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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  January 7, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm GMT

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growing covid pressures are making hospital care unsafe, warn nursing leaders. staff absences in the nhs in england have risen 40% in a week. nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what's happening instead is that they find themselves being spread thinner and thinner. but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. the armed forces are being deployed to support hospitals in london, we'll have the latest. also this lunchtime: the president of kazakhstan orders security forces to fire without warning — and blames foreign—trained terrorists for days of anti—government protests. novak djokovic remains in this australian hotel, awaiting a court decision on his entry to the country — a government minister says
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the grand slam champion is free labour says the prime minister still has serious questions to answer about the refurbishment of his downing street flat. and whatever happened to roly, zammo and gripper? grange hill, a tv staple for 30 years, is being turned into a film. and in sport, finally something to cheer about down under asjonny bairstow hits england's first century of this ashes series. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one.
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staff absences caused by covid are making hospital care unsafe — that's the warning from the main nursing union, the rcn. absences are up more than 40% in a week in england, and about one in eight hospitals are in a critical incident, which means they're struggling to provide core services. the armed forces have been called in to help. 200 personnel have been deployed in the capital, with another 1800 around the rest of the uk. our health correspondent katharine da costa reports. like many hospitals, kingston in south—west london has been tackling a rise in covid admissions over christmas and a busy ind. that has been compounded by growing staff absences. 4% of staff here are off work due to covid and that is having a big impact on morale.— a big impact on morale. chicken it is important _ a big impact on morale. chicken it is important. we _ a big impact on morale. chicken it is important. we learned - a big impact on morale. chicken it is important. we learned that - a big impact on morale. chicken it is important. we learned that in l a big impact on morale. chicken it. is important. we learned that in the first wave in the first five
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minutes, you check the everyone is ok and it goes a long way. the 0k and it goes a long way. the emotional _ 0k and it goes a long way. the emotional support is key to allow people _ emotional support is key to allow pe0ple to — emotional support is key to allow people to be their best selves when they come — people to be their best selves when they come to work.— people to be their best selves when they come to work. more than one in ten beds in — they come to work. more than one in ten beds in england _ they come to work. more than one in ten beds in england are _ they come to work. more than one in ten beds in england are occupied - they come to work. more than one in ten beds in england are occupied by| ten beds in england are occupied by patients who are fit enough to be discharged but need support from social care. 95—year—old jean brownlee had a fall on christmas day. she is still waiting for a care package to go home. it’s day. she is still waiting for a care package to go home.— package to go home. it's terribly frustrating- _ package to go home. it's terribly frustrating. i— package to go home. it's terribly frustrating. i mean, _ package to go home. it's terribly frustrating. i mean, i— package to go home. it's terribly frustrating. i mean, i could - package to go home. it's terribly frustrating. i mean, i could be i package to go home. it's terriblyi frustrating. i mean, i could be at home now. i admit i can't see to do what i used to do, but i would be in my own environment. life would be much more pleasant.— much more pleasant. hospitals are reachin: much more pleasant. hospitals are reaching capacity — much more pleasant. hospitals are reaching capacity whilst _ much more pleasant. hospitals are reaching capacity whilst seeing - much more pleasant. hospitals are reaching capacity whilst seeing a i reaching capacity whilst seeing a sharp rise in staff shortages. i6 trusts are still in critical incident mode. the latest nhs data shows more than 35,000 staff at acute trusts were off each day on average, due to covid come after the 2nd ofjanuary. that is
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average, due to covid come after the 2nd of january. that is 4% of the workforce and up 41% on the previous week. but there are regional differences. the north—east and yorkshire was hardest hit. there were more than 7000 covid absences, 5% of staff and up by 79% on the previous week. in london, there were over 5000 covid absences, or 3% of staff. that is down by 4% on the week before. staff. that is down by 496 on the week before.— week before. these figures are really stuck- — week before. these figures are really stuck. outside _ week before. these figures are really stuck. outside of- week before. these figures are really stuck. outside of health | really stuck. outside of health care, staffing shortages are closing shops and cancelling trains. but nurses can't stop helping their patients, so what is happening instead is that they are finding themselves being spread thinner and thinner, but they can't keep doing that indefinitely. the situation is not safe. ., , ., ., not safe. from assisting paramedics to bartering — not safe. from assisting paramedics to bartering teams _ not safe. from assisting paramedics to bartering teams at _ not safe. from assisting paramedics to bartering teams at testing - not safe. from assisting paramedics to bartering teams at testing sites l to bartering teams at testing sites and vaccination centres, more than 1800 service personnel have already been deployed across the uk. around 90 are preparing to assist three health boards in scotland, while in
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england 200 army medics and soldiers are being deployed across hospitals in london. this are being deployed across hospitals in london. , , ., in london. this winter, there is an extraordinary _ in london. this winter, there is an extraordinary pressure _ in london. this winter, there is an extraordinary pressure on - in london. this winter, there is an extraordinary pressure on our - in london. this winter, there is an | extraordinary pressure on our nhs. it is our duty to be a sticking plaster for the nhs to it is our duty to be a sticking plasterfor the nhs to help it is our duty to be a sticking plaster for the nhs to help get through a time of extraordinary crisis. , p, , p crisis. these are unprecedented times. while _ crisis. these are unprecedented times. while there _ crisis. these are unprecedented times. while there are - crisis. these are unprecedented times. while there are early - crisis. these are unprecedented l times. while there are early signs that cases may be slowing in london, it's too soon to know the full impact of the new omicron variant on hospitals. 7000 army forces personnel are on standby if more reinforcements are needed. katharine da costa, bbc news. 0ur health correpondent nick trigglejoins me. nick, the nhs always has a winter crisis. what's different this time? winter crises, as you say, are nothing new. the start of the year is always most difficult. we have in previous winters, as we have this week, about operations being cancelled and temporary treatment centres being set up in critical
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incidents being declared. but this is worse. we have a chart that perhaps illustrates this. it shows the delays that ambulances face when they hand over their patients to a&e. the dark orange shows this year, and the lighter orange is the last winter before the pandemic began. in the most recent week, 23% of ambulance crews face long delays, compared to 18% in the same week in years previously. that deterioration is because covid brings with it some unique challenges. as katharine da costa was reporting, staff absences are on the rise. secondly, the sheer number of patients coming in with covid. normally at this time of year, the nhs would see about 1000 admissions a day for all types of respiratory illness. but we are seeing double that for covid alone. there is some respite, because levels of flow are much lower. we
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only have less than 50 patients in hospital with flu. but what matters is how soon the peak comes, that will make a huge difference to how bad this winter will be. hick bad this winter will be. nick triu ule, bad this winter will be. nick triggle. many _ bad this winter will be. nick triggle, many thanks. - wales is now in the grip of an omicron "storm", according to the first minister mark drakeford. he said cases were now "astronomically high" — but has not announced changes to restrictions. 0ur wales correspondent hywel griffith is in cardiff. he has been talking in the last hour, bring it up to date? yes, during that press _ hour, bring it up to date? yes, during that press conference, l hour, bring it up to date? 1a: during that press conference, as you said, he described wales as being in the middle of a storm. his forecast for the future was equally gloomy, saying the peak of omicron cases isn't expected for another ten to 14 days. the rate here is already above 2000 per 100,000 members of the public. at the moment, that is a higher rate nationally than in england. so the inevitable question
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was, why keep restrictions in wales if they don't seem to be having an impact? mark drakeford's answer was that they are having an impact and he doesn't see a case for slackening those restrictions for at least another two weeks. that means the rule of six will stay in pubs, bars and cafes. it means nightclubs in wales will remain closed and it also means that major sporting events will happen behind closed doors. there has been a growing debate in wales about the future of the six nations rugby championships, with home games expected here in cardiff in february. it may be that there is just about time to ease restrictions ahead of that, but that the next two weeks, it is certainly unlikely that any restrictions in wales will come to an end. , , ' . ~ to an end. hywel griffith, thank ou. with pressure on hospitals growing, the bbc has launched a special nhs tracker with the latest data on waits for emergency treatment which will let you find out how your local services are coping this winter and how that compares to pre—pandemic demand.
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it's emerged that a second tennis player has had her visa cancelled in the run—up to the australian open, as exemptions given to competitors are re—examined in a row about covid rules. it comes after the men's world number one novak djokovic was barred from entering the country on wednesday. he's still inside in an immigration hotel pending a court decision on monday. shaimaa khalil reports from melbourne: this is the immigration detention hotel where novak djokovic is being kept. adnan has been here forfive months now, after being moved from another facility. i live in level two and djokovic lives in level one. that is the food we had been served every day by the canteen. we found a maggot and mould on the bread and we've been reporting it but unfortunately, there has been no action taken.
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outside the hotel, there was dancing and music, but also anger and frustration among novak djokovic's supporters. it's unclear if the tennis star will remain here until monday, when his legal team will challenge the cancellation of his visa. novak djokovic is waiting for a court decision on whether he'll be able to stay and compete in the australian open, or be deported. whatever happens, this has gone way beyond tennis. the world number one is now at the centre of a political and diplomatic storm. djokovic arrived on wednesday with an exemption, granted by tennis australia and the state of victoria. but the border force has revoked his visa, saying he did not meet the rules of entry. his mother dijana said on thursday that he was being kept like a prisoner. australia's home affairs minister, karen andrews, hit back, saying there was nothing stopping him from leaving. mr djokovic is not being held captive in australia,
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he is free to leave at any time that he chooses to do so and border force will actually facilitate that. another player has now had her visa cancelled. renata voracova from the czech republic is understood to be detained in the same hotel as djokovic. the australian open is one of the biggest sporting events here but it is turning into a big international embarrassment for the government. it seems that novak djokovic will be spending another night in this immigration detention hotel, and now we understand that he is joined by another player, renata voracova. we also know that at least one more visa or more is being investigated. all of this with a bit more than a week before the australian open, but the government here, scott morrison's government is adamant to say that they are in control of who is and is not allowed to come in.
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but in trying to handle this, they have created more chaos and confusion. this move has not only backfired, but it has also drawn more criticism and anger here. shaimaa khalil. the president of kazakhstan has ordered security forces to "fire without warning" during a violent crackdown on anti—government protests. the president blamed what he called "foreign—trained terrorists" for demonstrations which have been going on since sunday in the main city of almaty. the unrest was sparked by a big increase in the price of fuel. at least 26 people have been killed. rayhan demeytrie sent this report. the aftermath of riots in kazakhstan's largest city, almaty. businesses and government buildings gutted. security forces have permission to shoot to kill those the president of kazakhstan calls terrorists and bandits. translation: the militants have not laid their arms, they _ continue to commit crimes
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or are preparing for them. the fight against them must be pursued till the end. whoever does not surrender will be destroyed. what started as peaceful nationwide protests against the rising cost of fuel turned violent, the worst of it in almaty. | translation: it's really frightening| because we feel in danger and we are not protected by our state. this has shown the failure of the state in general. the total number of dead and injured is not yet known. 0fficially, 18 police and national guardsmen have been killed and more than 700 officers injured. this is the russian military deployed to kazakhstan, part of a moscow—led military block requested by the kazakh president to end unrest in his country. but many in kazakhstan are concerned about russian troops on the ground and what role they will play.
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normal life has been disrupted. with internet blackouts, they cannot use their bank cards. cash is in short supply. protesters wanted real change, political and economic reforms. those demands, for now, have been drowned out by the gunfire. rayhan demeytrie, bbc news. abdujalil abdurasulov is in almaty in kazakhstan and has taken a closer look at the aftermath of the clashes. some of the biggest clashes took place here at the former presidential residence and the mayor's office. the buildings were burnt down and you can see here, all these cars were also set on fire. you can hear again the shots. maybe the police and military officers are firing into the air to warn people not to approach the square, because they closed the square in order to prevent people from gathering. it's still not clear who those people who clashed with police forces are. protesters say that their
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movement is peaceful, and it was the authorities who provoked the violence. but many people now hope that the order can be restored very quickly. here, labour has accused the prime minister of apparent corruption, following an investigation into the refurbishment of his downing street flat. messages between borisjohnson and lord brownlow, who helped pay for the renovation, were published yesterday. the messages appear to show the prime minister offering support for a great exhibition — plans for a cultural festival which were being backed by lord brownlow. 0ur political correspondent damian grammaticas is in downing street. how big a problem is this now for the prime minister?— how big a problem is this now for the prime minister? well, labour are certainly pretty _ the prime minister? well, labour are certainly pretty strong _ the prime minister? well, labour are certainly pretty strong on _ the prime minister? well, labour are certainly pretty strong on this. - certainly pretty strong on this. they are talking about possible corruption, pointing to these messages where you have a prime minister here who is looking for tens of thousands of pounds to help
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pay for the renovation of his flat. they are exchanging messages with this rich donor and engaging with the project that donor was interested in, saying he was on the case. a few weeks later, the donor met the then culture secretary 0liver dowden. mr dowd and just left about a minute ago and the question was put to him about whether this was put to him about whether this was corruption. he didn't answer, he just got in his car and went. but downing street are saying this was normal and nothing came of it. but labour say it was the fact of passing it on that is what looks dubious to them. they want an inquiry. that may not happen, so the real issue for the prime minister might not be the jeopardy there, but the reputational questions, what we have seen in the last day or so, the prime minister looking for someone else to pay thousands of pounds for his flat even though he paid for it himself and was in the end cleared of any breach of the ministerial code. he didn't release the text messages to that inquiry, although he has apologised for that, and he may have sought to have a donor. all may have sought to have a donor. all difficult questions. damian
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grammaticas, thank you. the time is 16 minutes past one. our top story this lunchtime... staff absences in the nhs in england rise 40% in a week because of covid — nursing leaders warn of pressure on hospital care. coming up, the duchess of cambridge turns 40 this weekend — we look at how her public role has changed. and also in the sport, philippe coutinho is back in the premier league. the brazilian midfielder is heading to aston villa on loan from barcelona, where he willjoin up with his old liverpool captain steven gerrard. one in 10,000 babies are affected by a genetic disorder called spinal muscular atrophy, which causes muscle weakness. most babies with the condition won't live beyond the age of two without intervention. but last year, the world's most expensive drug was approved for use on the nhs to fight it, and already the life of one—year—old
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edward has been transformed. zoe conway has been to meet him and his mum, megan. he's just my little boy, just completely in awe of him, he's like the strongest little baby i know. i'm just so proud of him. he's just doing so well. edward was born with the genetic condition spinal muscular atrophy. it causes progressive muscle weakness. as a baby, edward became floppy, he couldn't move his legs. doctors feared that one day he might lose the ability to breathe. and then along came the most expensive drug in the world — zolgensma. it costs £1.8 million, although the nhs got a discount and approved it for use last may. this is edward being given zolgensma via a drip last august. the one—off treatment lasted an hour. in that time, his life was transformed. his muscle tone is a lot stronger.
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he's almost feeling like a child that doesn't have sma. he can roll, he can hold his head. i mean, honestly, it's endless, what he can do, compared to what he was doing before treatment. it's incredible. # if you see a crocodile...# the earlier a baby is given the drug, the better — ideally before the symptoms start. it wasn't clear whether edward would qualify for it. the thought of actually losing him was very, very, very real. and so it makes you appreciate every single little thing — every tantrum i appreciate because he can... he's got the strength to be a naughty boy, you know? and it's all those things that ijust didn't even think he would ever be able to do. spinal muscular atrophy can be detected in newborns using a simple heel—prick blood test. the condition affects one in 10,000 babies. great 0rmond street is calling for all newborns to be given the test.
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this is three—year—old lena's preferred mode of travel — whizzing by in the lap of her 16—year—old sister, amelia. they both have sma — although a different type from edward's. lena was treated as a baby with zolgensma — the drug came too late for amelia. lena is our little miracle. we knew that if we give lena the drug before any symptoms, it will be the best effect. that's why the pre—screening, it's so important. i think it's amazing, i wasn't able to walk_ i think it's amazing, i wasn't able to walk from the age of one and a half _ to walk from the age of one and a half i_ to walk from the age of one and a half. i wasn't able to run, i wasn't able _ half. iwasn't able to run, i wasn't able to— half. i wasn't able to run, i wasn't able to even— half. i wasn't able to run, i wasn't able to even crawl. so, yeah, it's quite _ able to even crawl. so, yeah, it's
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quite amazing. zolgensma has only been on the market for five years, so it's still unclear what effect it will have over the longer term, but the hope is that children like lena will forever be free of this disease. zoe conway, bbc news. the number of adults living with dementia could triple over the coming decades. researchers say growing and ageing populations are the main cause, but add that there are also other reasons, like obesity and smoking, which can be tackled. let's speak to our health correspondent michelle roberts. tell us more about what the study suggests and why scientists think this is happening. it isa it is a full cast, doesn't mean it will necessarily play out —— a forecast. but it gives government an idea of the scale of problem they're looking at and what has be done. some of the risk factors for dementia are unfortunately locked in, you can't change your own genetics, and it is associated with
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older age but not inevitable, not everybody, as they get older, develops it but there are certain lifestyle things that can make a big difference. the big risk factors they were looking at in this study were smoking, diabetes and obesity, which we all have some control over. they looked at predictions of what might be happening around the globe and interestingly, some of the developing nations are predicted to see quite a rise whereas the higher income countries that historically have had quite a large problem with it have not seen so much of the rise predicted to come. it really does send out a strong message about what is needed, a lot of public health measures but also research to find new treatments that can effectively tackle dementia, because we have good drug that can manage the symptoms and slow the progression but still no cure.— but still no cure. interesting, michelle. _ but still no cure. interesting, michelle, thank _ but still no cure. interesting, michelle, thank you. - now, many of us remember the tv drama grange hill for its gritty storylines and very catchy theme tune.
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it first aired in 1978, running for 30 years, and now it's going to be turned into a film, with some of the original characters expected to return as grandparents. jayne mccubbin has been chatting to some of the original cast members. grange hill theme music there was the theme tune... bom bom bom bom, ba—na ba—na nah nah, bam ba—na ba—na—na, bow bow bow... there was the gritty realism... it was just like a real british show, wasn't it, showing kids in their natural habitats, so to speak. yeah, cheeky and naughty. what's he talking about? it's not true. controversial storylines. did you just say no in school? idid. good girl. just say no! now, like an unheard of decent school dinner, there is going to be a second helping.
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my name is neil mattocks, i am a higher level teaching assistant, i run a podcast about grange hill called sausage on a fork. the very first episode i remember watching, i was about six years old and there was lads fighting on the telly, and ijust thought, this is amazing. this is like nothing i've ever seen. i'm alison valentine and i played fay in grange hill, fay lucas. the biggest thing which caused the biggest stir was my thing, i'm not sure what it was, with my teacher, mr king. my name is lee macdonald - and i played zammo in grange hill. i so, the transformation from thisl happy—go—lucky zammo character, to stealing off of roland, - licking the drugs off the floor in one of the scenes at the end, you know, was horrific. - zammo! i should drown you, scum.
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the bbc expelled grange hill after a 30—year run in 2008, but open auditions for the nextgen grange hill silver screen stars start soon. my name is celynjones, i'm the co—writer of grange hill the movie and in a previous life i also played mr green in grange hill, the english teacher. sir phil redmond suggested that it was time to bring back grange hill. i think bringing back grange hill was sort of like the bat signal, that he couldn't ignore from wayne manor any longer! by taking the best of the old and mixing with the new, they hope it pulls in the parents for nostalgia and their teens for a new edgy outing. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. that is today's earworm!
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cricket, and jonny bairstow�*s century has salvaged some pride for england in the ashes. england have already lost the series. they ended day three of the fourth test in sydney on 258—7. patrick geary has been watching. at a drizzly sydney, the weather soaked up more time in the test. for england, not nearly enough. australians have spent weeks mopping up, after all. bowled him! haseeb hameed beaten by mitchell starc for six. sydney was in pink to support the jane mcgrath cancer foundation, late wife of the great glenn who used to regularly do this to englishmen. the tormentor of zak crawley was scott boland, playing in his second test, having waited his whole career for these moments. joe root, england's captain, his ninth test wicket already. england's sad procession trudged on, surrounded, surrendering. three wickets for no runs, 36—4 by lunch. afterwards, it got surreal. ben stokes was given out leg before wicket. it turned out there was no leg and plenty of wicket.
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bails still on, stokes still in. but he was facing the pace with pain. a side injury kept him from bowling but not batting, battling. jonny bairstow went with him, both swatted 50s. here was the fight england had spoken about. and here was the counterpunch. stokes trapped by nathan lyon, jos buttler followed. but bairstow wasn't done. together with mark wood, he made sure england wouldn't be made to bat again and then, in the final over of the day, he passed 100. it's too late to save the series, it might still be too little to save the match, but at long last, england have something to celebrate. patrick gearey, bbc news. the duchess of cambridge will reach a milestone on sunday when she celebrates her 40th birthday. it's more than ten years since catherine middleton married into the royal family and took on the role of future queen. so how has the public role and image of the duchess changed
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over the last decade? 0ur royal correspondent, daniela relph, reports. a duchess at 40, a time to reflect a decade after her public life officially began. and it started here on anglesey, her first royal engagement still as kate middleton. katie griffiths, then just five, presented a photo to the royal couple. i remember i was really excited because i was meeting a real prince and princess. i thought they were going to be showing up in a massive dress and all that like prince charming and cinderella. the move from private, contained kate middleton to a public royal duchess of cambridge has had its challenges, adjusting to the attention, finding her voice. this, the duchess' first ever speech in 2012. you have all made me
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feel so welcome. i feel hugely honoured to be here to see this wonderful centre. almost ten years later, she is more confident and direct. addiction is not a choice. no—one chooses to become an addict. but it can happen to any one of us. well, the speech she gave last year was a landmark for us to have somebody in the royal family with credibility saying exactly those same messages, takes it out to a much wider audience. the duchess of cambridge has had to learn on the job, knowing there is an even bigger role ahead. i think she hasjust grown up. now she has a certain gravitas, | she certainly has got a stature| within the royal family. now, i think you look— at her when she walks into a room and she holds the room. when you are photographed and filmed this often, what you wear matters. she's taken a few more risks over the last few years and has really
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realised that if she makes a statement with her clothes, that can really help elevate her position. i think one of kate's recent fashion successes was thejenny packham dress that she wore to the james bond premiere. she looked better than any bond girl. kate knows when to step up and how to do it. and there will be more stepping up in the decade ahead for the duchess who will one day be queen. daniela relph, bbc news. time for a look at the weather. here's ben rich. tricky for people in some areas? difficult conditions with snow and ice for some, scotland bearing the brunt as you can see from this picture from south lanarkshire, a lot of snow has fallen in places but not only over high ground, this is northern ireland on the north coast, some snow on the beach to sea level put these wintry showers on the radar have been pushing in two parts
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of western scotland,

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