hour. just a couple of more... let's look — the hour. just a couple of more... let's look at _ the hour. just a couple of more... let's look at some _ the hour. just a couple of more... let's look at some of _ the hour. just a couple of more... let's look at some of these i the hour. just a couple of more... j let's look at some of these issues individually. do we know any timetable for the enquiry into the comments made to... allegedly made to nusrat ghani? brute comments made to. .. allegedly made to nusrat ghani?— to nusrat ghani? we do not. we know it will be looked _ to nusrat ghani? we do not. we know it will be looked at _ to nusrat ghani? we do not. we know it will be looked at by _ to nusrat ghani? we do not. we know it will be looked at by the _ to nusrat ghani? we do not. we know it will be looked at by the ethics i it will be looked at by the ethics committee, the group of people within the cabinet office, they will explore this. we do not know exactly who will lead it, we do not know if we will see the full scale of the report when it is complete, nor when it will be completed. several
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questions along those lines to be prime minister's official spokesperson this afternoon and we did not get a definitive answer as far as that was concerned. crucially, as far as nusrat ghani is concerned, it is a government led enquiry, an enquiry within government rather than the thing that she says she was offered originally, 18 months or so ago, which was an enquiry by the conservative party. she said that was not relevant because it was about her ministerial role in government, that being taken from her, ratherthan government, that being taken from her, rather than specifically connected to the party. as for the timing, we are not yet aware of the specifics, neitherare timing, we are not yet aware of the specifics, neither are we, as far as the other report we are waiting to come out of the government, of the cabinet office, the senior civil servant who is looking into the question of parties within whitehall, we expect that to be this week. beyond that, again, we are guessing as to be specifics. it would appear there are some in government, in downing street also not quite certain when that will
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come either.— not quite certain when that will come either. ~ . , come either. with all the swirling around, come either. with all the swirling around. what _ come either. with all the swirling around, what is _ come either. with all the swirling around, what is the _ come either. with all the swirling around, what is the mood - come either. with all the swirling i around, what is the mood amongst conservative backbenchers? intrigue i think is conservative backbenchers? intrigue i think is the — conservative backbenchers? intrigue i think is the best _ conservative backbenchers? intrigue i think is the best way _ conservative backbenchers? intrigue i think is the best way to _ conservative backbenchers? intrigue i think is the best way to put - conservative backbenchers? intrigue i think is the best way to put it. i i think is the best way to put it. lots of conversations and corridors, whispering between groups of conservative mps, lots wondering what it is that they might say when we finally get a hold of this report from sue grey. we do not expect to see all of it, we mightjust see the findings from it, there could be at then be a row in the immediate aftermath of those findings amongst mps to try to see the whole thing. crucially, what does this report say and what doesn't it say? we know it's and what doesn't it say? we know its terms of reference, it is likely to set out a timeline of the various parties that happened and what the rules were at the time of that party, but how far does it go in allowing critics to conclude that the prime minister frankly is in allowing critics to conclude that the prime ministerfrankly is not fit to remain in office? or does it stop sufficiently short of that that those who are currently waiting, think in the round it is best to
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carry on. it will all be in the text and the language of what mps say which i think well, in the short—term, determined be prime minister's feet and whether it provokes a number to decide it is time to move to that next stage and force a vote of no confidence. even if we get up to that stage, there will then be a big question about whether the prime minister would win. there is a swirl of gossip, thatis win. there is a swirl of gossip, that is all it is at this stage, as to what would happen at that hypothetical stage, one stage down the line, if you like, from where we are right now. the fact that people are right now. the fact that people are willing to have that conversation, and it is an open question without a definitive answer, tells you how powerless the prime minister's position continues to be. ., ~ prime minister's position continues to be. . ,, i. prime minister's position continues to be. ., ~' ,, , prime minister's position continues tobe. . , . prime minister's position continues tobe. ., , . ., to be. thank you very much for sta in: to be. thank you very much for staying on _ to be. thank you very much for staying on top _ to be. thank you very much for staying on top of— to be. thank you very much for staying on top of it _ to be. thank you very much for staying on top of it all. - to be. thank you very much for staying on top of it all. chris i staying on top of it all. chris mason, a political correspondent reporting from westminster. changes to the highway code are expected to come into force on saturday. the government says they will improve safety for cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders — they'll have more priority
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in certain situations, like atjunctions. but there are concerns that public awareness of the changes is low, and that this could cause problems, and even avoidable collisions. here's our transport correspondent katy austin. oh, my god! captured on camera. collisions... ..close shaves... ..and scary moments across the country. london cyclist mike campaigns for road safety. he says those sorts of incidents happen far too often. what are the most common problems you come across? the most common ones boil down to impatience, which is maybe overtaking too close and immediately stopping in a queue of traffic. or overtaking me and then crossing my path, forcing me to brake. guidance is about to be put into the highway code saying
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at least 1.5 metres should be left when overtaking a cyclist, two metres when overtaking a horse. but that's not all. some other changes to the highway code are due to come in soon, including something drivers really need to know about. i've come to a car testing track to get, who else, a driving instructor to explain. this brings back memories! all pleasant ones, i hope. well, i passed eventually. all right for me to get in? yes. road users who can cause the most harm, drivers of big lorries for example, will have the most responsibility for safety and there will be more priority for pedestrians and cyclists at junctions. so coming up to the junction, i check my mirrors, indicate left. i have got to give way if there is a pedestrian already crossing the road. is that going to change under the new guidance? the new guidance is if there's someone waiting to cross, you must stop in this hold back position. even though they haven't started, i will wait until they have crossed the road? correct. what about cyclists as well?
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you must allow them to pass and go straight ahead before we proceed. 0k. with no cyclists wanting to ahead of me and the pedestrian gone, i turn into the next road. and remember we mentioned how much space you should give a bike — well, here is me giving a dummy cyclist about 1.5 metres. reach across with your opposite arm and hold on to the door handle. there will also be guidance on looking over your shoulder when opening a car door, to avoid doing this. campaigners hope updated guidance will help to drive change and make the most vulnerable safer, if, that is, people follow the rules. katie austin, bbc news. a woman from cambridgeshire and her two friends are celebrating after setting a new world record — becoming the fastest female trio to row across the atlantic. kat cordiner from st neots completed the 3,000—milejourney with her crew mates, raising money for cancer research. it's a cause close to her heart as she herself has incurable cancer. emma braugh reports.
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that's in! you've got the line, yeah! the moment of triumph after achieving their epic goal. shattering the world record for crossing the atlantic. tired, because it is sam antigua time and i probably had a few too many rum punches last night, so, yeah, i think my body'sjust realised it's been rowing for 42 days and some, so i am feeling a little broken, i have to admit. kat, who celebrated her 42nd birthday on the trip, is living with incurable cancer, but she only talks about the physical toll of the journey on all of the crew. just general aches, knees, we all feel like we are a bit older than we actually are! but actually, you know, we are in pretty good spirits, and very wobbly legs. we haven't quite got our land legs back.
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during the mammoth trip, they faced many challenges. i think nothing prepares you for the first ten days. they were very emotional for all of us. i think we couldn't quite work out what we were doing and why we were doing it. and then you settle into a routine, you know, it's fine. so i think, really, we just underestimated about how tough it would be. organisers said they had showed the impossible was possible, and they had kept their sense of humour. we had a lot of fun on the boat. i mean, abby perpetually said, when does the fun actually start? but i think charlotte and i, you know, you find joy in so many moments when you are rowing, and honestly, it's very difficult, butjust trying to help each other to have the best day as we can, and just take one shift at the time.
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amazing achievement. overindulgence in chocolates and other festive treats often see people cutting back injanuary — and the same is apparently true for a pair of armadillos. patsy and eddie have been put on an exercise regime by zoo trainers after piling on two kilograms between them. they are are known to enjoy their treats, but it seems too many lie—ins and not enough moving around during the colder weather has caused them to get a bit out of shape. i have never seen anything like it! time for a look now at the weather. i know exactly how they feel. a very good evening to you. it has been a dry day for the vast majority today. cloud amounts have certainly varied. for some it has been very grey, others there's been some sunshine. close to this weather front in the far north we have seen just a little bit of rain. but this is the satellite picture, extensive cloud
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cover, parts of mid wales have struggled to get above freezing today. a bit of sunshine in aberdeenshire has left it at temperatures above 11 degrees. some contrast in the feel of the weather. through tonight, where we keep a lot of cloud, particularly for central and southern areas, temperatures should hold up. but have some players felt a lot in north—east england, some pod patches could develop, a touch of frost possible. always milder up towards the north and west of the uk where we will see more of a breeze developing through the night. as we get on into tomorrow, it is another mostly dry but often cloudy day. the thickest of the cloud across southern areas, parts of north wales, north—east england favourite to see some spells of sunshine. northern ireland, southern and eastern scotland to see some spells of sunshine through the day. we'll see some more patchy rain getting into the far north—west of scotland. the breeze will be strengthening through the day across the northern half of the uk. very light winds further south. nothing to move the cloud around, so if you have grey skies overhead, once again temperatures may only get 23—4 at
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best. milderfurther north temperatures may only get 23—4 at best. milder further north and west. through tuesday night into wednesday, initially in charge of the scene, but we see another frontal system that will start to approach for the north west. that will strengthen the once as the day wears on across northern parts of the uk. we could later see deals in some exposed spots up towards the north—west. outbreaks of rain getting into parts of scotland, may be northern ireland. across england and wales, there will be some dry weather and perhaps a slightly better chance of seeing some sunshine. a bit more of a breeze stirring the air, turning things over, so it will feel a little bit milder. wednesday night into thursday, this frontal system pushes south, but it begins as it goes. not much rain getting down into the south of the uk. some cloud and drizzle could linger for a time across a time across the south—west of england and the channel islands. further north, that weather front full of swept away a lot of the cloud, so certainly more in the way of sunshine. some showers in the far north of scotland, many places will be dry and temperatures generally between 8—12. while not feel too bad at 12 in cardiff in a little bit of
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sunshine. we look towards the end of the week on friday. i do brisk westerly winds, that will feed a lot of cloud eastwards across the uk. some rain into the north—west of scotland but most places will remain dry. with russian troops massed on the border, the prime minister issues a strong warning against invading ukraine. we need to make it very clear to the kremlin, to russia, that that would be a disastrous step. diplomatic channels between the us and russia are still open but tension in the region is ratcheting up, we'll bring you the latest. also tonight. another government inquiry — this time after a conservative muslim mp claims she was sacked as a minister because of her faith. fully vaccinated travellers to the uk will no longer have to take a lateral flow test after arrival from february.

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