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tv   Take Me to the Opera  BBC News  January 3, 2022 4:30pm-5:01pm GMT

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the uk prime minister says there is no reason forfurther measures in england despite a surge of cases due to the omicron variant. health advisers to the dutch government are meeting today to discuss whether schools should re—open there next week, after closing early last term to reduce the risk of children infecting older relatives over christmas. india has begun vaccinating 15 to 18—year—olds, as the country records its sharpest—ever weekly rise in infections. cases almost tripled in the week to sunday, with 130,000 new infections registered. a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes will stop a civil case against him in the us, has been made public. the duke of york has consistently denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17.
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let's bring you more news. sudan faces an uncertain political future following the resignation of its civilian prime minister, abdalla hamdok. he'd only been back in office for six weeks, after being ousted in a military coup in october. in a televised address, mr hamdok said that, without a new roundtable process to revive the country's transition to democracy, sudan risked sliding into disaster. it really complicates the political situation right now in sudan. the crisis depends, many people had seen this new deal that the prime minister had signed with the military following this coup as a way of trying to legitimise the continue staying power of the military, and now with the exit they see this as confirmation that the military does not want to see power in sudan, and therefore in the last
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few hours protesters have been taken to the streets again, calling for a return to civilian rule, and this really complicates the situation. the protesters are going to continue with their demands for civilian rule. the conservationist richard leakey, who's died at the age of 77. this discoveries were crucial and he took a stand against the ivory poachers of canyon. richard leakey helped tell the story of where we came from... ..but he was also concerned about where we're going. he made his name in the study of human evolution. his discoveries — including a famous turkana boy skeleton — helped transform our understanding of the origins of humanity.
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i think africa is beginning to recognise that our heritage is real. i think we are beginning to realise that blue—eyed guys like you, and the scandinavians, and people from all over the world, actually are part of the african diaspora. that's powerful. as was his commitment to conservation. in 1989, he was appointed head of kenya's national wildlife agency — his war against poaching symbolised by the public burning of tonnes of stolen ivory. the worst thing you could do with richard was to assume that he was british. he was a very proud kenyan and he was a good kenyan, and africa has lost a significant personality and an important personality. richard leakey was born in nairobi in 1944, the son of two famous anthropologists. he suffered throughout his life
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from ill—health, battling against cancer and needing a kidney transplant. he lost both his legs in a plane crash and he always suspected foul play — his fight against corruption creating many enemies. but those setbacks never got in the way of his love of scientific discovery and his love of africa. he was described as a visionary whose great contributions to human origins and wildlife conservation will never be forgotten. the conservationist richard leakey, who's died at the age of 77. dr paula kahumbu is a wildlife conservationist and the ceo of wildlifedirect — the charity founded in 2004 by dr richard leakey. she explained what a huge loss to the conservation world his death is. well, richard was a friend first and foremost and then he was my boss much of the time as well. he was somebody who stood for excellence in
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everything. he had an incredible mind, a mind that could hold many ideas together at the same time. and that meant he worked on his fossil work, as well as wildlife conservation at the same time and he interacted with lots of the world's top scientists on a regular basis. i remember him as somebody who had zero tolerance for corruption. he had a very, very high sense of integrity. he held everyone else to the same standard. and that is really, i think, a lasting memory i will have of him. when he was the head of the national museums of kenya, he was in charge of all of the research that was going on in terms of nature, biodiversity in kenya. in the 1980s, kenya's elephants were being slaughtered to feed the ivory trade in china and japan. richard was one of those people who went and talked to scientists in particularjoyce
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poole who was studying and she came to understand just how senti and these animals are. it really moved richard. i don't think he really thought about the social structures and behaviours of animals. and he decided there and then he was going to fight for elephants. his fight for elephants was incredible. he felt it was not good enough just to do it locally, it had to be a global statement. they burned 12 tonnes of ivory worth millions of dollars. as a statement that these animals were not deserving of being killed for their tasks. he changed the opinion of the world about this. he thought that ivory should not be in anything other than an elephant. that left a strong impression among africans and so well as that actually we have the right to defend these animals. they have a very important role in our culture and traditions.
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he went on to lead the canyon wildlife service and try to root out the corruption in the wildlife authority. he trained hundreds of kenyan scientists, wardens people in the wildlife sector and created a culture of conservation in kenya. brazil's president jair bolsonaro was rushed to hospital in sao paulo early on monday after feeling "abdominal discomfort" that doctors found was caused by an intestinal blockage. he's revealed in a twitter post that his doctors are evaluating whether he needs surgery. president bolsonaro has been hospitalized several times since he was stabbed during his presidential campaign in 2018. more than 28,300 people crossed the english channel to the uk aboard small boats in 2021 — that's triple the number for 2020 — according to figures compiled by the bbc. the last 12 months have also seen smugglers packing more and more
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people aboard larger and larger dinghies, sometimes with deadly consequences. a home office minister said the government is "reforming" its approach to asylum through its new plan for immigration. what is the secret to a longer life? 0ne region in southern italy is being studied by experts for its unusually high percentage of people who live past 100. sara monetta has more. hidden in the hills of southern italy lies one of the countries best—kept secrets — long life. this region that combines mountain and sea where life seems stuck in a less chaotic, simpler past. people here live on average ten years longer than other italians and about one resident in ten this past 100. scientists from the university of san diego have been studying the area for years.
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but if you ask antonio is 98 the answer is simple. translation: the peace here is incomparable. - people say hi, they know each other, they talk to each other. healthy food, pristine environment, lack of pollution are all believed to play a role. but also family. shejust turned 100, she says she never spends a day without her grandchildren. translation: | love all my - grandchildren and they love me. they cherish me. every time they call me nona i hearing the voices that they are proud of me. maybe the key to a long life is just that. pakistan is usually seen as a deeply conservative society, often in the news because of religious extremism. but in recent years korean popular music or k—pop has silently gripped the nation's youth, making it one of the hottest cultural sensations in the country. the bbc�*s shumaila jaffery reports.
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this is sofia. she lives in islamabad and calls herself a k—pop fanatic. while growing up she always had an interest in singing and dancing, but ten years ago, when she discovered korean pop music, she says it ignited her passion and changed her career path. now she has her own channels on social media where she gives tutorials on k—pop singing and dancing. the where she gives tutorials on k-pop singing and dancing.— where she gives tutorials on k-pop singing and dancing. the music, the dance, the fashion, _ singing and dancing. the music, the dance, the fashion, the _ dance, the fashion, the cinematography, and every aspect i was drawn to it, ok, this is what i want to do, this is what i want to achieve in life. i want to be like them. ,, . ., , achieve in life. i want to be like them. ,, . .,
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achieve in life. i want to be like them. ,, . . , ., them. since the values of k-pop idols are rooted _ them. since the values of k-pop idols are rooted in _ them. since the values of k-pop idols are rooted in asian - them. since the values of k-pop| idols are rooted in asian culture, theirfans, like idols are rooted in asian culture, their fans, like these youngsters in pakistan feel that the music and message of korean pop are more relatable, and it has given them a sense of purpose and community. she is a member of bts army, bts is one of the biggest south korean bands in care, and she has set out this free camp here. she says the army helped her to raise funds for the camp that she set up to celebrate the birth place of two bts members. translation:— place of two bts members. translation: , , ., , translation: they give us a message of self-love and _ translation: they give us a message of self-love and also _ translation: they give us a message of self-love and also teach _ translation: they give us a message of self-love and also teach us - translation: they give us a message of self-love and also teach us to - of self—love and also teach us to help others, they do a lot of charity work, and they donated four schools. this gives us information
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to do good. schools. this gives us information to do good-— schools. this gives us information todouood. ., ., to do good. k-pop fans from across pakistan are — to do good. k-pop fans from across pakistan are deeply _ to do good. k-pop fans from across pakistan are deeply connected - to do good. k-pop fans from across pakistan are deeply connected by i pakistan are deeply connected by social media. they celebrate the birthdays of the stars, they make friends on twitter and look out for each other. most fans do not understand the korean language, but sofia says that the language of music is universal. now it's been 100 years since the bbc launched, with its mission to inform, educate and entertain the world. the queen's coronation and the moon landing were both moments when people gathered around the tv to witness history in the making. zoe conway has been taking a look back at some of the events which shaped british television. when bbc tv launched in 1936, music theatre star adele dixon sang about television's magic rays of light. the studio crew can be forgiven
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for not looking very excited. tvs were so expensive, only 100 people in britain had one. even higher—ups within the bbc thought it would never catch on. the bbc didn't particularly want to make television and they were quite happy with radio, thank you very much. and lord reith, who was running the bbc, absolutely abhorred this newfangled invention. but, the government could see that war was coming. germany was using television for propaganda purposes. so they thought we have to get going and launch a television service. 12 years later, the london olympic games were televised. the coverage helping to buoy a nation still scarred by war, now beamed into 140,000 ohms. the action could be seen in real time. she is in fact wearing a dress of shimmering white. - but it was the queen's coronation in 1953 that would prove the turning point. 20 million people tuned in — for the first time, overtaking the bbc radio audience.
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even the male elephants don't have tasks. 0h, where having a slight penny down here. - five years later, blue peter launched, the longest—running children's tv programme in the world. it survived a urinating errant elephant and a scarily out—of—control campfire. # we are.# we are on fire. let's get the firemen in. the first black children's tv presenter was paul danquah on playschool in 1966. there has been a simply tremendous afternoon here. simply tremendous is one way to describe one of the most momentous moments of the 20th century — the first moon landing in 1969. a year later, the first same—sex kiss delivered by sir ian mckellen in a bbc two production of edward ii. in this series, i am
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going to show you how to cook... a british love affair with indian food was ignited by madhurjaffrey, whose show began in 1982. it is the kind of food you get in indian homes. one of the things i am going to make is roganjosh. this is a classical north indian dish. as you can see, our home is very relaxed. the launch of the iplayer in 2007 made streaming mainstream. what is ever—changing is not just what we're watching but how we're watching it. zoe conway, bbc news. the five permanent members of the un security council have issued a rare joint statement pledging to prevent the spread of atomic weapons and ensure a nuclear war is never fought. the five, china, france, russia, the uk and the us will be part of a major review of a key nuclear treaty later this year. in their statement they agreed a nuclear war couldn't be won and must never be fought. the annual rate of inflation in
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turkey has risen to more than 36%, its highest in nearly two decades. transport costs rose by more than half while the price of food and household goods increased by more than a0%. over the last year, the turkish currency — the lira — has lost nearly half of its value. the uk's prime minister boris johnson has echoed his ministers in signalling that the government is considering no new coronavirus restrictions for england at the moment. on a visit to a vaccination centre, he said everything would be kept under review. i think we got to recognise that the pressure on our nhs, and our hospitals, is going to be considerable in the course of the next couple of weeks, i may be more, because there is no question omicron continues to surge through the country. there is a couple of important points, it is plainly milder than previous variants, but we are also in a different position.
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we have got plan b in place, people should neverforget we have got plan b in place, people should never forget that, we have got plan b in place, people should neverforget that, we have got the measures we are using, making people wear masks on public transport, those types of restriction, working from home if you can, working from home if you can, but we are also continuing the massive boost to roll—out which you can see happening here in aylesbury today, and notjust the boost roll—out, but vaccination programme for those who have not yet even had their first or second vaccination. i just want to make a crucial point to people who are thinking about getting their booster, there are still quite a lot of people who have had two jabs but haven't had the third. a third jab really does make a big, big difference. there are 2 million slotsjust this a big, big difference. there are 2 million slots just this week to get your booster, so get boosted now. you can make all the difference in the world. the majority of people who are nicu sadly have not been
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vaccinated, and the vast majority have not been vaccinated. vaccinated, and the vast ma'ority have not been vaccinatedh vaccinated, and the vast ma'ority have not been vaccinated. these the sill data have not been vaccinated. these the silly data doesn't _ have not been vaccinated. these the silly data doesn't support _ have not been vaccinated. these the silly data doesn't support further - silly data doesn't support further restrictions, but there is increasing pressure on hospitals. you accept it is a gamble? i think the way forward _ you accept it is a gamble? i think the way forward for _ you accept it is a gamble? i think the way forward for the _ you accept it is a gamble? i think the way forward for the country i you accept it is a gamble? i think| the way forward for the country as you accept it is a gamble? i think. the way forward for the country as a whole is to continue with the past that we are on, we will keep everything under review, we will keep measures under review, but the mixture of things that we are doing at the moment is, i think, the right one, so, number one, continue with plan b, make sure people take it seriously, do what we can to stop the spread, make that it might use the spread, make that it might use the plan b measures, work from home if you can, wear a mask in public transport, be sensible about, take a test before going out to meet people you don't normally meet, think about the requirements under plan b, but also get the booster, nothing is the difference between the uk and so much of the rest of europe and is
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perhaps the rest of the world, we have a very, very high level of vaccination now, and we need to continue very fast to build up those defences and that protection in the population. almost 3a million people, 33.9 million people across the uk, have had a booster. in the 70-75 the uk, have had a booster. in the 70—75 group you're looking at over 90% of people have had it. huge numbers, i think 76% of adults. everybody was thinking about it, get a booster and you arejoining everybody was thinking about it, get a booster and you are joining the vast majority. a booster and you are “oining the vast majority-t vast majority. lincolnshire hosoitals _ vast majority. lincolnshire hospitals have _ vast majority. lincolnshire hospitals have declared i vast majority. lincolnshire hospitals have declared a| vast majority. lincolnshire - hospitals have declared a critical incident now over staff shortages. is that a major factor in terms of further restrictions, staff shortages?— further restrictions, staff shortages? further restrictions, staff shortaues? ., ., ., , shortages? we have got to make sure that we look — shortages? we have got to make sure that we look after _ shortages? we have got to make sure that we look after our _ shortages? we have got to make sure that we look after our nhs _ shortages? we have got to make sure that we look after our nhs in - shortages? we have got to make sure that we look after our nhs in any - that we look after our nhs in any way that can, and i took this morning to adam prichard, steve
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powers, all those who are running the nhs, i appreciate the pressures our hospitals are under, i think it's vital that we help them contain the pandemic in the way that we have set out. do other things i have said, make sure you follow plan b, get boosted, and how the nhs with the staff requirements. we are looking to move people into those areas that are particularly badly affected. don't forget that no matter how incredibly transmissible omicron is, there is no question it really spreads very fast, it is different from previous variants, and it does seem pretty conclusively to be less severe than delta or alpha, and it is putting fewer people into i see you —— fewer
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people into i see you —— fewer people into i see you —— fewer people into icu, and sadly the people into icu, and sadly the people who are going into icu are the people who are not boosted, so get boosted. when you look up what we have got, in effect, it's very close to the kind of limits, at one in the morning or minute past midnight on the day that you test, you test negative. we will continue to look at the infectivity periods, but the key thing is we don't want to be releasing people back into the workplace when they are still infectious, and the risk is you would increase the numbers of people going back into the workplace were infectious by a factor of three, so you might perversely have a negative effect on the workforce, so that's the argument we are looking at. a, the argument we are looking at. a word about facemasks, as children go back to school and people go back to colleges, some of your mps have been
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saying the efficacy is questionable. what would you say to that? fin saying the efficacy is questionable. what would you say to that? on the other hand there _ what would you say to that? on the other hand there are _ what would you say to that? on the other hand there are those - other hand there are those increasing body of scientific support for the idea that facemasks can contain transmission. we don't want to keep them, i don't like the idea of having facemasks in the classroom any more than anybody else does, but we won't keep them on a day more than is necessary. fine day more than is necessary. one final question, _ day more than is necessary. one final question, are _ day more than is necessary. one final question, are we _ day more than is necessary. one final question, are we at the beginning of the end of the pandemic? i beginning of the end of the pandemic?— beginning of the end of the andemic? ., . , pandemic? i think that the uk is much stronger _ pandemic? i think that the uk is much stronger position - pandemic? i think that the uk is much stronger position than - pandemic? i think that the uk isj much stronger position than this time last year, there is no doubt at all. that is basically because of science, because of vaccination. my view is that omicron is seems to be borne out by all the evidence, omicron is much milder, considerably milder than previous variants, and we are much more boosted, so our position is far, far better, looking
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at the pressures on the nhs in the next couple of weeks, and may be longer, looking at the numbers of people who are going to be going into hospital, it would be absolute folly to say that this thing is all over now bar the shouting. we got to remain cautious, we got to stick with plan b, we've got to get boosted. the opposition party, labour, has been responding through its shadow education secretary. bridget phillipson, said the government's plans to install ventilation systems in schools were not ambitious enough. 7000 air purifiers across hundreds of thousands of classrooms in england — of thousands of classrooms in england just isn't good enough. they clearly— england just isn't good enough. they clearly recognise there is a need to take action, — clearly recognise there is a need to take action, but for so many schools and so _ take action, but for so many schools and so many— take action, but for so many schools and so many head teachers, the answer— and so many head teachers, the answer has _ and so many head teachers, the answer hasjust been open and so many head teachers, the answer has just been open windows and keep— answer has just been open windows and keep children in cozz learning. we are _ and keep children in cozz learning. we are in— and keep children in cozz learning. we are in the middle of winter here, it'sjanuary. — we are in the middle of winter here, it'sjanuary. i— we are in the middle of winter here, it'sjanuary, i don't think it's an adequate — it'sjanuary, i don't think it's an adequate solutionjust it'sjanuary, i don't think it's an adequate solution just to tell children— adequate solution just to tell children that they should keep their
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coats _ children that they should keep their coats on _ children that they should keep their coats on and open windows. we�*ve coats on and open windows. we've known for months. _ coats on and open windows. we've known for months. sorry _ known for months. sorry to interrupt, obviously you have made it clear that you're not happy with the situation on ventilation as it stands, the fact is kids are going backin stands, the fact is kids are going back in a few days, so what is the answer? , , ., answer? there is still time for the government _ answer? there is still time for the government to _ answer? there is still time for the government to act _ answer? there is still time for the government to act on _ answer? there is still time for the government to act on ventilation, | government to act on ventilation, but we _ government to act on ventilation, but we also — government to act on ventilation, but we also need to see a redoubled effort _ but we also need to see a redoubled effort on _ but we also need to see a redoubled effort on the vaccination programme, too many— effort on the vaccination programme, too many children have not been able too many children have not been able to access _ too many children have not been able to access the vaccination programme, but also _ to access the vaccination programme, but also testing, testing will be vital if— but also testing, testing will be vital if we — but also testing, testing will be vital if we are to keep children learning — vital if we are to keep children learning in the classroom, there have _ learning in the classroom, there have been— learning in the classroom, there have been big issues around the sorrow— have been big issues around the sopplv of— have been big issues around the supply of tests, parents will want to make — supply of tests, parents will want to make sure you get those tests and steps _ to make sure you get those tests and steps to _ to make sure you get those tests and steps to remake because the children, but it's a last minute from _ children, but it's a last minute from the — children, but it's a last minute from the government, we know children— from the government, we know children have been returning, we know _ children have been returning, we know that — children have been returning, we know that when the date of the new school _ know that when the date of the new school term would be, back again and again— school term would be, back again and again the _ school term would be, back again and again the court as if by surprise, it is not— again the court as if by surprise, it is not good enough, and it is letting — it is not good enough, and it is letting down children and families.
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should let's get more now on a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes will stop a civil case against him in the us. virginia giuffre's 2009 settlement of her florida damages claim againstjeffrey epstein reveals she agreed not to sue anyone connected to him who could be described as a "potential defendant. "the document, disclosed in the last hour by a new york court, reveals that the sex offenderfinancier paid her $500,000 to end her claim. ms giuffre is suing prince andrew for sexual abuse — saying that 20 years ago she was trafficked to him by epstein and now—convicted ghislaine maxwell. jeffrey epstein agreed to pay her $500,000 to stop it in its tracks.
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virginia g3 is suing prince andrew saving _ virginia g3 is suing prince andrew saying that — virginia g3 is suing prince andrew saying that she was traffic, he denies the accusation. hello again. our weather is set to get a lot colder for many of us over the next 2a hours. if you think back to saturday, new year's day, we had temperatures as high as 16 degrees in kinlochewe, which is in the highlands of scotland, 15 in edinburgh. across the board by tomorrow it is going to be a lot colder. temperatures in the highlands about 4 in kinlochewe and 4, as well, in edinburgh. the change to much colder weather has already started to take place in scotland. these northerly winds will continue to dive southwards across the whole of the uk, reaching the south by tuesday. so this afternoon is where the colder air is. across scotland rain moving into the far north of england and northern ireland, too. south of this, a lot of dry weather, the last of the mild days with temperatures still reaching double figures. through the afternoon those temperatures dropping in scotland, highs of around 2 degrees for a time in scotland through the afternoon.
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overnight tonight things turn icy with showers frequently moving into scotland. some of those will be of snow. the band of rain continues southwards across england and wales. still mild across the far south — 7 degrees. but otherwise a frost is going to be quite widespread, particularly in the countryside. so a cold start to the day on tuesday. we will have frequent snow showers, accumulations maybe around 2—5cm here. more on the highest ground. and the winds could get very strong for a time towards the middle part of the day, particularly in orkney where we could get gusts of 60, maybe 70 mph for a time, so, very blustery. temporary blizzard conditions over the higher ground in scotland as well. wintry showers moving down the irish sea into the north of wales, north—west england. could see a little bit of sleet or snow mixed in with some of those but the lion's share of the snow showers will be across scotland, that's where we will see most of the accumulations. for wednesday there will be further showers coming down the eastern coasts of scotland and england, a few of those could be wintry and there will be frequent showers as well affecting north wales
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and north west england, perhaps running on to the north west midlands. another fairly chilly day, particularly in those cold winds. then for thursday a weather front moves into that cold air. there will be a spell of snow on the leading edge of this system but the snow will tend to become confined to the high ground for many as milder air pushes in for at least for a time. we could see some of the snow lasting for quite a while to the east of the pennines and eastern areas of scotland, so there may be one or two issues, more especially over high ground. that's your weather.
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this is bbc news broadcasting to viewers in the uk and around the globe. i'm ben brown. our top stories — in the last few minutes, a legal document which prince andrew's lawyer believes will stop a civil case against him in the us has been made made public. the duke of york has consistenly denied sexually assaulting virginia giuffre when she was 17. lawyers on both sides of the atlantic will be scrutinising the document which has just been unsealed to see what impact, if any, it will have on the case. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, rules out further covid measures in england for now despite the ongoing rise in omicron infections. the pressure on our nhs, on our hospitals is going to be considerable in the course
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of the next couple of weeks

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