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tv   BBC News  BBC News  January 10, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm GMT

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this is bbc news. the government tells house—builders it expect them to pay the £4 billion bill to remove dangerous cladding from low—rise buildings in england. to those who miss old dangerous products like cladding or insulation, to those who cut corners to save cash as they developed or refurbished people's homes, and to those who sought to profiteer from the consequences of the grenfell tragedy, we are coming for you. after novak djokovic wins his fight to stay in australia, his family thank all of those who supported him. i thank all of those who supported him. ., ., ., ~ thank all of those who supported him. . ., . ~' i” him. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood _ him. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood up _ him. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood up and _ him. i want to thank everyone in the world who stood up and supported l world who stood up and supported him, _ world who stood up and supported him. that— world who stood up and supported him, that is the energy that helped him, that is the energy that helped him to— him, that is the energy that helped him to fight. him, that is the energy that helped him to fight-— him to fight. another twist in the downin: him to fight. another twist in the downing street _ him to fight. another twist in the downing street party _ him to fight. another twist in the
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downing street party is - him to fight. another twist in the downing street party is a - downing street party is a controversy, the e—mail from a pm's private secretary inviting people to drinks in the private garden while the uk was facing strict limits on social gatherings. the largest fossilised skeleton of its kind ever found in the uk, a sea dragon, 250 million years old. and to mark the queen's platinumjubilee, it is parade, parties and puddings. there is a competition to design a brand—new pudding for the occasion and a royal chef tells us where to start. ., . ,, and a royal chef tells us where to start. ., ., ,, ., start. you have the queen on the throne for — start. you have the queen on the throne for 70 _ start. you have the queen on the throne for 70 years _ start. you have the queen on the throne for 70 years now, - start. you have the queen on the throne for 70 years now, and - start. you have the queen on the throne for 70 years now, and we | start. you have the queen on the - throne for 70 years now, and we know the queen loves chocolate. for me, i would have some chocolate in there. her favourite mint is a would have some chocolate in there. herfavourite mint is a mint fondant, maybe that is the route to go.
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good evening and welcome to bbc news. the housing secretary, michael gove, says he wants developers to pay up to £4 billion to fix dangerous cladding on medium height blocks of flats identified in the wake of the grenfell fire. mr gove says if they fail to co—operate, they could be taxed. until now, the government had committed money to repair only taller buildings. the new proposals do not address other fire safety defects though, such as missing firebreaks and flammable balconies. our business correspondent, sarah corker, has more. removing dangerous cladding — the grenfell tragedy exposed the scale of building safety failures across britain. the government says it will pressure the construction sector to pay and protect innocent leaseholders. the housing secretary had strong words for property developers today — pay up or we will force you to. to those who mis—sold dangerous products, like cladding or insulation, to those who cut corners to save cash as they developed or refurbished people's homes,
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and to those who sought to profiteer from the consequences of the grenfell tragedy — we are coming for you. but labour says these measures focus on cladding and don't address the wider safety faults exposed since grenfell. mr speaker, you cannot make a building half safe. given that he recognises the injustice of all leaseholders caught up in the building safety crisis, why is he abandoning those who are hit with bills for non—cladding defects? people living in blocks under 18 metres will no longer have to pay to remove dangerous cladding. until now, only blocks above that height were eligible for funding. developers will be expected to pay for the £4 billion scheme or face legal or tax changes. there's also more money for fire alarms, a review of the scale of work actually needed, and leaseholders will have up to 30 years to sue builders for defects — at the moment, it's six years. these measures bring some relief for father of four, neil.
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he now won't have to foot the bill for cladding on this low—rise block in south london, but he fears he will still have to pay for other faults. it seems like a step in the right direction, but at the same time, the cladding section on our bill is only a third of the bill. so there's still two thirds of other things that may need paying for. but that's still, you know, tens of thousands of pounds, it's still going to bankrupt people in our block. there will be no new money in the treasury for this and it is unclear how they will pay. often argue they met building regulations at the time, so they shouldn't have to pay to cover these costs. the largest home—builders have already allocated some funds for high—rise blocks. whatever proposals come forward have to be fair, have to be proportionate, and that means looking notjust at the home—builders, but beyond the home—builders, other parties who have been
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involved in the process, in particular the suppliers of the materials, which turned out not to be fit for purpose as far as we can understand. the government has given construction firms a deadline of march to come up with a plan of action. but for thousands of people, the financial situation is already critical. sarah corker, bbc news. yvette williams, who's a co—ordinator forjustice4grenfell, says she thought the housing reform package offered by michael gove was an improvement on suggestions the government made before but still didn't go far enough. it does sound different, and he has made a lot of recommendations. he has been very persuasive. but i still think it falls short of a real enforcement. we are still having to wait. and rememberjustice delayed isjustice denied. i don't think he isjustice denied. i don't think he is coming down on it as heavy as he
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should be, on the building firms. and we have to understand that it was their focus on money that made grenfell happen in the first place. he also made mention today that, with the top building companies, the top seven, over the last three years, they have made a profit of £16 billion. so in no form of monetary incentivise asian for them is going to work. people need to know —— no monetary incentives. people need to know what is going to happen, that is not clear today. i am not sure that every home affected is covered. more importantly, people living in those homesjust is covered. more importantly, people living in those homes just need to know when it is going to happen. yvette williams from the campaign group justice4grenfell. yvette williams from the campaign groupjustice4grenfell. then group justice4grenfell. then tomorrow's groupjustice4grenfell. then
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tomorrow's papers. tennis world number one novak djokovic has been back on the tennis court today after a dramatic courtjudgment in australia meant he was free to leave the hotel where he had been detained since last week. he says he still wants to compete at the australian open, despite the political row over whether he should have been allowed into australia. djokovic has confirmed he is unvaccinated against covid but had a medical exemption to enter the country. at seven this morning, a judge in melbourne ruled that djokovic had not been given enough time to respond to the cancellation of his visa — and gave border officials 30 minutes to release him. the australian government then had four hours in which it could have overridden that decision and revoked the player's visa again. but it chose not to. is this now the end of the saga? not necessarily. shaimaa khalil reports from melbourne. within hours of today's judgment, novak djokovic posted this picture on twitter,
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saying he was pleased and grateful that thejudge had overturned the visa cancellation. and despite all that has happened, he wants to say and try to compete at the australian open. cheering and this is the moment his supporters found out about his victory. he won, djokovic won! what we saw today here in the court that the australian legal system is functioning, it is evidence—based, it is about justice. yeah, i'm extremely happy. as is anyone, everyone - in the serbian community here. djokovic�*s family welcomed the news, but remained cautious about what would happen with his visa. i'm very worried, but i don't want to think like that. ijust hope it will stay like this, that he will be free and he will play. it's been a battle for all of us, it's notjust about novak, obviously, we have been
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defending him in every possible way we could, because we know he is a truthful and rightful guy. novak djokovic announced onjanuary 4th that he was going to australia after being granted a medical exemption — a move that angered many australians who have endured strict covid—19 rules. on january 5th, he arrived in melbourne but was held by border force officers. is visa was revoked, and he was taken to an immigration detention hotel, where he remained until today. his lawyers argued that his visa cancellation was unreasonable, and a judge agreed, allowing him to stay in the country. while many in the tennis community believe djokovic was unfairly treated, some argue that meeting any country's vaccination rules will pose problems for him beyond australia. he will have to face several times those problems, so i think bottom line —
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he will have to get the vaccine. but for this time, for australia, he got the visa, and he flew in with all the best intentions and having done all the work he should have done beforehand. the jubilant mood turned into chaos and confusion when it became unclear whether djokovic would be allowed to stay, despite the court's decision in his favour. at one point, djokovic�*s fans thought they caught a glimpse of him, but they clashed with the police and were dispersed with tear gas. today's events have moved and changed at a dizzying speed. it is still unclear whether the government will seek to deport novak djokovic. but after his release, the tennis star said he's focused on competing here in the australian open. it's only a few days before the tournament djokovic has dominated is due to start, but his win in court today doesn't seem to have guaranteed him a chance to defend his title. shaimaa khalil, bbc news. former top tennis player pam shriver says the issue
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isn't yet resolved. so many questions that even though we know one big thing that happened, the court overturned the deportation, there are so many more. what will the minister do? your question about the athlete's mine, novak djokovic is known not only as being the greatest tennis player, but also mentally so strong. but this is his biggest test ever. if he is allowed to compete, five days have been taken away from his training. he will have the most negative crowd that he has ever played before. and he has been booed many times, not only in melbourne that the us open when he was going to the calendar year grand slam. this is a very polarising athlete, even before this whole controversy came up. i do think the question surrounding his covid test, positive test of december the 16th and then his actions publicly in the days that followed, just something is not
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measuring up. it really kind of smells a bit stale. he is such an amazing athlete, both physically and mentally, and he will be even more determined, if he is allowed to play, to try and win his tenth straight open. take the controversies aside, this is not only the greatest player currently, but the best player in the history of the australian open on the main�*s site. and he loves the surface, he likes the overall conditions, but the conditions this year, given the storm around how he gained entry to the tournament, unvaccinated, supposedly with a positive test on december 16. supposedly with a positive test on december16. i believe supposedly with a positive test on december 16. i believe it was confirmed by one serbian doctor. and i want to bring up another thing, because of novak djokovic, there was a female player, a doubles player who about ten days after she got into the country had been removed by
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border control and deported. now what happens to her? anyway, novak is in a one in the world and to get the best legal team together in a short period of time that he was able to overturn that decision. but there are still a lot of questions. let's get more on this with sports journalist and tennis correspondent george bellshaw. george, how sure are you that this is the end of the matter? that it willjust beat novak djokovic playing in the australian open with nothing more to say? we playing in the australian open with nothing more to say?— nothing more to say? i've given up t in: to nothing more to say? i've given up trying to predict — nothing more to say? i've given up trying to predict anything - nothing more to say? i've given up trying to predict anything in - nothing more to say? i've given up trying to predict anything in this i trying to predict anything in this saga,it trying to predict anything in this saga, it seems to change hourly, never mind daily. if i was a betting man and had to guess, i would suspect he will end up playing in the tournament. i imagine he will get a fairly hostile response, reception from some quarters. and at some vociferous support from others. there is a heavy serbian face in
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melbourne, melbourne has been locked down city and people will not be pleased. there will be more twists and turns, i imagine.— and turns, i imagine. what has it done to his _ and turns, i imagine. what has it done to his reputation? - and turns, i imagine. what has it done to his reputation? it - and turns, i imagine. what has it done to his reputation? it is - done to his reputation? it is certainly — done to his reputation? it is certainly not _ done to his reputation? it is certainly not looking - done to his reputation? it 3 certainly not looking great and the mint, i think that is probably the biggest thing that is left to answer. that positive test on the 16th and the actions in the days after, the pictures of him having children and then a further interview on the 18th, an interview with a french sport newspaper. where he was maskless. there are questions about his engagement with the community that he has to answer. on the one hand he has a supportive fan base, but i think a lot of people, given the coverage it has had, they will probably be very disturbed by that and feel he is not following the same rules as everyone else. it will be interesting to see what he comes up with in terms of the next thing on that front. he
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comes up with in terms of the next thing on that front.— thing on that front. he is used to coin: thing on that front. he is used to «wing with _ thing on that front. he is used to coping with pressure, _ thing on that front. he is used to coping with pressure, but - thing on that front. he is used to coping with pressure, but what l thing on that front. he is used to - coping with pressure, but what might this have done to his game? the impact on him, he was not able to practice as he would have hoped. as you mention, there could be hostility towards him. physically, there will be _ hostility towards him. physically, there will be a _ hostility towards him. physically, there will be a little _ hostility towards him. physically, there will be a little bit _ hostility towards him. physically, there will be a little bit of- hostility towards him. physically, there will be a little bit of work. there will be a little bit of work to do. he has been trapped in a hotel room, we don't know exactly what sort of size that was and what he could do in there. in terms of his tennis, he has not played for five days. i'm sure he will get up to speed with that pretty quickly, he is a pretty good tennis player. i'm sure that would be too much of a problem. as you say, there will be an interesting outer sphere, that he is very used are thriving in adversity. he has never been the most popular player on tour, especially with roger federer and rafael nadal. ifeel like he's especially with roger federer and rafael nadal. i feel like he's going to be very to prove people wrong, as he has been his whole life and why he has been his whole life and why he has been such a good champion. it he has been such a good champion. it has been fascinating, but if this is
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just one tournament. covid is not going anywhere, and there are other tournament that they have to navigate. looking down the track, other event organisers are going to have to get their thinking caps on, aren't they? to have to get their thinking caps on, aren't they?— aren't they? to be fair, it will be down to the _ aren't they? to be fair, it will be down to the governments - aren't they? to be fair, it will be down to the governments of - aren't they? to be fair, it will be i down to the governments of those tournaments are in. tennis is such a global sport, and going from one country one week to another at the next. it requires a lot of documentation. if you are not vaccinated, a lot of preplanning. some countries will let you into these tournaments, but they are insisting on quarantine measures or different access levels, if you like, around that. it will be a big problem for him further down the line, notjust in australia. but he seems very single—minded about not getting vaccinated, we will have to see if that changes.— getting vaccinated, we will have to see if that changes. good to talk to ou, see if that changes. good to talk to you. thank — see if that changes. good to talk to you. thank you _ see if that changes. good to talk to you. thank you very _ see if that changes. good to talk to you, thank you very much. - sport and for a full round—up,
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from the bbc sport centre. good evening. manchester united, who've won the fa cup 12 times, are up against aston villa in their third round tie at old trafford with the winner to host middlesbrough. the home side took an early lead in the eighth minute with fred's bought into the box and seeing tom and tom and i get to the end of it to head past emiliano martinez. these are live pictures now on bbc one, there are about 22 minutes played. philip coutinho who signed from barcelona on loan from aston villa for the remainder of the season is going to be eligible to play in the premier league game against the same opponents on saturday. new figures from the premier league show the number of positive covid—i9 tests among players and staff have fallen for the second successive week. in the seven days up to and including the 9th of january, there were 72 new positive cases out
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of almost 13,000 tests. 94 new cases were recorded in the previous seven days. covid is still impacting on the league though — everton's premier league home match with leicester city on tuesday has been postponed because the foxes don't have enough players to fulfil the fixture. heartbreakfor zimbabwe in their opening africa cup of nations match — they were beaten by one of the tournament favourites, senegal, deep into stoppage time. senegal were awarded a late penalty after kelvin madzongwe handled the ball in the box, causing pandemonium. sadio mane, so accustomed to scoring in the premier league for liverpool, converted from the spot. zimbabwe, over 100 places below their opponents in the rankings, are hoping to avoid a third straight exit at the group stage. elsewhere in that group, guinea opened their campaign with a 1—0 win over malawi. the only goal coming in the first half from full back issiaga sylla. only his third goal for his country. meanwhile in group c,
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morocco left it late to beat the four—time winners ghana. former southampton winger sofiane boufal�*s strike in the 83rd minute sealing the win. one game taking place right now. and it's a big day for the comoros, their first time in the competition, they're up against gabon. the archipielago is one of football's youngest nations — they onlyjoined fifa in 2005. it's into the second half there, and they trail i—o. novak djokovic has thanked his fans for keeping him strong, after he won his appeal against a decision refusing him entry to australia. he tweeted he's looking forward to defending his australian open tennis title. but a former wimbledon champion feels if djokovic does compete, the going might be tough. marion bartoli said events over the last few days could be mentally draining for him. there's still the possibility for another twist — the australian immigration minister has to decide whether to cancel the visa for a second time.
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djokovic is on for a record 10th title in melbourne, and a landmark 21st grand slam overall. i think he can work his way through that first week and build his momentum towards the second week. it is more how mentally and psychologically he will be affected by all of this and the headlines. he is really the best when he is under pressure and into the circumstances, but it is more about how the crowd will react. if he has the whole stadium against him doing or whatever, how much will that affect him? it is really hard to tell in advance. last year's runner up, john higgins, is through to the quarter finals of snooker�*s masters tournament. the four—time world champion beat zhao xintong of china by six frames to two at alexandra palace. next up, he'll play mark williams, who knocked out the defending champion yan bingtao yesterday. the late game is well under way — 2015 champion shaun murphy currently
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against barry hawkins. just an update on manchester united against aston villa, it is 1—0 to manchester united after an eight minute goal by scott mctominay. that is live on bbc one. we don't want anyone to leave us, but thank you anyway. i cut him off in his prime. several people have confirmed to the bbc that they received an emailfrom the prime minister's private secretary, inviting them to drinks in the downing street garden in may 2020 — while the country was still under restrictions on social gatherings. it explicitly asked them to a social event, "with distancing in place". more than 100 guests were reportedly invited by email, to "bring your own booze" and "enjoy the lovely weather". let's get more from our political correspondent helen catt. tell us more about this latest twist in this never—ending story. this tell us more about this latest twist in this never-ending story.- in this never-ending story. this is an event that _ in this never-ending story. this is an event that we _ in this never-ending story. this is an event that we heard _ in this never-ending story. this is an event that we heard about - in this never-ending story. this is an event that we heard about for| an event that we heard about for the first time last week when the former number ten aide dominic cummings said ina
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number ten aide dominic cummings said in a book that there had been some socially distanced drinks held in the downing street garden on the the 20th of may 2020 when the rules for the rest of england where that you could only mean one other person outside. what has happened today is that he has said there was an e—mail invite that was sent out, today that e—mail has emerged. itv news had it earlier. several sources have confirmed to the bbc the contents of that e—mail, which as you said, was inviting people to enjoy the lovely sunshine. after what has been an incredibly busy period, to "bring your own booze." witnesses have said they saw the prime minister and his wife at the event in the garden too. earlier, borisjohnson was asked about whether he attended, and he said that it was pointed to an ongoing investigation into a number of gatherings by the senior civil servant who grace. it has also emerged that there was concern at the time about this event which apparently there was a long table
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set up in the garden, there were drinks and snacks laid out and that some staff from downing street has message one another at the time saying, asking why this would be encouraged or organised. another sending a message that simply said is this real? ., , sending a message that simply said is this real?— is this real? how wide is hsu areat's is this real? how wide is hsu great's investigation? - is this real? how wide is hsu great's investigation? doesl is this real? how wide is hsu| great's investigation? does it include this particular gathering? the prime minister's official spokesman said it would now be included in a number of different gatherings that sue gray is looking at. we understand this one will be too. labourthis at. we understand this one will be too. labour this evening reacting to this, angela rayner the deputy leader in the last few minutes has been speaking. earlier labour said while borisjohnson was ignoring the rules that he had made for other people, they said borisjohnson said he has no regard for the rules he put in place for the rest of us. he was trying to get officials to take the fall for his own mistakes but he sets the tone for the way downing street and the rest of government
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operates. quite a backlash this evening. it operates. quite a backlash this evenina. ., operates. quite a backlash this evenina. . , ., operates. quite a backlash this evenin.. . , ., ., evening. it all feeds into the idea that a lot of _ evening. it all feeds into the idea that a lot of critics _ evening. it all feeds into the idea that a lot of critics have - evening. it all feeds into the idea that a lot of critics have said - evening. it all feeds into the idea that a lot of critics have said it i that a lot of critics have said it is one rule for the government and another one for the rest of us. at the time when such gatherings were against the law. the the time when such gatherings were against the lava— against the law. the rules in england. — against the law. the rules in england, there _ against the law. the rules in england, there have - against the law. the rules in england, there have been i against the law. the rules in england, there have been a| against the law. the rules in i england, there have been a press conference that day in downing street setting out the latest position for england. as we said at that time, there were severe restrictions on who you can meet and where. it was the case that you were only allowed to meet one other person outdoors. so that was the situation in england.— person outdoors. so that was the situation in england. helen, for the moment, thank— situation in england. helen, for the moment, thank you _ situation in england. helen, for the moment, thank you very _ situation in england. helen, for the moment, thank you very much. i situation in england. helen, for the i moment, thank you very much. helen catt in westminster. let's get more reaction to the news that builders will have to pay to remove unsafe cladding from buildings. michael gove told builders that innocent leaseholders must not showed an unfair burden. he said he could use legal means to make them pick up the bill. let's
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speak to barry gardiner the labour mp who has campaigned for reform to the housing industry since the rental disaster in 2017. thank you for waiting so patiently —— the grenfell disaster. how adequate is what mr gove has announced today? words are cheap, the government has had 3.5 years to act. in the meantime, my constituents and over1 million leaseholders in this country have had their lives put on hold. people have become desperate. some people have felt suicidal, they have been trapped in homes that are now valueless, they cannot sell or move or go on with their lives. they can't have children because there is not enough space or they cannot get divorced because they cannot separate. this is an absolute scandal. and today, i would like to feel it is with good intention and
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that it feel it is with good intention and thatitis feel it is with good intention and that it is going to achieve the result that we said needed to happen three years ago. we said that there should be a windfall tax on the industry, that the government should then pay to remediate these unsafe buildings and claim it back in a windfall tax on the industry as a whole. that is not what michael gove is proposing today. he seems to be reserving it in his back pocket. but in the first instance, he is a saying that leaseholders should try and take the developer to court. in fact, many of the developers have already gone into liquidation. of course, it is extreme the costly leaseholders to take on the developers. leaseholders to take on the developers-— developers. why, though, should buildin: developers. why, though, should building companies _ developers. why, though, should building companies that - developers. why, though, should building companies that acted i developers. why, though, should building companies that acted in l building companies that acted in good faith, in line with the law, the building regulations said at the time they could use these materials in this way, why should they be left to pick up this enormous tab? you see, it is to pick up this enormous tab? you
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see. it is not _ to pick up this enormous tab? you see, it is not only _ to pick up this enormous tab? 7m. see, it is not only about the building materials and cladding, what was done was that they were desk evaluations which amalgamated certain regulations. it is not clear that they were unaware that this cladding was inadequate. but it is about much more than cladding. it's about much more than cladding. it's about the fire stopping in these buildings, it is about the unsafe balconies that are flammable, it is about the flammable insulation that is in the buildings. there are a whole series of fire stopping defects in so many blocks of flats. again, that was one of the gaps that michael gove was talking about today. of course, the people who are legally responsible for any building and its safety are the developers. the developers subcontract to not only construction companies but also to building regulations surveyors who come and they then approve it. so there are all sorts of legal
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battles that will go on between developers and their contractors for failing to actually put in the correct provisions to make sure the buildings are safe. unfortunately, michael gove appears to be leaving it to the leaseholders now to proceed against the developers, who themselves may be locked in a legal battle to try and recover these costs. that is not fair. in the meantime, leaseholders have been paying for the costs. some blocks are paying £28,000 per month for a waking watch. these are costs that are already racking up. people are going into bankruptcy because they cannot cope. you don'tjust sit back and say it is over to you now, we will try and give you a helping hand to take the culprits to task. the
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government really does need to now act, and that means to say" it will do the remediation, make sure that happens and proceed against the industry as a whole to recover the cost." because this has been an endemic problem throughout the whole of the industry, it is notjust a few bad apples. but of the industry, it is not 'ust a few bad apples.i of the industry, it is not 'ust a few bad apples. but how is it then fair for those _ few bad apples. but how is it then fair for those who _ few bad apples. but how is it then fair for those who have _ few bad apples. but how is it then fair for those who have remained l few bad apples. but how is it then. fair for those who have remained in fairfor those who have remained in business, unlike those you mention who have gone into liquidation either because they couldn't survive or they were concerned about what was coming down the track, those who are trying to meet their responsibilities, those who have already tried to make amends in some way, why should they shoulder so much more of the burden? it is much more of the burden? it is absolutely _ much more of the burden? it is absolutely right _ much more of the burden? it 3 absolutely right that those businesses who are doing the honourable thing, and there are some that are doing the honourable thing and trying to remediate the buildings that they were responsible for developing, they are doing the right thing and they should not have
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to pay additionally for that. of course, it is the industry as a whole but has failed here. it is not just a failure of developers, not just a failure of developers, not just a failure of developers, not just a failure of construction companies, it goes to the whole regulatory cycle. this goes right around so that the developer claims the contractor, the contractor blames the subcontractor, the subcontractor blames the regulatory inspector building works. and each one has been passing the buck. what is absolutely wrong is that individual leaseholders who bought a property in good faith, who were told that it had an hpc back—up and guarantees, who were told that all building regulations have been followed, it is absolutely wrong that they are now facing bankruptcy and for 3.5 years have had their lives on hold. the government has wasted too much time already, it
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must now act. wasted too much time already, it must now act-— wasted too much time already, it must now act. �* ., , ., ., must now act. before we let you go, i will must now act. before we let you go, i will spring — must now act. before we let you go, i will spring on _ must now act. before we let you go, i will spring on you _ must now act. before we let you go, i will spring on you a _ must now act. before we let you go, i will spring on you a question i i will spring on you a question about this more than 100 people apparently being invited to a bring your own booze event we are being told, in may 2020. it is probably likely to be part of the investigation that music: hot hot hot by arrow. is undertaking. what more would you like to know about —— undertaking. what more would you like to know about —- what undertaking. what more would you like to know about --_ like to know about -- what more would you _ like to know about -- what more would you like _ like to know about -- what more would you like to _ like to know about -- what more would you like to know— like to know about -- what more would you like to know about i like to know about -- what more i would you like to know about what happened? i would you like to know about what ha--ened? .�* would you like to know about what ha ened? ., �* ~' happened? i don't think we need to know more- — happened? i don't think we need to know more. the _ happened? i don't think we need to know more. the government i happened? i don't think we need to know more. the government and l know more. the government and particularly number ten and the prime minister have treated the public with contempt. they have espoused these rules, they have told us in nightly broadcasts how we all must behave, and they have then deliberately and quite clearly gone against it themselves. ijust hope
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that people realise that this is distracting our country from the real issues that we are facing. issues around the cost of living, issues around the virus, issues like leaseholders. these are the things that the government should be getting on with, and it can't because of its own contempt for the public in the way it has behaved. it is now mired in these investigations which are going on and on and on. i think the honourable thing would be for people to resign, they are likely not going to do that, and i think we all must pay the price at the moment. think we all must pay the price at the moment-— the moment. barry gardiner mp, thank ou ve the moment. barry gardiner mp, thank you very much- — hello there. it has been a cloudy start of the week for all of us. but the weather will change overnight because clearer skies will follow the cloud across scotland and northern ireland. the main cloud, rain and drizzle sinking down into england and wales, some low cloud, misty weather. mild night for england and wales — much milder than last night for eastern england, no frost here. clearer skies, though,
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for scotland and northern ireland means temperatures will be low enough for a pinch of frost here and there, and some sunshine to start the day on tuesday. that cloud and damp weather across england and wales moves southwards, coming to rest across east anglia and southern england. some late improvements in the day across south wales and the midlands, but more sunshine further north and a few blustery showers blowing into the northwest of scotland. the highest temperatures will actually be in that cloudy, damp weather across southern parts of england. that will clear away, though, overnight. through the rest of the week, northern areas will see the highest temperatures with a stronger atlantic wind. lighter winds further south mean it'll be colder with increasing amounts of mist, fog, and low cloud. hello this is bbc news. the headlines. government tells house builders it expects them to pay them for billion pounds bill to remove dangerous
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clotting from low—rise buildings in england. novak shot of x wins his right to stay in australia, his family say justice right to stay in australia, his family sayjustice has prevailed and thank all that have supported him. another twist in the downing string party controversy. the e—mail from the pms private secretary inviting people to drinks and the number ten garden while the uk was facing strict limits on social gatherings. the largest fossilised skeleton of its kind ever found the largest fossilised skeleton of its kind everfound in the uk, i see dragon 250 million years old. and to mark the queens platinum jubilee, its parades, parting and puddings look up to be a competition to design a brand—new dessert for the occasion. several people wreak conferred to the bbc that they received an e—mail from prime minister secretary inviting them to drinks in may 2020 when the country was still under restrictions on the social
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gatherings. labours deputy as we given her reaction. i gatherings. labours deputy as we given her reaction.— given her reaction. i think sucre will have that _ given her reaction. i think sucre will have that information i given her reaction. i think sucre will have that information as i given her reaction. i think sucre l will have that information as part of our investigation, i think she should hand over all that information to the police. if the laws been broken and borisjohnson is not above the law and they should investigate and deal with it properly. investigate and deal with it --roerl . ~ ., investigate and deal with it --roerl .~ . investigate and deal with it properly-— investigate and deal with it --roerl .~ . , investigate and deal with it --roerl. . , ~ properly. what your next steps? are ou filinu properly. what your next steps? are you filing for — properly. what your next steps? are you filing for the _ properly. what your next steps? are you filing for the action _ properly. what your next steps? are you filing for the action or _ properly. what your next steps? are you filing for the action or you i you filing for the action or you planning to let them finish the inquire and pick it up and? well, i won't give — inquire and pick it up and? well, i won't give up- _ inquire and pick it up and? well, i won't give up. like _ inquire and pick it up and? well, i won't give up. like many - inquire and pick it up and? well, i won't give up. like many people | inquire and pick it up and? well, i won't give up. like many people i| won't give up. like many people i lost loved ones during the covid pandemic and i wasn't it to be there. but i think the british public deserve better, they deserve to know the truth, they knew to learn the truth and they need to activate better from the prime minister. they deserve much better with a dog currently. people have been struggling and have been through so much and to find out that they were talking about the weather being nice, going out, having a party, inviting over hundred 50 guesses disgraceful behavior. the past seven years have been the hottest on record.
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that's according to the eu's copernicus climate change service which said they were the warmest by a clear margin since 1850. last year was the fifth—warmest year, with record—breaking heat in some regions. and levels of carbon dioxide and methane hit new heights. our climate editor justin rowlatt reports. what a way to see in the new year. almost 1,000 homes were destroyed and tens of thousands of people were forced to evacuate, as some of the worst wildfires ever seen in colorado swept across the state. coming down this road, the ditches and things, and the trees, they are all up inflames, like, there are embers everywhere. it looks like 2022 is set to continue the trend of extreme weather we saw last year. extreme events are likely to become more intense and more frequent, and we saw many examples of that.
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within 2021, there were the devastating floods in central europe that we saw in july and also the extreme heat waves that we saw across the world injune in canada and injuly in sicily. these latest temperature figures confirm that europe experienced its hottest summer on record. the global data collected by european satellites shows 2021 was the fifth hottest year ever recorded, and no surprise here, the concentration of warming gases in the atmosphere is continuing to rise with record levels of both carbon dioxide and methane. the direction of travel is inescapable, just look how temperatures have risen since the beginning of the industrial revolution 170 years ago. that, of course, is when the world began to burn fossil fuels on a really massive scale, and now look at the last seven years.
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these latest figures show they were the hottest seven years ever recorded, an average of 1.2 degrees centigrade above pre—industrial levels. and the bad news is a temporary cooling event in the pacific ocean actually lowered temperatures vary marginally last year. that will soon pass, so don't expect any let up in the warming trend in the years to come. it sometimes feels when we've got complex big problems like this that there is very little we can do as individuals, but we do have a choice. we can make changes to our lifestyle to reduce our own greenhouse gas emissions, whether that's reducing the amount of meat and dairy that we eat, travelling less by flying or, you know, not taking the car as much and walking and cycling instead. the planet we call home is in danger, she says, and we can't say we haven't been warned. justin rowlatt, bbc news.
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ikea has announced it will cut sick pay for unvaccinated staff who need to self—isolate because of covid. fully vaccinated staff will receive full sick pay. the company'sjoining a growing list of firms doing the same. the retail giant acknowledges it's an "emotive topic" but says its policy has to evolve with changing circumstances. our business correspondent emma simpson has been to one ikea store and explains what's behind the move. many companies are grappling with rising costs, and staff absences and this is all part of this. now ikea employes 10,000 people across the uk and right now, if any of them get covid, jabbed or unjabbed, they will get full sick pay. the difference is, if they are unvaccinated and are forced to self—isolate, coming into close contact with someone who has tested positive they are likely to end up with the minimum statutory sick pay of £96 a week
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unless there are mitigating circumstances, that is a financial penalty. wessex water is doing something similar starting this week where absence rates have double and that follows on from morrisons which cut its sick pay terms last year. it is worth pointing out some big firms in america have gone further, unvaccinated workers there having to pay monthly fees or some losing theirjobs all together, so what we are starting to see here, are some changes, ikea saying it is emotive and it could become a wider friend , trend. the latest official coronavirus figures show over 142,000 new infections in the latest 24—hour period. on average there were over 171,600 new cases per day in the last week. the latest figures show over 18,600 people in hospital with covid. there've been another 77 deaths — of people who died within 28 days
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of a positive test result. on average in the past week, there were 190 deaths per day. on vaccinations, over 35.6 million people have had a boosterjab, which means more than 62 percent of those aged 12 and over have now had three vaccine doses. the president of kazakhstan has described the protests last week — in which dozens are reported to have died — as an attempted coup d'etat. troops from russia are currently in the country at his request to restore order and today president putin said kazakhstan had been targeted by international terrorism, adding that russia would never allow revolutions to take place in the region. our correspondent steve rosenberg is in kazakhstan's largest city almaty, and sent this report. driving into almaty, you see immediately this is a city on guard. we passed through several
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army checkpoints. they've been setup to prevent more attacks. in the city centre, reminders of the violence the authorities now say was an attempted coup. almaty last week. what had started as peaceful protests over fuel prices, in another part of kazakhstan, was suddenly looking like war. translation:. these bandits were controlled by terrorists. for the level of organisation here, it must have been a criminal group that planned it in advance. dozens were killed. thousands have since been detained. there's still a lot of confusion about who was behind the violence. authorities blame terrorists and bandits. some talk about a power struggle in the ruling elite.
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but one thing is clear, that to stay in power, the president of kazakhstan had to call on foreign power to help and that's russia. enter the russian military. on paper, russian troops are peacekeepers, deployed to kazakhstan as part of a collective security alliance of former soviet states. but most of the soldiers are russian. the kremlin is keen to demonstrate its regional power. addressing colleagues, president putin made events fit his wider narrative. translation:. we understand the events in kazakhstan won't be the last attempt to interfere in the internal affairs of our countries. the measures taken by the force show we will not allow destabilisation at home and for so—called colour resolution is to take place. after the violence in almaty, there are mixed feelings
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about the arrival of russian troops. i welcome the russians are coming. they will put a stop to it. we should be able to cope ourselves. then again, without outside help, they could be civil war. what happened in kazakhstan has left this country and its people in shock and in fear at what comes next. russia and the united states have given no sign that they had narrowed their differences on ukraine and wider european security issues in talks that have started in geneva. moscow has repeated demands that washington says it cannot accept. russia has massed troops near ukraine's border while demanding that the u.s. led nato alliance rule out admitting the former soviet state or expanding further into what moscow sees as its back yard.
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the russian deputy foreign minister speued the russian deputy foreign minister spelled out his warning and a news conference. if now nato proceeds towards deployment of capabilities that are being developed very rapidly in the us and will possibly be introduced somewhere in europe it would require a military response on the russian part. that is a decision to counter this threat through means at our discretion. fiona hill is a senior fellow at the brookings institution and a former national intelligence officer on russia in the trump administration. she said that this is a dangerous moment for the talks — and for europe. i think we have to be very careful not to downplay it where we are right now.
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i think it's very significant here is that some of the focus has shifted. if you listen very carefully to what the deputy foreign minister of russia hasjust said, from ukraine but really onto european security and this is starting to look more like the 1980s. some of the war scares that we had over the palcement of the missiles in europe, going back to that. satan 1983, for example. 1983, for example. that my be deliberate on the russians part but they're actually shifting some of the attention away with some of these remarks today and over the weekend from ukraine itself to the future of the united states presence and the united states posture in europe. an independent inquiry willl investigate how a serving police officer, wayne couzens, was able to abduct, rape and murder sarah everard last march. the first phase will look his conduct during his career. it will also investigate whether any red flags were missed concerning him and the extent to which his behaviour, particularly in relation to women, was known about and raised by colleagues.
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the metropolitan police officer, david carrick, has been charged with nine further offences against women, including six counts of rape. last month, the officer — who has been suspended from the force pleaded not guilty to 20 other sexual offence charges. the 47—year—old is due to appear in court later this week in relation to the new charges, which cover a period between 2009 and 2018. a faulty electric heater is being blamed for a fire in an apartment block in new york, which has killed 17 people including eight children. another 32 people were taken to hospital, several of whom are in a critical condition. the building provided affordable housing, many residents were immigrants from gambia. our north america correspondent, nada tawfik has the latest. neighbours looked on with horror as heavy clouds of smoke engulfed the entire bronx apartment building. he is taking his time. he's got the baby.
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firefighters were on the scene within minutes. as they battled the initial blaze from a lower level apartment, the rising smoke proved to be deadly. it was just pitch black in my house, in the daytime. they were putting out the fire and all you could see was black smoke in front of the windows, black smoke. later, officials said it was a portable space heater that caused one of the worst fire disasters in new york's history. it started in a malfunctioning electric space heater. that was the cause of the fire. the fire consumed that apartment that was on two floors, and part of the hallway. the door to that apartment, unfortunately, when the residents left, was left open. it did not close by itself. the smoke spread throughout the building, thus the tremendous loss of life and other people fighting for their lives. tragically, a number of children
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have already died and it's feared the death toll could still rise. all 121 units in this building have now been cleared out and residents have been sent to a nearby shelter. and then they will be put in hotels for the time being. now, this high—rise is home to a large immigrant community and officials say they will dedicate funds to help them recover what they've lost. we're all feeling this and we are going to be here for this community, to help them navigate through this. crews are already on site cleaning up the debris, but much of what was lost cannot be replaced. nada tawfik, bbc news, new york. breaking news now, reaction from the covid—19 bereaved families for justice group in response to several sources confirming to the bbc that they received an e—mail from the prime ministers private secretary in may 2020 inviting them to a drinks gathering in the downing strength darden had said to have gone to over a hundred people and you eyewitnesses say they saw the prime minister and his wife at the event
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in the garden as well. this will be part the civil servant sue gray's investigation into parties that would be an old while the country was under strict lockdown rules regarding social gatherings. helen brady a spokesperson for the paris families forjustice group says "my dad died just a few days before this e—mail was sent out, he was only 55 and was a healthy heat worker, admits to him everyday sense. "just like the rest of the family my family had done everything to keep him in other states are in the lockdown. those days will stay with you for the rest of my life just like the families of the 353 people that died that day. my family couldn't even get a hug from our friends. to think that whilst it was happening borisjohnson was making the most of the weather and throwing a party for 100 people is truly beyond belief. it goes on to say... everyone going to the party would know what was wrong so how could those at the party know it was ok? at the be more disgraceful example of1 euro
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at the be more disgraceful example of 1 euro for them at the be more disgraceful example of1 euro for them and another for the rest of us. to make borders work last year i sat in the same garden with the prime minister in the eye and told him how my dad had died. he told me he had done everything he could to protect my dad. knowing that he parted in that same spot that he parted in that same spot that dads death certificate was signed. it makes me feel sick to think about it. a statement from hannah brady from the covid—19 bereaved families for justice. you're watching bbc news it's nine minutes to nine. the headlines. the government tells house builders it expects them to pay the £4 billion but in the dangerous cladding from low—rise buildings in england. novak djokovic wins his fight to stay in australia. his family say justice has prevailed and take all that have supported him. another twist in the downing street party controversy, the e—mail from the downing street party controversy, the e—mailfrom the prime minister is private secretary inviting people to drinks or the number ten garden while the uk was facing strict limits on social gatherings.
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one of the uk's greatest ever fossil finds has been revealed — the skeleton of a 10 metre long sea predator — rather like a huge prehistoric dolphin — that lived 250 million years ago. it was discovered poking through the mud at rutland water nature reserve in leceistershire. it's in rutland, not less a share. jonah fisher has more. last february, on a bank of mud in a midlands reservoir, joe davis made an extraordinary discovery. we were relandscaping some islands on the rutland water nature reserve there to improve it for bird habitats. and i looked down, ijust saw this series of ridges in the mud and thought, that looks different, there's something there that's different. and it had organic features almost where it connects onto the rib. so, yeah, that's when we thought we need to call somebody and find out. a team of experts was quickly dispatched.
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joe hadn't found a dinosaur, but it was an ichthyosaur — a monstrous, air—breathing sea reptile, also known as a sea dragon, that swam about 180 million years ago. back then, rutland and most of the midlands was under water, covered by a warm, shallow sea. what makes this particular sea dragon so special is its size and condition. this is a backbone, so it's part of the spine, and this is one of more than 150 individual vertebrae in this entire skeleton. so, this individual is not only the most complete ichthyosaur skeleton ever found, the biggest one ever found here in the uk, incredible at ten metres long. but it's actually the biggest prehistoric reptile skeleton ever found here as well, the most complete skeleton. 0k. the huge ichthyosaur has now been removed from the reservoir bed. the skull block on its own
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weighed almost a tonne. having lain in the mud undisturbed for nearly 200 million years, the rutland sea dragon is one of britain's greatest ever fossil finds. jonah fisher, bbc news. now — fancy yourself as a baker? could you be the one to come up with the recipe for the new platinum pudding to celebrate the queen's jubilee this year? it's not the only thing marking the queen's 70 years on the throne — there'll be pageantry, street parties and a four—day bank holiday weekend in june. our royal correspondent daniela relph can tell us more. every big celebration needs a decent pudding. this was the queen's 90th birthday five years ago. then, bake off winner nadiya hussain did the honours. but to mark the queen's 70 years on the throne you don't have to be a star baker. all of us can give it a go. the aim is to find a recipe with staying power. i'm looking for something that's visually beautiful. that's been made with love and has
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a bit of a story to it, and something that will look great in buckingham palace, as well as on a table in a street party. and there's a history of royally named food. coronation chicken was created for the queen's coronation. and the victoria sponge was named after queen victoria, who loved an afternoon tea. this year's platinum pudding competition is about getting everyone involved. anyone over eight years old can submit a recipe. younger bakers are so much better than they used to be. like the amount of kids, especially on bake off, who were so much better than me at my age, is mind—blowing. the big jubilee celebration comes injune, with the four day bank holiday weekend. on thursday, the second, there'll be trooping the colour on horse guards parade for the first time since 2019, due to covid. on friday the third, a service of thanks give poring the queen's reign will be held at st paul's cathedral. the biggest names in entertainment
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are promised on saturday fourth june, when the bbc hosts a platinum party at buckingham palace. the ballot for tickets will be launched next month. and then on sunday fifthjune, a pageant on the mall and the big jubilee lunch will be dished out in communities across the country. on the menu will be the winning platinum pudding that it is hoped the royal family will approve of. i spent 11 years cooking for the queen at buckingham palace, and one thing i did realise is that she does have a sweet tooth. afternoon tea, there will be lots of cakes, lots of pastries, but also at dinner lots of puddings too, and i think that one of her weaknesses is probably chocolate. jubilees are about creating memories. it is hope the uk's first ever platinum jubilee will feel that extra bit special. a pilot in los angeles has had a lucky escape — not once but twice.
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first, he had to make an emergency landing on a railway line, thankfully avoiding buildings and people. but then moments later a high speed train was racing towards him. police officers rushed to pull the pilot out — bleeding but relatively uninjured. hello there. it has been a cloudy start of the week for all of us. but the weather will change overnight because clearer skies will follow the cloud across scotland and northern ireland. the main cloud, rain and drizzle sinking down into england and wales, some low cloud, misty weather. mild night for england and wales — much milder than last night for eastern england, no frost here. clearer skies, though, for scotland and northern ireland means temperatures will be low enough for a pinch of frost here and there, and some sunshine to start the day on tuesday. that cloud and damp weather across england and wales moves southwards, coming to
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rest across east anglia and southern england. some late improvements in the day across south wales and the midlands, but more sunshine further north and a few blustery showers blowing into the northwest of scotland. the highest temperatures will actually be in that cloudy, damp weather across southern parts of england. that will clear away, though, overnight. through the rest of the week, northern areas will see the highest temperatures with a stronger atlantic wind. lighter winds further south mean it'll be colder with increasing amounts of mist, fog, and low cloud.
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hello, i'm christian fraser. welcome to the first edition of context, a new show on the bbc news channel and bbc world news. novak djokovic said he was practising on court within hours of leaving the hotel. this practising on court within hours of leaving the hotel.— leaving the hotel. this is a huge win for novak _ leaving the hotel. this is a huge win for novak and _ leaving the hotel. this is a huge win for novak and his _ leaving the hotel. this is a huge win for novak and his family i leaving the hotel. this is a huge | win for novak and his family and leaving the hotel. this is a huge i win for novak and his family and the whole free world. in win for novak and his family and the whole free world.— whole free world. in newly leaked e-mails, whole free world. in newly leaked e-mails. a _ whole free world. in newly leaked e-mails. a top — whole free world. in newly leaked e-mails, a top aide _ whole free world. in newly leaked e-mails, a top aide adult - whole free world. in newly leaked e-mails, a top aide adult boris i e—mails, a top aide adult boris johnson invited number ten staff to a party at the time when social mixing was banned. and that high—level talks with the united
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states in geneva, russian officials say we have

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