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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 10, 2021 2:00pm-4:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... the uk lowers its covid alert level, as the prime minister prepares to announce a major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. it's understood he'll say that, from next monday, there can be a return to indoor hospitality and household mixing, and people can hug each other again. after labour's crushing by election defeat, a reshuffled shadow cabinet meets, amid calls for an end to infighting. iamat i am at the scottish parliament where some of the new msps are going through the induction process. what is not new are the questions about a possible second independence referendum, with voices on the prounion and pro—independence side making themselves heard.
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suing the government. the family of a woman who took her own life after her benefits were cut. the search continues to locate an injured whale in the river thames, after it escaped a first rescue attempt. down memory lane. the queen recollects becoming the first young person in the commonwealth to receive a life—saving award. good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. the uk's covid alert level has been lowered from 4 to 3, which means the virus is no longer spreading exponentially. this afternoon, the prime minister is expected to announce a major easing of restrictions in england, so that, from next monday, six people or two households can meet indoors, while groups of up to 30 can meet outdoors. pubs and restaurants would be able to reopen indoors, and at last,
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people could hug friends and family outside their households. our health correspondent catherine burns reports. you have got to do two verses, happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you! since the pandemic began, we've had to learn to do everyday things differently. it started with hand washing. right, there we go. then we had to get used to wearing facemasks. now it looks like we might have to rethink how to do something else. hugging. we're expecting the prime minister later to give us the go—ahead to hug friends and family from next week, sort of. careful cuddling, if you will. keeping them short and selective, not hugging lots of people, and avoiding face—to—face contact. just a proper hug. not, i couldn't, it's not a hug. a hug is a hug. it's not a push them away sort of thing. it's not natural for. us to be so separate. we are, like, are social creatures. we need that interaction.
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i've been hugging direct family members, but other than that i haven't missed hugging anyone else. i do love to give my friends and family lots of hugs, especially as you don't know how long they're going to be here for so... today, the chief medical officers across the uk have agreed to lower the covid alert level from four to three. this means that case numbers, people in hospital and deaths have all fallen consistently, but that covid is still spreading, with people catching it every day. we have really, really high levels of vaccination, but the vaccines l are not 100% protective, - so, we need to be a little bit careful, but i think it is a good step in the right direction. - if we look at the figures, - the number of people getting infected, the number of people going into hospital, _ i are at really, really low levels, i back to where we were in august, lwhich was pretty much the lowest| time at any point in the pandemic. the government promised to follow the data. and with more than 50 million doses of the vaccine given so far, and just one in 1,100 people
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infected with coronavirus, it seems that there is no reason not to ease restrictions again in england from next monday. we still need to be cautious. we are incredibly aware that everybody wants to get together, that people want to hug each other, that people want to entertain in their own house. goodness me, we all want to do that. and we understand that. and that is why we have a road map. once it is confirmed, in england from next monday, social contact rules will be lifted outdoors. six people, or two households, can meet up inside, and indoor hospitality and hotels can open again. this step along the road map was always going to be a big one. right now, if you want to go to a pub or restaurant in england, you better bring a coat. this will bring our social lives indoors, and with hugging, bring us into closer contact. these are two things that help the virus to spread. wales and scotland are also expected to open up more next week, with northern ireland following the week after. catherine burns, bbc news.
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we can get more on this now by speaking to paul hunter, who is professor of medicine at the university of east anglia. thank you very much forjoining us again. how appropriate is this reduction from level four to three, do you believe? i reduction from level four to three, do you believe?— do you believe? i think it's right and in fact _ do you believe? i think it's right and in fact it — do you believe? i think it's right and in fact it was _ do you believe? i think it's right and in fact it was necessary - do you believe? i think it's right and in fact it was necessary if i do you believe? i think it's right| and in fact it was necessary if we are going to go to the next lengths, level of the relaxation on next monday. so it does fit in with the current state of the epidemic at the moment. so it is an appropriate decision. ., , , , , ., decision. how impressive is it that we have got _ decision. how impressive is it that we have got to _ decision. how impressive is it that we have got to this _ decision. how impressive is it that we have got to this point - decision. how impressive is it that we have got to this point at - decision. how impressive is it that we have got to this point at this i we have got to this point at this point? i we have got to this point at this oint? ~ we have got to this point at this oint? «' ., ”i , we have got to this point at this oint? ~' ., ._ , ., point? i think we were always going to net to point? i think we were always going to get to this _ point? i think we were always going to get to this point, _ point? i think we were always going to get to this point, i _ point? i think we were always going to get to this point, i think - point? i think we were always going to get to this point, i think it's - to get to this point, i think it's particularly impressive we managed it against a background of the kent variant which came and was, hit us in december. and as an indication of how effective the vaccination campaign has been over the recent months. fin
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campaign has been over the recent months. ., ., ., months. on the whole, how well do ou think months. on the whole, how well do you think the _ months. on the whole, how well do you think the public _ months. on the whole, how well do you think the public have _ months. on the whole, how well do you think the public have done - months. on the whole, how well do you think the public have done to i you think the public have done to get us to this point? the government will take some credit but it has relied upon as being compliant? absolutely. i think the vast majority of people have followed the rules, where best they can to minimise the risks to themselves or others. and that has been reflected in the success of the lockdown. and as the prime minister said only a few weeks ago, much of the early decline in the epidemic from its peak in earlyjanuary decline in the epidemic from its peak in early january was down solely to the lockdown measures and not the vaccination, but as we move out of that vaccination, out of restrictions, i think the vaccinations are critical to being able to relax at this point. there are concerns _ able to relax at this point. there are concerns in _ able to relax at this point. there are concerns in some _ able to relax at this point. there are concerns in some quarters i able to relax at this point. there i are concerns in some quarters that the fall in numbers, hospitalisations and cases generally, is beginning to stall.
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how much more important or continuing to be important is it that we follow the remaining guidance?— that we follow the remaining auidance? ~ , . ., guidance? absolutely critical. you are uuite guidance? absolutely critical. you are quite right- — guidance? absolutely critical. you are quite right. the _ guidance? absolutely critical. you are quite right. the last _ guidance? absolutely critical. you are quite right. the last few- guidance? absolutely critical. you are quite right. the last few days, the last three or four days, the numbers reported in each day have been higher than they were in the same day previous week. so we are still a long way out and i think some of that increase, that probably majority of the increase has been the spreading of the one of the indian variants. so if we're still going to see further relaxations in next month, we're going to be have to be very careful that we do continue to stick to the rules, otherwise we will we will be back in a difficult place. how otherwise we will we will be back in a difficult place.— a difficult place. how satisfied are ou with a a difficult place. how satisfied are you with a speed _ a difficult place. how satisfied are you with a speed of— a difficult place. how satisfied are you with a speed of vaccinations? | you with a speed of vaccinations? some parts of the country seem to be suggesting that uptake is either slowing down or the numbers being vaccinated each day perhaps for the second time it's not happening as
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fast as we would have expected? i have not been looking at the individual regional variations but overall, it has been pretty good. 0verall vaccination figures, the number of the projection figures has been quite high. the large majority of those infections have been second doses. back in march, we were possibly giving about 400—500,000 vaccinations a day to people who had not previously had a dose and at the moment because most of the injections are going to people who already have had their first dose, only about 100,000 people a day are getting a vaccine for the first time. so of course that has slow down and it was always expected to slow down. that will undoubtedly pick up again as we move through june and this big backlog of people who had their first dose is june and this big backlog of people who had theirfirst dose is back in february, march, will and indeed
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airily april, will be dealt with. i don't usually ask you personal questions but on this occasion i will make an exception. what are you most looking forward to being able to do, with caution? hard most looking forward to being able to do, with caution?— to do, with caution? hard my grandchildren. _ to do, with caution? hard my grandchildren. i— to do, with caution? hard my grandchildren. i hope - to do, with caution? hard my grandchildren. i hope you - to do, with caution? hard my i grandchildren. i hope you might to do, with caution? hard my - grandchildren. i hope you might say somethin: grandchildren. i hope you might say something like _ grandchildren. i hope you might say something like that. _ grandchildren. i hope you might say something like that. thank- grandchildren. i hope you might say something like that. thank you - grandchildren. i hope you might say something like that. thank you very much. —— something like that. thank you very much. -- , ., . and the prime minister will be leading the downing street briefing this evening. we'll have full coverage from 4:30 on bbc one and the bbc news channel. labour's new shadow cabinet has met for the first time after a reshuffle following a poor showing in last week's english local elections and the hartlepool byelection. last night, sir keir starmer sacked his shadow chancellor, annaliese dodds, and party chair angela rayner, moving both to other positions. sir keir claims his new shadow cabinet is refreshed and renewed. 0ur political correspondent helen catt reports. after a tough weekend, the labour leader off to meet his newly tweaked top team.
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that biggest change, the replacement of anneliese dodds as shadow chancellor. i'm fine. but not all changes went so smoothly. there was an apparent dispute between sir keir starmer and his deputy leader angela rayner, over changing some of herjobs. that has led to more friction within the party, not helpful, say some. it is about now moving forward. labour has got to stop this sort of internal focus, the civil war between those on the left of the party, those on the right of the party, from my point of view, that is absolutely pointless and destructive. and there is support from a former leader who is no stranger to strains at the top of the party. keir has got to be given the time and the power, and the resources to be able to get on with bringing forward new policies that will never be the same as 1997, cannot be the same as 2019, but he has got to bring forward and will bring forward new policies to change britain and he has got to get out there, as he wants to do, and listen to the people. so what does the new shadow cabinet look like? angela rayner was given
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some more senior roles, about 2k hours after she was sacked from herjob as party chair on saturday. anneliese dodds takes that role, after being sacked as shadow chancellor. rachel reeves has replaced her. and there is a promotion, wes streeting, considered to be a strong media performer, is in charge of the child poverty brief. reshuffles are always difficult, i it's more important i think to take the time to get exactly right the team that keir wants- around him, in the jobs - that he wants people doing. and i'm really pleased to be part of a shadow cabinet that has got very, very strong and committed | colleagues sitting alongside us. | and i'm very excited to be working l with those brilliant colleagues. l it won't be long before labour is having to go into another election. tracy brabin won the mayoralty in west yorkshire yesterday, a success for labour but it means she is stepping down as an mp for batley and spen, and that means another by—election. there is no doubt that what happened
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with angela rayner over the weekend has sparked real anger. to apportion blame to angie, and to sack her from her position, was a despicable act of cowardice from my point of view. the next test for sir keir will be to quieten the party's internal row quickly so it can look outward once again. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blake joins us now from westminster. he has a new up, but what is the strategy going to be?— he has a new up, but what is the strategy going to be? that's the big cuestion. strategy going to be? that's the big question. there _ strategy going to be? that's the big question. there are _ strategy going to be? that's the big question. there are not _ strategy going to be? that's the big question. there are not many - question. there are not many face—to—face meetings here in westminster, like workplaces across the country. nevertheless, the shadow cabinet did meet in person today. it was hardly a happy reunion, though. most shadow cabinet members going in pretty stony faced, one saying to me that they were just glad the elections were over. this was not a big reshuffle, by sir keir starmer, a very moderate moving
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around of roles in his top team. nevertheless, he told them at that meeting today that labour did have some things to celebrate, talking about the successful campaign the party had run in wales, where the administration led by mark drakeford secured another term in power and he also praised anas sarwar, scottish labour's role in preventing and snp majority in the scottish parliament. two matters closer to home for sir keir starmer, of course all eyes are on him and the party's response to a terrible set of election results over the weekend. not least the by—election in hartlepool, which the party lost to the tories and also losing control of several councils in england as well. the strategy, it seems from what sir keir starmer told the shadow cabinet today, will be to develop new policies and attempt to reconnect with voters. it may be that sir keir starmer�*s critics would say to him that has
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been obvious from the outset, what he needs to do. but he was very clear, we are told, telling his shadow cabinet it is he who takes responsibility for the election results, nobody else, i lead the labour party and its entirely on me. earlier on, he told labour party staff the party had spent too much time talking to itself and had not become good enough at focusing on the needs of voters. that it seems is the message from sir keir starmer. how that will manifest itself, the policies the party will come forward with in attempt to reconnect with voters, those are questions hanging over labour. thank ou ve questions hanging over labour. thank you very much- _ the headlines on bbc news... the uk lowers its covid alert level, as the prime minister prepares to announce a major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. it's understood he'll say that, from next monday, there can be a return to indoor hospitality and household mixing, and people can hug each other again.
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after labour's crushing by election defeat, a reshuffled shadow cabinet meets amid calls for an end to infighting. the re—elected first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, has told borisjohnson that another vote on scottish independence is inevitable. the snp leader also suggested that she could begin the process as early as next spring. my colleague annita mcveigh is outside holyrood this afternoon thank you very much. welcome back to the scottish parliament and it feels like a slightly strange moment for scottish politics. 0bviously on the campaign leading up to the elections, politicians of various parties were focusing on pandemic recovery. that was front and centre, of course, the question of another independence referendum as always been there but it was really all about the pandemic. nonetheless, now the dust has settled on the elections, the parties have been
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setting out their stalls on what they think on the independence question. nicola sturgeon saying yesterday that the snp could bring forward a referendum bill as early as next spring. gordon brown, former prime minister and a key figure in defence of the union in the first referendum campaign, has again, been out there, out of the blocks pretty quickly, to defend the union again. and warning borisjohnson against what he called muscular unionism. here is a bit of what gordon brown had to say. he has got to realise there is a stand—off inevitably between scotland and the rest of the uk and has to recognise everyone 16 the
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benefits of the united kingdom he has got to go out and do it and some of the new sp is are in there preparing for the induction process for support should be therefore? they know there is a big battle coming — they know there is a big battle coming between the scottish and uk government over a scottish independence referendum but i don't think it _ independence referendum but i don't think it will come immediately. i think_ think it will come immediately. i think this — think it will come immediately. i think this will be a political slow burn _ think this will be a political slow burn. speaking to nicola sturgeon's team, _ burn. speaking to nicola sturgeon's team, they— burn. speaking to nicola sturgeon's team, they are absolutely adamant the first _ team, they are absolutely adamant the first 100 days of their next government is about the pandemic. we will hear— government is about the pandemic. we will hear a _ government is about the pandemic. we will hear a lot about the health service, — will hear a lot about the health service, we will hear tomorrow about more _ service, we will hear tomorrow about more lockdown on easing in scotland. in more lockdown on easing in scotland. in truth, _ more lockdown on easing in scotland. in truth, neither side is ready for
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a referendum which is why it won't happen— a referendum which is why it won't happen any— a referendum which is why it won't happen any time soon. nicola sturgeon _ happen any time soon. nicola sturgeon as we saw during the campaign does not have answers to some _ campaign does not have answers to some of— campaign does not have answers to some of the big questions she is going _ some of the big questions she is going to — some of the big questions she is going to have to answer comprehensively. 0n the border with england. _ comprehensively. 0n the border with england, scotland was to be in the european — england, scotland was to be in the european union, on the economic picture. _ european union, on the economic picture, post—pandemic, and other things— picture, post—pandemic, and other things that — picture, post—pandemic, and other things that currency as well. the specifics— things that currency as well. the specifics of when you would move to a new _ specifics of when you would move to a new currency. that gordon brown clip is _ a new currency. that gordon brown clip is really— a new currency. that gordon brown clip is really indicative of something else which is the anti—independent side is not in the same _ anti—independent side is not in the same place — anti—independent side is not in the same place at the moment either. boris _ same place at the moment either. borisjohnson plans over same place at the moment either. boris johnson plans over the same place at the moment either. borisjohnson plans over the next few months to flood money into scotland — few months to flood money into scotland as part of his levelling up agenda _ scotland as part of his levelling up agenda. he is going to talk about different— agenda. he is going to talk about different ways in which the uk works together, _ different ways in which the uk works together, there is going to be a lot more _ together, there is going to be a lot more emphasis on what the uk government does in scotland. gordon brown _ government does in scotland. gordon brown does _ government does in scotland. gordon brown does not seem to think that will work — brown does not seem to think that will work. he is telling the prime minister— will work. he is telling the prime minister that muscular unionism is nonsense — minister that muscular unionism is nonsense and he's going to have to look at _ nonsense and he's going to have to look at a _ nonsense and he's going to have to look at a pretty comprehensive
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revamp — look at a pretty comprehensive revamp of the way the uk works. if he's going — revamp of the way the uk works. if he's going to be successful in keeping — he's going to be successful in keeping it together. it feels to me like there — keeping it together. it feels to me like there is a lot of debates to be had internally between the two sides. — had internally between the two sides. it — had internally between the two sides, it doesn't feel like an independence referendum is imminent, but i independence referendum is imminent, but i do— independence referendum is imminent, but i do think there is going to be a big _ but i do think there is going to be a big clash— but i do think there is going to be a big clash and it will be something that we _ a big clash and it will be something that we keep talking about over the next few _ that we keep talking about over the next few years. that we keep talking about over the next few years-— that we keep talking about over the next few years. thank you. what are the key constitutional _ next few years. thank you. what are the key constitutional questions? i the key constitutional questions? let's join the professor of politics at aberdeen university. formerly director of the centre for constitutional change. thank you for your time today. set out for us what those key constitutional questions are? �* , those key constitutional questions are? h ., those key constitutional questions are? �*, ., ., are? it's not whether scotland has a riaht are? it's not whether scotland has a ri . ht to are? it's not whether scotland has a right to independence. _ are? it's not whether scotland has a right to independence. everybody i are? it's not whether scotland has a l right to independence. everybody can see that _ right to independence. everybody can see that. concedes that. the question— see that. concedes that. the question is what are the circumstances under which scotland can't exercise that right was not legally, — can't exercise that right was not legally, the situation is for a referendum to take place it would
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require _ referendum to take place it would require westminster government to approve _ require westminster government to approve a _ require westminster government to approve a section 30 order, giving the power— approve a section 30 order, giving the power to the scottish parliament to do that _ the power to the scottish parliament to do that. this is what happened back to do that. this is what happened hack in_ to do that. this is what happened back in 2014. it's whether the uk government would do that when and under— government would do that when and under what _ government would do that when and under what circumstances and so far, the uk _ under what circumstances and so far, the uk government has said now is not the _ the uk government has said now is not the time, which raises the question— not the time, which raises the question of when would be the time? but some _ question of when would be the time? but some politicians and academics and legal personnel argue that under devolved powers, the scottish parliament does have the right to call an advisory referendum without that section 30 order that you were talking about, needing to be agreed to by westminster. what are your thoughts on that? we to by westminster. what are your thoughts on that?— thoughts on that? we don't really know, maybe... _ thoughts on that? we don't really know, maybe... it— thoughts on that? we don't really know, maybe... it would - thoughts on that? we don't really know, maybe... it would be - thoughts on that? we don't really know, maybe... it would be no i thoughts on that? we don't really i know, maybe... it would be no more than _ know, maybe... it would be no more than a _ know, maybe... it would be no more than a giant— know, maybe... it would be no more than a giant opinion poll what would have no— than a giant opinion poll what would have no consequences and without the uk accepting and participating in the process and pledging to respect
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the process and pledging to respect the result, scotland could not get the result, scotland could not get the international recognition it would — the international recognition it would need. that would require agreement with the uk government. so it would _ agreement with the uk government. so it would just _ agreement with the uk government. so it would just stretch out the process _ it would just stretch out the process but the unionists could simply— process but the unionists could simply ignore it. so process but the unionists could simply ignore it.— process but the unionists could siml ianore it. ., simply ignore it. so the government, the scottish — simply ignore it. so the government, the scottish government _ simply ignore it. so the government, the scottish government would - simply ignore it. so the government, the scottish government would need | the scottish government would need that strong legal footing, the scottish government would need that strong legalfooting, you argue. if the snp and scottish greens together were to pass a bill here at holyrood for another independence referendum, an independence referendum, an independence referendum, an independence referendum bill, what then could or how could boris johnson respond, would he, the concert being thrown down, would he then be in a position where it would look very undemocratic to refuse to follow that pass, order you think the uk government, westminster government would look to the courts to challenge that? thea;r government would look to the courts to challenge that?— to challenge that? they could go to the supreme _ to challenge that? they could go to the supreme court _ to challenge that? they could go to the supreme court to _ to challenge that? they could go to the supreme court to try _ to challenge that? they could go to the supreme court to try to - to challenge that? they could go to the supreme court to try to get - to challenge that? they could go to the supreme court to try to get the j the supreme court to try to get the legislation— the supreme court to try to get the legislation struck down. they have not said _ legislation struck down. they have not said they are going to do that
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and michael gove yesterday suggested that would not be there first recourse _ that would not be there first recourse. but if they keep on refusing _ recourse. but if they keep on refusing to run a section 30 order, people _ refusing to run a section 30 order, people will— refusing to run a section 30 order, people will ask them for a reason, what's _ people will ask them for a reason, what's the — people will ask them for a reason, what's the reason for doing that? and if— what's the reason for doing that? and if it's — what's the reason for doing that? and if it's not the time now, when would _ and if it's not the time now, when would he — and if it's not the time now, when would be the time? this could stretch— would be the time? this could stretch for quite a long time. it would — stretch for quite a long time. it would take time to get a referendum bill through, the supreme court involved. — bill through, the supreme court involved, it's not quite happen before — involved, it's not quite happen before the end of covid—19 and of course _ before the end of covid—19 and of course in — before the end of covid—19 and of course in three years time we will be looking — course in three years time we will be looking at a new uk election. very— be looking at a new uk election. very good — be looking at a new uk election. very good to hear your thoughts. of course what we have not mentioned is what is the mood of the people? do voters have an appetite potentially while scotland and everywhere else is recovering from the pandemic? do voters here have an appetite to take on questions of independence again? interestingly, that polling that was done by gordon brown's think tank and of course all polls come with
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certain caveats, don't they? it suggested around 40% of voters here are undecided one way or another. potentially as this question continues to be debated, there is a lot to be done on winning over the hearts and minds of many voters who are not quite sure one way they want scotland to go. back to you. we are not quite sure one way they want scotland to go. back to you.- scotland to go. back to you. we will see ou scotland to go. back to you. we will see you later _ scotland to go. back to you. we will see you later thank _ scotland to go. back to you. we will see you later thank you _ scotland to go. back to you. we will see you later thank you very - scotland to go. back to you. we will see you later thank you very much. | the palestinian red crescent says more than 300 palestinians have been hurt in clashes with police at one of the most sensitive sites injerusalem. israeli police fired stun grenades, rubber bullets and tear gas at stone, throwing protesters around al—aqsa mosque. more than 20 officers were injured. al—aqsa mosque. there are fears of more violence today ahead of a march byjewish nationalists. with me is our middle east editorjeremy bowen. some decision has been made about this march? , some decision has been made about this march?— this march? they have changed the route. normally _ this march? they have changed the route. normally they _ this march? they have changed the route. normally they go _ this march? they have changed the route. normally they go through i this march? they have changed the| route. normally they go through the damascus gate which has been the sight of a lot of tension in recent weeks and decided that the last minute and the announcementjust
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came through an iphone and it said that it's only, taken by the political echelon on the advice of the security people. to going through a different gate, an area which is not right through the heart of the muslim quarter. it's going along it, but it's more potentially contentious route you might see through damascus gate, but it does not take away from the issue. the issueis not take away from the issue. the issue is that while it is being away from the headlines quite a bit in recent years, the conflict between israelis and palestinians is as raw as ever. �* israelis and palestinians is as raw as ever. ~ ., , , ., ., as ever. and it has been going on for weeks- _ as ever. and it has been going on for weeks. what _ as ever. and it has been going on for weeks. what is _ as ever. and it has been going on for weeks. what is behind - as ever. and it has been going on for weeks. what is behind this i for weeks. what is behind this particular series of violence? number of things but the things which have restocked matters has been, there is an area just outside the old city which has been, there has been a long process, legal process, trying to evict
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palestinians from property there. the palestinian complaint along with a lot ofjustification because of what has happening is that the israeli government of many years has tried to change the demographic balance in the areas ofjerusalem, captured in 1960s seven, in favour of israeli jew. this captured in 1960s seven, in favour of israelijew. this is part of captured in 1960s seven, in favour of israeli jew. this is part of that and these properties are particularly symbolic and evocative of that struggle and that's why it is lately because that process has been coming to a climax, that has raised the temperature.— raised the temperature. because there are supposed _ raised the temperature. because there are supposed to _ raised the temperature. because there are supposed to be - raised the temperature. because i there are supposed to be evictions in the supreme court has stepped in? the are involved and decided to postpone the hearing because the assumption was the supreme court would uphold everything and the families would be evicted, perhaps forcibly which would cause a lot of trouble. so to calm things down they have kicked that forward a while.
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the issue remains.— the issue remains. ben'amin netanyahufi the issue remains. ben'amin netanyahu has i the issue remains. ben'amin netanyahu has said h the issue remains. benjamin netanyahu has said they - the issue remains. benjamin netanyahu has said they will| the issue remains. benjamin i netanyahu has said they will not stand for any disorder, he has backed what the police are doing? he: always will and part of the fact that this has become so poisonous is that this has become so poisonous is that netanyahu has brought into the political mainstream people from the extreme right of the racist israeli extreme right of the racist israeli extreme right, they have brought to the mainstream of politics and i think our feeling quite strong about that and have been involved in this as well. so some of the really nastiest elements in the conflict which have been become more sharpened in recent years, are on display. sharpened in recent years, are on disla . �* :, , sharpened in recent years, are on disla.�* , display. but as you say, it has been auoin on display. but as you say, it has been going on in — display. but as you say, it has been going on in the _ display. but as you say, it has been going on in the background - display. but as you say, it has been going on in the background behindl going on in the background behind the headlines over... we have been concentrating on other things? stand concentrating on other things? and palestinians — concentrating on other things? fific palestinians have suffered a lot concentrating on other things? e'"ic palestinians have suffered a lot in the pandemic. so that has, i think, people are harder financially, the pandemic. so that has, i think, people are harderfinancially, part of netanyahu's policy of trying to
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manage the conflict over the many years he has been prime minister, has been to try to get palestinians earning a bit more money, and then the argument goes they will be calmer and the conflict will be, therefore, blunted. but that management strategy really is only pretty skin deep. because, essentially, jerusalem is at the heart of this conflict that has been going on for a century and the holy sites are really right in the middle, like a time bomb. end sites are really right in the middle, like a time bomb. and if we look to the — middle, like a time bomb. and if we look to the gaza _ middle, like a time bomb. and if we look to the gaza strip, _ middle, like a time bomb. and if we look to the gaza strip, on _ middle, like a time bomb. and if we look to the gaza strip, on the - middle, like a time bomb. and if we look to the gaza strip, on the other| look to the gaza strip, on the other side of the country, conditions they don't get any better? ida. side of the country, conditions they don't get any better?— side of the country, conditions they don't get any better? no, gazza is a ve tou~h under various definitions but effectively a state of siege since 2007. a very long time indeed. there have been a few exchanges across the border between her
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her there are voices trying to calm things down, including people speaking to them and the american speaking to them and the american speaking to ministers are being warned that a failure to act on long—promised social care reform will be a "bitter blow" for care staff and the millions they help. the promise of a care plan was made by borisjohnson on his first day as prime minister, but has not yet been realised. local council leaders say tomorrow's queen's speech and the spending review later this year are "key opportunities" for the government to make good on its promise to "fix" the sector. the government says improving social care "remains a priority". rail passengers are facing disruption for a third day in a row after cracks were found in the chassis of some high speed trains during routine inspections. all hitachi 800 trains are being inspected, with disruption expected on long—distance routes. great western railway is advising people not to travel today,
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and london north eastern railway says passengers should check their bookings before travelling. in light—hearted online conversation, the queen has recollected becoming the first young person in the commonwealth to receive a junior lifesaving award from the royal life saving society. appearing in good spirits a few weeks after the death of her husband. she recalled her experience with lifeguards, who have been recognised for saving swimmers, and a seniorfigure from the royal life saving society. you obviously completed a life saving award. what was one of the memories that stuck out for you when you did it? well, it was of course all done in the bath club, in the swimming pool. and i suppose i didn't really actually realise quite what i was doing, you know? because i think i must have been 12 or something — 12 or 14. it's a very long time ago, i'm afraid. i think it's changed a lot.
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your majesty, when you say it was a long time ago, - it was in fact 80 years ago. that's terrible, isn't it? we know that you were actually the first holder of the award. i i didn't realise i was the first one. ijust did it. and had to work very hard for it. but it was a great achievement and i was very proud to wear the badge on the front of my swimming suit. i wonder if she sold it on herself? now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. hello there. well, i suppose it is going to be a decent day for spotting the rainbows. a particularly unsettled day with most of you seeing a downpour at some point during today. although quite a few of you will see several downpours — it is going to be very, very showery. the showers may well ease off for a time across southern england, but i think there will be another batch coming into sussex and kent later on.
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heaviest showers for northern england, northern ireland and scotland. some here having hail and thunder mixed in. and those temperatures around 14 to 16 celsius for most. 0vernight, more rain for scotland. inland areas in northern ireland, england and wales, the showers will gradually fade away, taking their time mind you, but eventually becoming drier. temperatures around six or 7 degrees. tomorrow, this early morning rain clears away from scotland. and then scotland, northern ireland, northern england getting off to a fine morning with spells of sunshine. further south, showers develop, those showers move northwards across england and wales reaching northern ireland and southern scotland through the afternoon. and some of them will be heavy and thundery. hello this is bbc news with martine croxall. the headlines... the uk lowers its covid alert level as the prime minister prepares to announce a major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. it is understood he will say from next monday there can be an return
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to indoor hospitality and mixing and people can hug each other again. after labour's crushing by election defeat, a reshuffled shadow cabinet meets, amid calls for an end to infighting. dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish nationalist march. suing the government, the family of a woman who took her own life after her benefits were cut. the search continues to locate an injured whale in the river thames after it escaped a first rescue attempt. that was the queen with her life—saving hat on, i didn't have time to tell you, i don't know why. let's talk about sport, shall we? good afternoon. the champions league final between chelsea and manchester city on the 29th of may could be played at wembley. uefa is set to decide by wednesday whether to switch the game
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from istanbul to london. turkey is in full lockdown, with the uk government saying people should only travel there in extreme circumstances. here's our senior sport news reporter, laura scott. it is incredibly complicated to move a final with such short notice. remember uefa only found out turkey being added to the uk government's red list on friday, when we all did. and they said that moving it is still on the table, but it is a hugely complex issue. a key point here seems to be whether the uk government would grant exemption to everybody that would need to come over to wembley for that final from abroad, that could be up to 3000 people including international media, sponsors and uefa officials. so whether the uk government will grant that, or on the flip side, whether it had to take place in istanbul, would the uk government give the players and club staff at
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chelsea and manchester city a quarantine exemption so they didn't have to go into hotel quarantine for ten days with the euros are so close? we haven't heard anything from the turkish football federation about what they think about potentially losing out on the champions league final. clearly we know frantically disappointed at not being able to see their teams, but the uk government and uefa and the fa need to work out a compromise here, which is more important of all of these factors at play? but there are just 19 days to go until this final, and we expect a decision to be made in the next 48 hours. he's had a great clay court season so far — but dan evans has lost in the opening round of the rome masters after being beaten by america's taylor fritz in straight sets. the british number one, ranked 26th in the world, struggled on serve throughout and showed his annoyance at the end of the first set. he beat novak djokovic in monte carlo and reached the last 16 in madrid last week,
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but a first round defeat for him here in rome as he lost 6—3, 6—2 to fritz, who is ranked five places below him in the world. australia have begun vaccinating their athletes against covid—19, ahead of this year's olympics and paralympics. the country has been slow to roll out the vaccine for the general population, but have decided to let their athletes jump the queue to give them what they say is "comfort and certainty" in their final preparations for the games in tokyo. 0lympic swimmer cate campbell was among the first to receive the vaccine. it isa it is a huge weight off your shoulders to be able to have access to this vaccine. i would really like to this vaccine. i would really like to thank the aoc and the federal government for allowing us to have this extra line of protection, because we are going into a pretty unknown situation over in tokyo, so they have this little band—aid is every one is —— having this little band—aid is a huge weight of everybody�*s shoulders.
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rugby union fans will be admitted to twickenham for the first time since december, with at least 10,000 able to attend each of england's summer test matches. eddiejones�* side will play tests against the usa on sunday the 4th ofjuly, and canada on saturday the 10th ofjuly. an england a side will face scotland a in leicester on sunday the 27th ofjune. there's plenty more rugby on the website including news of wales and ireland's summer fixtures. wales will come up against their former coach rob howley, who is now assistant coach of canada. they'll also play two matches against argentina. check out the details on bbc.co.uk/sport, or the bbc sport app. i will be back in the next hour but for now, back to you, martin. the family of a woman who took her own life after her benefit payments were cut is bringing legal action against the government. an inquest into the death of philippa day said the department for work and pensions made 28 mistakes in handling her case. it's now emerged the department has reviewed around 150 other similar cases, in which claimants either died
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or came to serious harm. michael buchanan reports. it's been six months. i am in so much debt. i have nothing to eat. i can't... phillipa day pleaded repeatedly with benefits officials for help. her money had been cut. they insisted she couldn't have a benefits assessment at home, so in despair, the 27—year—old mother took a fatal overdose, leaving her sister to fight her case. it was absolutely preventable. it was directly due to the impact of the claim. the coroner said that claiming benefits should not see that as a risk to life, and it was. an inquest found 28 errors in the way the government had processed phillipa day's application for personal independence payments, the main disability benefit. the family are now suing the department for work and pensions.
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it was a multitude of systemic issues that had been unaddressed for a very, very long time. so my sister was not the first to die, she was one of many. and clearly, lessons have not been learned. philippa day's death is one of scores that families have blamed on the stresses of the benefits system, including tim salter, errol graham, david clapson and jodey whiting. research by the bbc�*s shared data unit found that at least 150 reviews of death or serious harm to claimants have been carried out by the department for work and pensions between 2012 and 2019. the government told us they take each tragic case seriously, and review them in case there are lessons to learn. ben mcdonald, who died in march 2015, again taking his own life after being found fit for work. the labour mp debbie abrahams read out the names of some of those who have died in the house of commons last year. michael connolly, who died in may 2014... she says internal reviews of each incident is akin to the government
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marking its own homework. is this what we should be expecting from our social security system? and i'd say, no. it is not fit for purpose. it isn't a safety net. and we are seriously letting people down. campaigners say there should be an independent public inquiry to uncover how many benefit claimants died whilst seeking support. michael buchanan, bbc news. and if you've been affected by any of the issues raised in that report, you can find details of organisations offering help and support on the bbc action line website. there's a new warning that violent drugs gangs are causing misery across the country, expanding their operations from cities into smaller towns. the bbc�*s panorama programme has been filming with kent police for the last year, with so—called county lines drug running reaching a peak during the pandemic. panorama filmed the force's
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dedicated �*county lines and gangs team' as it investigated the drugs networks. rahil sheikh reports. police! don't move, don't move, don't move! kent officers are increasingly carrying out raids like these. 0n the floor, on the floor! get hold of your dog! get hold of your dog. targeting dealers believed to be part of county lines, transporting drugs worth millions from london to the county. great big rambo knife there. we've got multiple weapons, drugs, all sorts. a county line is a drug dealing network, often with a city—based dealer distributing illegal drugs to smaller towns. the gangs sell their drugs through phone dealing lines. we're trying to get to the snakes here, we're trying to find out who is bringing these drugs in. they're the people we are really after. what's this, for itv? police are after those higher up the chain, known as line holders. we want to take out the people that are holding the line, because they're the bigger threat. and they are harder to replace.
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they can be in control of several lines and several runners. so it would take out more people in the long run. you're under arrest concerning the supply of class a drugs. what we've got here is going to be a quantity of heroin, which is uncut, a quantity of crack cocaine here. he's got two mobile phones on him, and one of the mobile phones is what we call the job line. we've got bulk messages, basically saying that he's got heroin and crack cocaine for sale. silver to bronze ground and all units, strike, strike, strike. outside of london, the south east has the highest rate of drug seizures in the uk. profits from a single line often supplying heroin and crack cocaine can be £800,000 per year. when we first started looking at the phenomenon of county lines, which was probably back around seven years ago now, only seven forces in the country were actually affected. as of today, every police force
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in the country is affected. essentially an exchange hasjust taken place. according to the latest figures from the national crime agency, there are around 1,000 county lines in operation across the uk. here in kent, despite successive national lockdowns, the number of lines reached record levels at around 80. kent police have made over 300 drugs—related arrests in the last year and reduced the number of county lines to 46. it's hoping to triple the size of its dedicated team to 70 officers by next year, paid for with additional government funding. rahil sheikh, bbc news. and there is more on that story in panorama: drugs, cops and lockdown tonight on bbc one at 7.30pm. now, with domestic and selected international travel opening up and the vaccine roll—out fuelling optimism amongst brits, you may be considering a break away this summer.
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but should you be booking now and if so, what are the popular destinations? glenn fogel is the chief executive of the hotel bookings website, booking.com. thank you forjoining us. last year was a bit of a write—off are so many people in the travel industry, how are things looking now compared with one year ago?— one year ago? thank you for having me. one year ago? thank you for having me- things — one year ago? thank you for having me- things are _ one year ago? thank you for having me. things are looking _ one year ago? thank you for having me. things are looking a _ one year ago? thank you for having me. things are looking a lot - one year ago? thank you for having me. things are looking a lot more i me. things are looking a lot more optimistic. certainly with governments like the uk putting together a list of countries which people can travel to and of course the vaccine roll—out making people more optimistic about travel for 2021. :, , . more optimistic about travel for 2021. :, ,. :, more optimistic about travel for 2021. ., ,. ., 2021. how optimistic though can you really afford — 2021. how optimistic though can you really afford to _ 2021. how optimistic though can you really afford to be? _ 2021. how optimistic though can you really afford to be? we _ 2021. how optimistic though can you really afford to be? we have - 2021. how optimistic though can you really afford to be? we have the - really afford to be? we have the traffic light system here in the uk, but there are a lot of very popular destinations that are not on it. i know, i was disappointed the usa was not on it, and a little surprised. i think that, over time, so to be the
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governor has been saying this as well, as things become safer, those lights will change for different countries. i am optimistic, and you certainly hurt the heads of different governments in europe talking about tours being brought back, i think we should be very optimistic given the rate of vaccinations in many places. what are the attitudes _ vaccinations in many places. what are the attitudes that _ vaccinations in many places. what are the attitudes that you - vaccinations in many places. what are the attitudes that you are seeing from people who want to travel? of course it is notjust the holidays that people go overseas or within the uk, there are some people who have not seen family members over one year. it is who have not seen family members over one year-— over one year. it is very frustrating _ over one year. it is very frustrating for - over one year. it is very frustrating for people i over one year. it is very i frustrating for people who over one year. it is very - frustrating for people who miss their loved ones for so long, and there are other critical reasons people have to travel. you just did the story of how the champions league finals, can you go to turkey, will it be in the uk? there are lots of important reasons for travel besides just a holiday, of important reasons for travel besidesjust a holiday, and we need to get that up and running as fast
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as possible. to get that up and running as fast as possible-— to get that up and running as fast as ossible. ~ :, , i. ., as possible. what is your view about the idea of the _ as possible. what is your view about the idea of the vaccine _ as possible. what is your view about the idea of the vaccine passports - the idea of the vaccine passports that would enable you to travel if you can show that you are fully inoculated? i you can show that you are fully inoculated?— you can show that you are fully inoculated? :, , ., :, :, inoculated? i am fully in favour of that. i inoculated? i am fully in favour of that- i want _ inoculated? i am fully in favour of that. i want to _ inoculated? i am fully in favour of that. i want to be _ inoculated? i am fully in favour of that. i want to be very _ inoculated? i am fully in favour of that. i want to be very careful, i l that. i want to be very careful, i am not talking about domestic travel, i'm not talking about going to a bar or a restaurant or a theatre, i am talking about being able to travel internationally, and proving that you are a safe traveller. i see no reason not to allow people who can prove that they are not carrying the virus because you have proof of vaccination, that you have proof of vaccination, that you should be able to travel. it is something that is desperately needed for the industry. i would say if you went to any place and said you would be able to travel anywhere in the what if you showed that you have a vaccine, would you not want that? who would say no?— who would say no? what other destinations _ who would say no? what other destinations that _ who would say no? what other destinations that are _ who would say no? what other destinations that are most - who would say no? what other i destinations that are most popular at the moment? and how can you support customers if there is a bit of hesitancy about whether their
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trip can really go ahead? yes. of hesitancy about whether their trip can really go ahead? yes, right now, we trip can really go ahead? yes, right now. we have _ trip can really go ahead? yes, right now, we have just _ trip can really go ahead? yes, right now, we have just brought - trip can really go ahead? yes, right now, we have just brought out - trip can really go ahead? yes, right now, we have just brought out a i trip can really go ahead? yes, right. now, we have just brought out a way to try to get people to go and make that booking now by offering a promotion on our website for 10% off right now on the app. trying to get people off the couch and book now. and we are seeing it, someplace is really popular, still very domestic in the uk. cornwall for example, devon, yorkshire, and of course my wife who actually studied in the uk, she loves the lake district. so there are lots of great places, but i urge people to get up and do it now because prices are starting to rise. :, , now because prices are starting to rise. ., ,, now because prices are starting to rise. :, ,, ,, , ., ., ., rise. that is supply and demand for ou. rise. that is supply and demand for you- glenn — rise. that is supply and demand for you. glenn fogel— rise. that is supply and demand for you. glenn fogelfrom _ rise. that is supply and demand for you. glenn fogelfrom booking - rise. that is supply and demand for i you. glenn fogelfrom booking .com, you. glenn fogel from booking .com, thank you very much for your time. detectives in kent investigating the death of the police community support officer julia james have been searching a house in aylesham. she was attacked while walking her dog near her home on april the 27th. police have until tonight to question a man they arrested on friday, who comes
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from the canterbury area. earlier, simonjones gave us this update. this is day 14 of the murder investigation. police arrested a man on friday evening at around 9.30. yesterday lunchtime, they were given permission to question him for a further 36 hours. now, that takes them until the end of today. at that point, officers will have to decide whether to charge him, to release him, or they could ask for another 24 hours — a final 24 hours to carry on questioning him. there has been a lot of police activity at this house in aylesham, not far from the murder scene today. for a third day, we have seen forensic officers coming and going from the property. we saw one officer up a ladder with a camera examining guttering at the top of the house. police have not said how this property is linked to their murder investigation, but they have confirmed it is part of their inquiries. julia james was killed almost two weeks ago, she was working from home on that day but she took her dog toby for a walk when she was attacked.
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she suffered head injuries and was found dead. in terms of the local community, a lot of people still extremely concerned, still extremely worried. police are telling them they should keep their phones with them when they go out and let people know exactly where they are going to be. the afghan president, ashraf ghani, has ordered government forces to match a three—day ceasefire announced by the taliban to mark the end of ramadan. in a statement, president ghani also urged the insurgents to return to peace talks. at least 13 people were killed today in roadside bombs, and the country is still reeling from saturday's bomb blast, which killed at least 68 people, many of the victims were young girls. secunder kermani has the latest. the two latest deadly incidents in afghanistan both involved passenger buses being struck by roadside bombs. one in the southern province of zabul last night, another in parwan, just north of kabul, this morning. officials say the taliban is responsible. this comes of course as the country
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is still reeling from the aftermath of that awful attack on a school on saturday in which the vast majority of the victims were young girls. that was likely carried out by the islamic state group, though still no official claim of responsibility. the president, ashraf ghani, has declared that tomorrow will be a national day of mourning. meanwhile, the taliban have announced a three—day ceasefire in honour of the muslim festival of eid, which will begin later this week. any respite from the violence will be welcome, and president ghani has ordered his troops to observe that three—day ceasefire. and it is of course a very brief ceasefire, we have seen similar ones on two occasions in the past, only for violence to resume shortly after the ceasefire has ended. another senior afghan leader, doctor abdullah abdullah, has said that these short pauses in the fighting are of course not a durable solution, that can only come from a negotiated settlement. but at the moment, talks between the afghan government and the taliban have stalled, we will have to see if this ceasefire can help kick—start those once again.
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meanwhile, all remaining us and international troops are still continuing to withdraw from afghanistan, they will all be out by september, if not earlier. the fear is if the government and taliban have not reached a deal by then, then violence is only going to get worse. the us government has declared a state of emergency, after a cyber attack on the country's largest fuel pipeline. reports suggest the group responsible is demanding ransom money to restore services. the emergency status will allow fuel to be transported by road instead. 0ur security correspondent, gordon corera, told me who is likely to be behind the attack. it seems to be a well ransomware group, that is a criminal group thought to be linked in a way to the russian state, which has been running a campaign of these ransomware attacks in which they get into a corporate organisation's computer system and then they
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threaten to either publish the data they get hold of or encrypt it in a way that it cannot be used by the organisation unless a ransom is paid. this has become a played really, it has affected all kinds of institutions or stop washington, dc police were hit the other week, hospitals have been hit in germany, potentially leading to the death of individuals and companies in many cases. this is a particularly significant one because it has had a real—world impact in terms of the supply of fuel across the east coast, potentially up to half of that supply going through this company colonial pipeline. you can see the potential damage from this growing number of cyber attacks is significant. the criminal group are thought to have got in on thursday night, around five it became clear they demanded a ransom. the company have called and help. lights there! it looks like they shut down the pipeline to avoid that ransomware
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spelling further in their computer systems. as a result, they have been cautious about switching those systems back on. the longer it takes to get switched back on, the more risk there is the fuel supplies and causing some kind of problems for those who rely on fuel supplies. sir david attenborough has warned the problems awaiting the world in the next decade are greater than those currently posed by the coronavirus pandemic. the naturalist and broadcaster's comments come as he has been named as the �*people's advocate' for the cop26 climate change conference due to be held in glasgow in november, where sir david will address world leaders and key—policy makers. there could not be a more important moment that we should have international agreement. the epidemic has shown us how crucial it is to find agreement among nations if we are to solve such worldwide problems. but the problems that will await us within the next 5—10 years are even greater.
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it is crucial that these meetings in glasgow, cop26, have success, and that, at last, the nations will come together to solve the crippling problems that the world, the globe, now faces. so david attenborough. there's growing concern about a small whale that's believed to be still swimming in the river thames after it slipped loose from a rescue team overnight. large crowds gathered yesterday at richmond lock, in south—west london, to watch divers and fire crews try to free the minke whale to a safe location. trying to turn the tide. as the thames recedes, it leaves behind a baby minke whale, grounded in richmond lock. first responders hosed water over its weak body. hours earlier, the whale had first been spotted a few miles upriver,
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near barnes bridge. but, by 5pm, it was stuck in richmond, sparking a big emergency response and an even bigger crowd. they don't rate its chances too much. i don't know what the tide's like, but there is a lot of shallows, as well. the tide seems up at the moment, but, yes, it is probably going to be a sad outcome, i think. i hope he's going to be ok. it's heartbreaking if you think they're in danger. _ but as day turned to night, the rescue continued. 0n land, the police controlled the crowds. in the water, the fire brigade and rnli looked after the whale. u nfortu nately, unfortunately, the transportation of the world to a safe place didn't quite go to plan, and about one mile up quite go to plan, and about one mile up the river in around the eyes are
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worth area, the whale got agitated and came free from its inflatable cushions. the asking of anybody who may have seen the well to please get in touch with them because they want to find and assess it. matt grayling, bbc news. royal mail is beginning a trial of unmanned drone flights to deliver parcels from the uk mainland to the isles of scilly. the focus initially will be on supplying health and safety equipment and covid tests. if successful, royal mail says it will consider using drones to reach other remote parts of the country. as lockdown restrictions are eased, a campaign has been launched to turn the 4th ofjuly into a "thank you day" — to express gratitude to those who have helped people to get through the pandemic. and the idea is picking up plenty of support. i would like to say thank you to our little daughter lyra who has spent most of her life in lockdown. all the hard—working| staff within our acute services, like the hospitals. the person who's been caring for my mother over the last year.
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she's just been so generous. my next door neighbours, pam and derek, who have been there for me every single day. i'm thankful to and for all the - people who have supported theatre. that's why we... that's me... and me... are calling for sunday the 4th ofjuly to be thank you day. let's see if it is. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello again. well, i suppose it is going to be a decent day for spotting the rainbows. a particularly unsettled day with most of you seeing a downpour at some point during today. although quite a few of you will see several downpours, it will be very, very showery. what a change in weather functions thatis what a change in weather functions that is because it was particularly dry in april. this place and manage three centimetres of rain but may is more than making up for it. it is one of the wettest places in the uk, we have already had well over one months worth of rain, we are only ten days into may. that rain will be extensive as we go into the rest of this week, notjust into the rest of this week, notjust in scotland that across the whole of
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the british isles. it be a particularly wet spell of weather. and is all down to this area of low pressure reading those shower clouds in. this area of low pressure, these lows would move out of the way normally and do not hang around but this one can't move to the north and east because of this blocking area of high pressure. instead the lows will be over our heads pretty much all week bringing those shower clouds in. showers accepted today and may ease off at a time across a softening more sunshine, but i think we will see a batch of showers from france into sussex and kent. the heavier showers today, some of them will have hail and thunder mixed in with temperatures between 14 and 16. 0vernight tonight, rain for a time pushing into scotstoun, but across inland areas, northern ireland, england and wales, very gradually those showers will clear. and temperatures around six or seven overnight. tuesday, early rain clears out of the way in scotland and for a good chunk of the day should be reasonable here with some
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sunshine. same too for northern ireland and england, but further south, those showers really start to develop. through the afternoon, they will drive northwards across the whole of england and wales, northern ireland and into southern scotland. some thunderstorms mixed in with these heavy downpours. those temperatures for most of us still around 14 or 16 and will continue to be quite windy. those winds tend to die away a little bit on wednesday, another day of sunshine and showers but this time whether showers form, because the wind is that bit lighter, they will hang around. they will be slower to move through. temperatures still as you work, 14 and 16 celsius. through the rest of this week and that next week, it stays unsettled. merrymaking at —— may making up for that dry april.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the uk lowers its covid alert level as the prime minister prepares to announce a major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. it's understood he'll say that from next monday there can be a return to indoor hospitality and household mixing, and people can hug each other again. after labour's crushing by election defeat, a reshuffled shadow cabinet meets amid calls for an end to infighting. i'm at the scottish parliament and former prime minister gordon brown has been offering advice to boris johnson on how to defend the union after scottish first minister nicola sturgeon said she could introduce a referendum bill as soon as next
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spring. dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish nationalist march. suing the government. the family of a woman who took her own life after her benefits were cut. down memory lane. the queen recollects becoming the first young person in the commonwealth to receive a life saving award. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. the uk's covid alert level has been lowered from 4 to 3, which means the virus is no longer spreading exponentially. this afternoon, the prime minister is expected to announce a major easing of restrictions in england, so that from next monday, six people or two households can meet indoors, while groups of up to 30 can meet outdoors. pubs and restaurants would be able to reopen indoors, and at last,
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people could hug friends and family outside their households. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns reports. you have got to do two verses. # happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you! since the pandemic began, we've had to learn to do everyday things differently. it started with hand washing. right, there we go. then we had to get used to wearing facemasks. now it looks like we might have to rethink how to do something else. hugging. we're expecting the prime minister later to give us the go—ahead to hug friends and family from next week, sort of. careful cuddling, if you will. keeping them short and selective, not hugging lots of people, and avoiding face—to—face contact. just a proper hug. not, i couldn't, it's not a hug. a hug is a hug. it's not a push them away sort of thing. it's not natural for. us to be so separate. we are, like, are social creatures.
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we need that interaction. i've been hugging direct family members, but other than that i haven't missed hugging anyone else. i do love to give my friends and family lots of hugs, especially as you don't know how long they're going to be here for so... today, the chief medical 0fficers across the uk have agreed to lower the covid alert level from four to three. this means that case numbers, people in hospital and deaths have all fallen consistently, but that covid is still spreading, with people catching it every day. we have really, really high levels of vaccination, - | but of course the vaccines are not| 100% protective, so we need to be a little bit careful, - but i think it is a good step in the right direction. if we look at the figures, - the number of people getting infected, the number of people going into hospital, _ i are at really, really low levels, i back to where we were in august, which is pretty much the lowest time at any point in the pandemic. - the government promised to follow the data. and with more than 50 million doses of the vaccine given so far,
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and just one in 1,100 people infected with coronavirus, it seems that there is no reason not to ease restrictions again in england from next monday. we still need to be cautious. we are incredibly aware that everybody wants to get together, that people want to hug each other, that people want to entertain in their own house. goodness me, we all want to do that. and we understand that. and that is why we have a road map. once it is confirmed, in england from next monday, social contact rules will be lifted outdoors. six people, or two households, can meet up inside, and indoor hospitality and hotels can open again. this step along the road map was always going to be a big one. right now, if you want to go to a pub or restaurant in england, you better bring a coat. this will bring our social lives indoors, and with hugging, bring us into closer contact. these are two things that help the virus to spread. wales and scotland are also expecting to open up more next week, with northern ireland following the week after. catherine burns, bbc news.
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and the prime minister will be leading a downing street briefing this evening. he'll be joined by england's chief medical officer professor chris whitty and the government's chief scientific adviser sir patrick vallance. we'll have full coverage from 4.30 on bbc one and the bbc news channel. for a second time, rescuers are attempting to catch a three—metre long whale, stranded in the river thames in south—west london. it is believed to be a baby monkey spotted near barnes bridge and throughout has been swimming between richmond and teddington, where we are looking at it now. you can probably see it is bobbing up and down, close to that wall between those two trees which are in the middle of the picture. it is very close to the flying cloud cafe at
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teddington lock and its attracted a lot of attraction as you can see from people there who are on the river bank. rnli teams have managed to save it once but last night at around 1am it escape to the inflatable cushion that was being used to guide it down the river. it could have some injuries which is why the very keen to get a proper look at it and see what sort of state it is in. it had been displaying concerning behaviours that experts thought to have been saying that it was unwell. i think we have a little bit more information i can bring to you. from my correspondent who is down there and teddington. apparently, the whale is now stranded in shallow waters close to teddington lock. the rspca and rnli are in attendance, onlookers being urged to stay away
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from the waters edge. so as not to cause that baby minke any more stress the net is suffering. so we will keep an eye on that but it has been spotted again as we can see, rescuers had lost track of it but now it has been found at teddington lock. labour's new shadow cabinet has met for the first time after a reshuffle following a poor showing in last week's english local elections and the hartlepool byelection. last night, sir keir starmer sacked his shadow chancellor anneliese dodds and party chair angela rayner, moving both to other positions. sir keir claims his new shadow cabinet is refreshed and renewed. 0ur political correspondent helen catt reports. after a tough weekend, the labour leader off to meet his newly tweaked top team. that biggest change, the replacement of anneliese dodds as shadow chancellor. i'm fine. but not all changes went so smoothly. there was an apparent dispute
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between sir keir starmer and his deputy leader, angela rayner, over changing some of herjobs. that has led to more friction within the party. not helpful, say some. it is about now moving forward. labour has got to stop this sort of internal focus, the civil war between those on the left of the party, those on the right of the party, from my point of view, that is absolutely pointless and destructive. and there is support from a former leader who is no stranger to strains at the top of the party. keir has got to be given the time and the power, and the resources to be able to get on with bringing forward new policies that will never be the same as 1997, cannot be the same as 2019, but he has got to bring forward and will bring forward new policies to change britain and he has got to get out there, as he wants to do, and listen to the people. so, what does the new shadow cabinet look like? angela rayner was given some more senior roles, about 24 hours after she was sacked from herjob as party chair on saturday. anneliese dodds takes that role, after being sacked as shadow chancellor.
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rachel reeves has replaced her. and there is a promotion, wes streeting, considered to be a strong media performer, is in charge of the child poverty brief. reshuffles are always difficult, i it's more important i think to take the time to get exactly right the team that keir wants- around him, in the jobs - that he wants people doing. and i'm really pleased to be part of a shadow cabinet that has got very, very strong and committed | colleagues sitting alongside us. | and i'm very excited to be working i with those brilliant colleagues. i it won't be long before labour is having to go into another election. tracy brabin won the mayoralty in west yorkshire yesterday, a success for labour but it means she is stepping down as an mp for batley and spen, and that means another by—election. there is no doubt that what happened with angela rayner over the weekend has sparked real anger. to apportion blame to angie, and to sack her from her position,
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was a despicable act of cowardice from my point of view. the next test for sir keir will be to quieten the party's internal row quickly so it can look outward once again. the re—elected first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, has told borisjohnson that another vote on scottish independence is inevitable. the snp leader also suggested that she could begin the process as early as next spring. my colleague annita mcveigh is outside holyrood this afternoon welcome back to holyrood where some of the new msps are going through the induction process today. a lot on their agenda in the weeks and months ahead. primarily recovery from the pandemic, but the independence question is never very far away. we have been hearing something in the last shot while about what michael gove has been saying, ratherwhat about what michael gove has been
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saying, rather what he has not been seen, more accurately, in a briefing withjournalists. he was seen, more accurately, in a briefing with journalists. he was asked a couple of times whether the uk government would rule out going to the supreme court if scotland was not first minister, nicola sturgeon, was to bring forward a referendum bill here at holyrood without the say—so of the westminster government and he would not be drawn on that, would not respond specifically to that, and that follows on from gordon brown, former prime minister, a key figure in the last referendum campaign speaking in defence of the union and today, he has been offering some advice to boris johnson on how he should approach the campaign to defend the union. his muscular unionism, which is trying to make britishness compete with scottishness, just won't work. project fear won't work, scottish people are far too proud. he has got to change, he has got to realise that there is a big case for constitutional change, he's got to realise that there is no
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forum for cooperation and therefore there is a stand—off inevitably between scotland and the rest of the uk, and he has got to recognise also that if he wants to explain the benefits of the united kingdom, he's got to go out and do it and he's got to show why independence and the new pound or the new pension or whatever it is, it just won't work. looking at that break briefing to journalists a little earlier and it is about what michael gove did not say, ratherthan is about what michael gove did not say, rather than what he said and it recognises i think that this whole debate could become potentially illegal one before it becomes a political one? —— a legal one. i think the strategy the uk government is approaching on the potential for this all— is approaching on the potential for this all ending up in court is basically— this all ending up in court is basically to turn the other way and pretend _ basically to turn the other way and pretend the question is not being asked _ pretend the question is not being asked. we saw that from michael gove on the _ asked. we saw that from michael gove
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on the andrew marr show today, he has in _ on the andrew marr show today, he has in a _ on the andrew marr show today, he has in a briefing for scottish political— has in a briefing for scottish politicaljournalist has in a briefing for scottish political journalist today where has in a briefing for scottish politicaljournalist today where he has been — politicaljournalist today where he has been asked repeatedly about whether— has been asked repeatedly about whether if this place passes a referendum bill, the uk government would _ referendum bill, the uk government would try— referendum bill, the uk government would try to challenge it in court and say — would try to challenge it in court and say is — would try to challenge it in court and say is not within the power of the scottish parliament and quite frankly, _ the scottish parliament and quite frankly, the uk governmentjust is not getting into it at the moment. i would _ not getting into it at the moment. i would he _ not getting into it at the moment. i would be amazed if holyrood was able to pass _ would be amazed if holyrood was able to pass legislation and just got ignored — to pass legislation and just got ignored and ended up in a situation where _ ignored and ended up in a situation where there was a referendum because of the _ where there was a referendum because of the bill_ where there was a referendum because of the bill here. i do think if that happened — of the bill here. i do think if that happened it's likely to be some sort of legal— happened it's likely to be some sort of legal battle but before that and over the _ of legal battle but before that and over the next three months, ithink we are _ over the next three months, ithink we are also— over the next three months, ithink we are also going to see a bit of a political— we are also going to see a bit of a political battle as well. because the priority for nicola sturgeon's government is not to end up in court and have _ government is not to end up in court and have this — government is not to end up in court and have this all play out in the supreme — and have this all play out in the supreme court in london. it's to try and pressure — supreme court in london. it's to try and pressure borisjohnson's and pressure boris johnson's government and pressure borisjohnson's government into agreeing to another referendum. at the moment, no signs he is going _ referendum. at the moment, no signs he is going to do that. the important _ he is going to do that. the important thing _ he is going to do that. the important thing to - he is going to do that. t"ie important thing to emphasise is that when we look at the question of
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readiness, neitherside when we look at the question of readiness, neither side is ready yet, are they? to launch into a referendum campaign, another referendum campaign, another referendum campaign. you referendum campaign, another referendum campaign.- referendum campaign, another referendum campaign. you are right, there is no desire _ referendum campaign. you are right, there is no desire to _ referendum campaign. you are right, there is no desire to rush _ referendum campaign. you are right, there is no desire to rush into - referendum campaign. you are right, there is no desire to rush into it - there is no desire to rush into it at all— there is no desire to rush into it at all in — there is no desire to rush into it at all in scotland, partly because nicola _ at all in scotland, partly because nicola sturgeon set our government's first 100 _ nicola sturgeon set our government's first 100 days will be about pandemic recovery, no mention of independence on the for that first hundred — independence on the for that first hundred days at all. that will start with an _ hundred days at all. that will start with an announcement on lockdown easing _ with an announcement on lockdown easing in_ with an announcement on lockdown easing in scotland. but there is also _ easing in scotland. but there is also the — easing in scotland. but there is also the fact that neither side have their ducks — also the fact that neither side have their ducks in a row when it comes to another— their ducks in a row when it comes to another referendum. nicola sturgeon — to another referendum. nicola sturgeon has big questions to tackle over the _ sturgeon has big questions to tackle over the border, finance, currency. i'm over the border, finance, currency. i'm sure _ over the border, finance, currency. i'm sure there are plenty of others that welcome up as well. but we have also heard _ that welcome up as well. but we have also heard today i think a sign of split between the anti—independence camp, _ split between the anti—independence camp, the _ split between the anti—independence camp, the unionist camp about what they want— camp, the unionist camp about what they want to do. because gordon brown _ they want to do. because gordon brown says this idea of muscular unionism, — brown says this idea of muscular unionism, putting a union flag and everything — unionism, putting a union flag and everything just isn't going to cut it.
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everything just isn't going to cut it it's _ everything just isn't going to cut it it's not — everything just isn't going to cut it. it's not going to work in scotland _ it. it's not going to work in scotland. he wants a comprehensive change _ scotland. he wants a comprehensive change to _ scotland. he wants a comprehensive change to the way the constitutional settlement works in the uk. but his plan, _ settlement works in the uk. but his plan, boris — settlement works in the uk. but his plan, borisjohnson's plan is to spend — plan, borisjohnson's plan is to spend more money here, talk about with the _ spend more money here, talk about with the uk— spend more money here, talk about with the uk government doesn't scotland. — with the uk government doesn't scotland, put more signs up to save the uk _ scotland, put more signs up to save the uk corporate government has done this, that _ the uk corporate government has done this, that and the next thing. so it seems _ this, that and the next thing. so it seems the — this, that and the next thing. so it seems the unionist side does not notice _ seems the unionist side does not notice trying to achieve yet. different wings are trying to encourage different approaches. so~ ~~ _ encourage different approaches. so~ ~~ think _ encourage different approaches. so... think the prounion side is more _ so... think the prounion side is more fragmented than the pro—independence side at the moment? there are _ pro—independence side at the moment? there are some real tensions in the pro—independence side over how quickly— pro—independence side over how quickly you'd want to move to a new currency, _ quickly you'd want to move to a new currency, over whether the way you would _ currency, over whether the way you would engage with the uk the uk government on independence negotiations if the scottish people ever voted for that. slightly changed by the fact alex salmond's alba party did so badly in elections and failed — alba party did so badly in elections and failed to return a single msps. but in _ and failed to return a single msps. but in many ways, it's the pro—uk
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side that— but in many ways, it's the pro—uk side that has a bit more work to do at the _ side that has a bit more work to do at the moment. because there has always— at the moment. because there has always been this feeling within certainly the scottish conservative party— certainly the scottish conservative party and — certainly the scottish conservative party and parts of the scottish labour — party and parts of the scottish labour party, but the unionist side has not _ labour party, but the unionist side has not made a positive case for the uk. has not made a positive case for the uk and _ has not made a positive case for the uk. and what borisjohnson and gordon— uk. and what borisjohnson and gordon brown's different approaches show us _ gordon brown's different approaches show us is _ gordon brown's different approaches show us is that different people have _ show us is that different people have different visions of what that should _ have different visions of what that should look like. sol have different visions of what that should look like. so i suspect there is a lot— should look like. so i suspect there is a lot of— should look like. so i suspect there is a lot of soul—searching to go on over— is a lot of soul—searching to go on over the _ is a lot of soul—searching to go on over the next three months as they try to _ over the next three months as they try to figure — over the next three months as they try to figure out what the big sale to the _ try to figure out what the big sale to the scottish population is. more specifically that part of the population that can be persuaded of either— population that can be persuaded of either side, really.— either side, really. really interesting, _ either side, really. really interesting, thank - either side, really. really interesting, thank you i either side, really. reallyi interesting, thank you very either side, really. really - interesting, thank you very much. either side, really. really _ interesting, thank you very much. so what do scottish voters want? would they be ready in the short—term for another referendum campaign? certainly for a selection of the electorate they would and a section will remain staunchly prounion. but
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that group in the middle, the persuadable group, are they ready for another campaign whilst still in pandemic recovery mode? that's one of the big questions and all the politicians here in holyrood will certainly be considering. we will be back but for the moment it is back to you. back but for the moment it is back to ou. :, ~ back but for the moment it is back to ou. :, ,, i. back but for the moment it is back to ou. :, ~' ,, , back but for the moment it is back to ou. :, , . back but for the moment it is back to ou. .mg , . , back but for the moment it is back to ou. .mg, , . , to you. thank you very much, see you in a while- _ over 250 people have been wounded in clashes between palestinians and israeli police atjerusalem's al—aqsa mosque compound, one of islam's holiest sites. it comes asjewish nationalists are preparing to hold an annual march through one of the most sensitve sites injerusalem, which marks israel's capture of eastjerusalem in 1967. this was the scene at the al—aqsa compound earlier. the latest escalation in violence follows three nights of confrontations over the possible eviction of palestinian families from their homes in occupied eastjerusalem. the mosque sits in part of a complex which is one of islam's most revered locations and which also houses the dome of the rock, where it is a commonly held belief that the prophet muhammed ascended to heaven. it is also the holiest site injudaism, known as the temple mount, where the western or wailing wall is located. visitors to this area have
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for today, been banned. 0ur middle east editorjeremy bowen explained that security forces in the city had decided to change the route of today's planned march. that the last minute and the announcementjust came through an iphone and it said that it's only, taken by the political echelon on the advice of the security people. to going through a different gate, an area which is not right through the heart of the muslim quarter. it's going along it, but it's a more potentially contentious route, you might say, through the damascus gate, but it does not take away from the issue.
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the issue is that while it has been away from the headlines quite a bit in recent years, the conflict between israelis and palestinians is as raw as ever. and it has been going on for weeks. what is behind this particular series of violence? it's a number of things but the things which have stoked matters has been, there is an area just outside the old city which has been, there has been a long process, legal process, trying to evict palestinians from some properties there. the palestinian complaint, with a lot ofjustification, because of what has happening is that the israeli government of many years has tried to change the demographic balance in the areas ofjerusalem it captured in 1967 in favour of israeli jews. this is part of that and these properties here are particularly symbolic and evocative of that struggle and that's why it is lately, because that process has been coming to a climax, that has
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helped raised the temperature. because there are supposed to be evictions and the supreme court has stepped in? they are involved and decided to postpone the hearing because the assumption was the supreme court would uphold everything and the families would be evicted, perhaps forcibly which would cause a lot of trouble. so to calm things down they have kicked that forward a while. the issue remains. but benjamin netanyahu has said they will not stand for any disorder, he has backed what the police are doing? he always will and part of the fact that this has become so poisonous is that netanyahu has brought into the political mainstream people from the extreme right of... the racist israeli extreme right, they have brought to the mainstream of politics and i think are feeling quite strong as a result of that
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and they have been involved in this as well. so some of the really nastiest elements in the conflict which have been become more sharpened in recent years, are on display. but as you say, it has been going on in the background behind the headlines over... while we have been concentrating on other things. and palestinians have suffered a lot in the pandemic. so that has, i think, meant that people are harder financially, part of netanyahu's policy of trying to manage the conflict over the many years he has been prime minister, has been to try to get palestinians earning a bit more money, and then the argument goes they will be calmer and the conflict will be, therefore, blunted. but that management strategy really is only pretty skin deep. because, essentially, jerusalem is at the heart of this conflict that has been going on for a century and the holy sites are really right in the middle, like a time bomb.
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and if we look to the gaza strip, on the other side of the country, conditions there don't get any better? no, gaza is a very tough place to live, they have been living under various definitions but effectively a state of siege since 2007. a very long time indeed. there have been a few exchanges across the border wire and the israeli army. but there are voices trying to calm things down, including people speaking to hamas in gaza and the americans speaking to the israelis. detectives in kent investigating the death of the police community support officer, julia james have been searching a house in aylesham. she was attacked while walking her dog near her home on april the 27th. police have until tonight to question a man they arrested on friday, who comes
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from the canterbury area. simonjones is there. two weeks now i think into this investigation? yes, this is day 14 of the murder investigation and certainly things are continuing at pace. police arrested a man in his 20s from the canterbury area on friday evening at around 9:30pm. yesterday lunchtime, they were given permission to continue to question him if necessary for another 36 hours. that will take us up to the end of today. at that point, officers will have to decide whether to charge him, release him or they could apply to question him for a further 24 hour period but that would be the final period but that would be the final period they would be allowed to question him for. here at this house, there has been a lot of police activity. we don't know who the house belongs to but police have confirmed it's part of their murder investigation. we have seen forensic
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officers coming and going from the building. police standing guard outside. we saw one officer up a ladder using a camera to look into some of the guttering at the top of the house. clearly a focus of this investigation and searches are continuing in this rural area around the. julia james's body was discovered almost two weeks ago, she had been working from home that day. she went out walking her dog when she was attacked. she suffered serious head injuries. local people tell me they are still concerned and scared in many cases, people asking if it's safe for them to leave their home to go out alone. the safety advice from officers remains the same. they are telling people that when they go out, make sure they have their phone with them and their phone is fully charged, make sure they tell someone where they are going and how exactly, where exactly they are going to be and how lonely are likely to be gone for. in terms of the family, they have said on social media they are just keeping
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fingers crossed progress in this investigation. the family of a woman who took her own life after her benefit payments were cut is bringing legal action against the government. an inquest into the death of philippa day said the department for work and pensions made 28 mistakes in handling her case. it's now emerged the department has reviewed around 150 other similar cases, in which claimants either died or came to serious harm. some viewers might find this report from michael buchanan distressing. it's been six months. i am in so much debt. i have nothing to eat. i can't... phillipa day pleaded repeatedly with benefits officials for help. her money had been cut. they insisted she couldn't have a benefits assessment at home, so in despair, the 27—year—old mother took a fatal overdose, leaving her sister to fight her case.
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it was absolutely preventable. it was directly due to the impact of the claim. the coroner said that claiming benefits should not see that as a risk to life, and it was. an inquest found 28 errors in how the government had processed phillipa day's application for personal independence payments, the main disability benefit. the family are now suing the department for work and pensions. it was a multitude of systemic issues that had been unaddressed for a very, very long time. so my sister was not the first to die, she was one of many. and clearly, lessons have not been learned. philippa day's death is one of scores that families have blamed on the stresses of the benefits system, including tim salter, errol graham, david clapson and jodey whiting. research by the bbc�*s shared data unit found at least 150 reviews of death or serious harm to claimants have been carried out
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by the department for work and pensions between 2012 and 2019. the government told us they take each tragic case seriously, and review them in case there are lessons to learn. ben mcdonald, who died in march i 2015, again taking his own life i after being found fit for work. the labour mp debbie abrahams read out the names of some of those who have died in the house of commons last year. michael connolly, - who died in may 2014... she says internal reviews of each incident is akin to the government marking its own homework. is this what we should be expecting from our social security system? i and i'd say, no. it is not fit for purpose. it isn't a safety net. and we are seriouslyj letting people down. campaigners say there should be an independent public inquiry to uncover how many benefit claimants died whilst seeking support. michael buchanan, bbc news. and if you've been affected by any of the issues raised in that interview,
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you can find details of organisations offering help and support on the bbc action line website. ministers are being warned that a failure to act on long—promised social care reform will be a "bitter blow" for care staff and the millions they help. the promise of a care plan was made by borisjohnson on his first day as prime minister, but has not yet been realised. local council leaders say tomorrow's queen's speech and the spending review later this year are "key opportunities" for the government to make good on its promise to "fix" the sector. the government says improving social care "remains a priority". rail passengers are facing disruption for a third day in a row, after cracks were found in the chassis of some high speed trains during routine inspections. all hitachi 800 trains are being inspected, with disruption expected on long—distance routes. great western railway is advising people not to travel today, and london north eastern railway says passengers should check their bookings before travelling.
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in a light—hearted online conversation, the queen has recollected becoming the first young person in the commonwealth to receive a junior life—saving award from the royal life saving society. appearing in good spirits a few weeks after the death of her husband, she recalled her experience with lifeguards, who have been recognised for saving swimmers, and a seniorfigure from the royal life saving society. you obviously completed a life saving award. what was one of the memories that stuck out for you when you did it? well, it was of course all done in the bath club, in the swimming pool. and i suppose i didn't really actually realise quite what i was doing, you know. because i think i must have been 12 or something — 12 or 14. it's a very long time ago, i'm afraid. i think it's changed a lot. your majesty, when you say it was a long time ago, - it was in fact 80 years ago. that's terrible, isn't it?
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we know that you were actually the first holder of the award. i i didn't realise i was the first one. ijust did it. and had to work very hard for it! but it was a great achievement and i was very proud to wear the badge on the front of my swimming suit. as we all are. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello there. well, i suppose it is going to be a decent day for spotting the rainbows. a particularly unsettled day, with most of you seeing a downpour at some point during today. although quite a few of you will see several downpours, it is going to be very, very showery. the showers may well ease off for a time across southern england, but i think there will be another batch coming into sussex and kent later on. heaviest showers for northern england, northern ireland and scotland. some here having hail and thunder mixed in. and those temperatures around 14 to 16 celsius for most. 0vernight, more rain for scotland.
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inland areas of northern ireland, england and wales, the showers will gradually fade away, taking their time mind you, but eventually becoming drier. temperatures down to around six or 7 degrees. tomorrow, this early morning rain clears away from scotland. and then scotland, northern ireland, northern england getting off to a fine morning with spells of sunshine. further south, showers develop, those showers move northwards across england and wales, reaching northern ireland and southern scotland through the afternoon. and some of them will be heavy and thundery. hello this is bbc news with martine croxall. the headlines... the uk lowers its covid alert level as the prime minister prepares to announce a major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. it's understood he'll say that from next monday there can be a return to indoor hospitality and household mixing, and people can hug each other again. after labour's crushing by—election defeat, a reshuffled shadow cabinet meets, amid calls for an end to infighting.
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dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish nationalist march. suing the government, the family of a woman who took her own life after her benefits were cut. down memory lane, the queen recollects becoming the first young person in the commonwealth to receive a lifesaving award. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's chetan. good afternoon. the champions league final between chelsea and manchester city on the 29th of may could be played at wembley. uefa is set to decide by wednesday whether to switch the game from istanbul to london. turkey is in full lockdown, with the uk government saying people should only travel there in extreme circumstances. i've been speaking to our senior sport news reporter, laura scott.
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it is incredibly complicated to move a final with such short notice. remember uefa only found out about turkey being added to the uk government's red list on friday, when we all did. and they've said that moving it is still on the table, but it is a hugely complex issue. a key point here seems to be whether the uk government would grant quarantine exemption to everybody that would need to come over to wembley for that final from abroad, that could be up to 3,000 people including international media, sponsors and uefa officials. so whether the uk government will grant that, or on the flip side, whether it had to take place in istanbul, would the uk government give the players and club staff at chelsea and manchester city a quarantine exemption so they didn't have to go into hotel quarantine for ten days with the euros so close? we haven't heard anything from the turkish football federation about what they think about potentially losing out on the champions league final.
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clearly we know fans are disappointed at not being able to see their teams, but the uk government and uefa and the fa need to work out a compromise here — which is more important of all of these factors at play? but there are just 19 days to go until this final, and we expect a decision to be made in the next 48 hours. something that's looking a little more certain is edinson cavani extending his stay at manchester united. bbc sport understands the uruguayan striker, who's 34, will remain for another season. it took a while for cavani to settle in, but he's now scored eight goals in his past seven games — 15 in total. he's had a great clay court season so far, but dan evans has lost in the opening round of the rome masters after being beaten by america's taylor fritz in straight sets. the british number one, ranked 26th in the world, struggled on serve throughout, and showed his annoyance at the end of the first set. he beat novak djokovic in monte carlo and reached the last
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16 in madrid last week, but a first round defeat for him here in rome as he lost 6—3, 6—2 to fritz, who is ranked five places below him in the world. the four—time grand slam champion naomi 0saka says she's not sure whether the tokyo 0lympics should be going ahead this summer. the japanese world number two was speaking after a new poll in the country showed nearly 60% of people injapan want the games to be cancelled, following a surge of reported cases of covid—19 there. i think for me i am an athlete, and of course my immediate thought is that i want to play 0lympic. but as a human, iwould that i want to play 0lympic. but as a human, i would say we are in a pandemic, and if people are not healthy and if they are not feeling safe, then it is definitely... rugby union fans will be admitted to twickenham for the first
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time since december, with at least 10,000 able to attend each of england's summer test matches. eddiejones�* side will play tests against the usa on sunday the 4th ofjuly and canada on saturday the 10th ofjuly. an england a side will face scotland a in leicester on sunday the 27th ofjune. meanwhile, the ex—wales coach rob howley, who is now assistant coach at canada, will face wales on saturday the 3rd ofjuly in cardiff, before wales have two further tests against argentina. and ireland are set to host japan and the usa at the aviva stadium injuly as part of their reshuffled summer schedule. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. there is more about that on the bbc sport website. now, let's return to one of our main stories this hour. last night, sir keir starmer sacked his shadow chancellor annaliese dodds and party chair angela rayner, moving both to other positions. the labour leader says his new shadow cabinet is refreshed and renewed —
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but do members agree and what thoughts do they have on the party's future? with me to discuss this is the guardian columnist and author 0wenjones and the editor of labour list, sienna rodgers. thank you very much forjoining us. what difference is this really going to make? it wasn't the reshuffle that they planned of course, they actually intended to not only sack angela rayner, who is deputy leader, to as chair in an effort to scapegoat herfor the to as chair in an effort to scapegoat her for the election results, notably hartlepool, an election campaign she had nothing to do with whatsoever. they also intend to demote other members of the shadow cabinet, and such was the backlash they received over their abortive attempt to take down angela rayner, at that they had a u—turn on that as well. for example, if you take the party chair, they were going to hand that over to someone called steve reed, very much associated with the right wing of the labour party. and instead that has gone to annalisa dodds, who is
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associated i guess with the soft left of the labour party. that is what not what they intended to do, what not what they intended to do, what i think the reshuffle question that hangs over the abortive shuffle, which has really undermined keir starmer�*s authority, is will he use it to set out a clear vision for the country? and this is the point — lots of labour mps were not on the left are not happy with keir starmer because they don't think he has a clear vision for the country he seeks to serve. and there are also now question marks of a big selling points which were competence. and if we look back to the vision he set out in the leadership contest where he received that mandate from members, it was to advocate policies like hiking taxes on richer people, big business, in orderto like hiking taxes on richer people, big business, in order to fund investment, scrap tuition fees, investment, scrap tuition fees, invest in the economy, public service, bring utilities in the public ownership, to have party unity, to have competence and electability. and as things stand,
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he has not abided by the mandate, which was a decisive one he got from members, well over half of the party membership and others voted for him to be leader on that basis. the other danger is peter mandelson, by the looks of things, is essentially party running the labour party. he is signing off lines to shadow cabinet ministers and has told shadow cabinet ministers complaining to you on the bbc and elsewhere, they are complaining peter mandelson have signed them off. he signed off lines for the hartlepool by—election. a ghost of the new labour past has been resurrected by starmer�*s seen in a further departure from what they promised when he stood for labour leader, which was not to vote the keir starmer to have peter mandelson running the labour party. let’s starmer to have peter mandelson running the labour party. let's come back to the — running the labour party. let's come back to the strategy _ running the labour party. let's come back to the strategy in _ running the labour party. let's come back to the strategy in a _ running the labour party. let's come back to the strategy in a moment, i back to the strategy in a moment, but to what extent do you think that keir starmer has missed a trick in not bringing back some of the big
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names that some people expected which, from the era of peter mandelson?— which, from the era of peter mandelson? , , , , mandelson? yes, this reshuffle has been criticised _ mandelson? yes, this reshuffle has been criticised on _ mandelson? yes, this reshuffle has been criticised on so _ mandelson? yes, this reshuffle has been criticised on so many - mandelson? yes, this reshuffle has been criticised on so many levels, i been criticised on so many levels, first of— been criticised on so many levels, first of all— been criticised on so many levels, first of all because of timing because _ first of all because of timing because it started on saturday when results _ because it started on saturday when results were still coming in, which was quite — results were still coming in, which was quite a — results were still coming in, which was quite a confusing thing to do when _ was quite a confusing thing to do when actually some of the better results _ when actually some of the better results for labour that they could have _ results for labour that they could have been— results for labour that they could have been celebrating were actually starting _ have been celebrating were actually starting to come in. things like in the west— starting to come in. things like in the west of— starting to come in. things like in the west of england mayor which they .ot the west of england mayor which they got from _ the west of england mayor which they got from the tories. that kind of things— got from the tories. that kind of things they could be summarising amazing _ things they could be summarising amazing foster there is also the issue _ amazing foster there is also the issue of— amazing foster there is also the issue of falling between two stools, because _ issue of falling between two stools, because it _ issue of falling between two stools, because it infuriated some people on the left _ because it infuriated some people on the left of— because it infuriated some people on the left of the party and also the soft left — the left of the party and also the soft left of the party, the people who both — soft left of the party, the people who both support keir starmer and angela _ who both support keir starmer and angela rayner because of the moves against _ angela rayner because of the moves against deputy leader. there were negotiations and she ended up in a stronger— negotiations and she ended up in a stronger position than before. but at the _ stronger position than before. but at the same time, it has not really pleased _ at the same time, it has not really pleased people on the right of the party, _
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pleased people on the right of the party, mps are concerned that they wanted _ party, mps are concerned that they wanted people like yvette cooper, hilary _ wanted people like yvette cooper, hilary benn, those kind of figures, to come _ hilary benn, those kind of figures, to come back and really bring some heft to _ to come back and really bring some heft to the — to come back and really bring some heft to the shadow cabinet. instead, we have _ heft to the shadow cabinet. instead, we have just got a very, very big shadow— we have just got a very, very big shadow cabinet is now that it's all kind of— shadow cabinet is now that it's all kind of the — shadow cabinet is now that it's all kind of the same name is pretty much because _ kind of the same name is pretty much because he _ kind of the same name is pretty much because he has moved people around and create _ because he has moved people around and create a — because he has moved people around and create a new posts for them. owen, _ and create a new posts for them. owen, how — and create a new posts for them. 0wen, how can you draw and create a new posts for them. owen, how can you draw encouragement 0wen, how can you draw encouragement them from the more positive results that siena just referred to, which in some respects have been overlooked because of the damage that was done in hartlepool and any other local elections, english local council elections? what assumptions can be drawn about what labour voters are really looking for when you look at those successes? fin you look at those successes? on that, you look at those successes? ©"i that, senior labour figures are completely baffled about why they decided on saturday to start this abortive reshuffle which caused so much negative press for the media rather than focusing on those victories. what you did see, because obviously these are the worst local election results for a opposition party in 40 years, clearly
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hartlepool, the third time an opposition has lost to a governing body in half a century, that labour did buck the trend in manchester for example, in liverpool, in bristol. local authorities as well like salford and in preston, what was different... 0rwales, my welsh ancestors will be turning in their graves. under mark drakeford. and what is interesting about all of those results is that they were often associated with big labour figures who offered a bold vision. andy burnham is associated with challenging the conservatives over the treatment of the north during a pandemic. he has also brought the buses. in authorities like preston, the so—called preston model, in salford, they have a radical, bold policies which actually have attracted voters. salford is in the so—called red wall, if we are going to talk about working class amenities in the north. and labour
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did better. salford's mayor said they offered radical policies. mark drakeford they offered radical policies. mark dra keford after they offered radical policies. mark drakeford after 2019 election, he warned the labour leadership not to go away from radical policies that can inspire people. so these are not are all big lefty figures, they are authentic centre—left agendas. but they are big labourfigures associated with challenging the conservatives and having eye—catching policies and a vision. because that is where i think the labour leadership nationally has clearly failed. i think across the party there is a consensus that no one knows what keir starmer stands for. people do not andy burnham stands for, they do know what what mark drakeford wales stands for and we do know what he saw mayoral candidates in local authorities. labour has to love you cannot get people to vote for labourjust labour has to love you cannot get people to vote for labour just to stop the tories, that did not work. —— people cannot vote labour to stop the tories. but -- people cannot vote labour to stop the tories. �* :, .., -- people cannot vote labour to stop the tories. �* :, , :, the tories. but how can you extrapolate _ the tories. but how can you
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extrapolate a _ the tories. but how can you extrapolate a truly - the tories. but how can you extrapolate a truly national| extrapolate a truly national strategy from the kind of big, bold statements that 0wen is talking about, which are very much pinned the individuals and what the labour party needs is a strategy that is going to appeal to enough people across the entire country to get them elected?— across the entire country to get them elected? , :, , , them elected? obviously there were vafious them elected? obviously there were various factors _ them elected? obviously there were various factors here. _ them elected? obviously there were various factors here. so _ them elected? obviously there were various factors here. so bad - them elected? obviously there were various factors here. so bad and - various factors here. so bad and varied _ various factors here. so bad and varied to— various factors here. so bad and varied to he _ various factors here. so bad and varied to be honest, that pretty much _ varied to be honest, that pretty much every explanation you can find contribute _ much every explanation you can find contribute in some way to some of those _ contribute in some way to some of those losses. and the wins, mark drakeford. — those losses. and the wins, mark drakeford, people felt he had kept them _ drakeford, people felt he had kept them safe, that was the main thing coming _ them safe, that was the main thing coming up — them safe, that was the main thing coming up on the doorstep. these are important _ coming up on the doorstep. these are important things which keir starmer did not— important things which keir starmer did not have that advantage of. however. — did not have that advantage of. however, since the beginning of the year. _ however, since the beginning of the year. the _ however, since the beginning of the year, the leadership and the leaders office _ year, the leadership and the leaders office and his aides have been saying — office and his aides have been saying that they need to start showing — saying that they need to start showing some leg in terms of vision.
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"kia starmer— showing some leg in terms of vision. "kia starmer will show more of himself. — "kia starmer will show more of himself, his personality and what he stands _ himself, his personality and what he stands for~" — himself, his personality and what he stands for." but every time they tried. _ stands for." but every time they tried. it — stands for." but every time they tried, it was a bit bland. it is not only— tried, it was a bit bland. it is not only because covid was big in the newsi _ only because covid was big in the news, it— only because covid was big in the news, it was because it was itty bitty— news, it was because it was itty bitty bits — news, it was because it was itty bitty bits of policies rather than one big — bitty bits of policies rather than one big vision. i think a big economic— one big vision. i think a big economic changes one thing that actually— economic changes one thing that actually a — economic changes one thing that actually a recent review found really — actually a recent review found really brought together labour's coalition — really brought together labour's coalition voters. i think that's what — coalition voters. i think that's what we _ coalition voters. i think that's what we need to be looking at the moment — what we need to be looking at the moment. : ~ what we need to be looking at the moment. :, ,, , :, what we need to be looking at the moment. : ~' , :, , what we need to be looking at the moment. :, ,, , :, , . what we need to be looking at the moment. : ~ ,, , : :, what we need to be looking at the moment. :, ,, y:, , . :, moment. thank you very much to both of ou for moment. thank you very much to both of you for talking _ moment. thank you very much to both of you for talking to _ moment. thank you very much to both of you for talking to us. _ the uk's covid alert level has been lowered, in response to a consistent fall in cases, hospital admissions and deaths. it's now at level three, meaning the virus is in circulation but transmission is no longer high. borisjohnson is expected to announce later if the next stage of unlocking can go ahead in england, including the full reopening of pubs and restaurants. earlier i spoke to paul hunter, professor of medicine at the university of east anglia. i asked him whether he thought
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this was the right time to lower the alert level. i think it's right, and in fact it was necessary if we are going to go to the next lengths, level of the relaxation on next monday. so it does fit in with the current state of the epidemic at the moment. so it is an appropriate decision. how impressive is it that we have got to this point at this point? i think we were always going to get to this point, i think it's particularly impressive we managed it against a background of the kent variant which came and hit us in december. and is an indication of how effective the vaccination campaign has been over the recent months. 0n the whole, how well do you think the public have done to get us to this point? the government will take some credit, but it has relied upon us being compliant? absolutely.
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i think the vast majority of people have followed the rules, done the best they can to minimise the risks to themselves or others. and that has been reflected in the success of the lockdown. and as the prime minister said only a few weeks ago, much of the early decline in the epidemic from its peak in early january was down solely to the lockdown measures and not the vaccination, but as we move out of that vaccination, out of restrictions, i think the vaccinations are critical to being able to relax at this point. there are concerns in some quarters that the fall in numbers, hospitalisations and cases generally, is beginning to stall. how much more important or continuing to be important is it that we follow the remaining guidance? absolutely critical. you are quite right. the last few days, the last three orfour days, the numbers reported in each day have been higher
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than they were in the same day the previous week. so we are still a long way out of the woods, and i think some of that increase, probably the majority of the increase has been the spreading of one of the indian variants. so if we're still going to see further relaxations in next month, we're going to be have to be very careful that we do continue to stick to the rules, otherwise we will be... we will be back in a difficult place. how satisfied are you with the speed of vaccinations? some parts of the country seem to be suggesting that uptake is either slowing down, or the numbers being vaccinated each day perhaps for the second time, it's not happening as fast as we would have expected? i have not been looking at the individual regional variations but overall, it has been pretty good. 0verall vaccination figures, the number of the projection figures
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has been quite high. —— the number of injections given has been quite high. the large majority of those infections have been second doses. back in march, we were possibly giving about 400—500,000 vaccinations a day to people who had not previously had a dose and at the moment because most of the injections are going to people who already have had their first dose, only about 100,000 people a day are getting a vaccine for the first time. so of course that has slowed down and it was always expected to slow down. that will undoubtedly pick up again as we move throuthune, and this big backlog of people who had their first doses back in february, march, and indeed early april, will be dealt with. i don't usually ask you personal questions but on this occasion i will make an exception. what are you most looking forward
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to being able to do, with caution? hug my grandchildren. i hoped you might say something like that. thank you very much. there's a new warning that violent drugs gangs are causing misery across the country, expanding their operations from cities into smaller towns. the bbc�*s panorama programme has been filming with kent police for the last year, with so—called county lines drug running reaching a peak during the pandemic. panorama filmed the force's dedicated �*county lines and gangs team' as it investigated the drugs networks. rahil sheikh reports. police! don't move, don't move, don't move! kent officers are increasingly carrying out raids like these. 0n the floor, on the floor! get hold of your dog! get hold of your dog. targeting dealers believed to be part of county lines, transporting drugs worth millions from london to the county. great big rambo knife there. we've got multiple weapons, drugs, all sorts. a county line is a drug dealing network, often with a city—based
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dealer distributing illegal drugs to smaller towns. the gangs sell their drugs through phone dealing lines. we're trying to get to the snakes here, we're trying to find out who is bringing these drugs in. they're the people we are really after. what's this, for itv? police are after those higher up the chain, known as line holders. we want to take out the people that are holding the line, because they're the bigger threat. and they are harder to replace. they can be in control of several lines and several runners. so it would take out more people in the long run. you're under arrest concerning the supply of class a drugs. what we've got here is going to be a quantity of heroin, which is uncut, a quantity of crack cocaine here. he's got two mobile phones on him, and one of the mobile phones is what we call the job line. we've got bulk messages, basically saying that he's got heroin and crack cocaine for sale. silver to bronze ground and all
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units, strike, strike, strike. outside of london, the south east has the highest rate of drug seizures in the uk. profits from a single line often supplying heroin and crack cocaine can be £800,000 per year. when we first started looking at the phenomenon of county lines, which was probably back around seven years ago now, only seven forces in the country were actually affected. as of today, every police force in the country is affected. essentially an exchange hasjust taken place. according to the latest figures from the national crime agency, there are around 1,000 county lines in operation across the uk. here in kent, despite successive national lockdowns, the number of lines reached record levels at around 80. kent police have made over 300 drugs—related arrests in the last year and reduced the number of county lines to 46. it's hoping to triple the size of its dedicated team to 70 officers by next year,
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paid for with additional government funding. rahil sheikh, bbc news. and there is more on that story in panorama: drugs, cops and lockdown tonight on bbc one at 7.30. the former gogglebox star and i'm a celebrity winner scarlett moffatt has revealed how "horrific" online abuse led to her calling the samaritans for support. now she says she's in a better place, and she wants to use her experience to help others. she's become an ambassador for the charity. jayne mccubbin went to meet her. do you remember that first voice? yeah, this is going to sound really dramatic, but it's just like... it's like hope. scarlett moffatt recalls the moment she reached out to a stranger, and asked for help. that's what it sounded like, like hope. just hearing somebody say, like, "hello, samaritans?" like, "what's wrong?" queen of the jungle.
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she'd risen to fame through reality tv. a warm personality which saw her crowned queen of thejungle in 2016, but that is when her life started to unravel. when i came out of the jungle, i was on top of the world. i finally felt accepted. with all those positive things came a lot of negativity. i'd get a lot of trolling, and, before long, it was just consuming me. this sadness was just consuming every part of my body. that is when scarlett picked up the phone and dialled six numbers which, she says, didn'tjust change her life, but saved her life. here we are, danny and lisa. and today she is meeting two other people whose mental health took them on the same journey to samaritans. danny, when depression left him suicidal. lisa e—mailed the charity after she divorced. i remember giving a fake name, because i didn't dare say my name. and then, for the first time ever, having a decent night's sleep.
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just relief i think and, like, the power ofjust that human connection. have either of you still got that first e—mail? yes, definitely. the first one i sentjust says, "hi, i'm having a really tough - time at the moment." like you said about the relief - of getting that off your shoulders and to be able to have someonej on the other end who would just listen, whereas obviously sometimes i it is a bit more difficult to speak. to family, friends. for me, it wasjust, like, itjust being a pure stranger, them not knowing anything about you and just being, like, "this is the issue". today scarlett has been announced as samaritans�* new ambassador. she will use her platform to tell other people, especially young people, about the hope that�*s on offer. especially young people, about the help that�*s on offer. like, we�*ve all been in such a rubbish place, and, like, probably at the time, felt like there was no escape. but we�*ve done that. we are little legends.
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everyone who�*s rung samaritans is a little legend, aren�*t they? jane mccubbin, bbc news. and if you�*ve been affected by any of the issues and if you�*ve been affected raised in that interview, you can find details of organisations offering help and support on the bbc action line website. royal mail is beginning a trial of unmanned drone flights to deliver parcels from the uk mainland to the isles of scilly. the focus initially will be on supplying health and safety equipment and covid tests. if successful, royal mail says it will consider using drones to reach other remote parts of the country. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello again. well, i suppose it�*s a good day for spotting a rainbow or two. a particularly unsettled day where most of you will see a shower at some point during the day. quite a few of you will see several showers with the rain on and off pretty much all day. and what a change in weather fortunes that is because it was particularly dry in april. leuchars in east scotland only managed three millimetres of rain through the whole of the month. may is more than making up for it.
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here is one of the wettest places in the uk, we�*ve already had well over a month�*s worth of rain and we�*re only ten days into may. that rain will be extensive as we go to the west of the week. notjust in scotland but across the whole of the british isles. it�*s going to be a particularly wet spell of weather and it�*s all down to this area of low pressure. this low pressure, normally the lows would move out of the way so they would not hang around, but this one cannot move to the north and east because we have got this blocking area of high pressure. and so instead the low�*s going to be over our heads pretty much all week bringing those shower clouds in. showers extensive today and may well ease off for a time across southern england, a bit more sunshine, but we will see another batch of showers crossing from france particularly into sussex and kent. heavier showers today. northern ireland, northern england and scotland. some of them have hail and thunder mist in, temperatures around about 14—16. 0vernight, rain for a time pushing into scotland, but across inland areas, those showers will clear.
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temperatures around 6 or 7 degrees overnight. tuesday, early rain clears out of the way in scotland and for a good chunk of the day it should be reasonable here. the same too for northern ireland and northern england. however, further south, those showers really start to develop, and through the afternoon they will drive northwards across the whole of england and wales, northern ireland and into southern areas of scotland. again, some thunderstorms mixed in with these heavy downpours. and temperatures for most of us still around 14—16. it will continue to be quite windy. those winds tend to die away a little bit on wednesday. another day of sunshine and showers, but this time weather showers form, because the wind�*s that bit lighter, they�*ll hang around and be slower to move through. temperatures still 14—16. through the rest of the week, it stays unsettled. may is making up for that dry april.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the uk lowers its covid alert level as the prime minister prepares to announce a major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. it�*s understood he�*ll say that from next monday there can be a return to indoor hospitality and household mixing — and people can hug each other again. after labour�*s crushing by election defeat, a reshuffled shadow cabinet meets — amid calls for an end to infighting. iamat i am at the scottish parliament and after nicola sturgeon said she could bring forward legislation for another independence referendum as early as next spring, michael gove has refused to rule out the uk government taking action in the supreme court.
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dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem. suing the government — the family of a woman who took her own life after her benefits were cut. and down memory lane — the queen recollects becoming the first young person in the commonwealth to receive a life—saving award the uk�*s covid alert level has been lowered from 4 to 3, which means the virus is no longer spreading exponentially. in around one hour�*s time the prime minister is expected to announce a major easing of restrictions in england, so that — from next monday — six people or two households can meet indoors, while groups of up to 30 can meet outdoors.
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pubs and restaurants would be able to reopen indoors, and — at last — people could hug friends and family outside their households. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns reports. you have got to do two verses. # happy birthday to you, happy birthday to you! since the pandemic began, we�*ve had to learn to do everyday things differently. it started with hand washing. right, there we go. then we had to get used to wearing facemasks. now it looks like we might have to rethink how to do something else. hugging. we�*re expecting the prime minister later to give us the go—ahead to hug friends and family from next week, sort of. careful cuddling, if you will. keeping them short and selective, not hugging lots of people, and avoiding face—to—face contact. just a proper hug. not, i couldn't, it's not a hug. a hug is a hug. it's not a push them away sort of thing. it's not natural for. us to be so separate. we are, like, are social creatures. we need that interaction.
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i�*ve been hugging direct family members, but other than that i haven�*t missed hugging anyone else. i do love to give my friends and family lots of hugs, especially as you don't know how long they're going to be here for so... today, the chief medical 0fficers across the uk have agreed to lower the covid alert level from four to three. this means that case numbers, people in hospital and deaths have all fallen consistently, but that covid is still spreading, with people catching it every day. we have really, really high levels of vaccination, - | but of course the vaccines are not| 100% protective, so we need to be a little bit careful, - but i think it is a good step in the right direction. if we look at the figures, - the number of people getting infected, the number of people going into hospital, _ i are at really, really low levels, i back to where we were in august, which is pretty much the lowest time at any point in the pandemic. - the government promised to follow the data. and with more than 50 million doses of the vaccine given so far, and just one in 1,100 people
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infected with coronavirus, it seems that there is no reason not to ease restrictions again in england from next monday. we still need to be cautious. we are incredibly aware that everybody wants to get together, that people want to hug each other, that people want to entertain in their own house. goodness me, we all want to do that. and we understand that. and that is why we have a road map. once it is confirmed, in england from next monday, social contact rules will be lifted outdoors. six people, or two households, can meet up inside, and indoor hospitality and hotels can open again. this step along the road map was always going to be a big one. right now, if you want to go to a pub or restaurant in england, you better bring a coat. this will bring our social lives indoors, and with hugging, bring us into closer contact. these are two things that help the virus to spread. wales and scotland are also expecting to open up more next week, with northern ireland following the week after.
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catherine burns, bbc news. well, for more now on the easing of lockdown, we can speak to kate nicholls, who�*s the chief executive of uk hospitality. you must be waiting with bated breath? brute you must be waiting with bated breath? ~ : , you must be waiting with bated breath? ~ :, , ., ., ~ breath? we are but we are taking heart from _ breath? we are but we are taking heart from the _ breath? we are but we are taking heart from the fact _ breath? we are but we are taking heart from the fact that _ breath? we are but we are taking heart from the fact that earlier i heart from the fact that earlier today we saw the risk level fall to three and when we were looking at reopening outdoor hospitality on the 12th of april that was the precursor for the announcement to be made. we are hopeful the prime minister will make that big announcement and allow end hospitality to reopen. we hope you will signal we are also at the most important road maps that, the 2ist most important road maps that, the 21st ofjune, the lifting of all restrictions, when businesses can look to move back to making a profit in towards viability. this look to move back to making a profit in towards viability.—
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in towards viability. this next step likel to in towards viability. this next step likely to be _ in towards viability. this next step likely to be on _ in towards viability. this next step likely to be on the _ in towards viability. this next step likely to be on the 17th, _ in towards viability. this next step likely to be on the 17th, what - likely to be on the 17th, what preparations have your members have to make to make sure they are still within the guidelines that will go on for another five weeks? businesses have had to make an investment and reopening and restocking, bringing staff members orfor restocking, bringing staff members or for low restocking, bringing staff members orfor low on restocking, bringing staff members or for low on the gambler government will confirm the 17th of may is reopening. we are reopening with restrictions in place on social—distancing. tables have to be separated. there is a capacity restriction on the premises. and you have got two metres social—distancing or one metre plus depending on the layout. in addition, it is table service only. table ordering only. and the ability of the premises to generate revenue in a normal way would be constrained whether there are hotel, pub par or restaurant. the best they can achieve is 60%. that�*s below break even. we know that�*s not tenable
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long—term so that�*s why it�*s critical the government moves to be able to confirm we are on track for that final stage of the road map in england on the 21st ofjune. haifa england on the 21st ofjune. how similar will— england on the 21st ofjune. how similar will restrictions _ england on the 21st ofjune. how similar will restrictions from next monday be to the conditions your members have to operate under at points last year when we were moving in and out of lockdown? brute points last year when we were moving in and out of lockdown?— in and out of lockdown? we are re in and out of lockdown? we are pretty similar — in and out of lockdown? we are pretty similar to _ in and out of lockdown? we are pretty similar to the _ in and out of lockdown? we are | pretty similar to the restrictions we had july to september last year. the end of september we went in with curfews and restrictions on hours. restrictions on scotch eggs and eating. we are not going to have those tougher restrictions. the ones that pushed us to 20—30% of revenue levels. but we are opening pretty much the same way we were last summer. we know we can do it safely and we opened last summer and there was no increase in infection levels. as you heard earlier, the infection levels now are at the same low
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levels. we should be confident there is limited risk in reopening hospitality. that�*s the level of restrictions we�*re going to be facing which means we can�*t bring back full—time. and we can�*t get to above break even. haifa back full-time. and we can't get to above break even.— back full-time. and we can't get to above break even. how confident are ou --eole above break even. how confident are you people will _ above break even. how confident are you people will feel— above break even. how confident are you people will feel secure _ above break even. how confident are you people will feel secure enough i you people will feel secure enough to come out and spend money? even if they have money to spend, because of course, a lot of people have really struggled financially and won�*t be able to take advantage of the opening up of hospitality. this is about issue _ opening up of hospitality. this is about issue of _ opening up of hospitality. this is about issue of uncertainty. - opening up of hospitality. this is about issue of uncertainty. the i about issue of uncertainty. the government could do a lot to restore consumer and business confidence and those of workers taking the risk of coming back or changing job. we had a positive response from the public when we reopened outdoor hospitality. 45% of the uk customers came out within those first two weeks. sadly the weather devastated trade for the last two weeks but the
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first two weeks 45% return. that compares to one third of customers coming back out injuly last year. so much more positive sentiment. quicker bounce back loan appetite to return to hospitality. crucially those who returned cited restrictions on outer only. we are confident when we can bring people back into the warmth and show a safe welcome we will have a positive response. undoubtedly as we come out of the pandemic it will be a long road to recovery before businesses can repair shattered balance sheets, people can have the confidence to come out and spend and have economic recovery. come out and spend and have economic recove . : ~' come out and spend and have economic recove . :, ~ , :, y come out and spend and have economic recove . :, ~ , :, , . the prime minister will be leading a downing street briefing this evening. he�*ll be joined by england�*s chief medical officer professor chris whitty and the government�*s chief scientific adviser sir patrick vallance. we�*ll have full coverage from 4:30
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on bbc one and the bbc news channel. labour�*s new shadow cabinet has met for the first time after a reshuffle following a poor showing in last week�*s english local elections and the hartlepool byelection. last night sir keir starmer sacked his shadow chancellor annaliese dodds and party chair angela rayner, moving both to other positions. sir keir claims his new shadow cabinet is refreshed and renewed. 0ur political correspondent helen catt reports. after a tough weekend, the labour leader off to meet his newly tweaked top team. that biggest change, the replacement of anneliese dodds as shadow chancellor. i'm fine. but not all changes went so smoothly. there was an apparent dispute between sir keir starmer and his deputy leader, angela rayner, over changing some of herjobs. that has led to more friction within the party. not helpful, say some. it is about now moving forward. labour has got to stop this sort of internal focus, the civil war between those on the left of the party,
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those on the right of the party, from my point of view, that is absolutely pointless and destructive. and there is support from a former leader who is no stranger to strains at the top of the party. keir has got to be given the time and the power, and the resources to be able to get on with bringing forward new policies that will never be the same as 1997, cannot be the same as 2019, but he has got to bring forward and will bring forward new policies to change britain and he has got to get out there, as he wants to do, and listen to the people. so, what does the new shadow cabinet look like? angela rayner was given some more senior roles, about 24 hours after she was sacked from herjob as party chair on saturday. anneliese dodds takes that role, after being sacked as shadow chancellor. rachel reeves has replaced her. and there is a promotion, wes streeting, considered to be a strong media performer, is in charge of the child poverty brief. reshuffles are always difficult, i it's more important i think to take the time to get exactly right
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the team that keir wants- around him, in the jobs - that he wants people doing. and i'm really pleased to be part of a shadow cabinet that has got very, very strong and committed | colleagues sitting alongside us. | and i'm very excited to be working i with those brilliant colleagues. i it won�*t be long before labour is having to go into another election. tracy brabin won the mayoralty in west yorkshire yesterday, a success for labour but it means she is stepping down as an mp for batley and spen, and that means another by—election. there is no doubt that what happened with angela rayner over the weekend has sparked real anger. to apportion blame to angie, and to sack her from her position, was a despicable act of cowardice from my point of view. the next test for sir keir will be to quieten the party�*s internal row quickly so it can look outward once again.
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the re—elected first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, has told borisjohnson that another vote on scottish independence is inevitable. the snp leader also suggested that she could begin the process as early as next spring. my colleague annita mcveigh is outside holyrood this afternoon thank you. earlier today, the former prime minister gordon brown who was a strong prounion voice, he was out of the starting blocks quickly defending the union and urging boris johnson to avoid what gordon brown called a more muscular style of unionism in trying to persuade people in scotland that the union was where they should remain to be. continue to be. michael gove has been briefing journalists today and during that briefing he was asked about the question of any potential
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legal action by the uk government to stop any moves here at holyrood for another independence referendum and he would not all the asked a couple of times, he would not be drawn with any sort of answer. new msps, some have been getting involved in the induction process at holyrood today, one of them joins me now. the conservative mp for central scotland, formerly mp for stirling. thank you forjoining us. how has that induction process been? it has been good. — that induction process been? it has been good. it's _ that induction process been? it has been good, it's a _ that induction process been? it has been good, it's a privilege - that induction process been? it has been good, it's a privilege to - that induction process been? it has been good, it's a privilege to be here _ been good, it's a privilege to be here and — been good, it's a privilege to be here and honour to represent people in central— here and honour to represent people in central scotland. will here and honour to represent people in central scotland.— in central scotland. will there be another independence _ in central scotland. will there be - another independence referendum... no. ., ,, :, ., another independence referendum... no. ., ,, :, :, no. nicola sturgeon did not achieve her majority- _ no. nicola sturgeon did not achieve her majority. there _ no. nicola sturgeon did not achieve her majority. there is _ no. nicola sturgeon did not achieve her majority. there is certainly - no. nicola sturgeon did not achieve her majority. there is certainly no i her majority. there is certainly no supermajority in the country. for... at holyrood, — supermajority in the country. for... at holyrood, there is a pro—independence majority between the snp is and scottish greens. 0n the snp is and scottish greens. on that basis, presumably you can see
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them bringing forward legislation for another referendum? the them bringing forward legislation for another referendum? the power to hold another— for another referendum? the power to hold another referendum _ for another referendum? the power to hold another referendum is _ for another referendum? the power to hold another referendum is reserved. | hold another referendum is reserved. what would _ hold another referendum is reserved. what would be required under the scotland _ what would be required under the scotland act is a section 30 order and that's— scotland act is a section 30 order and that's in the hands of the uk government. this is as a reserved matter. _ government. this is as a reserved matter, related to the constitution are reserved so i don't believe there's— are reserved so i don't believe there's going to be another independence referendum. iwill tell you what— independence referendum. iwill tell you what i_ independence referendum. iwill tell you what i believe that very passionately and that's that we need to collectively turn over attention in that _ to collectively turn over attention in that parliament to scotland was not recovery from the pandemic. focus _ not recovery from the pandemic. focus on— not recovery from the pandemic. focus on the economy, jobs, the backlog — focus on the economy, jobs, the backlog in— focus on the economy, jobs, the backlog in the health services and how we _ backlog in the health services and how we will take care of that. also about _ how we will take care of that. also about scotland was not educational standards. those are the things that are urgent— standards. those are the things that are urgent and should be demanding of attention. are urgent and should be demanding of attention-— of attention. nicola sturgeon says for the next _ of attention. nicola sturgeon says for the next 100 _ of attention. nicola sturgeon says for the next 100 days _ of attention. nicola sturgeon says for the next 100 days that - of attention. nicola sturgeon says for the next 100 days that will. of attention. nicola sturgeon says for the next 100 days that will be | for the next 100 days that will be completely her focus. the recovery will not take _ completely her focus. the recovery will not take 100 _ completely her focus. the recovery will not take 100 days. _ completely her focus. the recovery will not take 100 days. the - completely her focus. the recovery| will not take 100 days. the scottish fiscal— will not take 100 days. the scottish fiscal commission is talking about scotland's — fiscal commission is talking about scotland's economy not recovering until past — scotland's economy not recovering until past 2023, 2024. so this is an
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urgent _ until past 2023, 2024. so this is an urgent need — until past 2023, 2024. so this is an urgent need the people of scotland actually _ urgent need the people of scotland actually voted for last week which is that— actually voted for last week which is that we — actually voted for last week which is that we focus on the immediate priority— is that we focus on the immediate priority is— is that we focus on the immediate priority is the people have given us which _ priority is the people have given us which is _ priority is the people have given us which is recovery from the pandemic. there _ which is recovery from the pandemic. there is— which is recovery from the pandemic. there is a _ which is recovery from the pandemic. there is a legal debate about whether the ability to call! there is a legal debate about whether the ability to call another referendum _ whether the ability to call another referendum or _ whether the ability to call another referendum or bring _ whether the ability to call another referendum or bring forward - whether the ability to call another referendum or bring forward a - whether the ability to call another referendum or bring forward a bill lies with in the remit of this devolved government. if the snp and scottish greens backed by the scottish greens backed by the scottish greens backed by the scottish greens decide to bring forward that bill, irrespective of any section 30 order, would you want to see borisjohnson then challenging that in the courts? nicola sturgeon is proposing to hold an illegal— nicola sturgeon is proposing to hold an illegal referendum... an advisory referendum- — an illegal referendum... an advisory referendum. you _ an illegal referendum... an advisory referendum. you are _ an illegal referendum... an advisory referendum. you are splitting - an illegal referendum... an advisory referendum. you are splitting hairs, j referendum. you are splitting hairs, we know what _ referendum. you are splitting hairs, we know what her _ referendum. you are splitting hairs, we know what her game _ referendum. you are splitting hairs, we know what her game plan - referendum. you are splitting hairs, we know what her game plan is - we know what her game plan is because — we know what her game plan is because the snp announced it in the run-up _ because the snp announced it in the run-up we — because the snp announced it in the run—up. we have an 11 step plan that .ets run—up. we have an 11 step plan that gets us— run—up. we have an 11 step plan that gets us to _ run—up. we have an 11 step plan that gets us to an— run—up. we have an 11 step plan that gets us to an illegal referendum. what _ gets us to an illegal referendum. what we — gets us to an illegal referendum. what we should be focusing on and
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must _ what we should be focusing on and must focus — what we should be focusing on and must focus on for the sake of scotland _ must focus on for the sake of scotland and people of scotland, is the recovery from the pandemic. it is peoples — the recovery from the pandemic. it is peoplesjobs and livelihoods, families— is peoplesjobs and livelihoods, families and their needs that should come _ families and their needs that should come first, — families and their needs that should come first, not the its obsession of the snp _ come first, not the its obsession of the snp and nicola sturgeon. we all know that _ the snp and nicola sturgeon. we all know that it's her life mission to break— know that it's her life mission to break up — know that it's her life mission to break up the united kingdom but this is a moment for us that's on these istands— is a moment for us that's on these islands across the kingdom. come together— islands across the kingdom. come together to build this recovery. she would sa together to build this recovery. s"ie would say she has a mandate from the people to do that. she would say she has a mandate from the people to do that-— would say she has a mandate from the people to do that._just i people to do that. she doesn't. just as the prounion _ people to do that. she doesn't. just as the prounion site _ people to do that. she doesn't. just as the prounion site says _ people to do that. she doesn't. just as the prounion site says it - people to do that. she doesn't. just as the prounion site says it has - people to do that. she doesn't. just as the prounion site says it has a i as the prounion site says it has a mandate to preserve the union. finally, if i may, get your thoughts on what gordon brown has said today, hesitates to borisjohnson to avoid a style of muscular unionism and focus more on people sense of scottishness in trying to make that case for scotland staying in the union. is that good advice? i have been in there _ union. is that good advice? i have been in there all— union. is that good advice? i have been in there all day _ union. is that good advice? i have been in there all day in _ union. is that good advice? i have been in there all day in these - been in there all day in these induction— been in there all day in these induction programmes which has been quite excellent, so i don't really know _ quite excellent, so i don't really know what — quite excellent, so i don't really know what gordon brown said other than what _
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know what gordon brown said other than what you have just said. i'm not even — than what you have just said. i'm not even sure what muscular unionism means _ not even sure what muscular unionism means if— not even sure what muscular unionism means. if we're talking about the uk government engaging with scotland, the uk _ government engaging with scotland, the uk government being present in the uk government being present in the landscape for scotland and playing — the landscape for scotland and playing an active part in the recovery, _ playing an active part in the recovery, i'm all for that. we have .ot recovery, i'm all for that. we have got the _ recovery, i'm all for that. we have got the model, with the city growth deals— got the model, with the city growth deals of— got the model, with the city growth deals of government working together, scottish government, uk government, businesses, educational establishments all coming together. that is— establishments all coming together. that is the _ establishments all coming together. that is the sense of mission we now need _ that is the sense of mission we now need in _ that is the sense of mission we now need in scotland as we recover from the pandemic. that's the urgent priority— the pandemic. that's the urgent priority to — the pandemic. that's the urgent priority to people of scotland gave us last _ priority to people of scotland gave us last week. priority to people of scotland gave us last week-— priority to people of scotland gave us last week. thank you for “oining us last week. thank you for “oining us this afternoon. �* us last week. thank you for “oining us this afternoon. very h us last week. thank you forjoining us this afternoon. very interesting | us this afternoon. very interesting to see how the prounion cases as the government brings its ideas forward within the scottish context to build that case. as things stand, nicola sturgeon says it�*s a matter of when, and not if, there is going to be another independence referendum.
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watch this space. back to you. over 250 people have been wounded in clashes between palestinians and israeli police atjerusalem�*s al—aqsa mosque compound, one of islam�*s holiest sites. jewish nationalists were due to hold a march through one of the most sensitve sites injerusalem, an annual event which marks israel�*s capture of eastjerusalem in 1967, but that has now been cancelled over fears of further violence. this was the scene at the al—aqsa compound earlier. the latest escalation in violence follows three nights of confrontations over the possible eviction of palestinian families from their homes in occupied eastjerusalem. the mosque sits in part of a complex which is one of islam�*s most revered locations and which also houses the dome of the rock, where it is a commonly held belief that the prophet muhammed ascended to heaven. it is also the holiest site injudaism, known as the temple mount, where the western or wailing wall is located. visitors to this area have for today, been banned.
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with me is our middle east editorjeremy bowen. news of some rockets that appear to have fired? rockets fired out of gaza, towardsjerusalem. that will be viewed as an escalation 42. i have a statement. the military wing of hamas, the palestinian movement that controls gaza, it says they have now directed missile strikes against the enemy and or in occupied jerusalem in response to his crimes and aggression against the holy city and aggression against the holy city and his abuse of our people that is referring to the violence you were talking about. they issued an ultimatum a couple of hours ago
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saying that if they did not move what they called the occupying forces out of the mosque and out of this area which is quite near, very near to the old city injerusalem, then they would take action and now they have taken action. there have been efforts to try to calm things down on the guys gaza front. the egyptians have been involved, the americans issuing appeals for calm. i think this, by hamas, if this is all... these statements are correct, will be considered to be a serious business. i have also seen video of vapour trails heading out of gaza. with these rockets presumably, the fact they are directed towards gaza, jerusalem, is a big deal because of
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coursejerusalem is a holy city and it�*s not their usual target. the fact they are able to send a missile that far is quite... it�*s probably 60 miles, 60 or70 miles that far is quite... it�*s probably 60 miles, 60 or 70 miles between gaza, about one hour 15 minutes if you drive there on the motorway. just to the border. so i think we can say that this is a serious escalation in what is happening there. and i absolutely certain the israelis will answer it. we there. and i absolutely certain the israelis will answer it.— israelis will answer it. we will try to net a israelis will answer it. we will try to get a look _ israelis will answer it. we will try to get a look at _ israelis will answer it. we will try to get a look at the _ israelis will answer it. we will try to get a look at the pictures - israelis will answer it. we will try to get a look at the pictures you | to get a look at the pictures you mentioned in a little while. for the moment, thank you very much. detectives in kent investigating the death of the police community support officer, julia james have been searching a house in aylesham. she was attacked while walking her dog near her home on april the 27th. police have until tonight to question a man they arrested on friday, who comes from the canterbury area. 0ur correspondent simonjones has been following the investigation and had this update from aylesham.
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police arrested a man in his 20s at around 9:30pm. yesterday lunchtime, they were given permission to continue to question mf necessary for another 36 hours. that will take us up to the end of today. at that point, officers will have to decide whether to charge him, release him or they could apply to question him for a further 24 hour period but that would be the final period they would be allowed to question him for. now at this house there has been a lot of police activity. we don�*t know who the house belongs to but police have confirmed it�*s part of the murder investigation. we have seen forensic officers coming and going from the building. police standing guard outside. we saw one officer per ladder.
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we saw one officer up a ladder using a camera to look into some of the guttering at the top of the house. clearly a focus of this investigation and searches julia james�*s body was discovered almost two weeks ago, she had been working from home that day. she went out walking her dog when she was attacked. she suffered serious head injuries. local people tell me they are still concerned and scared in many cases, people asking if it�*s safe for them to leave their home to go out alone. the safety advice from officers remains the same. they are telling people that when they go out, make sure they have their phone with them and their phone is fully charged, make sure they tell someone where they are going and how exactly, where exactly they are going to be and how lonely are likely to be gone for. in terms of the family, they have said on social media they are just keeping fingers crossed progress in this investigation. the family of a woman who took her own life after her benefit payments were cut is bringing legal action against the government.
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an inquest into the death of philippa day said the department for work and pensions made 28 mistakes in handling her case. it�*s now emerged the department has reviewed around 150 other similar cases, in which claimants either died or came to serious harm. some viewers might find this report from michael buchanan distressing. it�*s been six months. i am in so much debt. i have nothing to eat. i can�*t... phillipa day pleaded repeatedly with benefits officials for help. her money had been cut. they insisted she couldn�*t have a benefits assessment at home, so in despair, the 27—year—old mother took a fatal overdose, leaving her sister to fight her case. it was absolutely preventable. it was directly due to the impact of the claim. the coroner said that claiming benefits should not see that as a risk to life, and it was. an inquest found 28 errors in how the government had
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processed phillipa day�*s application for personal independence payments, the main disability benefit. the family are now suing the department for work and pensions. it was a multitude of systemic issues that had been unaddressed for a very, very long time. so my sister was not the first to die, she was one of many. and clearly, lessons have not been learned. philippa day�*s death is one of scores that families have blamed on the stresses of the benefits system, including tim salter, errol graham, david clapson and jodey whiting. research by the bbc�*s shared data unit found at least 150 reviews of death or serious harm to claimants have been carried out by the department for work and pensions between 2012 and 2019. the government told us they take each tragic case seriously, and review them in case there are lessons to learn. ben mcdonald, who died in march i 2015, again taking his own life i
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after being found fit for work. the labour mp debbie abrahams read out the names of some of those who have died in the house of commons last year. michael connolly, - who died in may 2014... she says internal reviews of each incident is akin to the government marking its own homework. is this what we should be expecting from our social security system? i and i'd say, no. it is not fit for purpose. it isn't a safety net. and we are seriouslyj letting people down. campaigners say there should be an independent public inquiry to uncover how many benefit claimants died whilst seeking support. michael buchanan, bbc news. and if you�*ve been affected by any of the issues raised in that interview, you can find details of organisations offering help and support on the bbc action line website. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris. hello there. well, i suppose it is going to be a decent day for spotting the rainbows. a particularly unsettled day
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with most of you seeing a downpour at some point during today. although quite a few of you will see several downpours, it will be very, very showery. the showers may well ease off for a time across southern england, but i think there will be another batch coming into sussex and kent later on. although quite a few of you will see several downpours, it is going to be very, very showery. the showers may well ease off for a time across southern england, but i think there will be another batch coming into sussex and kent later on. heaviest showers for northern england, northern ireland and scotland. some here having hail and thunder mixed in. and those temperatures around 14 to 16 celsius for most. 0vernight, more rain for scotland. inland areas of northern ireland, england and wales, the showers will gradually fade away, taking their time mind you, but eventually becoming drier. temperatures down to around six or 7 degrees. tomorrow, this early morning rain clears away from scotland. and then scotland, northern ireland, northern england getting off to a fine morning with spells of sunshine. further south, showers develop, those showers move northwards across england and wales, reaching northern ireland and southern scotland through the afternoon. and some of them will be heavy and thundery.
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this is a bbc news special on coronavirus ahead of a downing street briefing from the prime minister at five. the headlines... the uk chief medical officers lower the covid—19 alert level from four to three — saying the threat was not as great because of the lockdown and the vaccination programme. the prime minister is set to confirm the latest stage of lockdown easing at a downing street press briefing. it will mean that, from a week today, people in england will be able to go to the pub or restaurant inside and visit other people in their home. hugging will be allowed again, but the government is expected to urge people to be cautious over physical contact with others.
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we�*ll bring you more on that in the government�*s

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