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tv   Take Me to the Opera  BBC News  January 5, 2022 2:30pm-3:00pm GMT

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need to self-isolate, that people need to self—isolate, and until now it has been the case that people have to isolate for ten days after a positive test but one of the measures that nicola sturgeon has just outlined is that if people test negative using a lateral flow test, on days six and seven of self isolation, and they don't have a fever, then self isolation can end. what was also significant, i think, she mentioned if people were not fully vaccinated and they were a contact of someone who had covid, they would have to carry on isolating for ten days, so that is an indication that if you are fully vaccinated and that includes a booster, so three injections, you will be able to end self isolation after seven days if you have been a
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close contact of someone with covid but if you have not been fully vaccinated then your self isolation would have to continue for ten days and obviously that is a reflection of the medical, scientific evidence that being vaccinated does significantly reduce your chance of serious illness, having to go into hospital or possibly even worse consequences than that. very much t in: to consequences than that. very much trying to encourage _ consequences than that. very much trying to encourage more _ consequences than that. very much trying to encourage more people i consequences than that. very much trying to encourage more people to| trying to encourage more people to take all the vaccinations, including booster because nicola sturgeon pointing towards the fact that there could be1 million cases recorded since the start of the pandemic by tomorrow. . , ,, tomorrow. that is right. she did get a sense early _ tomorrow. that is right. she did get a sense early in _ tomorrow. that is right. she did get a sense early in his _ tomorrow. that is right. she did get a sense early in his statement - tomorrow. that is right. she did get a sense early in his statement of. a sense early in his statement of just how quickly omicron was spreading in scotland, so she said in the week up to the 31st of december, one in 20 people in scotland were estimated to have the
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virus. that obviously is a few days ago now, so it will be even more than that figure. she pointed out that the number of people in hospital has almost doubled. it has gone from 679 to 1223 in the past week. that is an increase of 80%. what was also i think significant about what nicola sturgeon was saying was that she was saying there is going to be a new strategy, which will be developed over the next few weeks, and that will be more in terms of trying to avoid restrictions and lock downs of the kind that we have seen for the last two years, a sort of acknowledgement that coronavirus has to be lived with, as she put it at one point, you cannot carry on living with these kinds of restrictions forever. you have to find some means to return to some form of normality. and so, it is interesting that even though we are in this situation
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where omicron is getting worse in scotland, at the moment the scottish government is starting to think about how to deal with the situation after omicron is at its worst, probably in the next few weeks, coming towards the end of january or into february, so very much looking forward to the coming months, as opposed to what is going to be happening in the next few weeks. james, thank you very much. we have had some more decisions coming out of cardiff. we are hearing that wales is making other changes to try to ease the pressure on pcr tests. we are hearing from mark dra keford, drakeford, the dra keford, the first drakeford, the first minister there, that the change will need people are unvaccinated and have cases of positive cases and a self isolating for ten days should now take a lateral flow test on days two and eight instead they pcr test. that is an immediate change. and then
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secondly, which is going to come into effect from tomorrow... they have agreed that if a person showing no symptoms has a positive lateral flow test they are no longer advised to have a follow—up pcr test to confirm that result unless they are in a clinically vulnerable group, which may need early access to treatment, of course. they hope this means that there will be something like an easing of demand by 5—15% for pcr tests. so that is what wales have just decided. we have more figures from the office of national statistics and to talk to us about them is ahead of statistics, robert cuffe. tell us what weeks these apply to? cuffe. tell us what weeks these a - -l to? , ., cuffe. tell us what weeks these a . .l to? , ., , cuffe. tell us what weeks these a- -l to? , . , ., apply to? these are in the run-up to new year's — apply to? these are in the run-up to new year's eve _ apply to? these are in the run-up to new year's eve and _ apply to? these are in the run-up to new year's eve and what _ apply to? these are in the run-up to new year's eve and what they - apply to? these are in the run-up to new year's eve and what they show| apply to? these are in the run-up to | new year's eve and what they show is a huge increase in the number of people who would be expected to test positive for coronavirus. 3.7 million people, up by about million in a single week. we were talking about tens of thousands or hundreds
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of thousands a week ago. most of the old days, we are talking about massive amounts of the moment. he has been england, read about one in 15 people, one in 20 or one in 25 in the other nations and rising rapidly in those other nations as well. it is properly not news in that we have been hearing those figures for some time now, but the scale of it is fairly stark and i think viewers can see that right now. we can see the gradual increases we remember from over the summer are really a thing of the past that shoot up from well below a million to almost four in the last couple of weeks is the omicron wave.— the last couple of weeks is the omicron wave. , ,., ~ , omicron wave. yes, so in the week up to the 23rd — omicron wave. yes, so in the week up to the 23rd of — omicron wave. yes, so in the week up to the 23rd of december, _ omicron wave. yes, so in the week up to the 23rd of december, it _ omicron wave. yes, so in the week up to the 23rd of december, it was - omicron wave. yes, so in the week up to the 23rd of december, it was 2.3 i to the 23rd of december, it was 2.3 million and then a week later 3.7. thatjust explains million and then a week later 3.7. that just explains exactly why that graph is as steep as it is. find that just explains exactly why that graph is as steep as it is.— graph is as steep as it is. and it exlains graph is as steep as it is. and it explains the — graph is as steep as it is. and it explains the reasons _ graph is as steep as it is. and it explains the reasons we - graph is as steep as it is. and it explains the reasons we are - graph is as steep as it is. and it. explains the reasons we are seeing all the pressure on the testing systems because so many people have a coronavirus or getting tested and possibly some of the reasons behind the switch from relying exclusively on pcr to lateral flows. there are
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some good reasons behind these figures now. in london we have seen the growth rate slowed down a bit. still growing, but instead of shooting up like that in the last week it went for about 7.5% to nearly 9%, so that is around going up nearly 9%, so that is around going up by nearly 9%, so that is around going up by 20% in a week stop that is not doubling in a week, so that is... good news, if a rise can be... relatively good news, yet. but it is the sheer number of cases, rather than the rate of hospitalisation thatis than the rate of hospitalisation that is the issue here, isn't it? because omicron is spreading so fast, so many people have got it, and that is what is putting pressure on the nhs, health services and social care. on the nhs, health services and social care-— on the nhs, health services and social care. ., ., , social care. even though we would be about people — social care. even though we would be about people being _ social care. even though we would be about people being killed _ social care. even though we would be about people being killed by - about people being killed by coronavirus. here we are about the number of extra intensive care beds —— like we were talking about the extra intensive care beds in order to support the people seriously sick and we're not saying that at this point. the number of people in hospital is not going up at the same rate, but eventually we will see
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that increase and the deaths start to increase and, as you say, as more and more people have to isolate because they are infectious, we will see more pressure on hospitals and we saw that any figures released week, with about, i think, with staff from acute nhs trusts, you would normally expect about 5% of them to be off sick and now it is about 8% and that is really covid that has an driving that these numbers we have been talking about continue to play through their we can see where the pressure will continue to grow on the nhs. but it is confusing — continue to grow on the nhs. but it is confusing for _ continue to grow on the nhs. but it is confusing for people, _ continue to grow on the nhs. but it is confusing for people, isn't - continue to grow on the nhs. but it is confusing for people, isn't it, - is confusing for people, isn't it, when you see those numbers that we are still at plan b in england, for example? that we are not seeing more restrictions put in, because the vaccine minister has pointed to the fact that the vaccination programme has helped? the fact that the vaccination programme has heled? , ., ., , fact that the vaccination programme has heled? , ., .,, , has helped? the bet that has been made is that _ has helped? the bet that has been made is that the _ has helped? the bet that has been made is that the combination - has helped? the bet that has been made is that the combination of i has helped? the bet that has been | made is that the combination of the boosters, which will prevent some serious sickness, and the fact that omicron is less likely to make you seriously ill, those two things will
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help prevent this huge number of infections turning into the kind of terrible levels of sickness and death we were talking about a year ago. that is hopefully the case. fingers crossed. but, as you were alluding to earlier, with that many people off, isolating, even if they are not feeling terribly sick, while still in for a rough couple of weeks. ., ., still in for a rough couple of weeks. ., ~ , ., still in for a rough couple of weeks. ., ~ i. .,, , ., weeks. thank you, robert cuffe, our head of statistics. _ the uk prime minister, borisjohnson has been meeting his cabinet
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borisjohnson has been discussing the latest on the pandemic with his cabinet this morning, ahead of a statement in the commons this afternoon. yesterday, mrjohnson said he hoped the country could "ride out" the omicron wave, despite the uk recording a record number of positive daily cases. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake. are you doing enough to help the nhs? the health secretary arrived in downing street this morning as ministers met to review the decision to keep current measures in place in england and go no further — for now. yesterday, the prime minister warned there were difficult weeks ahead, but said england could ride out the wave of omicron cases without new restrictions. i would say we have a good chance of getting through the _ omicron wave without the need for further. restrictions and without the - need, certainly, for a lockdown. over christmas, confidence has increased in government that england can cope with omicron without the need for further measures, but while that has eased political pressure on borisjohnson from his own backbenchers, many of whom are deeply opposed to tighter restrictions, it is not without risk and comes at a cost of increased pressure on the nhs. rising cases and staff shortages are increasing the strain. hospitals in greater manchester are stopping some non—urgent surgery.
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around 15% of the workforce there have covid or are isolating. from pausing procedures to critical incidents, several hospital trusts in england and one in wales have now taken steps to cope with the pressure. if you have been waiting for a hip operation or something along those lines, you are going to be delayed in that and that doesn't feel like a minor issue for those people, so we will see some additional challenges for people facing further delays and that then adds to the ongoing issue of backlog of cases in the system. in a move which could improve the availability of tests, people who get a positive lateral flow result will soon not need a follow—up pcr test, but will still have to isolate. what we have got, actually, is many, many more lateral flow tests and they are really accurate when you have a very infectious variant like omicron, so, actually, what we do all the time islook at what makes sense, is look at what makes sense, we don't need to do things which are unnecessary. amid changes to guidance, booster jabs are still the main hope to limit serious illness amongst older people. a key test of the government's approach. at westminister this afternoon, labour's deputy leader, angela rayner, will face borisjohnson at prime minister's questions.
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sir keir starmer is isolating, having tested positive for coronavirus for a second time. jonathan blake, bbc news. rules requiring travellers to take a test before they arrive in england could soon be scrapped, as the government reviews its coronavirus travel restrictions. the travel industry says compulsory testing for uk arrivals and departures has held back the sector's recovery. let's speak now to sean tipton from abta, which is an association representing travel agents and tour operators. thank you very much forjoining us. is this wishful thinking on your part? how realistic is it that you think they are going to drop this requirement?— think they are going to drop this requirement? well, it is certainly bein: requirement? well, it is certainly being muted _ requirement? well, it is certainly being muted in _ requirement? well, it is certainly being muted in the _ requirement? well, it is certainly being muted in the press - requirement? well, it is certainly being muted in the press from i requirement? well, it is certainly| being muted in the press from the last few days that is certainly what we are hoping will be announced later on today, but we'll have to wait and see, but i do know that when this requirement was brought in the health secretary up —— said at the health secretary up —— said at the time but this is purely because omicron being a largely unknown
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quantity at the time, but clearly a variant of concern, but once it came and if it did, and it has, widespread in the uk, they would be very little justification for keeping these tests and if you look at that as a previous statement, i think it is a good opportunity for previous departure tests to be scrapped. but previous departure tests to be scra ed. �* previous departure tests to be scraued. �* previous departure tests to be scra ed. �* ,, ., ., , ., scrapped. but if you get on a plane and are sitting _ scrapped. but if you get on a plane and are sitting there _ scrapped. but if you get on a plane and are sitting there with - scrapped. but if you get on a plane and are sitting there with hundreds of other people, it is a perfect petri dish, surely? tina of other people, it is a perfect petri dish, surely? two things, let's not forget _ petri dish, surely? two things, let's not forget there _ petri dish, surely? two things, let's not forget there are i petri dish, surely? two things, let's not forget there are otherj let's not forget there are other restrictions in place. if you try to get into most countries around the world, some you in at all and others need you to be double boost it. it is pretty unlikely that... it is actually pretty difficult to get on that plane in the first place. secondly, as i know plane travel very well, we have incredibly very good air filters on very well, we have incredibly very good airfilters on board, they filter out high levels of bacteria and virus particles in the air, so i asked some airlines to do research during the pandemic and there are
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very few cases clearly linked to from someone getting on a plane, so it is not... it is possible, but the likelihood is very small. airlines will insist you wear facemasks and the airport and on the plane as well and a couple of times i travelled last year i felt very safe, actually safer tha n last year i felt very safe, actually safer than i would do going into supermarkets in the uk, so yes, it is safe. in reality the dangers are pretty small. it is a lot about confidence, isn't it?- pretty small. it is a lot about confidence, isn't it? some people will choose _ confidence, isn't it? some people will choose not _ confidence, isn't it? some people will choose not to _ confidence, isn't it? some people will choose not to travel, - confidence, isn't it? some people will choose not to travel, of i will choose not to travel, of course, but others will feel they can. what sort of test measures do you feel would be proportionate, as things stand? i you feelwould be proportionate, as things stand?— things stand? i am glad you said proportionate — things stand? i am glad you said proportionate there _ things stand? i am glad you said proportionate there because i things stand? i am glad you said | proportionate there because that things stand? i am glad you said i proportionate there because that is one thing the world health organization station has said that they wanted me pandemic, looking at restrictions, they do very little to stop the virus and what is important, though, is people continue to go ahead with the vaccination programme, which is exactly what we're doing in the uk. obviously health must come first, but with something like omicron it
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has been assessed, it is now widespread, notjust in the uk, elsewhere, and it is also being tested. it is sensible to test for something that is hidden already and i don't think it is and hopefully thatis i don't think it is and hopefully that is something the government will announce later today, but coming back to the uk hopefully you would have all been double jabbed or you wouldn't be on a flight in the first place. as things stand, you have to take a pcr test and no later than two days after your return into the uk. 0k, than two days after your return into the uk. ok, if they are going to keep those, and we will wait and see, the must announce measures to make sure those tests are affordable. forsome make sure those tests are affordable. for some time they have said they will do something about the cost of pcr tests. they have not done so and they can be ridiculously expensive in the uk for, whereas overseas they are much cheaper and it is a question of why we can't do the same here. in some countries they are actually free. we need to make sure that countries don't get ripped off when they are paying for them and that can be done easily. a simple thing the government could do
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is scrap vat, so moving forward that is scrap vat, so moving forward that is something we ask them to do urgently and they still need to do. so let's not forget because i think going on holiday in the past i think people would have regarded it as a luxury, maybe, buti people would have regarded it as a luxury, maybe, but i think it is pretty clear now for the last two years that some people who wouldn't have been able to afford a domestic holiday previously have not been able to go overseas because the restrictions and they are desperate to go away, so as long as we do it following the restrictions is as proportionate and set out by the world health organization, we can do that and what is clear from my members of travel agents and others in the industry that airlines and many hundreds of others are dependent on the airlines for their support services and overseas, look at france at the moment, the french won't even let us in at the moment and that is having devastating impacts on there, particularly on their snow sports industries, chalets, hotels, etc, and they are scratching their heads and saying
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what is the point of this? it is in the uk, so why are you stopping people travelling? i think we have been very supportive for the industry from day one of the pandemic that public health must come first, but at the same time if you're going to take steps they have got to be logical and proportionate. 0f got to be logical and proportionate. of course. not everybody travels for a holiday. some people are desperate to see relatives they have not seen for a long time. omicron is the latest variant. we are told to expect more, particularly if it is not a truly global vaccine programme thatis not a truly global vaccine programme that is achievable. what do you hope the next variant will mean in terms of restrictions and approaches from our government?— our government? well, i think... i mean, our government? well, i think... i mean. this— our government? well, i think... i mean. this is _ our government? well, i think... i mean, this is the _ our government? well, i think... i mean, this is the first _ our government? well, i think... i mean, this is the first serious i mean, this is the first serious pandemic we have had to deal with for many, many years, so probably since the spanish flu incense of europe and the wild world. but i think we will have learned lessons from this and i think in particular it is about, is necessarily shutting borders down the best way to control the spread of the virus? because
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bluntly, it hasn't actually been that effective and also we need to make sure the vaccine roll—outs go ahead faster than i have. i think the nhs has done an amazing job and yes, to make sure other countries around the world also have access to the vaccines and that will be very important in making sure we go ahead as quickly as possible. we have all been talking about the new normal. i don't think it is a new normal, i think it is the current abnormal. we need to go back to where we were before in terms of going on holiday, but also visiting friends and also businesses. this has done immense damage to our economy, as business people have not been able to get together for face—to—face meetings, but it is just not the same and if you talk to business people many say in many cultures it is very difficult to actually seal the deal if they are not able to meet up. i think those lessons will have been learnt, so that the next time we have to deal with this, hopefully not in my lifetime, we will be in a much better position and will not
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have to go through such extreme lockdown is, potentially. mann; lockdown is, potentially. many eo - le lockdown is, potentially. many people will _ lockdown is, potentially. many people will echo _ lockdown is, potentially. many people will echo those - lockdown is, potentially. many people will echo those sentiments, no. sean tipton from abta, thank you very much your time. across europe, governments are struggling to contain the rising number of cases of the omicron variant. in france, president macron has said he wants to make life more difficult for people who haven't been vaccinated. italy's government will also meet later to decide whether to approve tougher measures. our correspondent, mark lowen, has more. a new year surge and new political tensions over tackling it. in france, currently with europe's highest cases, a parliament debate about vaccine passes for restaurants and trains was suspended after an interview by president macron that prompted howls of outrage. he told le parisien newspaper he wanted to bar the unvaccinated from social activities, using the slang word, emmerder, aiming to kiss them off. it's deepened france's already fractious discussion. the government's plans
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to bring in the law by mid january thrown into doubt. translation: a president - of the republic cannot say the sorts of things that have been said. translation: we will not continue i to debate a bill that you describe i as protecting french people when we learn from the press that it's a bill intended to "kiss" off a part of the population. despite more than 270,000 cases yesterday, france is using vaccines, not lockdowns to combat it. a picture that's repeated across much of europe. here in italy, the push is to vaccinate the over—fives as schools prepare to resume, arming the youngest in the battle against the pandemic. we are doing a job that's about society and we all have to contribute to make others feel safe. so it's teamwork. the first country in the west to fall to coronavirus in 2020 became the first in the world
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to lockdown nationwide back then. but today, even with record cases, italy's streets are once again busy, as it too tightens vaccine rules instead. the cabinet today debating compulsory shots for all workers. greece is also seeing soaring infections, leading to round—the—block queues for tests. the prime minister announcing all over 60s will be fined unless they get the vaccine. across the continent, countries are moving towards living with covid, but that means carrots and sticks to get the holdouts jabbed. mark lowen, bbc news, rome. a memorial to the 22 people murdered in the manchester arena terror attack has opened to the public. the white marble halo called the glade of light bears the names of those who died in the bombing in may 2017. relatives of the victims made memory capsules containing mementos and messages to be embedded inside.
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this year marks the 40th anniversary of the falklands conflict, which claimed the lives of 255 british and 649 argentinian troops. the conflict, which lasted ten weeks, was triggered when argentina invaded and occupied the falkland islands, followed by the invasion of neighbouring south georgia. our defence correspondent, jonathan beale, has been looking back at the events of 1982 — and speaking with some of the veterans who fought in it. it was a war on the other side of the world. on april the 2nd 1982, argentine forces invaded the falkland islands and claimed it as their own. brian hanrahan: the task force, with all its power, is ready. - britain has gathered its might, it must set its course. accompanied by the late brian hanrahan for the bbc, a task force of more than 100 ships had set sail within days, to make the 8,000—mile journey to liberate the islands. i thought we'd better get ready and take it seriously,
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but i'm not quite sure that i actually believed we'd do it. but, as they are sailed south, resolve hardened. first with the controversial sinking of the argentine cruiser, the general belgrano, with the loss of 323 lives. it would be the largest air and sea battle involving british forces since the second world war. 100 aircrafts and more than 20 ships would either be destroyed or damaged. julian thompson was the man charged with the initial british landings at san carlos on the 21st of may. luckily, it was thick fog, so the argentine air force never found us. we knew they were trying to find us, we could hear them zooming around and trying to find us. they might have created a bit of mayhem, had they done so. that was the bit i was really worried about. goose green was the first time british paratroopers came face—to—face with the enemy.
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the british lost 18 men. among them, friends of paul bishop, who was just 21. after we took casualties and friends had been killed, you know, my feeling was hate towards them, you know? we... you know, we wanted to take out as many as we could, we wanted to remove them from the islands. later, paul witnessed this — the argentine attacks at bluff cove, where the british lost more than 50 men. whoosh of artillery strikes we are now between the two gunlines and there's a right old artillery duel going on between them. the battle on the ground tookjust over a month. on the 14th ofjune, the argentines surrendered. 649 of them lost their lives. the british had lost 255 men. so what will the 40th anniversary mean for these veterans?
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i personally don't expect anything from the country, from the government. you know, we just volunteered to do it and we did it. it would be nice to be remembered. i visit the san carlo cemetery and usually shed a tear there and look out over that peaceful water and remember what it was like with guns firing and ships being hit and aeroplanes bombing and the contrasts are really quite remarkable. a0 years on from a war on the other side of the world, but they are still remembered. jonathan beale, bbc news. just a reminder, we will be heading to the house of commons at around 3pm four prime minister's questions here on bbc news. a 32—year—old army officer has become the first woman of colour to complete a solo expedition to the south pole. captain preet chandi trekked 700 miles in a0 days, pulling her equipment in a sledge.
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she faced temperatures of —45 celsius and said she wanted to "encourage people to push boundaries and believe in themselves." our correspondent phil mackie has the story. this was the moment she made it. a0 days after captain preet chandi set off and two years after she started training. i've made it to the south pole, where it's snowing. feeling so many emotions right now. i knew nothing about the polar world three years ago and it feels so surreal to finally be here. getting ready wasn't exactly easy. she went to iceland and spent 27 days in greenland to prepare for the extreme conditions. before she left, polar preet, as she's become known, who is an army physio, said one of the reasons she wanted to do it was to inspire other girls from her background. as a woman of colour, as an asian woman, you know, when people see me doing this, you know, an image they don't expect to see, they are so excited.
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and people have said to me that i'm such a role model, just for them to see somebody that looks, you know, slightly like them. during the trek, she had to tackle 60 mph winds while pulling a 90kg sled in temperatures that fell as low as —50 celsius. as she got closer, she suffered from exhaustion — but that all melted away with the elation of achieving her goal. you are capable of anything you want, no matter where you are from, where your start line is. everybody starts somewhere. i don't want to just break the glass ceiling, i want to smash it into a million pieces. who's with me? and an awful lot of people are. her accomplishment is being seen as a triumph back at home. she is going to have to get used to being at the pole for a little longer. an outbreak of covid means the flight crew that will bring her back is stuck in isolation. phil mackie, bbc news.
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so some breaking news or development in the novak djokovic story, which we have been reporting on to say that the world number one is to play in the australian open with a vaccination exemption, which some people have taken exception to stop writers are saying... they are quoting australian media, but he is now being held up by even visa error after he landed in australia. the cap is age newspaper is saying that the border forces can contact the state tournament, which is where the tournament is taking place, asking if they would support his application after the team applied for the wrong kind of visa. well not confirming the reason, the sports minister in victoria said, the federal government has been asked if we will support novak djokovic's visa application to enter australia. we will not be providing mr djokovic with an individual visa application or support to participate in the
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grand slam. we are not sure at the moment whether the federal government will allow his entry. it seems there has been a bit of a mix—up with the paperwork. he has been denied entry, certainly after that mix—up, but whether it will be ironed out for him to compete, it isn't yet clear. coming up, we'll bring you prime minister's questions. the labour leader sir keir starmer is missing today's session, as he's tested positive for coronavrius. his deputy angela rayner is standing in for him. let's speak to our political correspondent, jonathan blake, in westminster. sir keir starmer having to isolate foot feels like the umpteenth time? he has not had much luck, no exemptions for sir keir starmer, unlike djokovic, at ministers questions at the unlike djokovic, at ministers questions at the house unlike djokovic, at ministers questions at the house of unlike djokovic, at ministers questions at the house of commons this lunchtime. it is the second time he has tested positive for covid and the sixth time in total the labour leader has had to isolate
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since the start of the pandemic, so a big day, a big moment, the first prime minister's questions back after the christmas break came at westminster and he won't be there. his deputy, as you say, angela rayner, will stand in, and i should imagine we can expect quite a salary exchange as a result. she is very different in style and substance to borisjohnson and it should set up quite, perhaps, an entertaining match for us in the house of commons this lunchtime, is borisjohnson faces questions from not only angela rayner on the labour side, but backbench mps on all sides of the house as well, of the government's handling of the coronavirus pandemic, no doubt, but also other looming challenges the prime ministerfaces in the looming challenges the prime minister faces in the coming weeks and months. it is minister faces in the coming weeks and months-— and months. it is later today the normal isn't _ and months. it is later today the normal isn't it? _ and months. it is later today the normal isn't it? because - and months. it is later today the normal isn't it? because they i and months. it is later today the | normal isn't it? because they are onlyjust coming back from recess and they put it back to the afternoon, ratherthan and they put it back to the afternoon, rather than lunchtime, to give everybody time to get back, but of course the government has been
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meeting over this review of covid measures for england and of course we had heard from other parts of the uk on that as well.— uk on that as well. yes, parliament ma have uk on that as well. yes, parliament may have been _ uk on that as well. yes, parliament may have been in _ uk on that as well. yes, parliament may have been in recess _ uk on that as well. yes, parliament may have been in recess for - uk on that as well. yes, parliament may have been in recess for the i uk on that as well. yes, parliament | may have been in recess for the last couple of weeks over christmas and new year, but the business of parliament, certainly, as far as it goesin parliament, certainly, as far as it goes in terms of responding to and dealing with the pandemic, has continued throughout. they heavy daily meetings at downing street and virtual meetings between others and ministers and officials and we have seen changes in various developments continue up until today and that announcement from the uk health security agency that the period or the walls, forgive me, around isolation for people who test positive with a lateral flow test will change and they won't need to be a follow—up pcr for people who test positive on lateral flow without symptoms. but the cabinet met this morning, ministers in downing street, some dialling in virtually, to effectively rubber—stamp that decision to stick with plan b. rubber-stamp that decision to stick with plan b-— with plan b. jonathan, thank you, we're going _ with plan b. jonathan, thank you, we're going straight _ with plan b. jonathan, thank you, we're going straight now - with plan b. jonathan, thank you, we're going straight nowjulie i with plan b. jonathan, thank you, we're going straight nowjulie hasj we're going straight nowjulie has
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house of commons and to have a minister.

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