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tv   Newswatch  BBC News  May 22, 2021 3:45am-4:01am BST

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web of elaborate lies a web of elaborate lies to win the trust of the princess. what makes it more _ the trust of the princess. what makes it more wicked - the trust of the princess. what makes it more wicked is - the trust of the princess. what makes it more wicked is the i makes it more wicked is the aggrieved detail which martin bashir— aggrieved detail which martin bashir seems to have gone into. 425 years. — bashir seems to have gone into. 425 years, the bbc defended its global scoop but now stands accused of a failure of integrity. accused of a failure of integrity-— integrity. having left the bbc in 1999, martin _ integrity. having left the bbc in 1999, martin bashir- integrity. having left the bbc. in 1999, martin bashir returned in 1999, martin bashir returned in 2016, appearing on newswatch having been promoted to religion editor. last week, he resigned again due to issues with his health, and this week apologised for mocking up the documents he showed to el spencer but that they had no bearing on princess diana's choice to take part in the interview, of which he said he remained immensely proud. for its part, the bbc offered a full and unconditional apology and director—general tim davey said this to media editor and russian. , ., , russian. the report identifies
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three very — russian. the report identifies three very serious _ russian. the report identifies three very serious failings - l three very serious failings — amol rajan. the first is martin bashir�*s investigation the weather was carried out. to be clear, that was a breach of the current editorial guidelines at the time in 1993. you are right with the second thing around the investigation. it is clear it was not good enough. and it didn't get to the truth. and then finally, the way that the press was handling it, it was evasive and not up to standard. view express their concern about what lord dyson's report had uncovered, with susan writing... and sheila brown agreed. well, let's explore the
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implications of the report for the bbc with stuart purvis, border editor in chief at itn and a former partner at the regulator 0fcom. now that princes william and harry have spoken out publicly about deceit and their mother and the public on how serious you think this is? i think it was serious enough before _ this is? i think it was serious enough before they - this is? i think it was serious enough before they spoke i this is? i think it was serious. enough before they spoke but certainly so serious after they spoke that one wondered how could this be any worse? we have the man who will one day be the king of the country, launching a full out assault on the bbc, on the people who run it at the time and almost challenging it to get itself sorted out. i'm sure the bbc will try and rise to the challenge but the fact that the challenge but the fact that the challenge hazard to be made by a senior member of the royal family is completely unprecedented. family is completely un - recedented. ., , unprecedented. now there is what's martin _ unprecedented. now there is what's martin bashir- unprecedented. now there is what's martin bashir dead, i what's martin bashir dead, there is how the bbc behaved when colleagues raised concerns
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about that, then there's the whole cover—up in the original internal enquiry. which concerns the most? == internal enquiry. which concerns the most? -- martin bashir did- — concerns the most? -- martin bashir did. i— concerns the most? -- martin bashir did. i think— concerns the most? -- martin bashir did. i think it _ concerns the most? -- martin bashir did. i think it is - concerns the most? -- martin bashir did. i think it is the - bashir did. i think it is the latter two. bashir did. i think it is the lattertwo. i'm bashir did. i think it is the latter two. i'm not dismissing the importance of bashir faking the documents and indeed lord dyson says that bashir made one of them himself. that is an important element in the story but institutionally, and in terms of implications for the bbc, especially on this issue of trust, it is how did the bbc respond once the allegations were being made about the faking of the documents. and there we say, is basically lord dyson calls it, a woeful investigation. and if you drill down into the detail, which some of us about the time to do, you see this extraordinary moments where really suddenly bashir admits that he has been lying the whole time the bbc management, and they are shocked by this but they never basically tell their senior masters in terms of the
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governors, they never tell them that. , ., ~' governors, they never tell them that. ~ ., , ., ., that. do you think a situation like this could _ that. do you think a situation like this could arise - that. do you think a situation like this could arise now - that. do you think a situation like this could arise now at i like this could arise now at the bbc? i like this could arise now at the bbc?— the bbc? i think it is very dangerous to suggest it couldn't because so much of this revolves around what one individual working entirely on his own and at this point in the story when the faking was going on, he did not have a producer working with him so this was in essence very much the actions of one person. and who is to tell what anyone person working in the bbc can do. the question then is how does the management, how does the so—called compliance system regular three system work to correct the mistake. that is the biggest lesson and that is another of these big challenges that the bbc is facing. and which we already have the government now stepping in and saying something's got to be done about this. i saying something's got to be done about this.— done about this. i wanted to ask about — done about this. i wanted to ask about that. _ done about this. i wanted to ask about that. both - done about this. i wanted to ask about that. both the - ask about that. both the justice and the culture secretaries have raised the possibility that perhaps the
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bbc needs extra oversight. do you think there is a strong case to say that is what is needed? i case to say that is what is needed?— case to say that is what is needed? ~' ., ., needed? i think we have to remind ourselves _ needed? i think we have to remind ourselves that - needed? i think we have to remind ourselves that the l remind ourselves that the system in place in 1996 is not in place now. that was the governance, which was pretty much regulation in—house, a self—regulation. now, after many of these incidents, the legislation gave thatjob to 0fcom, a totally independent body. these to work there, i will declare that interest, i met admirer, think they do a good job and i think they would not have made mistakes the bbc has made. now what is being suggested by some people and i hear that the government might be interested, is setting up some kind of internal committee with outsiders to oversee complaints. i could see what might appear to the attraction of that but what i would want against is any intermediary is really in the system who die loot the bbc�*s accountability to 0fcom and to the public. we can't have a bbc saying, well actually, we agree with you. we thought these outsiders came in and told us to do it in a
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different way. no, there is a must maintain its editorial control but it must also be accountable to 0fcom. that is the way forward and if there is a way that we can bring outside influences as well without eluding it, fine, but let's not lose the whole thing out of a single incident. we lose the whole thing out of a single incident.— single incident. we have had some viewers _ single incident. we have had some viewers saying - single incident. we have had some viewers saying that. single incident. we have had i some viewers saying that they just don't think they can trust the bbc anymore. do trust and particularly with bbc news, is possibly now fundamentally broken? , ., ., broken? let me give you an example — broken? let me give you an example of— broken? let me give you an example of why _ broken? let me give you an example of why i _ difficult to rebuild trust. back in 2006, 2007, a former bbc producer anne now everyone is asked under the freedom of information act for the files of this bashir affair and were told there were no files. and now we have lord dyson yesterday quoting liberally from files which somehow have suddenly appeared. what does that tell us? we can only conclude from that that
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somebody back in 2006, 07, what an investigation and the truth. how can you just say, well, these things happen. that was a deliberate act and i think they were blocking by bbc management of the trip went on for some time after that, i think. so i think the bbc has to rebuild the trust and rebuild the assumption that when the bbc says something, it is true. because on this occasion, he did not turn out to be the case. ,, . , did not turn out to be the case. ,, ., , ., ~ case. stewart purvis, thank you so much- _ case. stewart purvis, thank you so much. after _ case. stewart purvis, thank you so much. after11 _ case. stewart purvis, thank you so much. after 11 days - case. stewart purvis, thank you so much. after 11 days of- so much. after 11 days of fighting, israeland so much. after 11 days of fighting, israel and hamas agreed a ceasefire by hundreds of people, mostly palestinians have been left dad. as ever with the middle east, the precise chain of events and their causes are passionately disputed and so too is the media coverage of the conflict —— newswatch. here are some different perspectives from viewers on the bbc�*s reporting from the region over the past couple of weeks. it from the region over the past
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couple of weeks.— from the region over the past couple of weeks. it is obvious bbc journalists _ couple of weeks. it is obvious bbc journalists carefully - bbcjournalists carefully choose words to convey a particular narrative. words like conflict, militants, violence, are carefully chosen to mask that israeli military and financial powers are far more advanced than that of any target. the manipulation of language used by the bbc is very sickening. the beating, shooting, bombs and tear gassing of worshippers in a mosque not clashes. i gassing of worshippers in a mosque not clashes. i wanted to comment on _ mosque not clashes. i wanted to comment on the _ mosque not clashes. i wanted to comment on the obvious - mosque not clashes. i wanted to comment on the obvious bias . mosque not clashes. i wanted to comment on the obvious bias of| comment on the obvious bias of the bbc's — comment on the obvious bias of the bbc's reporting on the current— the bbc's reporting on the current israeli—palestinian conflict _ current israeli—palestinian conflict. i wish to point out that— conflict. i wish to point out that israel is not the perpetrator, israelwas perpetrator, israel was defending itself perpetrator, israelwas defending itself against an unprovoked attack on its citizens _ unprovoked attack on its citizens. and i accept that palestinians have a right to be heard — palestinians have a right to be heard and _ palestinians have a right to be heard and of course it should be covered by yourjournalists. but then — be covered by yourjournalists. but then the israelis should be afforded — but then the israelis should be afforded the same reporting rights, — afforded the same reporting rights, but it it is not. i
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afforded the same reporting rights, but it it is not.- rights, but it it is not. i am extremely _ rights, but it it is not. i am extremely concerned - rights, but it it is not. i am| extremely concerned about the way that the bbc is framing all| way that the bbc is framing all of its _ way that the bbc is framing all of its coverage _ way that the bbc is framing all of its coverage about - way that the bbc is framing all of its coverage about what - way that the bbc is framing all of its coverage about what is l of its coverage about what is happening _ of its coverage about what is happening on _ of its coverage about what is happening on in _ of its coverage about what is happening on in israel- of its coverage about what is happening on in israel and l happening on in israel and palestine, _ happening on in israel and palestine, in— happening on in israel and palestine, in particular- happening on in israel and palestine, in particular by| happening on in israel and i palestine, in particular by the uses — palestine, in particular by the uses of— palestine, in particular by the uses of the _ palestine, in particular by the uses of the phrases _ palestine, in particular by the i uses of the phrases palestinian militants — uses of the phrases palestinian militants and _ uses of the phrases palestinian militants and in _ uses of the phrases palestinian militants and in israeli - militants and in israeli soldiers _ militants and in israeli soldiers. this - militants and in israelil soldiers. this suggests militants and in israeli - soldiers. this suggests what the israelis _ soldiers. this suggests what the israelis are _ soldiers. this suggests what the israelis are doing - soldiers. this suggests what the israelis are doing is - the israelis are doing is legitimate _ the israelis are doing is legitimate what- legitimate what the palestinians isn't. they are acting in self— palestinians isn't. they are acting in self defence. - palestinians isn't. they are acting in self defence. iiiilt�*el acting in self defence. we asked bbc _ acting in self defence. asked bbc news for a acting in self defence.“ asked bbc news for a statement about the coverage and they us... —— told us. thank you for all of your comments this week. if you want
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to share your opinions about what you see or hear on the bbc news, on tv, on radio online social media, e—mail or you can find us on twitter... 0r social media, e—mail or you can find us on twitter... or you can call us on... that is all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts on bbc news coverage next week. thank you. well, friday, for many of us was an absolute write—off. blowing a gale, heavy rain, surely the weather is going to improve. and, yes, it is. the low pressure is finally moving out into the north sea. it brought some really heavy rain to wales, for example, and some ferocious gusts of wind. here's an example, 89mph in an exposed place in the isle of wight. more typically it was around 60mph or more, so very windy for the time of year,
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and of course, very wet. you can see where the low pressure is early in the morning on saturday. pretty stormy out to sea there. but for many of us, it is calming down. in fact, so much so that across parts of scotland and northern ireland, with clearing skies, there will be a touch of frost. but anyway, here's the important bit, saturday's headline — drier, brighter and less windy for all of us. and this is what it looks like for the morning onwards. it will brighten up across many western areas right from the word go. there will be some showers around, particularly in the east of the country, maybe in the south, and there will still be a keen wind blowing out of the north—west, and it'll be chilly — ii in newcastle, 14 or 15 degrees elsewhere. but you know what? we'll take it after that nasty friday. now, here's the forecast saturday night into sunday — so the skies are clearing again, it's going to be a chilly morning on sunday. but you can't miss this, the winds spinning around behind me. yep, that's the next area of low pressure heading our way. so here's the headline for sunday — you may want to look away now, here it is — rain and wind again.
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so, this unsettled weather continues. here's the good news, across some eastern areas there will be sunshine in the morning. probably into the afternoon as well. and this weather front won't reach western areas until later on in the day, but the rain will be accompanied by gale force winds as well. so, not a great second half of the weekend. eventually, that weather front will sweep towards the east later on in the afternoon and into the evening hours. that low pressure is here to stay, it will park itself over us on monday and tuesday, and that means that the weather will remain unsettled into next week. so, you guessed it — showers to come, and remaining cool into next week.
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welcome to bbc news — i'm tim willcox. our top stories: international aid starts arriving in gaza as the damage from 11 days of fighting on both sides is assessed. gunfire but will the truce hold? palestinians throw petrol—bombs and israeli police respond with stun grenades at friday prayers injerusalem. a military plane crashes in nigeria killing everyone on board including the military general who was appointed in jan —— general. ——january. after analysing �*excess deaths' over the last year, the world health organization says the covid death toll could be three times higher
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than officialfigures. committing to keeping temperatures down —

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