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tv   Newscast  BBC News  May 28, 2021 1:30am-2:00am BST

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ordered afresh inquiry into the origins of the covid outbreak. suggestions that the pandemic began as a result of a leak from a chinese laboratory are persisting — beijing says us intelligence has a dark history of spreading misinformation. belarus�*s diversion of a passenger plane and the arrest of an opposition journalist on board is to be investigated by the un civil aviation agency. the mother of roman protasevich is asking for international help to organise his release. the united nations human rights council has agreed to open an investigation into this month's conflict between israel and the militant group hamas. hamas has welcomed the decision. but israel is describing it as a moral failure.
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now on bbc news — newscast the viewer, the concerned viewer is the labour peer who is here. hello, peter. just how bad was this tie?— bad was this tie? one thing adam is not _ bad was this tie? one thing adam is not as _ bad was this tie? one thing adam is not as a _ bad was this tie? one thing | adam is not as a fashionista. bad was this tie? one thing i adam is not as a fashionista. i want to see this horrendous tie. here is tai a. how would you describe it? i tie. here is tai a. how would you describe it?— tie. here is tai a. how would you describe it? i would say it is a classic— you describe it? i would say it is a classic navy _ you describe it? i would say it
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is a classic navy standard. - tory supporting tie. we have no allegiances. it isjust tory supporting tie. we have no allegiances. it is just blue. the next one isjust allegiances. it is just blue. the next one is just red. allegiances. it is just blue. the next one isjust red. it has a sort of corded appearance and looks like it is trying to masquerade as being silk but i'm not sure.— masquerade as being silk but i'm not sure. what you reckon about that _ i'm not sure. what you reckon about that one? _ i'm not sure. what you reckon| about that one? masquerading i'm not sure. what you reckon . about that one? masquerading as silk in red- _ about that one? masquerading as silk in red. that _ about that one? masquerading as silk in red. that looks _ about that one? masquerading as silk in red. that looks to - about that one? masquerading as silk in red. that looks to me - silk in red. that looks to me “unior silk in red. that looks to me junior minister _ silk in red. that looks to me junior minister new- silk in red. that looks to me junior minister new labour. silk in red. that looks to me i junior minister new labour era. this one is really radical. so this is skinny, floral, a bit like something that might be on wallpaper. navy background. sort of, trying to give the impression of liberty but it is just not. this is the extreme
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example to make the others are reasonable. did example to make the others are reasonable-— reasonable. did you have a hi ie reasonable. did you have a hippie upbringing? - reasonable. did you have a hippie upbringing? all- reasonable. did you have a hippie upbringing? all i - reasonable. did you have a hippie upbringing? alli do| reasonable. did you have a i hippie upbringing? alli do is hippie upbringing? all i do is warning _ hippie upbringing? all i do is warning against broadcasting in that tie — warning against broadcasting in that tie from an indian restaurant because you make merge — restaurant because you make merge into the wallpaper. is merge into the wallpaper. someone merge into the wallpaper. i3 someone who knows about political communication you might want to listen. it is either not wearing a tie because this is a podcast. find because this is a podcast. and lauren the _ because this is a podcast. and lauren the same _ because this is a podcast. fific lauren the same studio but because this is a podcast. fific lauren the same studio but we are still two metres apart i'm sorry you did not have the flowery one on. i sorry you did not have the flowery one on.— sorry you did not have the flowery one on. sorry you did not have the flowe one on. . , ., flowery one on. i am chris down the hall. flowery one on. i am chris down the hall- we _ flowery one on. i am chris down the hall. we will _ flowery one on. i am chris down the hall. we will hear _ flowery one on. i am chris down the hall. we will hear from - the hall. we will hear from lord mandelson _ the hall. we will hear from lord mandelson on - the hall. we will hear from lord mandelson on lots - the hall. we will hear from lord mandelson on lots of| lord mandelson on lots of
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things. lord mandelson on lots of thins. ,, ., ,., ., lord mandelson on lots of thins. ,, ., ., we things. showing potential. we -robabl things. showing potential. we probably should _ things. showing potential. we probably should not _ things. showing potential. we probably should not be - things. showing potential. we l probably should not be laughing because there is a serious story today about the bbc and an edition of panorama about another edition of panorama and it was that famous one from the 90s where martin bashir interviewed princess diana. there's been a huge investigation by a retired judge into how the bbc got that interview. it judge into how the bbc got that interview. , ., , ., interview. it is devastating in its indictment _ interview. it is devastating in its indictment of _ interview. it is devastating in its indictment of the - interview. it is devastating in its indictment of the bbc - interview. it is devastating in its indictment of the bbc is l interview. it is devastating in l its indictment of the bbc is an institution _ its indictment of the bbc is an institution and _ its indictment of the bbc is an institution and some - its indictment of the bbc is an institution and some of- its indictment of the bbc is an institution and some of the i institution and some of the individuals— institution and some of the individuals involved. - institution and some of the individuals involved. for. individuals involved. for context _ individuals involved. for context you _ individuals involved. for context you mentioned i individuals involved. for. context you mentioned the famous _ context you mentioned the famous notorious- context you mentioned the famous notorious martin i context you mentioned the i famous notorious martin bashir interview— famous notorious martin bashir interview in _ famous notorious martin bashir interview in 1995. _ famous notorious martin bashir interview in 1995. this - famous notorious martin bashir interview in 1995. this was i interview in 1995. this was where _ interview in 1995. this was where she _ interview in 1995. this was where she said _ interview in 1995. this was where she said there i interview in 1995. this was where she said there are l interview in 1995. this was i where she said there are three people — where she said there are three people in— where she said there are three people in the _ where she said there are three people in the marriage - people in the marriage therefore _ people in the marriage therefore it— people in the marriage therefore it was - people in the marriage therefore it was a i people in the marriage therefore it was a bit l people in the marriage - therefore it was a bit crowded and we — therefore it was a bit crowded and we have _ therefore it was a bit crowded and we have known _ therefore it was a bit crowded and we have known for- therefore it was a bit crowded and we have known for some i therefore it was a bit crowded i and we have known for some time that interview— and we have known for some time that interview was _ and we have known for some time that interview was obtained - that interview was obtained after— that interview was obtained after some _ that interview was obtained after some fake _ that interview was obtained after some fake bank- that interview was obtained i after some fake bank statements which _ after some fake bank statements which martin _ after some fake bank statements which martin bashir— after some fake bank statements which martin bashir asked - after some fake bank statements which martin bashir asked a i which martin bashir asked a graphic— which martin bashir asked a graphic designer— which martin bashir asked a graphic designer to - which martin bashir asked a graphic designer to mark i which martin bashir asked a l graphic designer to mark out were — graphic designer to mark out were shown _ graphic designer to mark out were shown to _ graphic designer to mark out were shown to earl- graphic designer to mark out were shown to earl spencer, | were shown to earl spencer, princess—
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were shown to earl spencer, princess diana's _ were shown to earl spencer, princess diana's brother, i were shown to earl spencer, princess diana's brother, isl were shown to earl spencer, | princess diana's brother, is a way— princess diana's brother, is a way of— princess diana's brother, is a way of gaining _ princess diana's brother, is a way of gaining his _ princess diana's brother, is a way of gaining his trust i princess diana's brother, is a way of gaining his trust and l way of gaining his trust and access— way of gaining his trust and access to _ way of gaining his trust and access to princess - way of gaining his trust and access to princess diana. i way of gaining his trust and i access to princess diana. this story— access to princess diana. this story kicked _ access to princess diana. this story kicked off— access to princess diana. this story kicked off in _ access to princess diana. this story kicked off in a _ access to princess diana. this story kicked off in a big - access to princess diana. this story kicked off in a big way . story kicked off in a big way around _ story kicked off in a big way around the _ story kicked off in a big way around the time _ story kicked off in a big way around the time and - story kicked off in a big way around the time and there i story kicked off in a big way i around the time and there was a bbc investigation _ around the time and there was a bbc investigation in _ around the time and there was a bbc investigation in the - around the time and there was a bbc investigation in the 19905 . bbc investigation in the 19905 which — bbc investigation in the 19905 which essentially— bbc investigation in the 19905 which essentially cleared i bbc investigation in the 19905 which essentially cleared him i which essentially cleared him of which e55entially cleared him of any— which essentially cleared him of any wrongdoing. _ which essentially cleared him of any wrongdoing. coming . which essentially cleared him l of any wrongdoing. coming up which essentially cleared him i of any wrongdoing. coming up to 25th anniversary— of any wrongdoing. coming up to 25th anniversary people - of any wrongdoing. coming up to 25th anniversary people looked l 25th anniversary people looked into it — 25th anniversary people looked into it again— 25th anniversary people looked into it again and _ 25th anniversary people looked into it again and found - into it again and found something _ into it again and found something missing i into it again and found i something missing here and there — something missing here and there was_ something missing here and there was a _ something missing here and there was a bit _ something missing here and there was a bit of— something missing here and there was a bit of a - something missing here and there was a bit of a row- something missing here and there was a bit of a row last| there was a bit of a row last year — there was a bit of a row last year a _ there was a bit of a row last year. a report— there was a bit of a row last year. a report has- there was a bit of a row last year. a report has been- there was a bit of a row last i year. a report has been issued and in — year. a report has been issued and in that— year. a report has been issued and in that report _ year. a report has been issued and in that report he _ year. a report has been issued and in that report he says- year. a report has been issued and in that report he says bad| and in that report he says bad things— and in that report he says bad things about _ and in that report he says bad things about the _ and in that report he says bad things about the bbc - and in that report he says bad things about the bbc and - and in that report he says bad things about the bbc and the | things about the bbc and the first thing _ things about the bbc and the first thing is— things about the bbc and the first thing is he _ things about the bbc and the first thing is he accuses - first thing is he accuses martih_ first thing is he accuses martin bashir— first thing is he accuses martin bashir of- first thing is he accuses . martin bashir of repeated tying _
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coming up to 25th - anniversary people looked into it again and found - something missing here and there was a bit. of a row last year. a report has been issued - and in that report he says bad things about the bbc and l the first thing is he accuses martin bashir- of repeated lying. i drew idrewa i drew a line between the two events — i drew a line between the two events. ~ . ., i drew a line between the two events. n, . , events. martin that she resigned _ events. martin that she resigned from - events. martin that she resigned from the - events. martin that she resigned from the bbc. events. martin that she - resigned from the bbc. what has he been saying today? he
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resigned from the bbc. what has he been saying today?— he been saying today? he has said once _ he been saying today? he has said once again _ he been saying today? he has said once again that _ he been saying today? he has said once again that he - he been saying today? he hasl said once again that he accepts that he was wrong and said it was a stupid mistake to ask for these bank statements to be marked up, as he put it, but he also strongly reassert that princess diana would have given him this interview anyway. it is a very central point that he says had it not been for these bank statements she was still in a place where she wanted to speak to the bbc and he also says that he is proud of the interview and he says proud of the fact that she discussed issues around mental health in particular. there is a lot of things about bulimia and dark stuff about mental health at the time and not many people were talking about it and he has reiterated that he is proud of that contribution that interview made to public life. a lot of this weather it is ever— a lot of this weather it is ever spencer reflecting on martin— ever spencer reflecting on martin bashir reflecting. there is no _ martin bashir reflecting. there is no way— martin bashir reflecting. there is no way of knowing what would have _ is no way of knowing what would have happened in a parallel universe _ have happened in a parallel universe despite all that the speculation and chatter that
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they— speculation and chatter that they will undoubtedly be about this _ they will undoubtedly be about this it — they will undoubtedly be about this it is — they will undoubtedly be about this. it is a significant story~ _ this. it is a significant story. but i suppose what is also — story. but i suppose what is also hard _ story. but i suppose what is also hard to tell is what the impact _ also hard to tell is what the impact really will be on the bbc — impact really will be on the bbc. the strange about the bbc and were — bbc. the strange about the bbc and were sitting in the bbc but there _ and were sitting in the bbc but there is— and were sitting in the bbc but there is immediately a lot of, this is— there is immediately a lot of, this is appalling. a stain on the — this is appalling. a stain on the bbc _ this is appalling. a stain on the bbc. but it is such a very tong — the bbc. but it is such a very tong time _ the bbc. but it is such a very long time ago. so i don't know how— long time ago. so i don't know how sure — long time ago. so i don't know how sure you feel we can be about — how sure you feel we can be about what the impact will be because — about what the impact will be because it is a long time ago and — because it is a long time ago and not _ because it is a long time ago and not the first time concerns about— and not the first time concerns about this _ and not the first time concerns about this interview have been raised — about this interview have been raised it— about this interview have been raised. it has been covered off and on — raised. it has been covered off and on for— raised. it has been covered off and on for a long time, too. the — and on for a long time, too. the one _ and on for a long time, too. the one thing that i would say, a key pillar of the bbc�*s rent since have been learned but one thing that we can set defence is the fact that he was rehired when tony hall was director—general of the bbc and he was rehired as a religious affairs correspondent in 2016
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which shows that tony hall who conducted that investigation, nous say it was a mistake. but the fact is he was rehired in the fact is he was rehired in the five years ago and the truth is, as you know better than anyone, as we all know in the slaughterhouse that is modern social media this is going to be to days and days of very bad headlines, damaging memes and social media is where nuance goes to die in some people might lose the fact that this is historic. some people will fail to understand this is something that might this will have a damage on the bbc�*s reputation. you need to get to bed, probably, because you are an early riser now. i bed, probably, because you are an early riser now.— an early riser now. i am an early riser— an early riser now. i am an early riser but _ an early riser now. i am an early riser but i _ an early riser now. i am an early riser but i am - an early riser now. i am an early riser but i am on - an early riser now. i am an early riser but i am on a i an early riser now. i am an. early riser but i am on a day off tomorrow. thank you for having me on. peter, do you remember what it was like seeing that interview at the
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time and did anyone give any thought about how the interview had actually been obtained and what was going on behind the scenes? ., ., , ., scenes? no, nobody went through the mechanics. _ scenes? no, nobody went through the mechanics. it _ scenes? no, nobody went through the mechanics. it was _ the mechanics. it was jaw—dropping. it was also upsetting. you felt that princess diana had gone through really heart—rending period of her life. there was something very authentic about it and had to say much more authentic than ifound to say much more authentic than i found the to say much more authentic than ifound the meghan to say much more authentic than i found the meghan markle intervene more recently. i mean, i think the bbc has been absolutely right to face up to this. it is a terrible blot on the bbc�*s copybook as the director—general has honestly said. the truth is that the interview was obtained under fraudulent basis. it
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deliberately, diana sense of paranoia, a sense of isolation including from a staff and personal protection officer, that was deliberately fed or manipulated in order to get that interview and you just have to ask yourself if that had not been the case and the interview had not taken place then perhaps history would have been different. perhaps if she had not been quite so isolated from her staff and her security people she wouldn't have been in paris so unprotected and so exposed to those human elements. ijust asked the question, that is all. that was you in the 905, let's talk about you in the notice when you are a european trade commissioner in brussels doing trade deals. there's been a bit
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of a rift in the cabinet over the uk's negotiating position for the upcoming trade deal with australia. in for the upcoming trade deal with australia.— for the upcoming trade deal with australia. in one corner ou've with australia. in one corner you've got — with australia. in one corner you've got george _ with australia. in one corner you've got george eustace l with australia. in one corner. you've got george eustace who should be a friend of the famine fisherman who is the secretary of state for the environment and rural affairs. he once said to be a trade deal with australia but he wants to be trade deal with australia are quite a lot of conditions attached so to protect farmers in the uk from the brute force of aussie farmers flooding the country with cheap exports. that is the fear. the other corner you've got the secretary of state for international trade who is desperate to do trade deal with australia and wants it to be a kind of no holds barred, let's go free trade buccaneering at the top of the list. in the middle quite a lot of people trying to find a consensus but it is tricky and awkward and relevant in a big away for two reasons. one because this would be the first radio the uk does that is
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notjust first radio the uk does that is not just a first radio the uk does that is notjust a rollover from the kind we used to have when we were in the eu and second of all of course this is being seen as a proxy for the kind of relationship the uk once with the rest of the world is in our globally british post—brexit feature. this isjust the globally british post—brexit feature. this is just the sort of thing you have got to get used to, isn't it?— of thing you have got to get used to, isn't it? you do when i dared used to, isn't it? you do when i dared to _ used to, isn't it? you do when i dared to get _ used to, isn't it? you do when i dared to get a _ used to, isn't it? you do when i dared to get a good - used to, isn't it? you do when i dared to get a good deal - i dared to get a good deal somewhere else? it i dared to get a good deal somewhere else?- i dared to get a good deal somewhere else? it is part of the course — somewhere else? it is part of the course and _ somewhere else? it is part of the course and i'm _ somewhere else? it is part of the course and i'm very - the course and i'm very familiar— the course and i'm very familiar with these trade—offs. everything of course at this stage — everything of course at this stage is— everything of course at this stage is completely exaggerated and overblown because when it is finally — and overblown because when it is finally agreed the actual ambition and standard of the entire — ambition and standard of the entire thing will be much lower than _ entire thing will be much lower than anyone is talking about now — than anyone is talking about now~ i— than anyone is talking about now i do _ than anyone is talking about now. i do not believe that australian food imports are going — australian food imports are going to _ australian food imports are going to swamp our markets. but it does— going to swamp our markets. but it does say— going to swamp our markets. but it does say something about the
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politics— it does say something about the politics of trade in food and i think— politics of trade in food and i think that if this sort of anxiety— think that if this sort of anxiety is being created over australian land, wait until we -et australian land, wait until we get back— australian land, wait until we get back to american chlorinated chicken and hormone injected — chlorinated chicken and hormone injected beef, then everyone will really start taking over there — will really start taking over there again. you had seen nothing _ there again. you had seen nothing yet. there again. you had seen nothing yet-— there again. you had seen nothing yet. there again. you had seen nothin: et. ~ , ., ~' nothing yet. when you think the compromise _ nothing yet. when you think the compromise should _ nothing yet. when you think the compromise should lie? - nothing yet. when you think the compromise should lie? wherel compromise should lie? where would you fall down on, ? i compromise should lie? where would you fall down on,? i know where it will— would you fall down on,? i know where it will fall _ would you fall down on,? i know where it will fall down _ would you fall down on,? i know where it will fall down on. - would you fall down on,? i know where it will fall down on. it - where it will fall down on. it witi— where it will fall down on. it will fatt— where it will fall down on. it will fall down on the side of george _ will fall down on the side of george eustis. it will fall down _ george eustis. it will fall down on the side of every agricultural trade deal that i've ever seen or negotiated and — i've ever seen or negotiated and that— i've ever seen or negotiated and that is that tariff elimination, which one side of the argument will make great tail and. _ the argument will make great tailand, shout the argument will make great tail and, shout from the rooftops about, will then be caveat — rooftops about, will then be caveat it _ rooftops about, will then be caveat it by quotas and by the whole — caveat it by quotas and by the
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whole thing being introduced over— whole thing being introduced over very many years. and that is how— over very many years. and that is how it — over very many years. and that is how it always is with agriculture because they are very. — agriculture because they are very, very sensitive sectors for att— very, very sensitive sectors for all concerned. the problem for all concerned. the problem for britain _ for all concerned. the problem for britain is that by and large _ for britain is that by and large are traders already open to the — large are traders already open to the rest of the world. the only— to the rest of the world. the only part _ to the rest of the world. the only part of our economy that isn't — only part of our economy that isn't is — only part of our economy that isn't is agriculture. it is the only— isn't is agriculture. it is the only seriously protected area that we — only seriously protected area that we have to and protects and therefore offer to the rest of the — and therefore offer to the rest of the world in order to get benefits— of the world in order to get benefits and opportunities in return — benefits and opportunities in return i_ benefits and opportunities in return. i am afraid that agriculture is going to be continuously exposed in each and every successive trade negotiation whether it be with australia, the united states of brazit — australia, the united states of brazil. anywhere where there are big — brazil. anywhere where there are big agricultural exporters we are — are big agricultural exporters we are going to be on the
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receiving end of very tough and offensive — receiving end of very tough and offensive demands made against our farm — offensive demands made against our farm sector. in offensive demands made against our farm sector.— our farm sector. in the offensive _ our farm sector. in the offensive is _ our farm sector. in the offensive is in - our farm sector. in the i offensive is in something our farm sector. in the - offensive is in something we are asking for not offensive as how dare you? fir are asking for not offensive as how dare you?— how dare you? or american football- — how dare you? or american football. offensive - how dare you? or american football. offensive over- football. offensive over agriculture. _ football. offensive over agriculture. your - football. offensive over agriculture. your own i football. offensive over- agriculture. your own offensive on services. and if you fall over— on services. and if you fall over yourself and you are so keen— over yourself and you are so keen to _ over yourself and you are so keen to show how quickly can achieve — keen to show how quickly can achieve these negotiations you are in— achieve these negotiations you are in danger of sacrificing the — are in danger of sacrificing the goals and targets that you established for yourselves. because you are so keen to show off politically because to realise those goals and offensive targets it requires more — offensive targets it requires more negotiation. it requires detait — more negotiation. it requires detait it _ more negotiation. it requires detail. it requires being prepared to walk away from a
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negotiation if you are not getting _ negotiation if you are not getting what you want rather than — getting what you want rather thanjust throwing getting what you want rather than just throwing everything in in — than just throwing everything in in a — than just throwing everything in in a mad great harry in order— in in a mad great harry in orderto— in in a mad great harry in orderto to in in a mad great harry in order to to produce something to wave — order to to produce something to wave around at the 620. you to wave around at the g20. you not to wave around at the g20. you rrot suggesting _ to wave around at the 620. gm, not suggesting they want to grip and grin moment. have to see if your prediction comes to. ~ ., ., . ,, . to. were going to talk about trains now — to. were going to talk about trains now because - to. were going to talk about trains now because if- to. were going to talk about trains now because if you i to. were going to talk about | trains now because if you are to. were going to talk about i trains now because if you are a fan of thomas the tank engine you will understand this reference. a new idea to bring all the railways in england together for the customers which makes much more sense but the new body, not called british rail but great british railways. by bringing the timetabling and the ticketing and network together effectively under one roof it does mean that you do know who is responsible when things go wrong. there is a single guiding mind or is the media often says a controller, running it. no reference to
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annie and klara bell. you are getting on trains a lot now. i getting on trains a lot now. i get the impression this blueprint for the railways could eventually mean that things do feel a bit different when it comes to tickets and scanning your phone at the gate and bt if you want a refund. not have as much as i watched thomas— not have as much as i watched thomas the tank engine with my little _ thomas the tank engine with my little ones. i could go through the whole cast this but i went. it the whole cast this but i went. it is _ the whole cast this but i went. it is quite _ the whole cast this but i went. it is quite a change coming given— it is quite a change coming given that one of the big criticisms of the privatisation area — criticisms of the privatisation area was— criticisms of the privatisation area was one of fragmentation. splitting — area was one of fragmentation. splitting up he was responsible for the — splitting up he was responsible for the tracking and signalling a people around trains and in all that— a people around trains and in all that complexity that you -et all that complexity that you get as— all that complexity that you get as a _ all that complexity that you get as a customer. i guess the case _ get as a customer. i guess the case that— get as a customer. i guess the case that is being made is trying _ case that is being made is trying to— case that is being made is trying to make the most of keeping _ trying to make the most of keeping an element of privatisation but keeping an estimate under that single new
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organisation.— organisation. why were lots of eo - le in organisation. why were lots of people in the _ organisation. why were lots of people in the westminster - people in the westminster village watching a clip of penny mordants having a go at angela rayner,?— penny mordants having a go at angela rayner,? cash your mind back seven _ angela rayner,? cash your mind back seven days _ angela rayner,? cash your mind back seven days and _ angela rayner,? cash your mind back seven days and we - angela rayner,? cash your mind back seven days and we are - angela rayner,? cash your mind back seven days and we are at i back seven days and we are at the end of a vigorous few days of interviews been given by the deputy leader the labour party. after a pretty brutal briefing war between her and secure starmer in the wake of labour's not good election results, the end of which she came out with lots of newjobs, one of which has given her a more front facing role, in theory, in public and in the comments, and this was herfirst public and in the comments, and this was her first big outing where she really wanted a socket to the tories but... she had stopped — socket to the tories but... she had stopped back— socket to the tories but... she had stopped back at her because she was making claims about dodgy donations and crony contracts and the tables were
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turned. if contracts and the tables were turned. , ., ., . ,, turned. if you were to take every single _ turned. if you were to take every single mp _ turned. if you were to take every single mp she - turned. if you were to take every single mp she has i turned. if you were to take i every single mp she has made an mp allegation _ every single mp she has made an mp allegation about _ every single mp she has made an mp allegation about this - mp allegation about this afternoon _ mp allegation about this afternoon and _ mp allegation about this afternoon and the - mp allegation about this afternoon and the kettle mp allegation about this i afternoon and the kettle did political _ afternoon and the kettle did political donations - afternoon and the kettle did political donations they i afternoon and the kettle did| political donations they have received _ political donations they have received since _ political donations they have received since the _ political donations they have received since the pandemic| received since the pandemic started. _ received since the pandemic started, since _ received since the pandemic started, since january- received since the pandemic| started, since january 2020, received since the pandemic. started, since january 2020, if you were — started, since january 2020, if you were to— started, since january 2020, if you were to add _ started, since january 2020, if you were to add them - started, since january 2020, if you were to add them all- started, since january 2020, if you were to add them all up, i started, since january 2020, if| you were to add them all up, if you were to add them all up, if you were — you were to add them all up, if you were to— you were to add them all up, if you were to double _ you were to add them all up, if you were to double them, i you were to add them all up, if you were to double them, no, i you were to add them all up, ifi you were to double them, no, if you were to double them, no, if you were — you were to double them, no, if you were to— you were to double them, no, if you were to quadruple - you were to double them, no, if you were to quadruple them, i you were to double them, no, if. you were to quadruple them, you 'ust you were to quadruple them, you just about — you were to quadruple them, you just about match _ you were to quadruple them, you just about match what _ you were to quadruple them, you just about match what the - just about match what the honourable _ just about match what the honourable lady- just about match what the honourable lady herself i just about match what the i honourable lady herself has received _ honourable lady herself has received in _ honourable lady herself has received in the _ honourable lady herself has received in the same - honourable lady herself has received in the same time. i honourable lady herself hasl received in the same time. is she received in the same time. she not the future now? . received in the same time. is she not the future now? . allj received in the same time. isl she not the future now? . alli know is the — she not the future now? . alli know is the labour _ she not the future now? . alli know is the labour party i she not the future now? . all i know is the labour party needs to transform its organisation, skill— to transform its organisation, skill base, campaigning and communications. angela is much better— communications. angela is much better in— communications. angela is much better in a — communications. angela is much better in a public facing role dealing _ better in a public facing role dealing with policy than she was — dealing with policy than she was dropped into the bowels of the labour party head office and expected to sort out the
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machinery and campaigning and organisation of the party. needs— organisation of the party. needs a complete overhaul and i'm needs a complete overhaul and i'm sure — needs a complete overhaul and i'm sure that has now become here _ i'm sure that has now become here starmer's priority. the truth is that _ here starmer's priority. the truth is that the _ here starmer's priority. tie: truth is that the labour party's whole campaign pa rty�*s whole campaign organisation party's whole campaign organisation has been completely run down under jeremy corbyn. i mean, people and their skills up and thrown to the winds. i mean, we have staff their party head office and elsewhere who frankly are underqualified, unmotivated, they were put there because they were put there because they were put there because they were cronies ofjeremy corbyn. and ijust, these are not people who you can transform by giving more support to. i think the staffing needs changing. we need to overhauljust about
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everything, really. the organisation, the way in which we have been selecting candidates, ourfunding base, candidates, our funding base, communications, candidates, ourfunding base, communications, what we did the social media. the whole thing needs a complete overhaul. could you write now tell us what voters should believe is here starmer's one central idea. if you could sum it up in a sentence in a way that we all know lots of people consume politics in the briefest of glimpses, what would you say was? it glimpses, what would you say was? . glimpses, what would you say was? , ., ., ., ., was? it is for him to do not me. was? it is for him to do not me- he _ was? it is for him to do not me. he speaks _ was? it is for him to do not me. he speaks on - was? it is for him to do not me. he speaks on his i was? it is for him to do not me. he speaks on his own| was? it is for him to do not i me. he speaks on his own behalf and i_ me. he speaks on his own behalf and i don't — me. he speaks on his own behalf and i don't speak for him. is a senior labour— and i don't speak for him. is — senior labour figure could you tell us what you think it is because if you can't isn't that actually the very problem. to meet freedom. i mean not the freedom — meet freedom. i mean not the freedom that comes from being self—reliant or self—made, the freedom — self—reliant or self—made, the freedom that comes from a strong _
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freedom that comes from a strong society and the state commit _ strong society and the state commit creating a platform on which — commit creating a platform on which everyone can grow tall and persist fulfil their potential and when they need to be protected yes, the state should _ be protected yes, the state should be there to do that for them — should be there to do that for them so— should be there to do that for them. so it is about freedom to me in— them. so it is about freedom to me in politics. them. so it is about freedom to me in politics-— me in politics. the next big challenge _ me in politics. the next big challenge will _ me in politics. the next big challenge will probably i me in politics. the next big challenge will probably be l me in politics. the next big i challenge will probably be the upcoming by—election. diane abbott gave a quote this week saying he faces another by—election in the coming months. if labour loses a game they must surely be curtains for him. do you agree with her? i'm guessing not but it is a test for him, isn't it? everything is a test every day he gets— everything is a test every day he gets up in the morning he has been _ he gets up in the morning he has been tested. what i like that— has been tested. what i like that and _ has been tested. what i like that and support in his leadership is that he knows that— leadership is that he knows that if— leadership is that he knows that if we're going to transform the country, we first have _ transform the country, we first have to — transform the country, we first have to transform ourselves, our policies and ideas. and
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without— our policies and ideas. and without that change we are not going _ without that change we are not going to — without that change we are not going to be in any fit state to fight — going to be in any fit state to fight and _ going to be in any fit state to fight and win the next general election _ fight and win the next general election. what i would say about— election. what i would say about here starmer, he needs allies — about here starmer, he needs allies he _ about here starmer, he needs allies. he needs to recruit soldiers _ allies. he needs to recruit soldiers. he's an army to help him _ soldiers. he's an army to help him drive _ soldiers. he's an army to help him drive through that change in the — him drive through that change in the party because we know that— in the party because we know that people who want to drag their— that people who want to drag their feet or are yet to be persuaded or want to block change _ persuaded or want to block change frankly are greater in number— change frankly are greater in number and change frankly are greater in numberand certainly change frankly are greater in number and certainly more vocal and determined then those people _ and determined then those people who are prepared to put the heads up above the parapet in order— the heads up above the parapet in order to bring about that necessary change. that is in the nature of politics. i think that— the nature of politics. i think that the _ the nature of politics. i think that the problem in a sense that— that the problem in a sense that he _ that the problem in a sense that he has is when he was elected _ that he has is when he was elected as leader he gave the impression that, you know, he wanted — impression that, you know, he wanted to— impression that, you know, he
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wanted to replace corbyn, change _ wanted to replace corbyn, change the face at the top without _ change the face at the top without rethinking our policies and that— without rethinking our policies and that people could vote for him as— and that people could vote for him as a — and that people could vote for him as a replacement for corbyn but continue with the same policies _ but continue with the same policies. now, idon't but continue with the same policies. now, i don't know if people — policies. now, i don't know if people did get that impression are zero— people did get that impression are zero or how many people got that impression but i think impression was created and i think— impression was created and i think he _ impression was created and i think he now realises that that is not — think he now realises that that is not going to win as the next election — is not going to win as the next election is— is not going to win as the next election. . . is not going to win as the next election. , . ., ., election. is he a good politician? _ election. is he a good politician? is - election. is he a good politician? is he i election. is he a good politician? is he goodj election. is he a good - politician? is he good enough the craft of politics? i politician? is he good enough the craft of politics?- the craft of politics? i think that he has _ the craft of politics? i think that he has the _ the craft of politics? i think that he has the right i the craft of politics? i think. that he has the right instincts as a _ that he has the right instincts as a politician. i think he is somebody who is decent and strong — somebody who is decent and strong values. i think he somebody i would characterise as being — somebody i would characterise as being on the left of the party— as being on the left of the party but i think he is
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pragmatic in his approach and has a — pragmatic in his approach and has a very— pragmatic in his approach and has a very modern outlook as a politician — has a very modern outlook as a politician-— politician. that is not a yes. as i politician. that is not a yes. as i have — politician. that is not a yes. as i have already _ politician. that is not a yes. as i have already said. i politician. that is not a yes. as i have already said. he l as i have already said. he needs— as i have already said. he needs more support. i think too many— needs more support. i think too many people thought when he became — many people thought when he became leader all we needed to deal was — became leader all we needed to deal was minus corbyn. they were — deal was minus corbyn. they were not— deal was minus corbyn. they were not right then and less right— were not right then and less right now. were not right then and less right now— were not right then and less riaht now. . ,, i. . right now. thank you. back that is enough _ right now. thank you. back that is enough for — right now. thank you. back that is enough for us. _ right now. thank you. back that is enough for us. evie _ right now. thank you. back that is enough for us. evie petered l is enough for us. evie petered out? , , ., ., ., out? definitely time to go now. goodbye- _ out? definitely time to go now. goodbye. goodbye. _ hello there. we saw plenty of sunshine today, and it felt much warmer across the board than what we've been used to this month so far. there are some subtle changes overnight.
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we've got a weak weather front pushing into western areas. that's going to bring the thicker cloud to many, but also outbreaks of rain across the west, initially for northern ireland, and then that rain will spill its way eastwards through the night across western scotland in towards western england and also western wales. there'll some mistiness and murkiness around, too. but the further east you are, although there will be more cloud around, it should tend to stay dry here. those temperatures no lower than around 8—11 degrees for most, so milder than last night. so, here we go — here's the pressure chart for friday, then. we've got this weak weather front across western areas pushing into high pressure, so that's always going to weaken it. so, it looks like the rain out west will slowly peter out through the course of the day, but could stay rather grey, damp and misty here. further north and east, we'll see the best of any sunny spells and dry weather, but where the sunshine does appear and pushes temperatures close to the 20 celsius mark, then we could see the odd heavy shower developing, particularly in towards east anglia. and temperatures not as high as what we've seen today. now, for the bank holiday weekend, though, we're going to see lots of sunshine around, particularly for england and wales, as high pressure continues
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to build in across the country. for saturday, there will be a legacy of cloud left from that weather front, so patchy cloud and sunny spells sums it up nicely. maybe the odd shower mixed into there, but most places will be dry. where you get the sunshine, temperatures reaching the low 205 celsius again. further north, where skies stay cloudy, then the high teens celsius. for sunday, though, i think it looks sunnier across the board. little bit of fairweather cloud bubbling up through the afternoon, and there will be light winds as well around this area of high pressure, so it's going to feel much warmer than what we've been used to. 22—23 degrees across the south, 20 celsius there across parts of scotland, too. now, for the bank holiday monday, we'll see this weather front push in from the north—west, affecting the north west of scotland, parts of northern ireland. but for the south and east of scotland, much of england and wales, it's pretty similar to sunday. plenty of sunshine, light winds and feeling warm — in fact, even warmer. we could make 2a—25 degrees across the south or the south east. and it stays fine, settled and sunny, particularly for england and wales as we head through the first week ofjune.
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temperatures holding up at around the mid—205 celsius across the south east.
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welcome to bbc news, i'm ben boulos. our top stories. china warns the us as president biden orders a fresh inquiry into the origins of covid, and suggestions of a chinese laboratory leak persist. the growing row over the arrest of a belarusian journalist whose flight was diverted, as a un agency investigates, his mother asks for international help. i beg you, i ask you for help. i call upon you to save roman, save my son. has the recent fighting between israel and hamas revealed faultlines in america's relationship with its main regional ally? and shedding light on dark matter — scientists map out the most enigmatic substance in the universe.

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