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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  January 18, 2022 5:30am-6:01am GMT

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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. clamping down on tax avoidance. eu finance ministers look set to rubber stamp a global agreement on corporation tax, which will see multinationals paying 15% of their profits. booming down under! australia see�*s a rise in the number of aboriginal—owned businesses, however complaints about prejudice remain. and it's winnie the pooh day — he's been a global superstar since 1926, but for the first time ever the fictional character will no longer be subject to us copyright laws — we'll tell you why!
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who doesn't love winnie the to? i grew up on those stories and we will talk about that later. let's start in europe where an important meeting is taking place today between eu finance ministers to discuss rubber stamping a global agreement on corporation tax. the ministers will discuss creating a new legislation for a minimum 15% global corporation tax for all multinational companies. the move is aimed at creating a more universal regulatory environment and minimising opportunities for tax avoidance. this follows a deal which was agreed by 136 countries last year and is designed to make sure large multinational firms pay tax of at least 15% on profits in each country they operate in.
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joining me now is tove maria ryding, who's the policy and advocacy manager at tax justice. lovely to see you again. so, they are going to rubberstamp this historic agreement that was reached between 136 countries. do you think this will do thejob? will the countries. do you think this will do the job? will the likes of amazon be paying much more tax to the countries in which they operate? tax to the countries in which they operate?— tax to the countries in which they operate? yes. it is true that they — they operate? yes. it is true that they are _ they operate? yes. it is true | that they are rubberstamping the deal but when you ask is this really going to make multinational corporations pay more tax, unfortunately that looks much less likely and there is also a global situation where the eu is set to rubberstamp the deal that it looks much less certain in washington and there are also a number of other big countries
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such as nigeria and tenure that are already starting to back out of the deal.— out of the deal. this is the problem- _ out of the deal. this is the problem- it _ out of the deal. this is the problem. it is _ out of the deal. this is the problem. it is one - out of the deal. this is the problem. it is one thing i out of the deal. this is the problem. it is one thing toi out of the deal. this is the i problem. it is one thing to all agree on a deal in the future and another thing to get it actually happening in practice and in washington, president biden has a realjob to get this through senate, doesn't he? ., , ., , this through senate, doesn't he? ., , ., ., , he? he does. it has already turned into _ he? he does. it has already turned into a _ he? he does. it has already turned into a discussion, i he? he does. it has already turned into a discussion, it| he? he does. it has already. turned into a discussion, it is interesting to see that in brussels the eu was discussing who will get the money. will it be the eu itself all member states? at the same time in washington, the discussions mean that it is uncertain whether this deal will ever turn truly global and at the same time we have over one third of the world's countries that actually never joined third of the world's countries that actually neverjoined the bit? about what they are going to do. ., i. bit? about what they are going to do, ., y” “ to do. so, where do you think this will end _ to do. so, where do you think this will end up _ to do. so, where do you think this will end up in _ to do. so, where do you think this will end up in that i to do. so, where do you think this will end up in that case? | this will end up in that case? fundamentally, they have all
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agreed to this 15% tax on corporate profit. will it ever happen or is itjust going to take years and years to become a reality? it take years and years to become a reali ? take years and years to become areali ? , a reality? it will probably be the same — a reality? it will probably be the same problem - a reality? it will probably be the same problem as i a reality? it will probably be the same problem as we i a reality? it will probably be i the same problem as we have seen on tax for many years which is uncertainty and things get implemented halfway but then the political discussion comes back. that is because the negotiations only apply to some countries and not others but, more importantly, it is not ambitious enough and right now with the global crisis we are seeing governments trying to find tax income wherever they can and that is why, for example, nigeria is starting to introduce new taxes that are not in line with this deal, because government really needs income and this deal is not, in the long run, going to do the job for them. we the long run, going to do the job for them.— the long run, going to do the job for them. we shall keep a close eye. — job for them. we shall keep a close eye, regardless. i job for them. we shall keep a close eye, regardless. thank| close eye, regardless. thank you for your analysis.
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let's get some of the day's other news. the bosses of ten of america's biggest airlines are warning that the united states "is facing major travel disruption" if verizon and at&t 5g mobile phone services are switched on as planned on wednesday. their concerns are centered on fears that c—band 5g signals will interfere with aircraft navigation systems, particularly those that are used in adverse weather conditions. uk supermarket morrisons has confirmed it has cut sick pay for unvaccinated workers who are forced to isolate after being exposed to covid. it follows similar moves from big retailers including ikea, next and ocado as staff absences rise. unjabbed morrisons workers who are told to isolate but test negative now get statutory sick pay of £96 a week. the price of orange juice climbed to its highest level in months, after us government agricultural forecasters said they expect the smallest florida orange crop since world war ii.
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the forecast is expecting 44 and half million boxes to be produced, which is 16% lower than last year's figure. india's prime minister — narendra modi — has called on collective action to tackle the grey area of crypto—currency regulation. speaking at virtual davos, modi said �*steps taken by a single country will not suffice'. elsewhere in the crypto world, spain has become the first member of the european union to order its financial markets regulator to clamp—down on crypto—currency adverts. promoters will now need to notify authorities in advance of posts promoting crypto. joining me now is swetha ramachandran, who's a investment manager at gam investments. lovely to see you. so this issue of crypto currency and
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how it is regulated, interesting to see what is proposed by number and remotely. proposed by number and remotely-_ proposed by number and remotel . ., ~ remotely. indeed and i think with the size _ remotely. indeed and i think with the size of _ remotely. indeed and i think with the size of the - remotely. indeed and i think with the size of the crypto i with the size of the crypto currency market which has grown to over $2 trillion recently i think that becomes much more pressing because linkages between crypto currency and fraud and financial systems are growing which potentially makes it a source of instability should not be regulated. talking of a source of instability, we hear the people instability, we hear the people in turkey are using crypto as a hedge against their currency, the lira, which has been falling significantly. that has been the promise _ falling significantly. that has been the promise of- falling significantly. that has been the promise of crypto l been the promise of crypto currency, that they will provide a hedge against inflation but many current crypto currencies are volatile. so if you add to the 40% inflation rate that we see in turkey at the moment, the inherent availability of an unregulated currency, it is a toxic combination of people potentially speculating rather than investing. d0 potentially speculating rather than investing.— than investing. do you think that is why _
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than investing. do you think that is why the _ than investing. do you think that is why the likes - than investing. do you think that is why the likes of i than investing. do you think| that is why the likes of spain is now cracking down on advertising surrounding crypto currency? advertising surrounding crypto curren ? , , ~ currency? yes, absolutely. and i think china — currency? yes, absolutely. and i think china is _ currency? yes, absolutely. and i think china is well _ currency? yes, absolutely. and i think china is well at - currency? yes, absolutely. and i think china is well at the i i think china is well at the end of december having taken a hard—line stance on banning all crypto currency transactions also proposed as miller down on the marketing of these transactions. they can be useful but there is an element of the market that has grown increasingly speculative where the risk to the wider financial system may be bigger than we currently anticipate because it remains completely unregulated not to mention the way that it is taxed in the capital gains on crypto currency are taxed differently across different jurisdictions and this does call for a more co—ordinated approach globally which is what the imf has also been asking for. �* , , ., the imf has also been asking for. m the imf has also been asking for. a ., ., for. as you say that you also hear about _ for. as you say that you also hear about not _ for. as you say that you also hear about not just - for. as you say that you also | hear about notjust countries hear about not just countries and hear about notjust countries and organisations but walmart announcing plans to lower that might its own crypto currency. we have seen many different organisations talk about dipping their toes into crypto
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currency and the wider use of something very specific such as walmart remains to be seen, whether it gains currency outside its actual use case of shopping at walmart. but that will be an interesting application to other organisation and brands to follow suit with their own coins. , ., a , follow suit with their own coins. , ., , coins. the plot thickens. good to seak coins. the plot thickens. good to speak to — coins. the plot thickens. good to speak to you _ coins. the plot thickens. good to speak to you and _ coins. the plot thickens. good to speak to you and we i coins. the plot thickens. good to speak to you and we will i coins. the plot thickens. good | to speak to you and we will see you again soon. to australia now, where there's been a sharp rise in the number of aboriginal—owned businesses in recent times. however, there are still complaints that prejudice and a lack of opportunities continue to hold back many first nation entrepreneurs. phil mercer reports from sydney. culture lies at the heart of first nation businesses in australia. aboriginal history dates back up to 65,000 years. on a small island in sydney, an
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indigenous market is giving entrepreneurs a chance to hone their skills. entrepreneurs a chance to hone theirskills. but their skills. but discrimination and theirskills. but discrimination and indifference can be barriers to success. there are my perceptions across australia about aboriginal people and those perceptions also translate into the business world but we just don't want people as —— that we don't want people as —— that we do not want stuff as much as other people but that could not be further from the truth. aboriginal people are on the margins of society and have not shared in australian prosperity. they can suffer high rates of unemployment, poverty and ill—health. answers have been hard to find. but in the business sector there is a belief that commercial success can help to tackle disadvantage. can help to tackle disadvantaue. , , disadvantage. this is the signature _ disadvantage. this is the signature of _ disadvantage. this is the signature of the - disadvantage. this is the signature of the artist. . disadvantage. this is the l signature of the artist. her name is — signature of the artist. her name is liz _ signature of the artist. her name is liz moloney. i signature of the artist. her name is liz moloney. this woman
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is a proud wiradjuri woman from new south wales. she co—founded and aboriginal business collective. i and aboriginal business collective.— collective. i really see aboriginal _ collective. i really see aboriginal businesses | collective. i really see i aboriginal businesses as a pathway to an independent economic model, a legacy that we can pass on to our children. a real pathway for us to have a self—determined future. buying directly from aboriginal people is really important. the directly from aboriginal people is really important.— is really important. the signs are promising. _ is really important. the signs are promising. indigenous i are promising. indigenous entrepreneurs are flourishing in a range of set is including construction, professional services and healthcare. in the last 15 years — services and healthcare. in the last 15 years there _ services and healthcare. in the last 15 years there has - services and healthcare. in the last 15 years there has been i services and healthcare. in the last 15 years there has been an exponential growth in the number of aboriginal enterprises. there are 18,000 aboriginal run enterprises contributing something like $3.9 billion to the national economy. $3.9 billion to the national economy-— economy. any aboriginal businesses _ economy. any aboriginal businesses more - economy. any aboriginal businesses more than i economy. any aboriginal. businesses more than just economy. any aboriginal i businesses more than just the it is more _ businesses more than just the it is more than a job, more than — it is more than a job, more than a _ it is more than a job, more than a mission. we represent our community, our culture, our people —
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our community, our culture, our --eole. . , our community, our culture, our --eole. ., , ., our community, our culture, our --eole. . , ., ., people. challenges do remain. as anuer people. challenges do remain. as anger about _ people. challenges do remain. as anger about so-called i people. challenges do remain. as anger about so-called is i as anger about so—called is this blackface when nonindigenous companies exploit australia's aboriginal culture without giving anything back to first nations communities. stay with us here on bbc news. still to come. winnie the pooh day — he's been a global superstar since 1926, but for the first time ever the fictional character will no longer be subject to us copyright laws — we'll tell you why! donald trump is now the 45th president of the united states. he was sworn in before several hundred thousand people on the steps of capitol hill in washington. it's going to be only america first. america first.
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demonstrators waiting for mike gatting and his rebel cricket team were attacked with tear gas and set upon by police dogs. anti—apartheid campaigners say they would carry on the protests throughout the tour. they called him the 'butcher of lyon'. klaus altmann is being held on a fraud charge in bolivia. the west germans want to extradite him for crimes committed in wartime france. there, he was the gestapo chief klaus barbie. millions came to bathe as i close as possible to this spot. a tide of humanity that's i believed by officials to have broken all records. this is bbc news. the latest headlines: downing street has denied claims by borisjohnson's former top adviser that he was warned about staff holding a drinks party during lockdown.
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australia and new zealand's military send aid to tonga following the volcanic eruption and tsunami. now lets focus on the jobs market, where many are pushing for higher wages and better work life balance and many are seeing the opportunity to be on the move. in a few hours we will have the latest unemployment numbers for the uk. the jobless rate is expected to fall to 4.1 percent in the three monts to the end of november — that's the lowest rate 15 months. new research from linkedin suggests more than two thirds of workers are considering changing jobs this year. joining me now is janine chamberlin, who's the uk country manager at linkedin.
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what is this year going to look like in the uk? i what is this year going to look like in the uk?— like in the uk? i think it would be _ like in the uk? i think it would be an _ like in the uk? i think it would be an exciting i like in the uk? i think it| would be an exciting year like in the uk? i think it - would be an exciting year for jobseekers. confidence is soaring in the uk, despite the fact the pandemic has changed the way we work. nine out of ten people feeling confident and there current role, which might be contributing to the sense of looking for new opportunities. more than two—thirds of people in the uk are expecting or wanting to change, one in five looking for a new role right now.- change, one in five looking for a new role right now. where are the skills? _ a new role right now. where are the skills? we _ a new role right now. where are the skills? we are _ a new role right now. where are the skills? we are hearing i a new role right now. where are the skills? we are hearing a i the skills? we are hearing a lot from employers they cannot find the people they desperately need. find the people they deseratel need. . ., �* desperately need. what we're seeinu at desperately need. what we're seeing at the _ desperately need. what we're seeing at the same _ desperately need. what we're seeing at the same time i desperately need. what we're seeing at the same time as i seeing at the same time as feeling confident, employers desperately looking for skills. we have done some research as well to understand where the fastest growing jobs in the uk market and it is an interesting
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trend, very much influenced by things like the pandemic, brexit. roles like customs officers, machine learning engineers and a lot ofjobs out there for people right now. customs officer is right at the top in terms of fastest growing roles. sustainability manager is pretty high up as well which is pretty high up as well which is interesting. data engineering... so many technology led ross. presumably people who are skilled in those areas, can they ask for anything? higherwages, anything? higher wages, flexible conditions? anything? higherwages, flexible conditions? share anything? higher wages, flexible conditions? are they enter the _ flexible conditions? are they enter the driving _ flexible conditions? are they enter the driving said? i flexible conditions? are they enter the driving said? the l enter the driving said? the power really is in the hands of jobseekers right now with the demand for skills being so high people can indeed push for higher wages and certainly are
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looking for more flexibility is one of the key factors from looking for a new opportunity as well stop also when it comes to otherjobs, working in sainsbury, supermarkets. wages are auoin sainsbury, supermarkets. wages are going up. _ sainsbury, supermarkets. wages are going up. will _ sainsbury, supermarkets. wages are going up, will this— sainsbury, supermarkets. wages are going up, will this have i are going up, will this have pressure in the months ahead? there's a number of these contributing. the demand for talent and skills is high, we are also battling with people sometimes unfortunately being too sick to work. the power is in the hands ofjobseekers to push for more incentives right now. ., , ., ., push for more incentives right now. ., ., ., , now. for someone who is looking to stand out _ now. for someone who is looking to stand out - — now. for someone who is looking to stand out - i _ now. for someone who is looking to stand out - i know _ now. for someone who is looking to stand out - i know for - now. for someone who is looking to stand out - i know for many i to stand out — i know for many they might use linkedin as a tool. what is your top tip? there's a series of life events, free to attend for anyone and it is about getting expert advise from leading
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industry and career experts about how you go about making a change in your career and obviously tap into your network, get people to help you find the job of your dreams. than find the job of your dreams. an exciting year ahead, according to you. thank you for being on the programme.— think tanks have been warning since last year that the uk is headed towards a "catastrophic" digital skills shortage because not enough people are learning to code. getting women into coding also continues to be a challenge. here's the bbc�*s mary—ann russon with more.
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the mind boggles, doesn't it. i am sure you are all familiar with this character, winnie the pooh. today is winnie the pooh day, a celebration of the fictional character, created by author aa milne in 1926. since then, the yellow bear has become a global superstar raking in over $80 billion for copyright owners disney. but that's all about to change! according to us copyright law, anyone will be able to republish or adapt any work published on or before 1926 without needing to pay the author's estate or even seek their permission.
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joining me now is tim westcott, senior principal analyst at 0mdia. good morning. good morning. could we start _ good morning. good morning. could we start a _ good morning. good morning. could we start a business i good morning. good morning. | could we start a business today printing t—shirts of winnie the pooh and nobody would come after us? , , ., pooh and nobody would come after us? , i. pooh and nobody would come afterus? , ~~ after us? yes, you can, the aa milne and _ after us? yes, you can, the aa milne and theian _ after us? yes, you can, the aa milne and theian shepherd i milne and theian shepherd drawings are out of copyright so you can go into that world and create your stories and characters. however, if disney has been producing its own content since the 60s, films, videos, books, drawings, illustrations and if you produce something which resembles their copyrights, they still have the copyright to those designed so if lawyers feel what you are producing is too close to what they have created and still own, they
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will keep after you.- created and still own, they will keep after you. when it comes to — will keep after you. when it comes to the _ will keep after you. when it comes to the actual- will keep after you. when it | comes to the actual movies, animation, that is protected by disney so you have to be very careful as to how you navigate this if you want to start some sort of winnie the pooh business?— sort of winnie the pooh business? . �* , ., business? that's right and reall , business? that's right and really, because _ business? that's right and really, because the i business? that's right and really, because the m i business? that's right and i really, because the aa milne and illustrations, wonderful as they are, well done in the 19205, they are, well done in the 1920s, most people are familiar with aa milne and its characters through disney's illustrations, for example the red shirt on winnie the pooh. if you're creating based on winnie the pooh, it will be quite a stretch to produce something which is not identifiable with winnie the pooh as disney and its wonderful animators and artists have created over the years so people will really have to completely reimagine it and maybe go back to the original
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drawings. maybe go back to the original drawinus. ~ _, , ., drawings. when it comes to other elements, _ drawings. when it comes to other elements, for - drawings. when it comes to l other elements, for example, you could have possibly winnie the pooh bear and ft, or digital tokens, that is something that is fair game because it is something that is not been done before? —— nft. there are already some nft, some quite horrifying. no—one is quite sure how big or small nft's are going to be winnie the pooh as a property, which disney has made billions of dollars out of, it takes a long time to build that so creating very few properties as successful as winnie the pooh mickey mouse and harry potter and it takes a great deal of time to actually build those franchises so get wrench slowly
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is more the maximum. —— get rich slowly. is more the maximum. -- get rich slowly-— rich slowly. could this die loot it all— rich slowly. could this die loot it all and _ rich slowly. could this die loot it all and spoil- rich slowly. could this die loot it all and spoil it i loot it all and spoil it somehow? it loot it all and spoil it somehow?— loot it all and spoil it somehow? , , . ., somehow? it is difficult to sa . as somehow? it is difficult to say- as a _ somehow? it is difficult to say. as a property, i somehow? it is difficult to say. as a property, since l somehow? it is difficult to i say. as a property, since this is the first fully acquired the rights and it did take them quite a long time and litigation to get that, it has devoted quite a lot of attention into building and exploiting the franchise so it is not an easy business, creating content like this. absolutely not. thank you for your thoughts on that. and that brings to a close the programme. do tell me what you think about anything with covid but in particular winnie the
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pooh day. have a lovely day and there is more detail on the stories we have covered on our website so take a look if you have time. i will see you soon. hello. clear skies across most parts of the uk at the moment. may mean we're getting to see a full glimpse of the first full moon of the season, the wolf moon, but it also has led to temperatures dropping quite widely. a widely frosty start to tuesday morning, maybe as low as —3 to —5 in some parts of central, southern england, and it's here where we've got some dense patches of fog to start the tuesday morning commute. some of that could start to build for a while during the morning rush—hour but then slowly start to shift during the morning. lots of sunshine elsewhere. a bit more breeze to the north and west, so not as cold here, but it's here in northern ireland and western scotland we'll see some outbreaks of rain develop from lunchtime into the afternoon. most parts, though, will stay dry. cloud amounts increase. predominantly sunny, though, for northern england. and with winds lightest towards the south and east of the country, here, we'll see temperatures actually the lowest after that
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foggy start — only three to five celsius for one or two. the milder breeze out in the west lifts temperatures between 9 and 11 celsius. into this evening, some showers for a time in scotland and then another batch will push in on strengthening winds, all tied into this cold front. this is a bit more active than the one that precedes it, just bringing a few showers across england and wales during the night, meaning not as cold a start to wednesday morning. but cold air will be pushing southwards through the day behind this zone of cloud and showers which starts around the borders of scotland, northern england, north wales and then drifts its way southwards. in its wake, though, most will see good long sunny spells through the afternoon. one or two showers dotted around to the north and northwest, those showers turning wintry in northern scotland — just 2 degrees in lerwick, holding onto around 10 celsius in the south. but as we go through into wednesday night and thursday morning, a widespread frost will develop once again. perhaps for some of you, a colder night than will start tuesday. and that frost will be greeted with some sunshine
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overhead too. but a cold breeze down eastern coasts could feed in one or two wintry showers for a time. a noticeable wind—chill here. maybe feeling subzero through the day across some eastern coastal counties of england. come further west, with the winds lighter, temperatures up to where we should be for this stage in january. another chilly night to come, then, through thursday night into friday, and as the high—pressure starts to drift its way southwards once again, we are back to the problems with mist and fog in the south, but allowing more of an atlantic breeze to push in through the north, bringing varying amounts of cloud and lifting the temperature a little bit. and, crucially, for much of the uk, end of the week and the weekend will be staying dry. see you soon.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with sally nugent and dan walker. our headlines today. boris johnson's former adviser dominic cummings says the prime minister was warned about a downing street bring your own booze party at the height of lockdown. the first images of tonga after the tsunami, with homes covered in volcanic ash, as aid agencies warn of an urgent need for fresh water. magistrates in england and wales will be given powers to jail criminals for up to a year, under plans to tackle the backlog of cases in crown courts. navigating the pensions minefield — should people be automatically given financial advice when they near retirement?
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that's the main suggestion from a new report.

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