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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 20, 2022 9:00am-10:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the prime minister vows to fight any leadership challenge, as mps await a crucial report into downing street parties. as soon as those facts are established, he will be right back in parliament, and subject himself to scrutiny, and i think that is the right way forward. from today, facemasks are not compulsory in classrooms, moves away from plan b coronavirus restrictions. it means england — in the words of the health secretary — is the most open country in europe. but is it too soon to take such a step? get in touch with me on twitter @annitabbc or by using the hashtag, bbc your questions.
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also this hour, the british dental association says nhs dentistry is "hanging by a thread" as some patients wait two years for check ups. the first plane carrying aid lands in tonga, on a runway newly cleared of ash, following saturday's volcanic eruption and tsunami. and coming up in half an hour, we'll have the latest from melbourne, where andy murray and emma raducanu are both in action. borisjohnson�*s political allies are suggesting the immediate threat to his leadership has eased. they say the defection of the conservative mp for bury south, christian wakeford, to labour, appears to have persuaded other mps not to challenge him this week. it's now thought many tory backbenchers will wait for the report into downing street parties before deciding
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their next move. the investigation by the senior civil servant, sue gray, is expected next week. nick eardley reports. calm? there isn't much of it around here. westminster is tense about a report into what parties happened in downing street during lockdown, and how long borisjohnson will remain prime minister. yesterday, one conservative mp decided he'd had enough. christian wakeford joined the labour party, very publicly defecting on the floor of the house of commons. music to the ears of his new leader. can i start by warmly welcoming the honourable member for bury south to his new place in the house... cheering. ..and to the parliamentary labour party? mr speaker, like so many people up and down the country, he has concluded that the prime minister and the conservative party have shown themselves incapable
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of offering the leadership and government this country deserves. a prime minister underfire from his own side too, but showing no signs he wants to go anywhere. and as for bury south, mr speaker, as for bury south, we will win again in bury south at the next election under this prime minister. but then listen to this, from one of his own mps, a former brexit ally. i expect my leaders to shoulder the responsibility for the actions they take. yesterday, he did the opposite of that. so i will remind him of a quotation. "you have sat there too long for all the good you have done. in the name of god, go." cheering. rumours are flying around here about whether the prime minister will face a confidence vote. the chances of that happening this week appear to have receded, and some think it would be a bad idea. colleagues are coming out now strongly and supporting the prime minister as the right man
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to lead our country. and on all the big decisions, you know, he's got the call right, whether it's covid, brexit, or creating the fastest—growing economy in the g7. but plenty of conservatives are angry. and some may move next week when a report into lockdown parties is published. and i think there is a real sense of stepping back and realising that the right thing to do is to wait for sue gray's report, to then question the prime minister, as he has quite properly said he will come to the house of commons and make a statement and answer for it. some hope borisjohnson survives, others aren't so sure. the prime minister's future is farfrom certain. nick eardley, bbc news, westminster. the health secretary sajid javid has been speaking this morning. he was asked about plan b, the move away from plan b in england but also about the situation with the prime minister.
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what was going on in downing street at the time when all of us were living that way, that damages our democracy, doesn't it? yes, it does. of course, things like this damage our democracy, and that is why... this downing street has damaged our democracy. no, the, from what we all already know, from the people that have come forward and apologised for the parties that took place, so for example, the one on the eve of prince philip's funeral, you know, that was completely wrong. it was wrong in every single way. and that is already damaging. of course it is. and the way we now get through this is to get the facts out, to get them on the tablen and so that we can all then reach a judgment ourselves. let's get more on this from adam fleming, our chief political correspondent. morning adam and i am sure sajid javid would prefer to this morning have focussed purely on talking about plan a. the move away from plan b in terms of coronavirus
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measures but, inevitably being asked about the situation with the prime minister, how much room do you think wriggle room we could call us does borisjohnson wriggle room we could call us does boris johnson have wriggle room we could call us does borisjohnson have this morning, yesterday an extraordinary day, it looked a lot trickier for him? to be fair sa'id looked a lot trickier for him? to be fair sajid javid _ looked a lot trickier for him? to be fair sajid javid answered _ looked a lot trickier for him? to be fair sajid javid answered a - looked a lot trickier for him? to be fair sajid javid answered a lot - looked a lot trickier for him? to be fair sajid javid answered a lot of i fair sajid javid answered a lot of questions about covid so it wasn't just interviews about borisjohnson and downing street party, although one story is dominating the other. in terms of wriggle room the prime minister is in less vulnerable position than yesterday morning, so that group of new mps who were trying to get letters submitted to call a vote of no confidence, they didn't get enough. it hasn't hit 5a. the vote of confidence isn't hitting today or imminently. then you have the defection of christian wakeford who is now a labour mp for bury, that created a sense of unity in the conservative party and helped some mps step back from the brink of submitting their letters of no
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confidence. david davis's high profile knifing of borisjohnson in the front, was no repeated by other people, and david davis could be isolated a bit by the tory leadership, so, the prime minister looks relatively stronger, now, than he did yesterday. although it is all relative because this could all change when the sue gray report is published and we are thinking that will be more likely the middle of next week, looking unlikely we will get it in the final days of the week, but that sage sage interview is very —— sajid javid interview is interesting. his backing of the prime minister throughout was pretty luke warm, and if you look back through sajid javid's tweet, they have been pretty luke warm for about a week or ten days now. secondly, he referred to what happened in downing street as party, itjust shows you some of those events, particularly the one on the eve of prince philip's funeral you couldn't get away by describing them as worker
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event, blowing off steam at their desk, he called it a party. he has just absolutely raised the stakes about what this sue gray report and what this whole story is about. he is now saying it is about faith in democracy, and he is implicitly, a word that is being used a lot lately, saying his boss, the prime minister, and the people round him are the ones doing the damage to the democracy. that is quite extraordinary actually. yes, that anal sis extraordinary actually. yes, that analysis of _ extraordinary actually. yes, that analysis of the _ extraordinary actually. yes, that analysis of the precise _ extraordinary actually. yes, that analysis of the precise language| analysis of the precise language really interesting adam. do you think, is it your sense that many conservative mps are waiting then, for the procedure to happen, for that report, to come out before they decide one way or another, what to do? , , ., . . . decide one way or another, what to do? , . ., ., do? yes, you can cut that a few wa s, do? yes, you can cut that a few ways. you _ do? yes, you can cut that a few ways. you have _ do? yes, you can cut that a few ways, you have a _ do? yes, you can cut that a few ways, you have a few _ do? yes, you can cut that a few ways, you have a few mps - do? yes, you can cut that a few ways, you have a few mps who | do? yes, you can cut that a few- ways, you have a few mps who have made up their mind and have decided the prime minister has to go, and go fairly soon and they have submitted a letter to that effect. you have tory mps who made up their mind that
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the prime minister has to go but they are not sure now is the right time so they are waiting to do it. there is is a lot of mps who are waiting for the sue gray report so they can reach a judgment based on facts and stuff in black—and—white. i was chatting to one of the mps who is at the further end of the scale who says he thinks a lot of colleagues are kidding themselves and they know, yes, so, i think borisjohnson's position is not looking great, and as david day phased in his interview in the telegraph today, even if he survivors, borisjohnson, the sue gray process, david davis's words he faced deaths by a thousand cuts after, the former brexit secretary predicting public anger about the tax increase to pay for the nhs coming in april, pressure on the government from the cost of living and potential other errors that downing street, the downing street operation could make, meaning that actually there could be a drip, drip, drip of letters calling for a vote of no confidence in the prime
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minister, which means for a lot of mps, it is not a case of now, it is a case of when. adam, thank you very much for that. with me now is former uk defence secretary dr liam fox, mp for north somerset. i want to ask you about the move away from plan b in a moment. first away from plan b in a moment. first a word on the pm because that does have a bearing on the other business of government, so 5a letter of no confidence haven't material realised yet and boris johnson confidence haven't material realised yet and borisjohnson sounding in bullish form in the telegraph, but, is he on borrowed time as prime minister in your opinion?- minister in your opinion? well, i have said all _ minister in your opinion? well, i have said all along _ minister in your opinion? well, i have said all along i _ minister in your opinion? well, i have said all along i think - minister in your opinion? well, i have said all along i think this i minister in your opinion? well, i have said all along i think this is| have said all along i think this is the wrong time for any leadership challenge. the country is facing a number of very big issues at the present time, we have got inflation rising in the uk, we have inflation rising in the uk, we have inflation rising more in the united states,
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the impacts on the global economy, the impacts on the global economy, the global economy is still recovering from covid and there are major challenges in that, and of course we have a major security challenge in the shape of russia and ukraine at the present time, this is not in my view a period where the tory party should be indulging in three months of navel—gazing, we had a leadership election in 2016, 2019 and now one in 2022? i don't think thatis and now one in 2022? i don't think that is a good thing for the country. that is a good thing for the count . �* , ., country. but whether it is the wrong time or not. — country. but whether it is the wrong time or not. is _ country. but whether it is the wrong time or not, is not _ country. but whether it is the wrong time or not, is not the _ country. but whether it is the wrong time or not, is not the business - country. but whether it is the wrong time or not, is not the business of. time or not, is not the business of the sue gray report, is it, her report is looking at the facts round these party, these vents and sajid javid has referred to them clearly as parties and interviews this morning, so last night mrjohnson said he would fight a leer ship challenge if a vote of no confidence comes but he has told everyone else to way for the sue gray report but it doesn't sound like he is doing
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that, it sound like he has decided that, it sound like he has decided that he is going to fight any challenge irrespective of what that report says. challenge irrespective of what that report says-— report says. well, i think we have to wait for— report says. well, i think we have to wait for the _ report says. well, i think we have to wait for the report _ report says. well, i think we have to wait for the report and - report says. well, i think we have l to wait for the report and everyone else seems to be campaigning at the present time so it is unsurprising that the prime minister uses that language. the thing is that you have to remember what britain was like before boris johnson's to remember what britain was like before borisjohnson's premiership. before boris johnson's premiership. it before borisjohnson's premiership. it wasn't clear whether we would have brexit stolen, by those who wanted to defy the result of the referendum, and we found ourselves adrift politically, we now have brexit down, we have a parliamentary majority of 80 in the conservative government, which is remarkable, considering where we were, so i think that you have to weigh those thing things up, the success of the vaccine programme, we have given the united kingdom a strong start, we have seen strong economic growth in britain, we have seen sterling strengthen, these are great
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statistics for any government. it... but... ~ ., ., statistics for any government. it... but... ~ . ., statistics for any government. it... but... ~ . . , , but... what i am saying is it is riaht we but... what i am saying is it is right we wait _ but... what i am saying is it is right we wait for _ but... what i am saying is it is right we wait for the _ but... what i am saying is it is right we wait for the sue - but... what i am saying is it is right we wait for the sue gray | right we wait for the sue gray report but it is not the only issue in british politics and it is not the only issue in britain's national life. {371 the only issue in britain's national life. .., , the only issue in britain's national life. , ., , , life. of course that brings me back to the point _ life. of course that brings me back to the point i _ life. of course that brings me back to the point i was _ life. of course that brings me back to the point i was making - life. of course that brings me back to the point i was making earlier, l to the point i was making earlier, you can't have a situation round a prime minister, where it is so distracting that the other business that a government ought to be getting on with there a constant distraction you know and that seems to be primarily what we are having at the moment, so, i come back to that point i was making, does it seem to you like the prime minister has decided he is going to fight any challenge, if a challenge comes, before he has heard what the sue gray report has to say? i before he has heard what the sue gray report has to say?— before he has heard what the sue gray report has to say? i think the messaue gray report has to say? i think the message he _ gray report has to say? i think the message he is _ gray report has to say? i think the message he is sending _ gray report has to say? i think the message he is sending out - gray report has to say? i think the message he is sending out to - gray report has to say? i think the message he is sending out to myl message he is sending out to my parliamentary colleagues is, that he is determined because of his record as prime minister, to continue with that work and that is not at all southern pricing,s but i think all of us have to wait for the sue gray
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report and see what it says. before i move on report and see what it says. before i move on to _ report and see what it says. before i move on to plan _ report and see what it says. before i move on to plan b... _ report and see what it says. before i move on to plan b... i— report and see what it says. before i move on to plan b... i go- report and see what it says. before i move on to plan b... i go back. report and see what it says. before i move on to plan b... i go back o,| i move on to plan b... i go back 0, to this point. _ i move on to plan b... i go back 0, to this point. it _ i move on to plan b... i go back 0, to this point, it is _ i move on to plan b... i go back 0, to this point, it is not _ i move on to plan b... i go back 0, to this point, it is not the - i move on to plan b... i go back 0, to this point, it is not the only - to this point, it is not the only issue in british politics and we cannot have ourselves hung up on one issue, where there are so many major challenges for the government to undertake. �* ., ., ., ., undertake. before i move on to the ruestions undertake. before i move on to the questions of _ undertake. before i move on to the questions of plan _ undertake. before i move on to the questions of plan b _ undertake. before i move on to the questions of plan b and _ undertake. before i move on to the questions of plan b and a - undertake. before i move on to the questions of plan b and a with - undertake. before i move on to thej questions of plan b and a with you, are you concerned about the checks and balances in this process, in that the report when it comes goes to the prime minister who is one of the subjects of that report? weill. the sub'ects of that report? well, who the subjects of that report? well, who sells the _ the subjects of that report? well, who sells the report _ the subjects of that report? well, who sells the report going - the subjects of that report? well, who sells the report going to - the subjects of that report? -ii who sells the report going to do to? a report commissioned inside number ten, of course it will go to the prime minister. he is not going to veto the subject so it is only right he sees it in any case, given he is one of those who is being investigated by sue gray as it were, it would be normalfor him investigated by sue gray as it were, it would be normal for him to see it any way. it would be normal for him to see it an wa . ~ ., ., ., it would be normal for him to see it an wa. ., ., any way. well, i will no on now, to matters of — any way. well, i will no on now, to matters of coronavirus _ any way. well, i will no on now, to matters of coronavirus restrictions | matters of coronavirus restrictions and do you fully agree with the prime minister's decision to return to plan a in england? i
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prime minister's decision to return to plan a in england?— to plan a in england? i didn't su ort to plan a in england? i didn't support the _ to plan a in england? i didn't support the imposition - to plan a in england? i didn't support the imposition of- to plan a in england? i didn'tl support the imposition of plan to plan a in england? i didn't- support the imposition of plan b. i thought that the evidence at that time was that the 0micron variant was not posing a threat to hospitalisations, or deaths, and that the increased measures that were undertaken last time, it was the first time i had voted against the first time i had voted against the government, on their coronavirus measure, so i think this is taking us back to a sensible place. aha, us back to a sensible place. a government spokesperson said before that decision was announced that it was a finely balanced decision, we have to factor in we are still in winter, people are indoors a lot the time and there seems to be some push back specifically on the issue of mask wearing, so, do you think it was prudent to remove all of the plan b measures, because no—one wants a situation given the progress that has been made, of going one step forwards, two steps back? itrefoil step forwards, two steps back? well i think that step forwards, two steps back? well i think that if — step forwards, two steps back? well i think that if you _ step forwards, two steps back? -ii i think that if you look a the sort of planning that we are getting from
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sage and some the government modellers, they were so wide of the mark, and i think that that there are big questions to be asked about why it took such a pessimistic view and why even their best case scenario was worse than what has actually happened, and i think the evidence has been that 0micron, for people who have been vaccinated, is a relatively minor illness, and if yes look at those who have been hospitalised, those who have been in hospitalised, those who have been in hospital for hospitalised, those who have been in hospitalfor any hospitalised, those who have been in hospital for any length o of time, those who have been many intensive care it is very largely those who are unvaccinated. it is unreasonable to keep the whole country locked down because some refuse to get a vaccine that has been offered for free by the nhs. but vaccine that has been offered for free by the nhs.— vaccine that has been offered for free by the nhs. but are there any mitigations — free by the nhs. but are there any mitigations in _ free by the nhs. but are there any mitigations in this _ free by the nhs. but are there any mitigations in this for _ free by the nhs. but are there any mitigations in this for people - free by the nhs. but are there any mitigations in this for people who l mitigations in this for people who are vaccinated, but who are immunosuppressed who suffer from conditions like mass for example, there is a big constituency of
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people who are concerned, they are not saying that all of these measures should have stayed in place, but they are saying as far as they are concerned they see mask wearing and a mask mandate as a relatively simple way of allowing people to get out and about, keep the economy going but protecting them? i the economy going but protecting them? ., ., ., ., ., them? i am one of those who are asthma theicer, _ them? i am one of those who are asthma theicer, i _ them? i am one of those who are asthma theicer, i got _ them? i am one of those who are asthma theicer, i got an - them? i am one of those who are asthma theicer, i got an early - asthma theicer, i got an early vaccine because of that. i think you have to retain a sense of proportion about this. there will always be in any respiratory outbreak those who are more vulnerable, immunosuppress, who are shielding for other reasons but you have to keep a sense of balance and proportion, you have to get the economy moving, people socialising, as much as possible, and i think that this is a perfectly reasonable rate of removing the restriction, and i think that we are, we are now, i hope, looking at the end of this pandemic unless there are new danger dangerous variants that remerge which is
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possible for any virus but we have to go about our normal lives as much as we can. the global economy has to recover and britain has an important part to play not least because developing countries ensure they get their chance to trade their way out of poverty, and we have an important role to play in that. find of poverty, and we have an important role to play in that.— role to play in that. and do you believe, role to play in that. and do you believe. just — role to play in that. and do you believe, just finally, _ role to play in that. and do you believe, just finally, that - role to play in that. and do you believe, just finally, that the l believe, just finally, that the announcement on the move to plan a, in england, yesterday, are you content that that was for the best of scientific reasons, rather than for political reasons, to try to move the conversation on from the focus on the prime minister himself? i didn't support going to plan b so i didn't support going to plan b so i think it is perfectly reasonable. it could have been taken several weeks ago. i it could have been taken several weeks ago-— it could have been taken several weeks auo. . ., i. ., weeks ago. i am asking you about the motivation yesterday _ weeks ago. i am asking you about the motivation yesterday for _ weeks ago. i am asking you about the motivation yesterday for that - motivation yesterday for that announcement? i motivation yesterday for that announcement?— motivation yesterday for that announcement? ~' ., ., ., announcement? i think the motivation is it is the right _ announcement? i think the motivation is it is the right thing _ announcement? i think the motivation is it is the right thing to _ announcement? i think the motivation is it is the right thing to do. _ announcement? i think the motivation is it is the right thing to do. it - is it is the right thing to do. it would have been the right thing do a month ago. would have been the right thing do a month auo. ., ~ would have been the right thing do a month auo. . ~ i. would have been the right thing do a month auo. ., ~' ,, ., i. would have been the right thing do a month ao. ., ~ ., , month ago. thank you for your views this morning- — month ago. thank you for your views this morning. well, _ month ago. thank you for your views this morning. well, let _ month ago. thank you for your views this morning. well, let us _ month ago. thank you for your views this morning. well, let us get - month ago. thank you for your views
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this morning. well, let us get the i this morning. well, let us get the response from wales to the situation borisjohnson finds response from wales to the situation boris johnson finds himself response from wales to the situation borisjohnson finds himself in, and to the end of plan b in england. we can speak to andrew rt davis. thank you for your time. picking up on that point i was discussing with liam fox, the motivation fossilfuel that announcement yesterday, do you think it was purely for scientific reasons or was there a political motivation there as well? well, good morninu. motivation there as well? well, good morning- no. — motivation there as well? well, good morning- no. it— motivation there as well? well, good morning. no, it was— motivation there as well? well, good morning. no, it was scientific - morning. no, it was scientific reason, we have gone through nearly twoer queers of hell with restrictions and civil liberties taken away for understandable ta ken away for understandable reasons taken away for understandable reasons because we have been going through a pandemic, but any government sits op keeping these restriction #23as place like we are seeing in wales, is in dereliction of its duty. we need to return the celebrity, we need to re—open the economy and get back to a sense of normality and rebuilding our lives.
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mark drakeford enjoys a pretty high approval rate, do you think it was the right thing to remove plan b or could part of it have been kept like mask wearing, i know the prime minister oath has suggested people stilly that in crowded indoor space, without the mandate is there a risk we could go a step backwards in trying to deal with this virus? itruieiiii trying to deal with this virus? well if the signs — trying to deal with this virus? -ii if the signs support it all these measures stack up, because it is important that the science is followed but no government can keep these in place on people's civil liberties and a sense of normality. we have built up huge debt thes and the economic consequences as well as the economic consequences as well as the health consequence, it is vital as liam fox was saying we get the economy firing on all cylinders so we can start tackling the huge waiting list, today in wales we are getting the latest waiting list, where one in five people were on a waiting list, that is one in five of
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the whole population, it is a similarfigure in england would have to be between 12 and 13 million people on a waiting list, that is the scale of the challenge as we come out of the pandemic that governments across the uk but in particular here in wales face. in terms of the situation that boris johnson finds himself in, he seems to have a bit of breathing space today. it looked tricky with rumours of 5a letters being handed in, that didn't materialise, obviously, what is your view on borisjohnson right now, do you think that he will have to go? now, do you think that he will have to no? ~ to go? well, i met with the prime minister yesterday, _ to go? well, i met with the prime minister yesterday, and _ to go? well, i met with the prime minister yesterday, and obviouslyj minister yesterday, and obviously the prime minister enjoys my confidence, i want to see the sue gray report like everyone else because its encaps lates all allegations, and i am someone who sits on the standards commit tier here in the assembly, and one thing i have learned during that tenure is
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instead of following the headline look at the evidence, and when get reports coming before us, they are very detailed, concise, and very often the evidence that comes in those reports bears no relation to the headlines that the media have been pushing over a number of weeks so—and—so that is why i want to see the report publish. we can digest the report publish. we can digest the findings and the prime minister has said he will go before the house of commons people want to put to him. the media have been doing _ people want to put to him. the media have been doing their— people want to put to him. the media have been doing theirjob, _ people want to put to him. the media have been doing theirjob, they - people want to put to him. the media have been doing theirjob, they have l have been doing theirjob, they have been carrying out investigations, and the health secretary himself was saying this morning that calling these events party, he wasn't beating about the bush he was saying they were partying and talked about how it might endanger democracy, you talk about the prime minister having of your confidence, does that depend on the outcome of the sue gray report for you?— on the outcome of the sue gray report for you? well, obviously that sue gray report _
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report for you? well, obviously that sue gray report will _ report for you? well, obviously that sue gray report will have _ report for you? well, obviously that sue gray report will have all- report for you? well, obviously that sue gray report will have all the - sue gray report will have all the evidence, i am sue gray report will have all the evidence, iam not sue gray report will have all the evidence, i am not part of the westminster process, because i am a member of the welsh parliament so i am not familiar with all the events that have gone on, from my experience i want to be in a position to report a report that has access to all the people involved and collated that evidence to form that opinion, that is what is important to me, and that is what i want to do. wejust want to do. we just lost your picture, hopefully we will get that back. while we do that, let me bring in a clip for you, now this is a reminder of the moment in parliament, in westminster, a week ago, when the leader of the house of commons jacob rees—mogg was asked, can you name the leader of the welsh conservatives. does he think the leader of the welsh conservatives is a lightweight
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figure and can he name him? mr; welsh conservatives is a lightweight figure and can he name him? my right honourable friend, _ figure and can he name him? my right honourable friend, the _ figure and can he name him? my right honourable friend, the secretary - figure and can he name him? my right honourable friend, the secretary of i honourable friend, the secretary of state for wales is called simon hart. i want to ask you what you thought after that it i want to ask you what you thought after tha . , after that it might seem we might have some _ after that it might seem we might have some family _ after that it might seem we might have some family connection, i after that it might seem we might i have some family connection, because the rees in his surname comes from the rees in his surname comes from the vale of glamorgan and my family hailfrom the same the vale of glamorgan and my family hail from the same village so we might have a family connection and families do sometimes drift apart, but on a serious note the leader of the house was corrects, we do not have a designated leader in wales under the conservative party constitution, simon hart leads the contingent in westminster, i lead the welsh conservatives in the welsh parliament and glynn davis who is a former mp is chairman of the voluntary party in wales i want to see that change so we have a
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designated leader in wales but i am sure the leader of the house wouldn't have wanted to misled them from the despatch box. you wouldn't have wanted to misled them from the despatch box.— wouldn't have wanted to misled them from the despatch box. you must have been frustrated _ from the despatch box. you must have been frustrated and _ from the despatch box. you must have been frustrated and the _ from the despatch box. you must have been frustrated and the comment i from the despatch box. you must have been frustrated and the comment that| been frustrated and the comment that jacob rees—mogg made about douglas ross, as well, do you feel that good manners, good relations if you like are being sacrificed with the aim of showing support for borisjohnson, showing support for boris johnson, which showing support for borisjohnson, which is whatjacob rees—mogg showing support for borisjohnson, which is what jacob rees—mogg was doing when he called douglas ross a political lightweight for saying he had no confidence in the prime minister. he had no confidence in the prime minister. , ., ., minister. he is not a political lightweight- _ minister. he is not a political lightweight. he _ minister. he is not a political lightweight. he is _ minister. he is not a political lightweight. he is leader- minister. he is not a political lightweight. he is leader of l minister. he is not a political. lightweight. he is leader of the scottish conservative party, he has been voted to that position by the membership of the scottish conservative party and that is an important vote of confidence in douglas, as i said i met with jacob yesterday, we had a conativial meeting and i take the comments he made with a pinch of salt but i have explained the position to you, i enjoy being leader of the welsh conservatives in the welsh
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parliament. putting my shoulder to the wheel for nearly 11 years, making sure we add vase in wales and we have done that at local government election, westminster elections and at the said none elections and at the said none elections with a record haul of mss come back to the welsh parliament. that is the successen ground, what media and opposition politicians wanted to try and makes my chief over is up to them to be honest with you. over is up to them to be honest with ou. �* , ., ~ over is up to them to be honest with ou.�* , ., ., you. andrew rt davies, thank you for our time. england's plan b restrictions are to be scrapped, with mandatory face coverings in public places and covid passports both dropped. borisjohnson said england was reverting to plan a due to the boosters uptake and how people had followed plan b measures. let's take a look in more detail at how the guidance is changing. from today, the government is no longer asking people in england to work from home. face coverings don't need to be worn in secondary school
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classrooms from today, and guidance about using them in communal areas will soon be updated. for everyone else, from next thursday face coverings will not be required by law, though advice remains to wear one in enclosed and crowded spaces. also from next thursday, you won't need a covid pass to gain entry to nightclubs and large events. those who test positive will still need to self—isolate, bput this could be phased out by the end of march. simonjones has this report. dr sarah pitt is a microbiologist at the university of brighton and fellow of the institute of biomedical science. good to have you with us, thank you for your time this morning and your broad reaction first of all to that announcement on the move to plan a in england. announcement on the move to plan a in encland. ~ ., ~' announcement on the move to plan a in encland. ~ ., ~ , ., in england. well, i do think it is a little bit too _ in england. well, i do think it is a little bit too early _ in england. well, i do think it is a little bit too early to _ in england. well, i do think it is a little bit too early to remove i in england. well, i do think it is a little bit too early to remove all. little bit too early to remove all the measures that we have in place, to stop the spread of this very dangerous virus, which can be nasty in some people. i don't really like the use of the word restrictions for things like wearing a mask in
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enclosed public space because what it is, it is allowing us to do more things and helping us to stop the spread of the virus. i really think with 108,000 new cases across the uk reported yesterday, and we are running at 1800 deaths with covid as a recorded, within 28 days sorry of covid test being covid positive test, sorry, that is still far too much for me.— test, sorry, that is still far too much for me. so, would you have referred much for me. so, would you have preferred the _ much for me. so, would you have preferred the government - much for me. so, would you have preferred the government keep i much for me. so, would you have | preferred the government keep all much for me. so, would you have i preferred the government keep all of the plan b measures in place or perhaps just the plan b measures in place or perhapsjust some of the plan b measures in place or perhaps just some of them? because at some point, they have to start being relaxed haven't they? thea;r being relaxed haven't they? they have, but being relaxed haven't they? they have. but i _ being relaxed haven't they? they have, but i think, _ being relaxed haven't they? they have, but i think, i— being relaxed haven't they? they have, but i think, i have- being relaxed haven't they? iie: have, but i think, i have heard being relaxed haven't they? "iie: have, but i think, i have heard a lot of people saying, oh, well, we just need to li with it like we live with the flu for example and what i think is being missed here, is that on average, if you don't do
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anything, to stop the spread of a particular infection, and you just people just go about their normal business, we can calculate how likely, what number of people someone who with the infection is likely to pass it op to, and with flu, someone with flu infects on average one other person, someone with the 0micron variant of the covid—19, it is up to eight or nine, it is much more infectious than most of the other things that we have lived with, you know, in, in our lives before covid, in terms of infections which are spread through droplets and the air, apart from the exception is measles virus, but that is a different story in a way. so things like wears masks in enclosed public spaces is a simple measure we could keep doing. iii public spaces is a simple measure we could keep doing.— could keep doing. ifi may interrupt. _ could keep doing. ifi may interrupt, sorry _ could keep doing. ifi may interrupt, sorry to - could keep doing. if i may.
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interrupt, sorry to interrupt could keep doing. if i may i interrupt, sorry to interrupt you, on that point, the prime minister said to people yesterday, it is still winter, you know, be cautious, especially if you are indoors in a crowded place, i mean, do you think that people will listen to that, if something isn't mandatory, do you think that they will use their common—sense, that is a phrase the prime minister has often talked about as well, will they use common—sense if they are mingling with a rot people and there is as we know scientifically a greater risk of the virus being transmitted. what we saw back injuly, when the mandatory requirement for wearing masks in england was lifted, people just stopped doing it. they got out of the habit of doing it. if there were people who were in shops, or public transport, or even in schools who are trying to ask people to wear masks, and sort of say, the reason you are wearing masks is to protect
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other people, as much as yourself, it is because we know that even if you have done your lateral flow test before you have gone out, there is a chance that you will test negative on the natural flow, chance that you will test negative on the naturalflow, but chance that you will test negative on the natural flow, but you still might have active effects that you could pass on to other people. but you might not have any symptoms. that is the reason we are wearing a mask. as i say, it is a lot more infectious than influenza. i have experienced it myself. peoplejust gradually stopped wearing them, to the point where there were some times when i went into a shop or on a train and i was the only person wearing a mask, back in october, november time. wearing a mask, back in october, novembertime. people wearing a mask, back in october, november time. people will stop taking them if they think it is optional. people who are being put at risk in shops, on buses, buy lots of people coming and not wearing masks, they will not be able to ask them to wear a mask. they can ask
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them, but they won't be able to make it happen, which means it could be putting other people at risk. for the life of me, there are some people who can't wear a mask for medical reasons, some people are very uncomfortable. and most of the rest of us, it is a minor inconvenience that allows us to keep doing the things that we want to do. i think we should keep it. serra; doing the things that we want to do. i think we should keep it.— i think we should keep it. sorry to interru t, i think we should keep it. sorry to interrupt. we _ i think we should keep it. sorry to interrupt, we are _ i think we should keep it. sorry to interrupt, we are out _ i think we should keep it. sorry to interrupt, we are out of _ i think we should keep it. sorry to interrupt, we are out of time, i interrupt, we are out of time, unfortunately. doctor sarah pitt, thank you very much. with pressure on hospitals growing, take a look at the bbc�*s nhs tracker, which has the latest data on emergency waiting times for services in your area, and how that compares, with pre—pandemic demand. now time for the weather forecast and carole has the latest. a cold and frosty start to the day, but for many there will be lengthy spells of sunshine throughout the day. we have gusty wind across the north and also the east in particular, and here we have some showers. wintry on the far north of
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scotland, one or two ones across the north york moors. the showers across south—west wales and south—west england tending to fade. in the gusty wind along the east coast, it will feel raw today. through this evening and overnight come under clear skies we will have widespread frost. you can see more cloud coming in across the north and west, with the odd spot of drizzle coming out of that. there will also be mist and fog patches forming, primarily across south—west scotland and north—west england. temperatures in parts of southern england could fall away as low as —5 —6. a cold and frosty start to the day tomorrow, but a lot of sunshine. the fog slowly lifting. still cloud across the north and west, thick enough to produce pots of drizzle. the wind is not as strong down the east coast. high is between six and nine. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... the prime minister vows to fight any leadership challenge, as mps await a crucial report
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into downing street parties. as soon as those facts are established, he will be right back in parliament and subject himself to scrutiny. and i think that is the right way forward. from today, facemasks are not compulsory in classrooms, and working from home guidance is dropped, as england moves away from plan b coronavirus restrictions. also this hour, the british dental association says nhs dentistry is "hanging by a thread" as patients wait two years for check ups. the first plane carrying aid lands in tonga, on a runway newly cleared of ash, following saturday's volcanic eruption and tsunami. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's mike. good morning it's a bumper day for the brits, at the australian open, and in the men's draw, while dan evans went through earlier to round three,
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without hitting a ball, with his opponent pulling out injured, all eyes are now on andy murray. he has lost his fight to stay in the competition. he's up against the japanese qualifier taro daniel, who's slightly below him in the world rankings, and murray lost the first set 6—4. murray has shown at times, the strength and determination we've seen from him so often and has been able to break serve, but daniel has always had the edge when it matters with murray not as mobile as he had been, in that first round epic five set win, which seems to have taken a lot out of him, and daniel hasjust taken the match in straight sets. emma raducanu made a great start to her match against danka kovinic, breaking serve in the opening game and then again, to race into a 3—0 lead. but she needed on—court treatment for a blister and she began to struggle, losing the first set 6—4. but she seems to have recovered, and she's broken serve again at the start of the second
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set, and she leads 3—2. tottenham pulled off an incredible comeback to win 3—2 at leicester last night, to move up to fifth in the premier league. the home side led until the match went into stoppage time — james maddison with the goal that put them 2—1 up, but with 90 minutes plus five on the clock, substitute stephen bergwijn, scored what looked to be a late equaliser. and straight from the restart, spurs got the ball back and harry kane played through for bergwijn to score again. fantastic, fantastic. the fans, it was a fantastic game and i scored two goals. to was a fantastic game and i scored two coals. ., .., was a fantastic game and i scored two coals. ., was a fantastic game and i scored twouoals. ., , . was a fantastic game and i scored twouoals. , . two goals. to come off the bench so late, what two goals. to come off the bench so late. what on _ two goals. to come off the bench so late, what on earth _ two goals. to come off the bench so late, what on earth did _ two goals. to come off the bench so late, what on earth did the - two goals. to come off the bench so late, what on earth did the managerj late, what on earth did the manager say to you?— late, what on earth did the manager sa to ou? . ., say to you? score goals, create some difficulties therefore _ say to you? score goals, create some difficulties therefore the _ say to you? score goals, create some difficulties therefore the defenders i difficulties therefore the defenders and stay close to eric. i was so happy ijumped in the crowd. it was emotional. manchester united overcame a really poor start to beat brentford 3—1.
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teenager anthony elanga, scoring his first goal of the season to get them going in the second half. but when the manager made changes, cristiano ronaldo didn't even try to hide his frustration at being replaced late on. yes, he was not happy that i substituted him and took him off. but he came back from a little injury, he was not training for one and a half weeks. i said, listen, cristiano you are 36, still in fantastic physical shape, but once you are a head coach at one stage yourself, maybe you also see it through the glasses of a head coach. england's netball team can learn a lot from their late defeat to australia, in their quad series final last night in london according to head coachjess thirlby. her roses team were on top, for most of this match, against their old rivals at the copper box and had a one point lead, going into the final quarter, but in a remarkable finish, australia, stepped up several gears, and won comfortably — by 58 points to 46. a valuable lesson in what can happen, ahead of the commonwealth games in birmingham in the summer, when england will be defending
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champions. i think what hurts the most tonight is the nature by which we lost it. the margin by which we did, having been so closely contested throughout the game. ijust asked them to be disciplined with how we review and reflect on that. there will be bigger stages where we need to be at our best. and i think the fact we have had back—to—back games here is a great insight as to where we are at. england's women have begun their bid to win the ashes for the first time since 2014. they've been put into bat by australia in the first t20 in adelaide. and they're going well — tammy beaumont is the only batter to fall, caught and bowled for 30. danni wyatt scored a half—century, eventually bowled by tahlia mcgrath for 70 — england 147—3 off 17 overs. that's all the sport for now. i want to read out some of your
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tweets, we were asking you earlier about the move away from plan b, to plan a in england and what you think of that. the general political situation. the speaker on twitter says more difficult to get tests, scandal at downing street, but simultaneous removal of restrictions, all happening pretty much at the same time. coincidence? kay wilson says the removal of mask mandates and plan b, could there be a more blatant look at this, rather than that, tactic? putting health of country over personal survival. you can imagine how kay is feeling about that, from her tweet. this one is from juicy convert on twitter, referring to the interview with liam fox earlier, saying it was good that he got a priority vaccine, being asthmatic, but he didn't acknowledge many did not. thank you for those. keep them coming in. you can get in touch with me on twitter, and you
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can use the hashtag bbc your questions. you might want to get in touch about this next story about nhs dentistry. let me know if you are having a problem getting a dental appointment. unions have warned that nhs dentistry is "hanging by a thread" with some patients facing up to two—year waits for routine check—ups. bbc analysis shows a total of 950 who left the nhs in the last year across england and wales dentists who were covering a total of 2,500 roles — as some dentists worked in more than one region at a time. and then turning to the service the nhs offers — the latest analysis shows about 75% of practices in england had not updated the site to show whether they were accepting nhs patients or not within the last three months. tsj smile clinical director sarfraz khan runs six practices in barnsley. he says the staffing issues are exacerbating wait times.
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the waiting times are getting longer, due to people not getting access to dentists. it's as simple as that. first of all, in march last year, in 2020, dental practices were completely shut down for a period of time. that caused a backlog, on top of which we are actually finding it very difficult to get dentists to come and work. they are just not interested in coming to work in suburban areas, which is making waiting times go through the ceiling. sharon grey from suffolk says she was forced to take matters into her own hands after waiting more than 12 months for treatment. i filed them down with a metal file, i filed them down with a metal file, i have _ i filed them down with a metal file, i have superglued them back in and managed _ i have superglued them back in and managed to superglue most of my mouth— managed to superglue most of my mouth as — managed to superglue most of my mouth as well. fix a dent to try to hold a _ mouth as well. fix a dent to try to hold a bridge onto my teeth, that doesn't _ hold a bridge onto my teeth, that doesn't work either. i think i must
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have _ doesn't work either. i think i must have covered most things now. i have worked _ have covered most things now. i have worked all— have covered most things now. i have worked all my life, paid my ni number, — worked all my life, paid my ni number, i_ worked all my life, paid my ni number, i worked for the nhs even, and i_ number, i worked for the nhs even, and i was _ number, i worked for the nhs even, and i was left in this situation. i think_ and i was left in this situation. i think it — and i was left in this situation. i think it is — and i was left in this situation. i think it is diabolical. with me now is shawn charlwood. he is the british dental association's general dental practice committee chairman. thank you for your time. that is a really horrendous situation that the lady in that clip we have played is talking about, because she cannot get access to an nhs dentist, she says, having paid national insurance all her working life. it shouldn't be like this, should it? so why is it? it be like this, should it? so why is it? ., , y be like this, should it? so why is it? _. �*, ~ it? it absolutely shouldn't be like this. as it? it absolutely shouldn't be like this- as your— it? it absolutely shouldn't be like this. as your viewers _ it? it absolutely shouldn't be like this. as your viewers have - it? it absolutely shouldn't be like this. as your viewers have said, i this. as your viewers have said, many parts of the country are seeing the nhs dental service hanging by a thread, with up to two year waits for patients to be seen. this is a crisis for patients, and it is a crisis for patients, and it is a crisis for patients, and it is a crisis for local nhs dental practices as well. in areas all over
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the country, practices are really struggling to recruit dentists and support staff within nhs dental practices. in portsmouth, we have had reports that they have lost 26% of their nhs dentists. 0ne had reports that they have lost 26% of their nhs dentists. one in four of their nhs dentists. one in four of their nhs dentists. one in four of their dentists have moved away from nhs dentistry in the last 12 months. that picture is being replicated all over the country. there are many towns throughout the country that are unable to attract a single applicant for an nhs dental post. and they are waiting for years to fill those posts. and many of them have given up. we are to the british dental association want a strong nhs dental service, so that, you know, your viewers and patients can access the care that they need. sorry to interrupt... please go ahead. i think the line is a little
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bit... ~ ., ahead. i think the line is a little bit... . . ., , ., , bit... when we are hearing stories of diy dentistry. — bit... when we are hearing stories of my dentistry, it _ bit... when we are hearing stories of diy dentistry, it is _ bit... when we are hearing stories of diy dentistry, it is really - bit... when we are hearing stories of diy dentistry, it is really sad. i of diy dentistry, it is really sad. as your viewer said, it patiently shouldn't be like us. we should have an nhs dental service fit for all. to understand what needs to be done, let me go back a step to what the causes are. it sounds from what you're saying that many dentists are moving from the nhs into private practice. going back further, are enough people wanting to study dentistry in the first instance? 50. dentistry in the first instance? so, there are dentistry in the first instance? srr, there are plenty dentistry in the first instance? so, there are plenty of dentistry in the first instance? s513, there are plenty of people dentistry in the first instance? sr3, there are plenty of people that want to study dentistry. it's very competitive to get into dental school. there are a lot of people that are leaving dentistry. and we are struggling to recruit new dentists, particularly to the nhs dental system. and the main factor thatis dental system. and the main factor that is driving this is an outdated nhs dental contract. and the health select committee, over ten years ago, described the nhs dental contract as unfit for purpose. it is
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outdated, it is target driven, it makes delivering prevention difficult, it makes it difficult for practices to see new patients. also, practices to see new patients. also, practices are subjected to, in many cases, tens or hundreds of thousands of pounds worth of financial claw—back if they don't meet very demanding targets in the middle of a pandemic. who; demanding targets in the middle of a andemic. ~ , ., , ., demanding targets in the middle of a andemic. , ., demanding targets in the middle of a andemic. ~ , ., , ., .«r pandemic. why does a contract make it difficult for — pandemic. why does a contract make it difficult for a _ pandemic. why does a contract make it difficult for a practice _ pandemic. why does a contract make it difficult for a practice to _ pandemic. why does a contract make it difficult for a practice to see - it difficult for a practice to see new patients?— it difficult for a practice to see new patients? it difficult for a practice to see new atients? , . , . new patients? because a practice has a certain quota _ new patients? because a practice has a certain quota of _ new patients? because a practice has a certain quota of what _ new patients? because a practice has a certain quota of what we _ new patients? because a practice has a certain quota of what we call - a certain quota of what we call units of dental activity. 0nce a certain quota of what we call units of dental activity. once they have met those, they cannot see any more patients. so they won't be paid more patients. so they won't be paid more than a contract for the year. so if new patients arrive, if they have met their contract, they can't see them. so it makes it difficult. and dentistry has actually 30% less spent on it by government than it did a decade ago. it's the only part
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of the nhs that has seen that level of the nhs that has seen that level of reduction of funding, and not a penny of the government's multi billion pounds nhs capture funding has gone to dentistry. and it may surprise you to know that, before covid, the system was only funded to deal with roughly 50% of the population. so unless we have a significant recommitment to nhs dentistry, with a new contract, and a clear statement as to when the uda contract will end, ifear a clear statement as to when the uda contract will end, i fear that the situation we have at the moment will become the norm, and it could actually worsen, where viewers and patients struggle even more to find an nhs dentist, and we don't want that to happen. an nhs dentist, and we don't want that to happen-— that to happen. clearly a dentist can only see _ that to happen. clearly a dentist can only see so _ that to happen. clearly a dentist can only see so many _ that to happen. clearly a dentist can only see so many patients i that to happen. clearly a dentist| can only see so many patients in that to happen. clearly a dentist l can only see so many patients in a day. but it does seem very strange that there is a contract which states that once you have done a certain amount of work, you won't get paid for any further patients
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you see after that. why on earth was that contract set up in the first place? that contract set up in the first lace? ~ ., . ., , , place? well, of course, it limits the spend _ place? well, of course, it limits the spend on — place? well, of course, it limits the spend on nhs— place? well, of course, it limits the spend on nhs dentistry i place? well, of course, it limits the spend on nhs dentistry by l the spend on nhs dentistry by government. whereas before, if a patient attended at a practice and they could be accommodated within they could be accommodated within the appointment book of the practice, then they could be seen within nhs dentistry and the funding would go to the practice, so that they could be seen. and all of the clinical procedures be carried out. as i say, now, each practice has a quota of units of dental activity which, in effect, limits the overall budget for nhs dentistry. and, given that it was only allocated for approximately 50% of the population, you can see why we have a crisis. there isn't enough funding in place to deliver care to the numbers of people that need it, and we need an urgent statement from the secretary
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of state and ministers as to when the current discredited system will end, and when an appropriate and fairfinancial end, and when an appropriate and fair financial settlement for nhs dentistry will be implemented. i am sure all of the _ dentistry will be implemented. i am sure all of the patients looking for an appointment will be very keen to hear that statement as well. the british dental association general practice committee chairman, thank you for explaining the situation. a reminder, if you want to let me know about your situation, have you been trying to get an appointment with no luck? do let me know. 0r trying to get an appointment with no luck? do let me know. or perhaps you have been able to get the appointments you have been looking for. you can do that on twitter. some other stories now — two men have been arrested in birmingham and manchester as part of the investigation into the texas synagogue attack. british—born malik faisal—akram was shot dead by us police after holding four people hostage in a synagogue on saturday. they all escaped unharmed. uk counter—terrorism police
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say they're continuing to support us authorities with their investigation. the first foreign aid plane has arrived in tonga, carrying much—needed water and supplies for the pacific nation. new pictures have emerged showing the scale of devastation following saturday's eruption of an undersea volcano, with cars, roads and buildings covered by a thick layer of ash. at least three people are now known to have died, including a british woman. joanne mataele lives in australia but has relatives in tonga. she hasjust managed to get in touch with them. i heard from my parents yesterday at about 1.30 pm australian time. it is about 1.30 pm australian time. it is a relief to finally hear their voices and finally know how they are back home. my dad had told me they are fine, no major damages to our homes. it's pretty muchjust are fine, no major damages to our homes. it's pretty much just the houses along the coastal line that have been pretty much damaged and
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houses across the west coast of tonga. you know, yeah, as i mentioned, just a relief to finally hear from them. the only information that my parents were able to tell me over the phone was a people are busy trying to get the ashes cleared, especially from their homes, and the ground as well. that is the main concern. 0ther ground as well. that is the main concern. other than the damages to the homes on the coastal lines, it is pretty much just trying to get rid of the ashes and clearing it out. the major concerns, as of now, is drinking water. i had actually spoken to my auntie on the phone, and she mentioned that food at the moment is fine, the main, major concerns are the drinking water. and medical supplies and shelter as well. you know, because this is the
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first major damage that has happened in tonga, and it is the first... you know, mother nature disaster that has happened, people were also worried about their health at the moment. homes and things like that. we have our neighbour is staying with each other, if they do not have shelter. the news back home that my auntie had mentioned, everyone was just devastated. and more so scared, is what she described. president biden has warned russia that it will pay dearly if it invades ukraine. in a news conference marking his first full year in office, mr biden predicted president putin would "move in" on ukraine, but said he didn't think moscow wanted a full—blown war. 0ur washington correspondent gary 0'donoghue reports. gunfire. ever since russia began its build—up of troops on the ukrainian border, america has been threatening wide
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ranging economic sanctions, if vladimir putin went ahead with an invasion. now the us president is predicting that his russian counterpart will make a move on ukraine, testing the west. and while us troops would not be involved, the president said the consequences would be deadly. the cost of going into ukraine in terms of physical loss of life for the russians — and they will be able to prevail over time, but it's going to be heavy. it's going to be real. it's going to be consequential. at home, the administration's handling of covid has been severely criticised, particularly for the slow response on testing. now a billion tests will be available for americans to take at home, and the president promised no more lockdowns. i'm not going to give up and accept things as they are now. some people may call what's happening now the new normal. i call it a job not yet finished. it will get better.
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we are moving toward a time when covid—19 won't disrupt our daily lives. the president claimed credit for bringing unemployment down, and passing covid relief and infrastructure legislation. but with inflation high, and other bills being blocked, he blamed republicans for not getting more done. i did not anticipate that there'd be such a stalwart effort to make sure that the most important thing was that president biden didn't get anything done. joe biden believes his first year has seen important progress on the economy, on covid and on infrastructure. but with key parts of his legislative programme mired in congress, and a looming crisis with russia, there are huge challenges ahead, not least those mid—term elections in november. gary 0'donoghue, bbc news at the white house. lawyers for the convicted sex—trafficker ghislaine maxwell have formally applied for a retrial
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after it was revealed one of her originaljurors had been the victim of sexual abuse. maxwell — an associate of the paedophile, jeffrey epstein — was found guilty last month of several charges including one of sex trafficking. but the verdict has been thrown into doubt after a juror revealed in a media interview that he'd used his own experience of being abused, to influence his fellowjury members. the biggest iceberg in the world, known as a68, has been slowly melting after breaking away from antarctica in 2017. now scientists have calculated how much water it's thought to have fed into the ocean. the a68 covered an area of about 2,300 square miles. it eventually drifted into the south atlantic where it began to collapse. it's reckoned the ice was at one point releasing one and a half trillion litres of fresh water into the ocean every day. that's nearly eight times the daily water consumption of the us.
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researchers say the iceberg will have altered ocean currents in the south atlantic as it melted, and the dust it deposited will have boosted the production of plankton. i want to bring you more of your tweets. this is in response to england moving from plan b to plan a. england moving from plan b to plan a, one says a complete removal of restrictions before the wave passes means that the clinically vulnerable will be forced to overcompensate to stay safe. rick said that masks made shops and public indoor spaces safer, they are now no go again. this is from richard, about the dental story that we have been telling you about. the crisis in nhs dentistry in england, according to the british dental association. richard says unacceptable waiting times for dental treatment is also prevalent when trying to get private treatment, albeit possibly not as
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bad as trying to get nhs treatment. the earliest appointment i can get for the hygienist is injuly, around six months�* time. sam khan dentistry, watching your article on dental care, the government needs to increase money. dental problems don�*t only give you toothache, but heart problems, says sam r. and this is from watson, i have not been registered with a dentist for several years, since the one i was with closed. i�*ve tried several times to register being told they are not accepting patients at present. for20 are not accepting patients at present. for 20 years i haven�*t really needed one, says watson, fingers crossed i don�*t. that is extraordinary, 20 years of that going to the dentist. jonathan wood vine says i haven�*t had a dentist for over two years, nobody is taking on new patients. last year i started travelling to poland for treatment on £10 flights, with the cost of flights and treatment it is still
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cheaper than an nhs dentist and a better service and technology. he has taken to travelling abroad to get his dental treatment. do keep your tweets coming in. you can do that on twitter and use the hashtag bbc your questions. good morning. it has been a cold start to the day, but we have a lot of sunshine today. gusty wind across the north and east particularly, making it feel cold. some showers, wintry times across the north york moors and also across the far north of mainland scotland, and the northern isles. these are the temperatures that you will see on the thermometer. four, five and six down the east coast. but when you add on the wind chill, this is how it actually feels, freezing or below. it is going to feel cold today, wherever you are. through this evening and overnight come under clear skies, we will see a widespread frost. we have got cloud toppling around the top of the area
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of high pressure, that will be thick enough for drizzle at times and we will also see mist and fog four south—west scotland and north—west england. these are overnight lows, but in some rural parts of the southwest arraignment, temperatures can fall to —5 —6. tomorrow, once again, it cold and frosty start. a lot of dry weather and sunshine. the fog slowly lifting. still, the cloud thick enough to be producing some spots of drizzle across parts of the north and west. but it will be on and off through the course of the day. temperatures tomorrow between seven and nine. at that brisk wind will not be as strong down the north sea coastline. as we head into the weekend, the high pressure that has beenin weekend, the high pressure that has been in charge of the weather for the last wee while will continue to be. so for the next wee while, it remains with us. on sunday, a weather front tries to get in across the north west, bringing rain. during the course of saturday, quite a bit of cloud around at times. there will be some brighter breaks. a week where the front coming in across the north west, producing
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some spots of rain. still mild in the north of the country. aberdeen and stornoway, 11 degrees has become further south, and stornoway, 11 degrees has become furthersouth, into and stornoway, 11 degrees has become further south, into the south—east, we are looking at 7 degrees as the top temperature. sunday, variable amounts of cloud and sunny skies. here comes the weather front, preceded by some showers. behind this, the air will turn slightly cooler than it has been across the north. these are the kind of temperatures you can expect on sunday, between eight and 10 degrees. and then the outlook beyond that remains fairly settled, with high pressure firmly in charge. still fairly mild for the time of year. areas of cloud and fog to watch out for at night, as well as some frost. but at times, rather like today and tomorrow, the cloud will be thick enough to produce some drizzle, may be also some light spots of rain.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. from today, facemasks are not compulsory in classrooms, and working from home guidance is dropped, as england moves away from plan b coronavirus restrictions. this doesn�*t mean that by any means that covid is not a problem, it�*s not there, we are still in a pandemic, the prevalence is still high. the prime minister vows to fight any leadership challenge, as mps await a crucial report into downing street parties. president biden warns vladimir putin that the us will do significant harm to russia, if he decides to invade ukraine. the first plane carrying aid lands in tonga, on a runway
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newly cleared of ash, following saturday�*s volcanic eruption and tsunami.

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