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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 10, 2021 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news 7 these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. a shake—up in uk labour's top team — after the party's disappointing election results. the newly re—elected manchester mayor says the party needs to stop the infighting within its ranks. labour's got to stop this sort of internalfocus, you know, the civil war between those on the left of the party, those on the right of the party. it'sjust, from my point of view, that's absolutely pointless and disruptive. borisjohnson is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england, with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish nationalist march.
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a cyber attack has shut down the largest fuel pipeline in the us. fuel prices are on the rise after the colonial pipeline was completely knocked offline. a whale stranded in the river thames has escaped from rescuers as they tried to take it to safety. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, has completed a re—shuffle of his top team team, in response to disappointing election results across england last week. let's take a look at some of the changes that have been made...
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angela rayner, the deputy leader, was sacked from her role as party chair on saturday, before being handed more senior roles last night. another high profile dismissal was anneliese dodds, who lost her job as shadow chancellor. she takes up the position of party chair in place of ms rayner. ms dodds was replaced as shadow chancellor by rachel reeves. wes streeting, considered to be a strong media performer, was promoted to the shadow cabinet, in charge of the child poverty brief. andy burnham was re—elected as the labour mayor of greater manchester over the weekend. he said the party's disappointing local election results could not be blamed onjust on person. well, everyone has a role, don't they? and everyone has to take some responsibility, but i think it's about collective, rather than saying it is all about one person. you know, angela rayner doesn't set all of the policies on which we fight elections. so, you know, that's why i made my displeasure clear, victoria. but, as i say, i'm glad it's been
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resolved and it seems to have been resolved in the right way. and it is now about moving forward. you know, labour's got to stop this sort of internal focus, you know, the civil war between those on the left of the party, those on the right of the party. from my point of view, that's absolutely pointless and destructive. you know, we have got a fantastic vision here in greater manchester. this is labour in power, showing what we can do. buses under public control, these are labour policies. isn't it about time the party starts celebrating those things? its labour mayors, we have a new woman mayor in west yorkshire, tracy brabin and steve rotherham re—elected. eight labour mayors elected at the weekend. but also across the country there are now ten, this is a positive story. labour has been way too lukewarm about english devolution so far. and it now enthusiastically needs to get behind it. so, the party, this morning, the shadow cabinet, everybody, needs to listen to what the public were saying at the weekend. they are saying they like evolution
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here, they want more of it. and the party needs to listen to that and understand it. you said labour has lost its emotional connection with its supporters. you talked about buses and tracy brabin is promising the same now. in west yorkshire, bringing buses under public control. what does the emotional connection bit mean? this is the thing, i was talking about the left and right on the labour party having this usual war that they do at the weekend. you know, the right were saying it was all the former leader, jeremy corbyn, it was all his fault and the left were saying we didn't have the right policies at the election. i am saying it's deeper than that. it's deeper. there is a loss of emotional connection. particularly in those areas that were previously strongest with regard to labour support. so, my former constituency, lee or in hartlepool, that you mentioned, it's about authentic connected representation for those people, those communities. building from the bottom up on issues that matter to them.
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that's what we are showing in greater manchester, that is what we are doing here with devolution. our council results were better than other parts of the country. why? because i think people can see we are in the communities, we're working with them, we're building from the bottom up and dealing with things that matter to them. transport, ijust mentioned before, london has a much cheaper public transport system. i caught a bus this morning and it was £2.50 for a short journey, £1 more than it costs in london, how can that be right? labour should be all over that issue, why does public transport cost more in some of the poorest parts of the country? that is wrong and we should challenge it and speak up on issues that affects people in every single day of their working lives. that is what the party has now got to do. the labour mp, diane abbott — who served injeremy corbyn�*s top team says she didn't understand why
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sir keir starmer sacked angela rayner as party chair. it was a very foolish thing to do, because she didn't take any of the big decisions around hartlepool. no—one up and down the country is saying people weren't voting labour because of angie rayner, it was a foolish thing to even think about, and he's had to walk it back. he can't sack an elected deputy leader. kate green has kept herjob as shadow education secretary. she has kept herjob. hello, kate. why was angela rayner sacked as party chair when sir keir starmer said he took full responsibility? taking responsibility as a leader is making sure you've got the right team around you, doing thejobs making sure you've got the right team around you, doing the jobs you want them to be doing and i am very pleased with the shadow cabinet colleagues i will be working with. i am delighted angela is taking on a really important new role in the shadow cabinet. it's about making sure that you've got square pegs in
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square holes and you've really got people working together as a shadow cabinet too, as andy burnham was saying a moment ago, stop focusing internally on ourselves and get out there and be talking to real people in our communities about what they want from the labour party and where they think, at the moment, perhaps we've not been delivering it. was sir keir starmer _ we've not been delivering it. was sir keir starmer not been doing that since he took over as leader? {iii since he took over as leader? of course, it has been really difficult during the pandemic. we have all found it very hard not being able to meet people face—to—face in the way that we would like. but i'm not talking aboutjust being there. as andy was saying, it's about the emotional connection, the sense of trust that i think people want to have in labour and how we understand where that trust has frayed and what we need to do to rebuild it. this isn'tjust we need to do to rebuild it. this isn't just about, we need to do to rebuild it. this isn'tjust about, you know, turning up, it's about really taking the time to hear about people's concerns and their hopes for the future. and
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i know that people are very aspirational and ambitious for their communities, theirfamilies. we need to understand what it is they want from labour to help them achieve those ambitions and dreams. i5 from labour to help them achieve those ambitions and dreams. is it “ust those ambitions and dreams. is it 'ust that those ambitions and dreams. is it just that labour _ those ambitions and dreams. is it just that labour isn't listening? you talk about the sense of trust fraying, yet you put somebody who supported remain and who supported a second eu referendum as your candidate in hartlepool, a town that voted 70% brexit.— voted 70% brexit. well, i was in hartlepool _ voted 70% brexit. well, i was in hartlepool before _ voted 70% brexit. well, i was in hartlepool before the _ voted 70% brexit. well, i was in l hartlepool before the by-election hartlepool before the by—election and, actually, the thing that came up and, actually, the thing that came up mostly on the doorsteps, victoria, wasn't brexit, it was about local services, the local nhs. i'm not actually... about local services, the local nhs. i'm not actually. . ._ about local services, the local nhs. i'm not actually... about investment in the community. _ i'm not actually... about investment in the community. forgive _ i'm not actually... about investment in the community. forgive me... - in the community. forgive me... foraive in the community. forgive me... forgive me. _ in the community. forgive me... forgive me, kate... _ in the community. forgive me... forgive me, kate... i— in the community. forgive me... forgive me, kate... i was - in the community. forgive me... l forgive me, kate... iwas listening to voters on _ forgive me, kate... iwas listening to voters on the _ forgive me, kate... iwas listening to voters on the doorstep. - forgive me, kate... iwas listening to voters on the doorstep. i - forgive me, kate... iwas listening to voters on the doorstep. i wasn'tj to voters on the doorstep. i wasn't sa in: the to voters on the doorstep. i wasn't saying the issue — to voters on the doorstep. i wasn't saying the issue is _ to voters on the doorstep. i wasn't saying the issue is about _ to voters on the doorstep. i wasn't saying the issue is about brexit, i saying the issue is about brexit, because everyone knows we have left but what i'm saying is there is a lot of trust because... you promised, initially, that he would, you know, follow through the outcome
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of the brexit referendum, then labour supporters are thinking, hang on a minute, you are now promising a second eu referendum and i'm suggesting that i wonder if they haven't forgiven you for that. we've not to haven't forgiven you for that. we've got to understand _ haven't forgiven you for that. we've got to understand there _ haven't forgiven you for that. we've got to understand there were - haven't forgiven you for that. -- got to understand there were people supporting the second referendum in all parties, it wasn'tjust supporting the second referendum in all parties, it wasn't just a supporting the second referendum in all parties, it wasn'tjust a labour thing. but that is water under the bridge, now, as you rightly say. we've left the european union and we need to be moving forward with an understanding of what it is that the country needs, what people want from labour. and, you know, what they're telling me in my own constituency and up and down the country where i've been over the last few weeks, is that they want good schools for their children, they want an nhs where they know they can get an appointment with their gp and they won't have to wait months for a specialist appointment. they want clean, healthy air in their communities and affordable public transport. they want the potholes filled in and the and bins collected. they want youth services.
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you know all that! that collected. they want youth services. you know all that!— you know all that! that is what eo - le you know all that! that is what peeple are _ you know all that! that is what people are talking _ you know all that! that is what people are talking about - you know all that! that is what people are talking about and l you know all that! that is what i people are talking about and what you know all that! that is what - people are talking about and what i have been listening to. but if people are talking about and what i have been listening to.— have been listening to. but if you know all that, _ have been listening to. but if you know all that, how _ have been listening to. but if you know all that, how did _ have been listening to. but if you know all that, how did you - have been listening to. but if you know all that, how did you do - have been listening to. but if you - know all that, how did you do badly? it was a mixed picture, we did disappointingly in some parts of the country and i won't shy away from that. but we also did very well in winning metro mayors in areas right up winning metro mayors in areas right up and down the country from the west of england to the north—west, where i am an mp. we did very well in wales and i think that people aren't different in these parts of the country, they all want the same thing for themselves, for their families. so i think we've got to understand, first of all, why we were less successful in some parts of the country than in others and, secondly, whether we are talking about the right things for the whole country. i certainly think that what i'm hearing is that people want to concentrate on decentjobs, decent housing, decent schools, nhs that is there for them when they need it and
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a decent community to live in, police on the streets. those are the things that are important in my constituency and every constituency. at what labour has to be able to do is convince people in every part of the country that we get that and those are our priority is —— and watch. the same priorities of the british people. d0 watch. the same priorities of the british maple-— watch. the same priorities of the british people. do you accept that was somewhat _ british people. do you accept that was somewhat overshadowed - british people. do you accept that was somewhat overshadowed by i british people. do you accept that i was somewhat overshadowed by the mess over the reshuffle? the sacking of angela rayner and the fact that, reports go, that she wouldn't accept the job that was offered her, so it took a lot longer.— took a lot longer. well, i haven't talked to angela _ took a lot longer. well, i haven't talked to angela or _ took a lot longer. well, i haven't talked to angela or keir - took a lot longer. well, i haven't talked to angela or keir about i took a lot longer. well, i haven't i talked to angela or keir about what happened and i wasn't in the room. reshuffles are always difficult. it is more important, i think, to take the time to get exactly right the team that keir ones around him in thejobs, that he team that keir ones around him in the jobs, that he wants people doing. i'm really pleased to be part of a shadow cabinet that has got very, very strong and committed colleagues sitting alongside us. i'm very excited to be working with those brilliant colleagues. did you
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know it was _ those brilliant colleagues. did you know it was cheaper _ those brilliant colleagues. did you know it was cheaper to _ those brilliant colleagues. did you know it was cheaper to travel - those brilliant colleagues. did you know it was cheaper to travel on l those brilliant colleagues. did you know it was cheaper to travel on a bus in london than in manchester? i absolutely do, i am a manchester mp, victoria. i have to tell you, it is both the cost of buses, the fact that only now we have been able to get control of the buses in the way that london has had for decades, so that london has had for decades, so that we can stop the nonsense of services that don't connect with each other. one company competing against another while another route has left completely unserved. in my constituency, you couldn't buy a return ticket on some routes because one bus service would take it into the city centre but he would have to get another bus company service to bring you home. —— you would have. i'm really aware how important it is. we devolve these powers to our metropolitan mayors and local and regional level so we can get a sensible public transport system that people have enjoyed in london for years that we need in the rest of the country. for years that we need in the rest of the country-— for years that we need in the rest of the country. thank you very much for talkin: of the country. thank you very much for talking to — of the country. thank you very much for talking to us. _ here, ministers are meeting
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to decide whether to press ahead with the next stage of lockdown easing in england. borisjohnson is expected to say that the latest data on coronavirus infections and vaccinations supports a further relaxation — meaning that pubs and restaurants will be allowed to serve customers inside from next monday — and people will be able to hug each other again. if you want to. the health minister nadine dorries says it's important a balance is struck. caution is the byword. the data is excellent, but, you know, the prime minister will set out where we're going next but caution is... it over arches everything that we do and we think about, in terms of easement and the road map. we do have variants of concern, on one hand. on the other hand, we have the capacity to twice... lateral flow twice test everybody in the uk and we have the capacity to surge test in localised areas where we see variants of concern and where we know problems may be rising. so, we have that in our armoury now, which we never had before, but we still need to be cautious. we are incredibly aware that everybody wants to get together. people want to hug each other, people want to entertain
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in their own homes. my goodness me, we all want to do that. and we understand that. and that's why we have a road map that people can follow and that's why we can see those steps very clearly in front of us. we'll be getting there, we'll be moving along that road map. the prime minister will be announcing this afternoon the next stage, but the important thing is that we are all aware that, as we move into each step of easement, that there may be an increase in the variants or there may be an increase in the virus and our objective is to nail that virus, to make sure that we are never, as a country, in the position we were last year again and that we move out of this cautiously and safely. and the prime minister will confirm the further easing of coronavirus restrictions in a downing street conference at 5pm london time tonight. we'll bring that to viewers in the uk live on bbc news. there have been violent
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clashes outside the al aqsa mosque injerusalem. the palestinian red crescent says more than 180 palestinians have been injured in the violence. it follows weeks of rising tensions and comes ahead of an israeli annual flag parade in the old city. our middle east correspondent tom bateman joins us from jerusalem. tom what's the picture there this morning? hi, victoria. several hours before that flag parade you mentioned due to get under way and already, in the last three to four hours, there have been very violent confrontations right here at this site, which lies at the heart ofjerusalem's most sensitive holy areas. you can see the golden dome of the al aqsa mosque and i came past here before 5am local time and is ready police were already firing volleys of stun grenades at palestinians who were throwing stones and rocks and other objects. some confrontations have reached inside the mosque itself. that went on for two hours or so.
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meantime, outside the old city walls, stones thrown by palestinians at a passing car with some israelis inside. that car lost control and crashed into a barrier on the pavement, injuring one of the palestinians. the driver himself had minor injuries, as well. a very, very tense morning. what is happening now is that palestinians are preparing for prayer again on the plaza. wejust heard are preparing for prayer again on the plaza. we just heard the call to prayer from the al aqsa mosque, which is suggesting something of a lull but we have had a few more volleys of stun grenades near the religious shrine, as well. we are in a moment where we are waiting for this flag parade in the afternoon. whether or not it will go through some of the very sensitive areas of the old city remaining to be seen that people are fearful of a pretty volatile mix. that people are fearful of a pretty volatile mim— the us government has declared a state of emergency, after a cyber attack on the country's largest fuel pipeline. reports suggest the group responsible is demanding ransom money to restore services. the emergency status will allow fuel
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to be transported by road instead. our cyber reporter, joe tidyjoins me now. they say it's ransomware ? how does ransomware work and how serious an issue is it? how big a deal is this? it normally starts with a _ how big a deal is this? it normally starts with a needle, _ how big a deal is this? it normally starts with a needle, like - how big a deal is this? it normally starts with a needle, like most - starts with a needle, like most cyber attacks. starts with a needle, like most cyberattacks. perhaps starts with a needle, like most cyber attacks. perhaps we don't know yet but perhaps someone would have been sent an e—mail by these hackers and that e—mail would have been booby—trapped with some sort of malware, malicious software and that way the hackers got into the network of colonial pipeline and they would have spent perhaps weeks, perhaps even months, digging around in the systems inside the pipeline, working out which areas are weak and which areas are vulnerable. and what data they might want to steal. and then we see the hackers decide to take all the data they think is valuable and then encrypt the victims' copy of the data. thereby reduce the company to working to pen and paper in many cases. we don't know how bad it is at the pipeline but we know it is bad enough that they have closed down their systems and stop the flow
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of oil, 2.5 million barrels a day flowing through those pipelines normally but now it is at a standstill pretty much. clearly this is a company that is extremely important to the smooth running of the us ? how can this have happened to them? yeah, this is what you call critical national infrastructure, an area of cyber security people have been increasingly concerned about because, of course, these computer systems that they run are just the same as any other computer system that a company or a school or university would run. previously, those sorts of organisations, perhaps less important to the smooth running of the country, those types of organisations were under attack. but now we are seeing increasing attacks on these critical national infrastructure entities like colonial pipeline. of course, we have seen water supplies in florida drying up, sorry, not drying up but almost poisoned. they had to shut those down for a while. these attacks are happening on these really important part of modern life. who do we think is responsible and where do we think
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they could be based? we think it is dark side. fairly new, they have been responsible for some major ransomware attacks since appearing on the scene last summer. there are suggestions they could be based in russia, where many ransomware groups are based. the big problem the world is facing right now, and there has been a global coalition set up call the ransomware task force is how do you deal with these groups like darkside operating perhaps in russia with almost the permission of the russian government with —— according to some in the cybersecurity world. there are hackers who are making the malware, there are people who are paying the malware, to get into systems and extorting companies out of sometimes hundreds of thousands of pounds, sometimes millions of pounds. it is a massive and growing problem around the world and there's nothing we can do about it. even if we do find out who the hackers are, we can't arrest
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them. . , who the hackers are, we can't arrest them. ., , . who the hackers are, we can't arrest them. . , . _. who the hackers are, we can't arrest them. ., , . ., , them. thanks very much, joe, really interesting. — them. thanks very much, joe, really interesting, thank _ them. thanks very much, joe, really interesting, thank you. _ the re—elected first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, has told borisjohnson that another vote on scottish independence is inevitable. the snp leader also suggested that she could begin the process as early as next spring. annita mcveigh is outside holyrood for us. all day today. hello, again. thanks very much. — all day today. hello, again. thanks very much, victoria, _ all day today. hello, again. thanks very much, victoria, welcome - all day today. hello, again. thanks very much, victoria, welcome backj all day today. hello, again. thanks i very much, victoria, welcome back to edinburgh and to the scottish parliament building behind me, hollywood. back in 2014 the question was put to scottish voters about whether they wanted scotland to become independent from the rest of the uk. that was rejected. but the question is very much back again after the elections last week. the big difference and political change in that time is that brexit has happened, the uk has left the eu but if you break down how that vote went, here in scotland, voters said they didn't actually want to leave they didn't actually want to leave the eu. that is why the snp, the
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party which the first minister, nicola sturgeon, comes from, and which has the biggest number of seats here at the scottish parliament, says it is a case of when, not if there's going to be another independence referendum. on the pro union side, we have gordon brown, former uk prime minister. he was a big figure in the first referendum campaign in defence of the union. he has been speaking again today with a message for the current uk prime minister, boris johnson. borisjohnson will change his mind on this. his muscular unionism, that's an attempt to sort of put britishness into scotland, that's not going to work very well. project fear will not work. scottish people are very proud indeed. but what he'll come to realise is what i'm suggesting. he will set up a review on the future of the united kingdom, there will be a constitutional review, like kilbrandon 50 years ago. he will set up a permanent forum, in my view, of consultation between the nations, the regions, and the centre. and he will strive in the end for better cooperation.
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now, whether he does it too late, i don't know. but these are the decisions that the government will make, in the end. that's the patriotic, positive and principled case and i do urge all scots who believe in this, because we are more scottish than british. in most cases, people would choose scotland as against britain if they had a choice. but people don't want to make that choice. i'm joined now by our political correspondent nick earley and gordon brown saying people don't want to make that choice. picking up on that, do they want to and have to make that choice now, when we are still very much in pandemic recovery phase? is thatjust too much for voters to want to take on board in addition to dealing with the pandemic? that is something all political parties that hollywood will be thinking about. {line political parties that hollywood will be thinking about.- political parties that hollywood will be thinking about. one of the few thins will be thinking about. one of the few things that _ will be thinking about. one of the few things that scottish _ will be thinking about. one of the few things that scottish and - will be thinking about. one of the few things that scottish and uk i few things that scottish and uk governments agree on is that there shouldht— governments agree on is that there shouldn't be a referendum right now. nicola _ shouldn't be a referendum right now. nicola sturgeon is making a very public— nicola sturgeon is making a very public thing over the next couple of days of— public thing over the next couple of days of going back to work and
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talking — days of going back to work and talking about the pandemic. her argument is that if you have another referendum, it has to be out of the health_ referendum, it has to be out of the health emergency. but before you think_ health emergency. but before you think about economic recovery because — think about economic recovery because she would argue that the economic— because she would argue that the economic recovery can only happen in scotland _ economic recovery can only happen in scotland if— economic recovery can only happen in scotland if it — economic recovery can only happen in scotland if it is independent. i think— scotland if it is independent. i think what you are starting to see is the two sides may be accepting this campaign will be a slow burning thinking _ this campaign will be a slow burning thinking about how they need to form their arguments. thinking about how they need to form theirarguments. she thinking about how they need to form their arguments. she avoided the question— their arguments. she avoided the question is in the campaign about how you _ question is in the campaign about how you would avoid a border with england _ how you would avoid a border with england after independence. how you would _ england after independence. how you would deal with some of the economic challenges _ would deal with some of the economic challenges after the pandemic. we also hearing from gordon brown, splits _ also hearing from gordon brown, splits on — also hearing from gordon brown, splits on the unionist side, a warning _ splits on the unionist side, a warning to the prime minister that putting _ warning to the prime minister that putting a _ warning to the prime minister that putting a uk flag on buildings, uk government buildings, around scotland — government buildings, around scotland is not going to cut it, frankly~ — scotland is not going to cut it, frankly. and that is the divide in
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the unionist camp, just now, over exactly— the unionist camp, just now, over exactly the — the unionist camp, just now, over exactly the best way to try and win over those — exactly the best way to try and win over those voters in the middle, who will he _ over those voters in the middle, who will be crucial first to deciding if there _ will be crucial first to deciding if there is— will be crucial first to deciding if there is another referendum campaign and at _ there is another referendum campaign and at the _ there is another referendum campaign and at the appetite stays, it's going — and at the appetite stays, it's going to _ and at the appetite stays, it's going to be down to undecided voters — going to be down to undecided voters. and if there is another referendum, and it is still and if, if there _ referendum, and it is still and if, if there is— referendum, and it is still and if, if there is another referendum, whether— if there is another referendum, whether the unionist side can win. -- an— whether the unionist side can win. -- an it _ whether the unionist side can win. -- an if. whether the unionist side can win. -- an if, , .,, whether the unionist side can win. -- an if. , .,, ., whether the unionist side can win. -- an if. , ., , -- an if. some people are fed up with the debate, _ -- an if. some people are fed up with the debate, frankly, - -- an if. some people are fed up with the debate, frankly, they i -- an if. some people are fed up| with the debate, frankly, they call it the neverendum. do you think it is inevitable, if not in the short—term and it may be a slow burn, but in the medium term, in the next parliament were going to see another vote on independence? i don't think we can say with any certainty— don't think we can say with any certainty that it will happen. it will he — certainty that it will happen. it will be down to factors. if you go into the — will be down to factors. if you go into the numbers. the snp won this election. _ into the numbers. the snp won this election, quite clearly and there is a comfortable pro—independence majority — a comfortable pro—independence majority in the new parliament but the country is split roughly 50—50 on its _ the country is split roughly 50—50 on its constitutional future. there
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are a _ on its constitutional future. there are a lot — on its constitutional future. there are a lot of — on its constitutional future. there are a lot of people in the middle who will— are a lot of people in the middle who will key to this —— be key to this process _ who will key to this —— be key to this process. both sides will spend a lot of— this process. both sides will spend a lot of the — this process. both sides will spend a lot of the next few months thinking _ a lot of the next few months thinking of how to win them over. nicola _ thinking of how to win them over. nicola sturgeon says it is a question— nicola sturgeon says it is a question of when, not if. she thinks it's definitely going to happen. there — it's definitely going to happen. there is— it's definitely going to happen. there is a _ it's definitely going to happen. there is a lot at play here. absolutely, thank you, nick. before scotland would even get to a vote, if there is to be another question of staying with the union, or becoming independent put to the scottish electorate, it could end up in the courts. so many complexities to this and there could be a legal battle between the uk government in westminster and the scottish government, overwho westminster and the scottish government, over who has the right to call a referendum in the first place. and if that happens, it could just be an advisory referendum, it wouldn't automatically lead to independence. a really complex
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situation that is going to play out over quite a long time here. back to you, victoria. over quite a long time here. back to you. victoria-— the winning horse in america's most prestigious race, the kentucky derby, has failed a drugs test. medina spirit won on the first of may — giving his trainer, bob baffert, a record seventh victory in the race. baffert has now revealed that the horse tested positive for a banned substance after the race. he strongly denies wrongdoing. mark lobel reports. ok, here he is. here he is indeed. trainer bob baffert parades his long shot kentucky derby record breaking winner, medina spirit. describing this latest twist as the biggest gut punch in racing for something he claims he didn't do. all i can tell you is that... er, betamethasone, even though it's an allowed drug, therapeutic medication, we did not give it. my vet, nobody here. after winning the prestigious race,
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medina spirit was found to have double the legal limit of a banned steroid that is injected into joints to reduce pain and swelling. steroids are often given to mask an injury, as well as to have a horse run faster than it otherwise would, risking the safety of both horse and rider. medina spirit's high—profile trainer has paid fines before. this latest episode has left him licking his wounds. there is definitely something wrong. why is it happening to me, you know? there's problems in racing, but it's not bob baffert. at stake is both the derby title and winnings. the racecourse has banned bob baffert from entering any more horses while the kentucky horse racing commission investigates. if a second sample confirms the infringement, the runner—up, mandaloun, will be declared the winner instead. barring an appeal, which could
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reportedly take years. medina spirit would then become only the third winner stripped of the title in the derby�*s 147 race history. this high—profile dispute is also proving another hurdle for america's horse racing organisers, jockeying to get on the front foot over a drugs problem, still saddling the sport. mark lobel, bbc news. more than 1,000 migrants landed on the italian island of lampedusa in the space of a few hours on sunday, and further arrivals are expected. more boats were spotted off the coast of nearby malta, as sara monetta reports. clear skies and calm waters. with the weather improving, the number of migrants leaving libya to reach europe has soared. here in lampedusa, italy's closest point to africa, 14 boats have arrived over the weekend. the tiny sicilian island now
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hosts over 1,400 people in its reception centre. and more are currently out at sea. in the control room of this ngo ship, monitors flare up when a boat in distress is identified. the alarm—phone hotline was alerted to five boats in distress, all within the maltese search and rescue zone, and they carry over 400 people. on these five boats in distress, there are men, women, children, minors, and they are all trying to escape from libya. and we heard that one of these boats has safely reached lampedusa, but, to our knowledge, four of these boats are still in distress in the central mediterranean sea. more rescued migrants arrive every day. a growing number are minors, often travelling on their own. this group was intercepted last week — dozens of them, crammed on a rubber dinghy with no adult on board. since the start of 2021, almost 11,000 people have reached italy — that's over double the arrivals
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from the same time last year. and with summer approaching, this is only set to get worse. sara monetta, bbc news. a shake—up in uk labour's top team — after the party's disappointing election results. the newly re—elected manchester mayor says the party needs to stop the infighting. labour's got to stop this internal civil war between those on the left of the party and those on the right of the party. from that point of view, that is pointless and disruptive. from my point of view, that is pointless and disruptive. borisjohnson is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england, with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish nationalist march. a cyber attack has shut down
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the largest fuel pipeline in the us. fuel prices are on the rise after the colonial pipeline was completely knocked offline. a whale stranded in the river thames has escaped from rescuers as they tried to take it to safety. india is continuing to be hit by a huge second coronavirus wave, but although its government has said the pandemic is showing signs of slowing down in some regions, numbers of cases have started to rise again. experts say that the testing capacity is under continued pressure and that positivity rates are still high, with people unable to access tests because facilities are overburdened. so, why has india been so badly hit by this second wave, and what is needed to stop the spread from getting worse? abhijit banerjee was awarded the nobel memorial prize in 2019 for his experimental approach to alleviating global poverty. he is a professor of economics
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at massachusetts institute of technology and joins me now from paris. thank you forjoining us. hello. why thank you for “oining us. hello. why has the thank you forjoining us. hello. why has the second _ thank you forjoining us. hello. why has the second wave _ thank you forjoining us. hello. why has the second wave hit _ thank you forjoining us. hello. why has the second wave hit india - thank you forjoining us. hello. why has the second wave hit india so - has the second wave hit india so badly in your view when they seemingly had things under control? i don't think anybody knows the answer to that. it seems like it is a different set of variants. there is one variant which wasn't originally identified in the uk, one mutant variant that seems to have started in india. they seems to have started in india. they seem to have slightly different properties. they seem to be more infectious at the point of infection. but i don't think anybody really knows exactly why the two waves were so different. what really knows exactly why the two waves were so different. what do you think is needed _ waves were so different. what do you think is needed right _ waves were so different. what do you think is needed right now— waves were so different. what do you think is needed right now to - waves were so different. what do you think is needed right now to stop - waves were so different. what do you think is needed right now to stop it i think is needed right now to stop it getting worse? i think is needed right now to stop it getting worse?— getting worse? i think what's happening — getting worse? i think what's happening already _ getting worse? i think what's happening already which - getting worse? i think what's happening already which is i getting worse? i think what's happening already which is a | getting worse? i think what's i happening already which is a set getting worse? i think what's - happening already which is a set of lockdowns, i think what is worrisome
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is there are places that should be locked down and are still not locked down. one hopes there is a more coordinated lockdown so that there isn't just one coordinated lockdown so that there isn'tjust one place left out which eventually causes a third wave because that's where the disease remains. that's the concern. lockdowns are coming down the pipeline, lots of states are locking down on their own. but a centrally led lockdown which would require coordination across all the regions hasn't happened yet. so coordination across all the regions hasn't happened yet.— hasn't happened yet. so that's something _ hasn't happened yet. so that's something that _ hasn't happened yet. so that's something that could - hasn't happened yet. so that's something that could be - hasn't happened yet. so that's| something that could be done. hasn't happened yet. so that's i something that could be done. is this the world's problem, the fact it is so bad in india?— it is so bad in india? indeed, i think so- _ it is so bad in india? indeed, i think so. first, _ it is so bad in india? indeed, i think so. first, these - it is so bad in india? indeed, i| think so. first, these variants, it is so bad in india? indeed, i- think so. first, these variants, the indian mutant variant, has moved out. we see ten cases of that elsewhere, places where the infrastructure is easily challenged. meaning what?—
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infrastructure is easily challenged. meanin: what? ~ . meaning what? meaning if we get the same rates of — meaning what? meaning if we get the same rates of spreading _ meaning what? meaning if we get the same rates of spreading as _ meaning what? meaning if we get the same rates of spreading as we - meaning what? meaning if we get the same rates of spreading as we see . meaning what? meaning if we get the same rates of spreading as we see in | same rates of spreading as we see in india we are going to start to see immediate demands for oxygen etc. we need to think ahead to that, or what happens if in kenya, especially, not just in nairobi, but outside nairobi, if we start to see very large spreading indian style. i think the response would need to be a lot of help from the rest of the world if we need to oxygenate the people and save lives. you mentioned kenya, which is home to what some people describe as a huge slump. there is, in terms of people living cheek byjowl, that's what they are doing in slum housing. it could spread massively there. so spread massively there. indeed. so how do you — spread massively there. indeed. so how do you stop — spread massively there. indeed. so how do you stop that? _
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spread massively there. indeed. so how do you stop that? i _ spread massively there. indeed. so how do you stop that? i think- spread massively there. indeed. so how do you stop that? i think this l how do you stop that? i think this is probably _ how do you stop that? i think this is probably not — how do you stop that? i think this is probably not quite _ how do you stop that? i think this is probably not quite the - how do you stop that? i think this is probably not quite the time - how do you stop that? i think this is probably not quite the time to l is probably not quite the time to declare a lockdown in this area but careful tracking of the disease would be important and finding the point if it looks like exploding to shut down quickly. i think india should have shut down before it did to prevent the levels that were reached. , , ,., ., reached. the uk is preparing to reintroduce _ reached. the uk is preparing to reintroduce international - reached. the uk is preparing to reintroduce international travel | reached. the uk is preparing to i reintroduce international travel on the 17th of may, although not to all countries, as you might imagine. what do you think of that? that countries, as you might imagine. what do you think of that? at some oint it what do you think of that? at some point it has — what do you think of that? at some point it has to _ what do you think of that? at some point it has to happen, _ what do you think of that? at some point it has to happen, so _ what do you think of that? at some point it has to happen, so i- what do you think of that? at some point it has to happen, so i don't i point it has to happen, so i don't think of it as being avoidable. i think of it as being avoidable. i think one can't live one's life completely shut in little cubes for the rest of one's life. the infections have come down, at least
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infections have come down, at least in most parts, so i think there is some argument we need to start to open up. what the right priorities are on that, that's less clear, whether we need the the nail salon is open right now or not. those are less clear. is open right now or not. those are less clear-— less clear. thank you very much, professor — less clear. thank you very much, professor abhijit _ less clear. thank you very much, professor abhijit banerjee. i there's going to be more disruption on long—distance train routes this week, after 183 high—speed trains were taken out of service for safety checks. our business presenter ben thompson has the latest on what is going on. this problem that was identified over the weekend affecting the hitachi class 800 trains. you may know them if you travel on great western railway out of paddington down towards the west of england, but also on lner trains up the east coast of england to scotland. they are most affected. they have the most of these trains. what they've told passengers again today is not to travel. that's because over the weekend they identified a problem, a small crack underneath the train,
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they have now identified that this is the part that attaches the main coach, the bit we all sit in, to the wheels underneath. they say it isn't a safety risk to passengers but there is a potential danger that something could break off and therefore could cause chaos on the network so they are saying please don't travel once again today. they are offering the usual refunds and coach replacement services if you do need to travel. but there are some fundamental problems here. what the company has said as they will need to assess each of these carriages, just to give you a sense of how many, 183 were taken out of service over the weekend. they have got to look at them, inspect them, and then crucially of course, come up with a fix. i think it is fair to say this disruption could last quite a while, and that's because a lot of trains and a lot of staff will be on the wrong place because the trains have not been running over the weekend. and now the company has said it has
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to come up with a fix, work out how to solve this problem, and inevitably that will mean taking some services out of action to fix them before they can go back into service. detectives have been granted more time to question a man over the murder of a police community support officer in kent in southern england. julia james was attacked while walking her dog near her home on april 27th. police have until tonight to question the man, who comes from the canterbury area. our correspondent, simonjones, is in kent with the latest. this is day 14 of the murder investigation. officers arrested a man on friday evening at around 9:30pm, he is in his 20s and from the canterbury area. yesterday lunchtime, police were given more time to question him on an additional 36 hours. that pretty much takes them up to the end of today. at that point the police will have to decide whether to charge him, whether to release him, or whether to ask for a final 24 hours to question him. there's no let—up in the police
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activity around this area. just down the road from here, officers stand guard outside a house in aylesham. yesterday we saw forensic teams coming and going from the property. they were searching through a skip outside the house. through the garden, they were lifting up paving slabs. police haven't said who this house belongs to but it does form part of this investigation. now, julia james was killed almost two weeks ago. she'd been working from home that day. she took her dog toby for a walk when she was attacked. she suffered serious head injuries. people in this area still remain concerned. officers are advising them when they go out to make sure they have their phones with them, to make sure they tell someone where exactly they are going and how long they are expected to be gone for. julia james's family say are keeping all fingers crossed just in the hope that there will be some positive developments in this case.
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weak employment numbers last week have led presidentjoe biden to intensify his calls for congress to pass his americanjobs act? which aims to create jobs with huge investments in us infrastructure. the problem is it will require tax increases to pay for it that are being fiercely opposed by republicans. samira hussain has more from newjersey. it's no secret to anyone who lives in the us, but can sometimes come as a surprise to people around the world — american roads and bridges are crumbling. take a look at these potholes in newjersey, home to some of the worst roads in the country. people have taken to social media to complain. ijust need you guys to look at these craters, like, what is that? lewis cuomo has come to this garage to get his tyres fixed — again. it's a common excursion for newjersey drivers. they're terrible in this state. it really has to do with, you know,
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you go over a pothole and the next thing you know your rim'sjammed up. i mean, they are alloy rims, they are not made of the strongest stuff. so it'sjust a constant battle. and it's a costly battle, too. this tyre shop has seen a dramatic increase in the number of cars coming in with tyre damage from potholes. it could be as low as $150 to replace a tyre, all the way up to a couple of thousand dollars. you know, we had a lexus in where they'd damaged the wheel, they'd damaged the strut, they'd damaged the control arm — ended up being almost $1,900 worth of damage. all because of potholes? one pothole, yes. the biden administration wants to fix newjersey�*s bumpy roads through the $1.9 trillion infrastructure spending plan. the goal of these construction projects is to spur economic activity and to help the american economy that was badly hurt by the covid—19 pandemic. this is the largestjobs plan since world war ii. it creates jobs to upgrade our
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transportation infrastructure, jobs modernising our roads, bridges, highways, jobs building ports and airports, rail carters, transit lines. the plan is ambitious and it will be a tough sell. funding it will require tax increases, so the opposition is fierce. but there is still may be some middle road on which both sides can agree. it is long overdue. there is certain infrastructure that is falling apart — roadways, bridges. some of our bridges really need urgent maintenance. the driving public is united in their contempt for potholes. at a time when there are few things washington can agree on, road repair seems like an easy fix. samira hussain, bbc news, new jersey. german sex workers have told the bbc that a countrywide ban on the industry is putting them in danger. sex work is usually legal and largely regulated in germany,
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but the government has closed brothels as part of coronavirus restrictions. as our berlin correspondentjenny hill reports, many workers say they have no choice but to flout the ban. translation: i've been here for 23 years. i i love myjob. jana's out of work. germany's brothels closed, sex work banned because of corona. translation: right now i'm ok. i've had a help. i get a basic income each month from the government so my rent and things like that are paid. we're normal people, you can't wish us away, otherwise the business goes underground. like many, aisha isn't registered with the authorities and told us she has no choice but to keep working. she didn't want to be identified. translation: i didn't think about the ban. i i just kept working. everyone did secretly.
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i don't get any help from the state. but there are charities which help with food and clothes. early evening in one of berlin's red light districts. we saw at least a dozen sex workers. what is causing concern are the ones you can't see. the corona restrictions are supposed to make life safer for all of us. the sex workers we have spoken to say for them they have simply made life more dangerous. and some suspect an ulterior motive. an attack on the industry itself. translation: throughout, - we have felt we are notjust legally restricted but discriminated against on all levels. - of course, it can be safe. we have security and hygiene protocols. i they are not different from those i of hairdressers or massage parlours. zusu, casper and cleo are part of a support network run by trans sex workers. we met them as they prepared to hand out supplies, advice to people on the streets here.
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clients know that it's illegal at the moment so clients, they can steal your money and just leave, because what are you going to do? call the police? with hotels being closed, often we are expected to host clients in our homes but they don't want to give any information. so you just end up having to decide whether you are going to take the money and be unsafe, pay your rent. you know, that's not a nice situation. the pandemic�*s exposed parts of german society some would prefer to ignore. what they really want here is recognition. jenny hill, bbc news, berlin. the headlines on bbc news. a shake—up in uk labour's top team — after the party's disappointing election results. borisjohnson is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england, with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish
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nationalist march. spurred on to change his life after a failed attempt to shoot and kill him when he was 21, explorer and adventurer dwayne fields is hoping to help others from disadvantaged communities to discover the outdoor world. the 37—year—old was the first black briton to walk more than 400 miles to the magnetic north pole. he says taking part in adventures like climbing mountains and trekking across glaciers changed his life — and he wants to make them accessible for everyone. through his foundation, wetwo, he's launched a project to give a group of underprivileged teenagers the opportunity tojoin an expedition to antarctica, and is looking for nominations. let's talk to dwayne fields now. hello to you. i can't hear you. can you hear me? i
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hello to you. i can't hear you. can you hear me?— you hear me? i can hear you find. perfect, you hear me? i can hear you find. perfect. we _ you hear me? i can hear you find. perfect. we just _ you hear me? i can hear you find. perfect, we just didn't _ you hear me? i can hear you find. perfect, we just didn't open i you hear me? i can hear you find. perfect, we just didn't open the i perfect, we just didn't open the microphone. thank you for talking to us. i wonder if you can tell our audience a bit about your life as you are growing up? i audience a bit about your life as you are growing up?— audience a bit about your life as you are growing up? i grew up, like many young — you are growing up? i grew up, like many young people. _ you are growing up? i grew up, like many young people, in _ you are growing up? i grew up, like many young people, in a _ you are growing up? i grew up, like many young people, in a really i many young people, in a really centralised location in london, east it was tough, it was challenging for me, as i know it is for many young people growing up nowadays come in can be tough and many young people growing up in these areas are under stresses and pressures a lot of people cannot identify with. that doesn't mean they will turn to crime, just means they are under stresses and pressures. what we have done at wetwo, which is my team—mate phoebe smith and myself, is we have decided to make the outdoors a means of escape for these young people, taking the main expeditions they wouldn't otherwise get the opportunity to go on, and we are exposing them to people and careers they wouldn't otherwise get the opportunity to see and experience,
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and we are hopeful, based on past experiences that both myself and phoebe that this will change and impact their lives for the better. we will talk more about that in a moment, but i'm interested in how your life was impacted by the fact that you were robbed at gunpoint when you are 16 and then when you were 21, a man pointed a gun at you and fired twice but the gun jammed. tell us about the impacts on you of that. �* ., ., ., ., ., , that. i'm one of the fortunate ones that. i'm one of the fortunate ones that ou that. i'm one of the fortunate ones that you didn't _ that. i'm one of the fortunate ones that you didn't hear— that. i'm one of the fortunate ones that you didn't hear about - that. i'm one of the fortunate ones that you didn't hear about on i that. i'm one of the fortunate ones that you didn't hear about on the l that you didn't hear about on the news. i'm one of the ones that didn't die from what happened to me and i'm even luckier that i'm one of the ones who didn't decide then to go and seek retribution to either end up killing someone or end up in prison. for me it was a situation where i've never carried a gun, i've never carried a knife, and yes, i was robbed at gunpoint because i was at the wrong place at the wrong time. i was actually on my way to the cinema when a guy asked me and a friend of mine to help him put his car. we walked around the corner to
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help him get his car out of the road and he turned around and said give me your phones and wallets. at 16 i was terrified. i had a small plastic bus pass case with maybe £10 on it to pay for my cinema ticket and get some popcorn and he took that. i was angry. i left that location angry thinking and actively planning how am i going to get someone back? it was after about 20 minutes i calmed down, my friend calmed down and we decided we didn't need to pursue anything and we would leave it alone. we are both good guys. we talked ourselves and each other out of going and doing something that equated to that to someone else. later on i was stabbed, i was stabbed twice, i never carried a knife. oncejust here in my chest and once in my lower stomach. again, it was an incident that i didn't start anything, i wasn't in an argument or a dispute with anyone, i was in the wrong place at the wrong time, which seems to be a running theme when you grow up in some parts of inner city areas. later, i was
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then, something was stolen from my younger brother, i went to retrieve it and the person decided it would be easier to pull a gun and pull the trigger rather than give it back to me. after that, trigger rather than give it back to me. afterthat, i trigger rather than give it back to me. after that, iwas trigger rather than give it back to me. after that, i was under a lot of pressure from a lot of people around me to go and get this guy back. we know where he is, we know where you can get this, that and the other and why don't you get him back? for me, i didn't want to get this guy, i thought, i'm here, i'm alive, i can make a difference, what can i do to improve the situation for myself? selfishly, myself, and help other people. and i decided i would go back to my roots. i was born in ruraljamaica, had woodlands, fields and forests around where i grew up and forests around where i grew up and that was my roots, that's where i went back to, so as to bent more and more time in the outdoors and started to reap the benefits come and see the benefits for other people as well. —— i spent more and more time. people as well. -- i spent more and more time-— people as well. -- i spent more and more time. ., ., ., more time. you have highlighted that are not many — more time. you have highlighted that are not many adventurers _ more time. you have highlighted that are not many adventurers and - are not many adventurers and explorers who look like you, ie,
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black people. explorers who look like you, ie, black people-— explorers who look like you, ie, black people. how will you change that? the main _ black people. how will you change that? the main thing _ black people. how will you change that? the main thing we _ black people. how will you change that? the main thing we have i black people. how will you change that? the main thing we have to l black people. how will you change | that? the main thing we have to do is start allowing people to see that they can do these things, to see you, or if they are a young black person or a young girl, or a young man, wherever they are from, just allowing them to see people who look like them, or come from where they come from, in a particular industry. that's success rewired both phoebe and myself started this because we realised the vast majority of explorers and adventurers are men, white middle—class men, it isjust a fact, it is not a good thing or a bad thing, it isjust a fact, it is not a good thing or a bad thing, it is just a fact. we decided if we want more diversity in this field we would have to be the change we wanted to see, to quote someone probably smarter than me. so you started to take applications from 16—18 —year—olds. you started taking applications for this specially chartered expedition in 2022 for this ship going to antarctica. what type of people are
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you looking for? the amazing thing is, a lot of people look for firsts when talking about expeditions. the fortunate thing for this one is we have lots of firsts. it’s fortunate thing for this one is we have lots of firsts.— have lots of firsts. it's going to be the first _ have lots of firsts. it's going to be the first of— have lots of firsts. it's going to be the first of a _ have lots of firsts. it's going to be the first of a carbon - have lots of firsts. it's going to | be the first of a carbon negative expedition of its kind. we have support from crack hoppers, the shipping company, family trust, or working really hard to make sure the carbon created by this is all offset and eventually absorbed in what we do as a foundation and what we get our young people to take part to do. what we are looking for is 16—18 —year—olds. they can't be older than 19 on the 25th of february 2022, which is when we set out and we are looking for them from all over the country. if you are from an area of deprivation were aspirational goals may be less for you than somebody else, you are the kind of person we're looking for. if you are somebody who is willing to take part in local initiatives to make sure your impact as a result of this trip is as minimalas your impact as a result of this trip is as minimal as possible, you are the person we are looking for. you
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could be a social worker, parent, friend, you can nominate a young by just going to team #wetwo radar, and fill out a form, it is six long, very basic, and we want to get as many young people to apply as possible to give as many people the opportunity to do something like this is possible. we know that aspirations change based on available resources and based on opportunities, so what we are doing is giving opportunities to absolutely every young person who fits the remit in the uk.— fits the remit in the uk. thank you for tellin: fits the remit in the uk. thank you for telling us _ fits the remit in the uk. thank you for telling us about _ fits the remit in the uk. thank you for telling us about it _ fits the remit in the uk. thank you for telling us about it and - fits the remit in the uk. thank you for telling us about it and good i for telling us about it and good luck, i'm sure you will get loads of nominations.— luck, i'm sure you will get loads of nominations. thank you very much, victoria. sir david attenborough says the problems that await the world in the next five to ten years because of climate change are greater than the coronavirus pandemic. the wildlife broadcaster's comments come six months ahead of the cop26 meeting in glasgow, where he'll be addressing global leaders and key decision—makers.
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sir david outlined the challenge ahead for the world in a video message on social media. they could not be a more important moment that we should have international agreements. the epidemic has shown us how crucial it is to find agreement among nations if we are to solve such worldwide problems. but the problem is that await us within the next 5—10 years are even greater. it is crucial that these meetings in glasgow, cup 26, have success, and that at last the nations will come together to solve the crippling problems that the world, the globe now faces. —— cop26. the annual hajj pilgrimage to mecca is to go ahead this year but under special conditions to prevent the spread of the coronavirus. the ministry of hajj in saudi arabia said the details and conditions would be made public
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at a later date. a gunman shot dead six people and then himself at a birthday party in colorado springs. the shootings took place at a mobile home park where families had gathered in one trailer to celebrate. the identities of the victims and the attacker have not yet been released. china is planning on setting up a line of separation on the summit of mount everest, to prevent climbers from nepal and tibet from mingling. this is in response to a sharp rise in coronavirus cases in nepal, but critics argue this will be hard to enforce, since mount everest�*s summit is the size of a dining table. you're watching bbc news. we will bring you the latest news and views in the next hour of the
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programme, so do stay tuned to us right here, right now. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello, again. this week really we're looking at unsettled week, forecast to be one of sunshine and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and thundery, some of them with hail, and today blustery around the showers in england and wales in particular, where we could have gusts of wind as much as 40mph. we have also got rain pushing up the north sea getting into the northern isles. showers continuing in the west. some getting over towards the east. and as i mentioned, some heavy with hail and thunder. it should dry up later on across parts of the south east and southern england. gusty around those showers, temperatures today 9—17 degrees. as we head on through the evening and overnight, some of the showers will fade but some will merge to give some longer spells of rain across northern ireland,
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pushing in across parts of scotland where we still have some rain in the north. a lot of dry weather, though, and not a cold night. those are our overnight lows, sevens and eights, so no issues with frosts tonight, in fact, no issues with frost this week. low pressure still very much driving our weather tomorrow. the showers rotating around it in an anticlockwise direction. they have been coming in from the south—west pushing north—eastwards and then there's another system waiting in the wings for the south—west for wednesday. you can see the effect on the temperatures, still in this and milder air around the area of low pressure, so temperatures still roughly where they should be at this stage in may. so for tuesday's forecast we start off on a largely dry note, then all the showers come in from the south—west pushing north—eastwards. we've still got some rain across the north. but in between there will be some bright skies, or indeed some sunshine with highs 10—16 degrees. moving on through the week, we still have that combination of bright skies, sunshine and showers, but you can see that little system coming
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in across the south—west, bringing in some more persistent rain across the isles of scilly, the channel islands, devon and cornwall. but there will still be some sunshine to look forward to during the course of wednesday and temperatures again roughly where they should be at this time of year, 10—16 degrees, north to south. as we head on towards the latter part of this working week, we continue with the unsettled theme. and in fact, we still are looking at sunshine and showers. one change is that it won't be quite as windy as it is going to be at the start of the week and temperatures slipping slightly.
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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 11. a shake—up in labour's top team — after the party's disappointing election results in england. the newly re—elected manchester mayor says the party needs to stop the infighting within its ranks. labour's got to stop this sort of internalfocus, you know, the civil war between those on the left of the party, those on the right of the party. it'sjust, from my point of view, that's absolutely pointless and disruptive. the prime minister is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england — with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. nicola sturgeon says the snp's win in the scottish elections means a second independence referendum
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is a "matter of when, not if". former prime minister gordon brown also speaking on the issue in defence of the union. i'm at the scottish parliament where i will be asking what is going on behind the scenes and what is the mood of the voters. dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish nationalist march. a cyber attack has shut down the largest fuel pipeline in the us. fuel prices are on the rise after the colonial pipeline was completely knocked offline. a whale, stranded in the river thames, has escaped from rescuers as they tried to take it to safety.
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good morning. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, says he hopes his "refreshed and renewed" front bench team will help the party bounce back, after poor local election results in england. let's take a look at some of the changes that have been made. angela rayner, the deputy leader, was sacked from her role as party chair on saturday, before being handed more senior roles last night. another high profile dismissal was anneliese dodds, who lost herjob as shadow chancellor. she takes up the position of party chair in place of ms rayner. ms dodds was replaced as shadow chancellor by rachel reeves. and wes streeting, considered to be a strong media performer, was promoted
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to the shadow cabinet, in charge of the child poverty brief. our political correspondent damian grammaticas has more. any news on the reshuffle? for the labour leader, this was a late finish after a torrid few days. in his office, he'd worked deep into sunday evening to complete his reworking of his top team. sir keir starmer says labour needs bold ideas after a disappointing set of elections and must change. so, out goes anneliese dodds. she has lost herjob as shadow chancellor. once part ofjeremy corbyn's team, she has been moved to the lower—profile role of party chair. it was sir kier�*s difficulty shifting the old party chair, his deputy, angela rayner, that complicated this reshuffle. her allies say she has emerged strengthened with a new role to find ways to win back voters lost to the conservatives. angela rayner tweeted...
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labour's new shadow chancellor is rachel reeves. she tweeted. .. and wes streeting has a new shadow cabinet role focused on child poverty. he said... the weekend did bring some labour cheer. tracy brabin, the first ever mayor of west yorkshire, adding to gains in cambridgeshire and the west of england. and labour won council seats in places that have been traditional tory areas — in west sussex, oxfordshire, and worthing on the south coast. but with all council results in, the bigger picture remains sobering for labour. in these elections, it lost control of eight councils, while the conservatives have gained control of more than a dozen.
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winning back lost voters — labour's challenge. damian grammaticas, bbc news. andy burnham was re—elected as the labour mayor of greater manchester over the weekend. he described the so—called civil war within the party is pointless and disruptive. within the party is pointless and disru tive. ,., , within the party is pointless and disrutive. , ., ., , disruptive. neighbours got to stop the civil war. _ disruptive. neighbours got to stop the civil war. from _ disruptive. neighbours got to stop the civil war. from my _ disruptive. neighbours got to stop the civil war. from my point i disruptive. neighbours got to stop the civil war. from my point of- the civil war. from my point of view, that is absolutely pointless and disruptive. we have got a fantastic vision here in greater manchester. this is labour power showing what we can do. buses under public control. these are labour policies. is it not time the party started celebrating these things? we have got a new woman mayor in west yorkshire. labour mayor is elected at the weekend, and across the
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country there are now ten. labour has been way too lukewarm about english devolution so far, i did now enthusiastically needs to get behind it. the party this morning, the shadow cabinet, everybody, needs to listen what the public were saying at the weekend. they like devolution here, they want more of it. and the party now needs to listen to that and show that it understands it. labour's shadow education secretary, kate green said ensuring you have the right team around you is the job of the party leader. taking responsibility as a leader is making _ taking responsibility as a leader is making sure that you have the right team _ making sure that you have the right team around you doing the jobs that you want— team around you doing the jobs that you want them to be doing, and i'm very pleased with the shadow cabinet colleagues that i will be working with _ colleagues that i will be working with i'm — colleagues that i will be working with. i'm delighted that angela is taking _ with. i'm delighted that angela is taking on— with. i'm delighted that angela is taking on a really important new role _ taking on a really important new role so. — taking on a really important new role. so, you know, it's about making — role. so, you know, it's about making sure that you've got square
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pe-s making sure that you've got square pegs and _ making sure that you've got square pegs and square holes, and people really— pegs and square holes, and people really now— pegs and square holes, and people really now working together as a shadow— really now working together as a shadow cabinet too, as andy burnham was saying. _ shadow cabinet too, as andy burnham was saying, stop focusing internally on ourselves and get out there and be talking — on ourselves and get out there and be talking to real people in our communities about what they want from the _ communities about what they want from the labour party and where they think at— from the labour party and where they think at the _ from the labour party and where they think at the moment, perhaps, we have _ think at the moment, perhaps, we have not— think at the moment, perhaps, we have not been delivering it. our political correspondent, helen catt, is at westminster. that reshuffle doesn't seem to have solved very much for sir keir starmer?— solved very much for sir keir starmer? ., ., , �* ., ., solved very much for sir keir starmer? ., �* ., ., ., ., starmer? no, it hasn't. not a ma'or reshuffle, starmer? no, it hasn't. not a ma'or reshuffle. but— starmer? no, it hasn't. not a ma'or reshuffle, but it i starmer? no, it hasn't. not a ma'or reshuffle, but it took i starmer? no, it hasn't. not a ma'or reshuffle, but it took a i starmer? no, it hasn't. not a ma'or reshuffle, but it took a very i starmer? no, it hasn't. not a ma'or reshuffle, but it took a very long i reshuffle, but it took a very long time _ reshuffle, but it took a very long time to— reshuffle, but it took a very long time to announce, _ reshuffle, but it took a very long time to announce, from - reshuffle, but it took a very long time to announce, from that i reshuffle, but it took a very long | time to announce, from that first news _ time to announce, from that first news coming _ time to announce, from that first news coming out _ time to announce, from that first news coming out on _ time to announce, from that first news coming out on saturday i time to announce, from that first i news coming out on saturday night about _ news coming out on saturday night about angela — news coming out on saturday night about angela rayner— news coming out on saturday night about angela rayner being - news coming out on saturday nightl about angela rayner being removed from that— about angela rayner being removed from that position _ about angela rayner being removed from that position as _ about angela rayner being removed from that position as party- about angela rayner being removed from that position as party chair- from that position as party chair and charge _ from that position as party chair and charge of— from that position as party chair and charge of running _ from that position as party chair. and charge of running campaigns. from that position as party chair- and charge of running campaigns. it was 24 _ and charge of running campaigns. it was 24 hours — and charge of running campaigns. it was 24 hours after _ and charge of running campaigns. it was 24 hours after that _ and charge of running campaigns. it was 24 hours after that news - and charge of running campaigns. it was 24 hours after that news camel was 24 hours after that news came out about — was 24 hours after that news came out about what _ was 24 hours after that news came out about what your _ was 24 hours after that news came out about what yourjob _ was 24 hours after that news came out about what yourjob is - was 24 hours after that news came out about what yourjob is going i was 24 hours after that news came out about what yourjob is going toj out about what yourjob is going to be. out about what yourjob is going to be what— out about what yourjob is going to be what i— out about what yourjob is going to be what i did _ out about what yourjob is going to be. what i did was _ out about what yourjob is going to be. what i did was to— out about what yourjob is going to be. what i did was to allow- out about what yourjob is going to be. what i did was to allow this i be. what i did was to allow this feeling — be. what i did was to allow this feeling that _ be. what i did was to allow this feeling that there _ be. what i did was to allow this feeling that there is _
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be. what i did was to allow this feeling that there is a - be. what i did was to allow this feeling that there is a dispute l feeling that there is a dispute between _ feeling that there is a dispute between sir— feeling that there is a dispute between sir keir— feeling that there is a dispute between sir keir starmer i feeling that there is a dispute between sir keir starmer and| feeling that there is a dispute - between sir keir starmer and angela rayner— between sir keir starmer and angela rayner to— between sir keir starmer and angela rayner to develop. _ between sir keir starmer and angela rayner to develop, it _ between sir keir starmer and angela rayner to develop, it gave _ between sir keir starmer and angela rayner to develop, it gave a - between sir keir starmer and angela rayner to develop, it gave a lot i between sir keir starmer and angela rayner to develop, it gave a lot of i rayner to develop, it gave a lot of space _ rayner to develop, it gave a lot of space for— rayner to develop, it gave a lot of space for the _ rayner to develop, it gave a lot of space for the critics _ rayner to develop, it gave a lot of space for the critics of _ rayner to develop, it gave a lot of space for the critics of keir- space for the critics of keir starmer— space for the critics of keir starmer to— space for the critics of keir starmer to really- space for the critics of keir starmer to really come i space for the critics of keirj starmer to really come out space for the critics of keir- starmer to really come out and dominate — starmer to really come out and dominate the _ starmer to really come out and dominate the airwaves - starmer to really come out and dominate the airwaves while i starmer to really come out and i dominate the airwaves while that starmer to really come out and - dominate the airwaves while that was happening _ dominate the airwaves while that was happening so— dominate the airwaves while that was happening so there _ dominate the airwaves while that was happening. so there are _ dominate the airwaves while that was happening. so there are some - happening. so there are some concerns— happening. so there are some concerns within _ happening. so there are some concerns within the _ happening. so there are some concerns within the party i happening. so there are some l concerns within the party about happening. so there are some i concerns within the party about how that was _ concerns within the party about how that was handled, _ concerns within the party about how that was handled, the _ concerns within the party about how that was handled, the politics- concerns within the party about how that was handled, the politics of- that was handled, the politics of it, that was handled, the politics of it. the _ that was handled, the politics of it, the political— that was handled, the politics of it, the political management, i that was handled, the politics of. it, the political management, and there _ it, the political management, and there is— it, the political management, and there is a — it, the political management, and there is a bit— it, the political management, and there is a bit of— it, the political management, and there is a bit of frustration - it, the political management, and there is a bit of frustration in- there is a bit of frustration in andy— there is a bit of frustration in andy burnham's _ there is a bit of frustration in andy burnham's clip - there is a bit of frustration in andy burnham's clip there i there is a bit of frustration in. andy burnham's clip there that there is a bit of frustration in- andy burnham's clip there that that also overshadow— andy burnham's clip there that that also overshadow some _ andy burnham's clip there that that also overshadow some of— andy burnham's clip there that that also overshadow some of the - andy burnham's clip there that that| also overshadow some of the better results _ also overshadow some of the better results that — also overshadow some of the better results that labour— also overshadow some of the better results that labour saw— also overshadow some of the better results that labour saw over - also overshadow some of the better results that labour saw over the i results that labour saw over the weekend, — results that labour saw over the weekend, such— results that labour saw over the weekend, such as _ results that labour saw over the weekend, such as the _ results that labour saw over the weekend, such as the west i results that labour saw over the i weekend, such as the west yorkshire mayoraltw _ weekend, such as the west yorkshire ma oral . f , weekend, such as the west yorkshire ma oral . j , ,, ~ mayoralty. they've been talking about the move _ mayoralty. they've been talking about the move forward. - mayoralty. they've been talking about the move forward. when | mayoralty. they've been talking i about the move forward. when we mayoralty. they've been talking - about the move forward. when we look at that reshuffle, is there any that indication of the direction that sir keir starmer wants to move on? the? keir starmer wants to move on? they want to move — keir starmer wants to move on? they want to move forward. _ keir starmer wants to move on? they want to move forward. they will have to move _ want to move forward. they will have to move forward _ want to move forward. they will have to move forward pretty— want to move forward. they will have to move forward pretty swiftly - want to move forward. they will have to move forward pretty swiftly too, . to move forward pretty swiftly too, because _ to move forward pretty swiftly too, because one — to move forward pretty swiftly too, because one of— to move forward pretty swiftly too, because one of the _ to move forward pretty swiftly too, because one of the consequences i to move forward pretty swiftly too, i because one of the consequences of the mayor— because one of the consequences of the mayor of— because one of the consequences of the mayor of west _ because one of the consequences of the mayor of west yorkshire - because one of the consequences of the mayor of west yorkshire is - because one of the consequences of the mayor of west yorkshire is that i the mayor of west yorkshire is that she is— the mayor of west yorkshire is that she is stepping _ the mayor of west yorkshire is that she is stepping down _ the mayor of west yorkshire is that she is stepping down as— the mayor of west yorkshire is that she is stepping down as a - the mayor of west yorkshire is that she is stepping down as a mp - the mayor of west yorkshire is that she is stepping down as a mp here| the mayor of west yorkshire is that . she is stepping down as a mp here at
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westminsteh — she is stepping down as a mp here at westminster. that— she is stepping down as a mp here at westminster. that means _ she is stepping down as a mp here at westminster. that means another. westminster. that means another bv-electioh — westminster. that means another bv-electioh it_ westminster. that means another by—election. it is— westminster. that means another by—election. it is a _ westminster. that means another by—election. it is a seat— westminster. that means another by—election. it is a seat that - by—election. it is a seat that labour— by—election. it is a seat that labour has _ by—election. it is a seat that labour has held _ by—election. it is a seat that labour has held for- by—election. it is a seat that labour has held for about i by—election. it is a seat that| labour has held for about 20 by—election. it is a seat that - labour has held for about 20 years. but in _ labour has held for about 20 years. but in 2019. — labour has held for about 20 years. but in 2019. the _ labour has held for about 20 years. but in 2019, the majority— labour has held for about 20 years. but in 2019, the majority was - labour has held for about 20 years. | but in 2019, the majority was pretty stim~ _ but in 2019, the majority was pretty stim~ it— but in 2019, the majority was pretty stim~ it is— but in 2019, the majority was pretty stim~ it is going _ but in 2019, the majority was pretty slim. it is going to— but in 2019, the majority was pretty slim. it is going to be _ but in 2019, the majority was pretty slim. it is going to be another- slim. it is going to be another pretty— slim. it is going to be another pretty swift _ slim. it is going to be another pretty swift electoral- slim. it is going to be another pretty swift electoral test - slim. it is going to be anotherj pretty swift electoral test that slim. it is going to be another. pretty swift electoral test that sir keir starmer— pretty swift electoral test that sir keir starmerand _ pretty swift electoral test that sir keir starmerand his— pretty swift electoral test that sir keir starmer and his new- pretty swift electoral test that sir keir starmer and his new team i pretty swift electoral test that sir. keir starmer and his new team are going _ keir starmer and his new team are going to _ keir starmer and his new team are going to have _ keir starmer and his new team are going to have to _ keir starmer and his new team are going to have to face. _ keir starmer and his new team are going to have to face. we - keir starmer and his new team are going to have to face. we have - keir starmer and his new team are i going to have to face. we have heard a lot of— going to have to face. we have heard a lot of talk— going to have to face. we have heard a lot of talk from _ going to have to face. we have heard a lot of talk from them _ going to have to face. we have heard a lot of talk from them about - a lot of talk from them about tistehihg _ a lot of talk from them about listening to _ a lot of talk from them about listening to voters, _ a lot of talk from them about listening to voters, about - a lot of talk from them about - listening to voters, about changing, about _ listening to voters, about changing, about reativ— listening to voters, about changing, about really engaging _ listening to voters, about changing, about really engaging with - about really engaging with communities. _ about really engaging with communities. i— about really engaging with communities. ithink- about really engaging with communities. i think the l about really engaging with - communities. i think the question is going _ communities. i think the question is going to _ communities. i think the question is going to be — communities. i think the question is going to be how— communities. i think the question is going to be how much— communities. i think the question is going to be how much can _ communities. i think the question is going to be how much can they- communities. i think the question is going to be how much can they do . going to be how much can they do that before — going to be how much can they do that before they— going to be how much can they do that before they have _ going to be how much can they do that before they have to _ going to be how much can they do that before they have to go - going to be how much can they do that before they have to go into . that before they have to go into this next — that before they have to go into this next electoral— that before they have to go into this next electoral test, - that before they have to go into this next electoral test, and - that before they have to go into i this next electoral test, and where do they— this next electoral test, and where do they go— this next electoral test, and where do they go after— this next electoral test, and where do they go after that? _ this next electoral test, and where do they go after that? we - this next electoral test, and where do they go after that?— this next electoral test, and where do they go after that? we were livid there for now. _ do they go after that? we were livid there for now. thank— do they go after that? we were livid there for now. thank you _ do they go after that? we were livid there for now. thank you very - do they go after that? we were livid | there for now. thank you very much. ministers are meeting this morning to discuss whether to proceed with the next stage of lockdown easing in england. borisjohnson will hold a press conference at 5 o'clock, when he is expected to say, the data supports a further relaxing of the measures. pubs, restaurants and other hospitality are set to re—open on may 17th — as well as venues such as cinemas
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and soft play areas. and it's thought the prime minister will announce that is "ok" to hug friends and family — after the government said it wanted to see "friendly contact" between people restored. speaking this morning the health minister, nadine dorries, said it was important the right balance was struck. we were hoping to hear what she was going to say, so lets just ask this question, how are people going to react if and when our freedoms from lockdown are eased? robin dunbar is professor of evolutionary psychology at the university of oxford. thank you forjoining us, professor. many people are looking forward to that first hug. how do you expect human behaviour to change? is it
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going to be a gradual transition or will wejust get on going to be a gradual transition or will we just get on with it? i going to be a gradual transition or will we just get on with it?- will we 'ust get on with it? i think it will we just get on with it? i think it rather depends _ will we just get on with it? i think it rather depends on _ will we just get on with it? i think it rather depends on who - will we just get on with it? i think it rather depends on who you - will we just get on with it? i think it rather depends on who you are| it rather depends on who you are going to prospectively hug, actually. physical contact, hugging, caressing, is a fundamentally important part of the way we build close friendships, family relationships. 50 that's why we have missed it. we will want to get back to it as soon as possible. on the whole, we don't do it with everybody. we are fairly choosy about who we hug. and that tends to really extend to only your 50 best friends and family. out beyond that, it is handshakes and that's all. so i think the people you would normally want to hug and cuddle, are people you can trust. you know their behaviour. at least, you know if you cannot trust them, in terms of whether they put themselves at risk of covid. there is you know and
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trust, you will rush in and have a good hug with. a good thing, too. i good hug with. a good thing, too. i just want to ask, how did you interpret hugging responsibly? i think in exactly the way i've said. keep it close to family and close friends. don't rush around and hug with all in sundry who you don't know and have never seen before. just how important is touch to people's well—being? this just how important is touch to people's well-being? this whole business -- _ people's well-being? this whole business... illustrates _ people's well-being? this whole business... illustrates how - business... illustrates how important it is to our relationships to build and maintain our relationships. i sometimes say you really want to know how somebody feels about you, how they touch you is worth a thousand words any day. there is something honest and and
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receivable in the way people touch each other, whereas they might tell you all sorts of nonsense. —— something undeceivable. because we have lost most of our fire, what we have lost most of our fire, what we have done is sort of substitute stroking and cuddling and hugging, which kicks in the same system in the brain, it isjust which kicks in the same system in the brain, it is just exactly what monkeys and apes do, but that is why we only do it with our nearest and dearest, because monkeys and apes only do social grooming with their nearest and dearest.— only do social grooming with their nearest and dearest. there have been some peeple — nearest and dearest. there have been some peeple who _ nearest and dearest. there have been some people who have _ nearest and dearest. there have been some people who have really - nearest and dearest. there have been i some people who have really welcomed that personal space, and are already starting to stress a little about perhaps being expected to be more touchy—feely and not wanting to.
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this is true, but then the world does not consist of robots, i'm afraid. perhapsjust does not consist of robots, i'm afraid. perhaps just as well. does not consist of robots, i'm afraid. perhapsjust as well. each of us is just slightly different from everybody else. so some people are less touchy—feely than others. and that's just part of the rich tapestry of life. just to say, by and large, that seems to be to do with the brain chemistry that underpins this. there is a small cultural difference between countries, but not enormous. we've looked at physical contact, what is acceptable as physical contact, right away across europe and as far as japan. yes, the italians are a bit more huggy than the british, but not by that much really. places where touch is acceptable, according to the relationship you have the person, are pretty much identical right across that huge swathes of
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eurasia, basically.— right across that huge swathes of eurasia, basically. thank you very much indeed _ eurasia, basically. thank you very much indeed for _ eurasia, basically. thank you very much indeed for your _ eurasia, basically. thank you very much indeed for your time. - and the prime minister will confirm the further easing of coronavirus restrictions in a downing street conference at five o'clock tonight. we'll bring that to you live on bbc news. the headlines on bbc news... a shake—up in labour's top team — after the party's disappointing election results in england. the prime minister is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england —— with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. nicola sturgeon says the snp's win
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in the scottish elections means a second independence referendum is a "matter of when, not if". the re—elected first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, has told borisjohnson that another vote on scottish independence is inevitable. the snp leader also suggested that she could begin the process as early as next spring. my colleague annita mcveigh is outside holyrood this morning. hi, thank you very much. welcome back to _ hi, thank you very much. welcome back to edinburgh, and around 20 of the new— back to edinburgh, and around 20 of the new intake of members of the scottish— the new intake of members of the scottish parliament in the parliament building this morning. they have — parliament building this morning. they have not been sworn in yet but they are _ they have not been sworn in yet but they are going through the induction process, _ they are going through the induction process, and for all the members of the scottish parliament manyjobs on the scottish parliament manyjobs on the agenda for them. primarily of course _ the agenda for them. primarily of course the — the agenda for them. primarily of course the focus is very much on pandemic— course the focus is very much on pandemic recovery. but clearly, the discussion. — pandemic recovery. but clearly, the discussion, it has never really gone away. _ discussion, it has never really gone away. is _ discussion, it has never really gone away, is about the potential for a second _ away, is about the potential for a second independence referendum. as you have _
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second independence referendum. as you have mentioned, nicola sturgeon saving _ you have mentioned, nicola sturgeon saving it _ you have mentioned, nicola sturgeon saying it was very much a case of when. _ saying it was very much a case of when, not — saying it was very much a case of when, not if, _ saying it was very much a case of when, not if, with the timetable of possibly— when, not if, with the timetable of possibly introducing a bill as soon as next— possibly introducing a bill as soon as next spring, although she did add in some _ as next spring, although she did add in some pretty hefty caveat to that idea _ in some pretty hefty caveat to that idea and — in some pretty hefty caveat to that idea. and then the pro union side, out of— idea. and then the pro union side, out of the — idea. and then the pro union side, out of the starting blocks today, with gordon brown making the case for the _ with gordon brown making the case for the defence of the union. and saving _ for the defence of the union. and saving to — for the defence of the union. and saying to borisjohnson for the defence of the union. and saying to boris johnson a very clear message, _ saying to boris johnson a very clear message, about the way he thinks the current— message, about the way he thinks the current prime minister needs to handle — current prime minister needs to handle the situation. borisjohnson will change his mind on this. his muscular unionism, that's an attempt to sort of put britishness into scotland, that's not going to work very well. project fear will not work. scottish people are very proud indeed. but what he'll come to realise is what i'm suggesting. he will set up a review on the future of the united kingdom, there will be a constitutional review, like kilbrandon 50 years ago. he will set up a permanent forum, in my view, of consultation between the nations, the regions, and the centre. and he will strive, in the end,
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for better cooperation. now, whether he does it too late, i don't know. but these are the decisions that the government will make, in the end. that's the patriotic, positive and principled case and i do urge all scots who believe in this, because we are more scottish than british. in most cases, people would choose scotland as against britain if they had a choice. but people don't want to make that choice. let's find out a little bit more about — let's find out a little bit more about what might be happening inside the scottish parliament in the weeks and months ahead. i can talk now with the _ and months ahead. i can talk now with the journalist from holyrood daitv~ _ with the journalist from holyrood daily. give us a sense of what is going _ daily. give us a sense of what is going on— daily. give us a sense of what is going on behind the scenes come out bevond _ going on behind the scenes come out beyond the _ going on behind the scenes come out beyond the political statements about _ beyond the political statements about independence or from the pro union— about independence or from the pro union side — about independence or from the pro union side. is it really going to be a focus _ union side. is it really going to be a focus on — union side. is it really going to be a focus on daily business, and of course _ a focus on daily business, and of course pandemic recovery? i don't think it's going _ course pandemic recovery? i don't think it's going to _ course pandemic recovery? i don't think it's going to be _ course pandemic recovery? i don't think it's going to be a _ course pandemic recovery? i don't think it's going to be a focus - course pandemic recovery? i don't think it's going to be a focus on i think it's going to be a focus on daily— think it's going to be a focus on daily business— think it's going to be a focus on daily business in— think it's going to be a focus on daily business in the _ think it's going to be a focus on| daily business in the parliament inrnrediateiv, _ daily business in the parliament immediately, that— daily business in the parliament immediately, that is— daily business in the parliament immediately, that is not- daily business in the parliament immediately, that is not what. daily business in the parliament i immediately, that is not what they are going — immediately, that is not what they are going to— immediately, that is not what they are going to be— immediately, that is not what they are going to be working _ immediately, that is not what they
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are going to be working on. - immediately, that is not what they are going to be working on.- immediately, that is not what they are going to be working on. jenny, i think we have _ are going to be working on. jenny, i think we have a _ are going to be working on. jenny, i think we have a problem _ are going to be working on. jenny, i think we have a problem with - are going to be working on. jenny, i think we have a problem with the i think we have a problem with the line _ think we have a problem with the line we — think we have a problem with the line. we are just trying to find out if we _ line. we are just trying to find out if we can— line. we are just trying to find out if we can establish contact again. we are _ if we can establish contact again. we are going to try to work on that line, _ we are going to try to work on that line. but— we are going to try to work on that line. but in— we are going to try to work on that line, but in the meantime, speaking about— line, but in the meantime, speaking about the _ line, but in the meantime, speaking about the mood of the people and what voters might want to happen i’ilht what voters might want to happen right now. — what voters might want to happen right now, are they ready for another— right now, are they ready for another referendum? our correspondence has been talking to voters _ correspondence has been talking to voters in _ correspondence has been talking to voters in ayr with that very question _ voters in ayr with that very question. they are hunting for treasure _ question. they are hunting for treasure. so question. they are hunting for treasure. ., �* ., ., treasure. so far, i've got two pennies. — treasure. so far, i've got two pennies. a — treasure. so far, i've got two pennies. a 5p. _ treasure. so far, i've got two pennies. a 5p. a _ treasure. so far, i've got two pennies, a 5p, a secret - treasure. so far, i've got two - pennies, a 5p, a secret message in a little _ pennies, a 5p, a secret message in a little bottte — pennies, a 5p, a secret message in a little bottle-— little bottle. this election says a messare, little bottle. this election says a message. says _ little bottle. this election says a message, says nicola _ little bottle. this election says a message, says nicola sturgeon, little bottle. this election says a - message, says nicola sturgeon, that scotland has a mandate for a second independence referendum. daoid independence referendum. david a . rees. independence referendum. david aurees. if independence referendum. david agrees. if there _ independence referendum. david agrees. if there is _ independence referendum. david agrees. if there is a _ independence referendum. david agrees. if there is a independence referendum — agrees. if there is a independence referendum tomorrow, _ agrees. if there is a independence referendum tomorrow, i— agrees. if there is a independence referendum tomorrow, i would - agrees. if there is a independence referendum tomorrow, i would be| agrees. if there is a independence - referendum tomorrow, i would be very much _ referendum tomorrow, i would be very much for— referendum tomorrow, i would be very much for being — referendum tomorrow, i would be very much for being independent _ referendum tomorrow, i would be very much for being independent and - referendum tomorrow, i would be very much for being independent and being | much for being independent and being in charge _ much for being independent and being in charge of— much for being independent and being in charge of our— much for being independent and being in charge of our own _ much for being independent and being in charge of our own destiny. - much for being independent and being in charge of our own destiny. he - in charge of our own destiny. he would in charge of our own destiny. would vote yes if there was
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in charge of our own destiny. hr; would vote yes if there was a referendum tomorrow. and you would vote? i’m referendum tomorrow. and you would vote? �* ., . ., vote? i'm on the fence at the moment- _ vote? i'm on the fence at the moment- do _ vote? i'm on the fence at the moment. do you _ vote? i'm on the fence at the moment. do you discuss - vote? i'm on the fence at the - moment. do you discuss politics? not renerall . moment. do you discuss politics? not generallv- ayr — moment. do you discuss politics? not generallv- ayr saw _ moment. do you discuss politics? not generally. ayr saw one _ moment. do you discuss politics? not generally. ayr saw one of _ moment. do you discuss politics? not generally. ayr saw one of the - moment. do you discuss politics? not generally. ayr saw one of the more i generally. ayr saw one of the more dramatic shifts _ generally. ayr saw one of the more dramatic shifts in _ generally. ayr saw one of the more dramatic shifts in this _ generally. ayr saw one of the more dramatic shifts in this election. i dramatic shifts in this election. these swimmers staying cheerful, even though they are disappointed. i'm a tory voter, so i'm not very happy— i'm a tory voter, so i'm not very happy about— i'm a tory voter, so i'm not very happy about the _ i'm a tory voter, so i'm not very happy about the snp _ i'm a tory voter, so i'm not very happy about the snp being i i'm a tory voter, so i'm not very happy about the snp being backj i'm a tory voter, so i'm not very. happy about the snp being back in. however. _ happy about the snp being back in. however. they— happy about the snp being back in. however, they won _ happy about the snp being back in. however, they won the _ happy about the snp being back in. however, they won the majority. i however, they won the majority. nicola _ however, they won the majority. nicola sturgeon— however, they won the majority. nicola sturgeon says _ however, they won the majority. nicola sturgeon says she - however, they won the majority. nicola sturgeon says she wants i however, they won the majority. i nicola sturgeon says she wants to be the first _ nicola sturgeon says she wants to be the first minister to lead scotland to independence.— to independence. personally, we would not survive. _ to independence. personally, we would not survive. with - to independence. personally, we would not survive. with the i to independence. personally, we i would not survive. with the question of scotland's — would not survive. with the question of scotland's future _ would not survive. with the question of scotland's future taking _ would not survive. with the question of scotland's future taking off - of scotland's future taking off again. — of scotland's future taking off again. is— of scotland's future taking off again, is there multi—politics here than _ again, is there multi—politics here than in _ again, is there multi—politics here than in the — again, is there multi—politics here than in the constitution. it's got lvndon — than in the constitution. it's got lyndon single issue country now? | lyndon single issue country now? i don't lyndon single issue country now? don't think lyndon single issue country now? i don't think it is. when you are looking —
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don't think it is. when you are looking at— don't think it is. when you are looking at some _ don't think it is. when you are looking at some of _ don't think it is. when you are looking at some of the - don't think it is. when you are i looking at some of the feedback, it has been _ looking at some of the feedback, it has been you — looking at some of the feedback, it has been you either— looking at some of the feedback, it has been you either voted - looking at some of the feedback, it has been you either voted snp- looking at some of the feedback, it has been you either voted snp fori has been you either voted snp for independence _ has been you either voted snp for independence or— has been you either voted snp for independence or another- has been you either voted snp for independence or another party- has been you either voted snp for independence or another party for the union — independence or another party for the union i— independence or another party for the union i put _ independence or another party for the union. i put labour— independence or another party for the union. i put labour for- independence or another party for the union. i put labour for my- the union. i put labour for my preference _ the union. i put labour for my preference but— the union. i put labour for my preference but would - the union. i put labour for my preference but would still- the union. i put labour for my preference but would still be. the union. i put labour for myl preference but would still be in favour — preference but would still be in favour of — preference but would still be in favour of independence. - preference but would still be in favour of independence. it. preference but would still be in favour of independence.- favour of independence. at the town's sunday _ favour of independence. at the town's sunday market, - favour of independence. at the town's sunday market, among | favour of independence. at the i town's sunday market, among some passions— town's sunday market, among some passions are — town's sunday market, among some passions are running high. ijust passions are running high. i 'ust want to showi passions are running high. i 'ust want to show my i passions are running high. i 'ust want to show my badge. i passions are running high. ijust want to show my badge. that i passions are running high. iflmt want to show my badge. that is all i need to say. i wear it all the time and i will wear it for ever more until we get our independence. itrufhiiie until we get our independence. while for others there _ until we get our independence. while for others there is _ until we get our independence. while for others there is a _ until we get our independence. while for others there is a weary _ for others there is a weary resignation about what the next few years _ resignation about what the next few years might hold. | resignation about what the next few years might hold-— years might hold. i think it's 'ust auoin to years might hold. i think it's 'ust going to overshadow i years might hold. i think it'sjust going to overshadow everything | years might hold. i think it'sjust i going to overshadow everything else. but what _ going to overshadow everything else. but what can— going to overshadow everything else. but what can we _ going to overshadow everything else. but what can we do? _ going to overshadow everything else. but what can we do? there _ going to overshadow everything else. but what can we do? there is - going to overshadow everything else. | but what can we do? there is another five years _ but what can we do? there is another five years of— but what can we do? there is another five years of it. — but what can we do? there is another five years of it. it _ but what can we do? there is another five years of it, it will— but what can we do? there is another five years of it, it will be _ but what can we do? there is another five years of it, it will be nearly - five years of it, it will be nearly two decades, _ five years of it, it will be nearly two decades, won't _ five years of it, it will be nearly two decades, won't it? - five years of it, it will be nearly two decades, won't it? me i five years of it, it will be nearly two decades, won't it?- five years of it, it will be nearly two decades, won't it? we 'ust have to wait and — two decades, won't it? we 'ust have to wait and see. i two decades, won't it? we 'ust have to wait and see. what i two decades, won't it? we 'ust have to wait and see. what is i two decades, won't it? we just have to wait and see. what is this? i two decades, won't it? we just have to wait and see. what is this? when j to wait and see. what is this? when is that— to wait and see. what is this? when is that from? — to wait and see. what is this? when is that from?— to wait and see. what is this? when is that from?- it _ to wait and see. what is this? when is that from?- it is _ to wait and see. what is this? when is that from?- it is not - to wait and see. what is this? when is that from?- it is not about | is that from? 1950s. it is not about the future that _ is that from? 1950s. it is not about the future that are _ is that from? 1950s. it is not about the future that are the _ is that from? 1950s. it is not about the future that are the deciding i the future that are the deciding factor— the future that are the deciding factor for— the future that are the deciding factor for this pro—independence
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voter~ _ factor for this pro-independence voter. �* , ., factor for this pro-independence voter. fl ., ., factor for this pro-independence voter. �*, ., ., �*, ., , voter. it's not for me. it's for my grandkids- _ voter. it's not for me. it's for my grandkids. let's _ voter. it's not for me. it's for my grandkids. let's put _ voter. it's not for me. it's for my grandkids. let's put it _ voter. it's not for me. it's for my grandkids. let's put it this i voter. it's not for me. it's for my grandkids. let's put it this way, l grandkids. let's put it this way, would you be happy to let the woman next door to you hold your purse strings? next door to you hold your purse strinus? ,, , a, a, a, next door to you hold your purse strinus? ,, m a, a, a, strings? for everyone in favour of independence _ strings? for everyone in favour of independence here, _ strings? for everyone in favour of independence here, there - strings? for everyone in favour of independence here, there is- strings? for everyone in favour of - independence here, there is someone else who _ independence here, there is someone else who wants the union to remain. how do _ else who wants the union to remain. how do you — else who wants the union to remain. how do you feel about the idea of another— how do you feel about the idea of another referendum? it how do you feel about the idea of another referendum?— how do you feel about the idea of another referendum? it makes me nervous. another referendum? it makes me nervous- the _ another referendum? it makes me nervous. the fact _ another referendum? it makes me nervous. the fact that _ another referendum? it makes me nervous. the fact that i _ another referendum? it makes me nervous. the fact that i personally| nervous. the fact that i personally wouldn't _ nervous. the fact that i personally wouldn't want _ nervous. the fact that i personally wouldn't want to _ nervous. the fact that i personally wouldn't want to be _ nervous. the fact that i personally wouldn't want to be away- nervous. the fact that i personally wouldn't want to be away from - nervous. the fact that i personally| wouldn't want to be away from the rest of _ wouldn't want to be away from the rest of great — wouldn't want to be away from the rest of great britain. _ wouldn't want to be away from the rest of great britain.— rest of great britain. what lies ahead is far — rest of great britain. what lies ahead is far from _ rest of great britain. what lies ahead is far from clear. - rest of great britain. what lies ahead is far from clear. the i rest of great britain. what lies i ahead is far from clear. the first minister— ahead is far from clear. the first minister insists the question of an referendum is now a matter of when, not if _ referendum is now a matter of when, not if. ., ., ., referendum is now a matter of when, notif. ., ., ., ,, not if. lorna gordon assessing the mood there _ not if. lorna gordon assessing the mood there of _ not if. lorna gordon assessing the mood there of voters _ not if. lorna gordon assessing the mood there of voters stuff - not if. lorna gordon assessing the mood there of voters stuff i'm - mood there of voters stuff i'm pleased to say that we do havejenny davidson back with us now. we will have another go. and you just started to answer the first question
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i posed you, which was, give us a sense of what is going to be going on behind the scenes in the scottish parliament building behind me? is it very much a focus on pandemic recovery, other daily business, rather than the question of another independence referendum, despite those big political statements? i those big political statements? i think initially yes it well. there are a _ think initially yes it well. there are a lot — think initially yes it well. there are a lot of— think initially yes it well. there are a lot of new— think initially yes it well. there are a lot of new msps - think initially yes it well. there are a lot of new msps who - think initially yes it well. there are a lot of new msps who are | think initially yes it well. there - are a lot of new msps who are just going _ are a lot of new msps who are just going to _ are a lot of new msps who are just going to be — are a lot of new msps who are just going to be finding _ are a lot of new msps who are just going to be finding their— are a lot of new msps who are just going to be finding their feet- are a lot of new msps who are just going to be finding their feet overl going to be finding their feet over the next — going to be finding their feet over the next few— going to be finding their feet over the next few weeks. _ going to be finding their feet over the next few weeks. they- going to be finding their feet over the next few weeks. they are - going to be finding their feet over. the next few weeks. they are getting their induction — the next few weeks. they are getting their induction today. _ the next few weeks. they are getting their induction today. msps - the next few weeks. they are getting their induction today. msps will- the next few weeks. they are getting their induction today. msps will be i their induction today. msps will be sworn _ their induction today. msps will be sworn in _ their induction today. msps will be sworn in on — their induction today. msps will be sworn in on thursday. _ their induction today. msps will be sworn in on thursday. to - their induction today. msps will be sworn in on thursday. to begin - their induction today. msps will be . sworn in on thursday. to begin with, it's sworn in on thursday. to begin with, it'sjust _ sworn in on thursday. to begin with, it's just everyone _ sworn in on thursday. to begin with, it's just everyone finding _ sworn in on thursday. to begin with, it'sjust everyone finding their- sworn in on thursday. to begin with, it's just everyone finding their way. it's just everyone finding their way around _ it's just everyone finding their way around the — it's just everyone finding their way around the parliament. _ it's just everyone finding their way| around the parliament. obviously, it's just everyone finding their way. around the parliament. obviously, as nicola _ around the parliament. obviously, as nicota sturgeon— around the parliament. obviously, as nicola sturgeon has— around the parliament. obviously, as nicola sturgeon has said _ around the parliament. obviously, as nicola sturgeon has said right- nicola sturgeon has said right through— nicola sturgeon has said right through this _ nicola sturgeon has said right through this campaign, - nicola sturgeon has said right through this campaign, the i nicola sturgeon has said right- through this campaign, the pandemic recovery— through this campaign, the pandemic recovery and — through this campaign, the pandemic recovery and getting _ through this campaign, the pandemic recovery and getting through - through this campaign, the pandemic recovery and getting through this - recovery and getting through this crisis _ recovery and getting through this crisis continues— recovery and getting through this crisis continues to _ recovery and getting through this crisis continues to be _ recovery and getting through this crisis continues to be the - recovery and getting through this crisis continues to be the main i crisis continues to be the main focus — crisis continues to be the main focus for— crisis continues to be the main focus for the _ crisis continues to be the main focus for the time _ crisis continues to be the main focus for the time being. - crisis continues to be the main focus for the time being. i- crisis continues to be the main. focus for the time being. i don't think— focus for the time being. i don't think that — focus for the time being. i don't think that was _ focus for the time being. i don't think that was just _ focus for the time being. i don't think that was just campaign i focus for the time being. i don't l think that was just campaign talk, that genuinely— think that was just campaign talk, that genuinely is _ think that was just campaign talk, that genuinely is the _ think that was just campaign talk, that genuinely is the case, - think that was just campaign talk, that genuinely is the case, and i think that was just campaign talk, j that genuinely is the case, and we can expect — that genuinely is the case, and we can expect the _ that genuinely is the case, and we can expect the pandemic- that genuinely is the case, and we can expect the pandemic to - that genuinely is the case, and we can expect the pandemic to still . that genuinely is the case, and wei can expect the pandemic to still be the focus _ can expect the pandemic to still be the focus of— can expect the pandemic to still be the focus of the _ can expect the pandemic to still be the focus of the parliament - can expect the pandemic to still be the focus of the parliament over i can expect the pandemic to still be i the focus of the parliament over the next few _ the focus of the parliament over the next few weeks. _ the focus of the parliament over the
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next few weeks, and _ the focus of the parliament over the next few weeks, and going - the focus of the parliament over the next few weeks, and going up - the focus of the parliament over the next few weeks, and going up to i the focus of the parliament over the | next few weeks, and going up to the summer— next few weeks, and going up to the summer recess _ next few weeks, and going up to the summer recess. and _ next few weeks, and going up to the summer recess. and of— next few weeks, and going up to the summer recess. and of course, i next few weeks, and going up to the summer recess. and of course, it's. summer recess. and of course, it's not been _ summer recess. and of course, it's not been mentioned _ summer recess. and of course, it's not been mentioned that _ summer recess. and of course, it's not been mentioned that much, i summer recess. and of course, it'sl not been mentioned that much, but there _ not been mentioned that much, but there is— not been mentioned that much, but there is the — not been mentioned that much, but there is the cup— not been mentioned that much, but there is the cup 26 _ not been mentioned that much, but there is the cup 26 climate - not been mentioned that much, but there is the cup 26 climate summit. that does— there is the cup 26 climate summit. that does not— there is the cup 26 climate summit. that does not mean— there is the cup 26 climate summit. that does not mean that _ there is the cup 26 climate summit. that does not mean that no - there is the cup 26 climate summit. that does not mean that no one i there is the cup 26 climate summit. j that does not mean that no one will be talking _ that does not mean that no one will be talking about _ that does not mean that no one will be talking about independence i that does not mean that no one will be talking about independence andl be talking about independence and the referendum. _ be talking about independence and the referendum. probably- be talking about independence and the referendum. probably not i be talking about independence and the referendum. probably not the i the referendum. probably not the focus _ the referendum. probably not the focus of— the referendum. probably not the focus of parliamentary— the referendum. probably not the focus of parliamentary business. i the referendum. probably not the l focus of parliamentary business. —— the c0p26— focus of parliamentary business. —— the com. summit. _ focus of parliamentary business. —— the com. summit. you _ focus of parliamentary business. —— the cop26 summit. you can - focus of parliamentary business. —— i the cop26 summit. you can certainly expect— the cop26 summit. you can certainly expect it _ the cop26 summit. you can certainly expect it to— the cop26 summit. you can certainly expect it to be — the cop26 summit. you can certainly expect it to be a _ the cop26 summit. you can certainly expect it to be a focus _ the cop26 summit. you can certainly expect it to be a focus of— expect it to be a focus of discussion, _ expect it to be a focus of discussion, and - expect it to be a focus of discussion, and we - expect it to be a focus of discussion, and we have| expect it to be a focus of- discussion, and we have already seen. _ discussion, and we have already seen. you — discussion, and we have already seen. you have _ discussion, and we have already seen, you have just— discussion, and we have already seen, you have just had - discussion, and we have already seen, you have just had a - discussion, and we have already seen, you have just had a clip. discussion, and we have alreadyj seen, you have just had a clip of gordon— seen, you have just had a clip of gordon brown, _ seen, you have just had a clip of gordon brown, we _ seen, you have just had a clip of gordon brown, we have - seen, you have just had a clip of gordon brown, we have got i seen, you have just had a clip of- gordon brown, we have got michael gove in _ gordon brown, we have got michael gove in scotland _ gordon brown, we have got michael gove in scotland at _ gordon brown, we have got michael gove in scotland at the _ gordon brown, we have got michael gove in scotland at the moment, i gove in scotland at the moment, there _ gove in scotland at the moment, there are — gove in scotland at the moment, there are clearly _ gove in scotland at the moment, there are clearly manoeuvres i gove in scotland at the moment, . there are clearly manoeuvres going on on _ there are clearly manoeuvres going on on the _ there are clearly manoeuvres going on on the union— there are clearly manoeuvres going on on the union side _ there are clearly manoeuvres going on on the union side that _ there are clearly manoeuvres going on on the union side that have i on on the union side that have realised — on on the union side that have realised that _ on on the union side that have realised that there _ on on the union side that have realised that there is - on on the union side that have realised that there is a - on on the union side that have l realised that there is a potential crisis _ realised that there is a potential crisis coming _ realised that there is a potential crisis coming up _ realised that there is a potential crisis coming up and _ realised that there is a potential crisis coming up and they- realised that there is a potential crisis coming up and they need i realised that there is a potential. crisis coming up and they need to start— crisis coming up and they need to start working _ crisis coming up and they need to start working on _ crisis coming up and they need to start working on building - crisis coming up and they need to start working on building the i crisis coming up and they need toj start working on building the case for the _ start working on building the case for the union _ start working on building the case for the union.— start working on building the case for the union. which leads me onto m next for the union. which leads me onto my next question, _ for the union. which leads me onto my next question, and _ for the union. which leads me onto my next question, and that - for the union. which leads me onto my next question, and that is, i for the union. which leads me onto my next question, and that is, do | my next question, and that is, do you think— my next question, and that is, do you think it— my next question, and that is, do you think it is fair to say that the pro union— you think it is fair to say that the pro union side at this stage is more fragmented compared to the pro—independence side? i fragmented compared to the pro-independence side? i think at the moment. _ pro-independence side? i think at
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the moment, because _ pro-independence side? i think at the moment, because we - pro-independence side? i think at the moment, because we are i pro-independence side? i think at| the moment, because we are quite early— the moment, because we are quite early on _ the moment, because we are quite early on and — the moment, because we are quite early on and we _ the moment, because we are quite early on and we are _ the moment, because we are quite early on and we are not— the moment, because we are quite early on and we are not actually. the moment, because we are quite early on and we are not actually inl early on and we are not actually in a campaign, — early on and we are not actually in a campaign, we _ early on and we are not actually in a campaign, we haven't— early on and we are not actually in a campaign, we haven't got- early on and we are not actually in a campaign, we haven't got any. early on and we are not actually in l a campaign, we haven't got any kind of unified _ a campaign, we haven't got any kind of unified trody— a campaign, we haven't got any kind of unified body separate _ a campaign, we haven't got any kind of unified body separate from - a campaign, we haven't got any kind of unified body separate from the i of unified body separate from the political _ of unified body separate from the political parties. _ of unified body separate from the political parties. like _ of unified body separate from the political parties. like there - of unified body separate from the political parties. like there was . of unified body separate from the political parties. like there was a| political parties. like there was a yes movement _ political parties. like there was a yes movement and _ political parties. like there was a yes movement and ate _ political parties. like there was a yes movement and ate no- political parties. like there was a i yes movement and ate no movement political parties. like there was a - yes movement and ate no movement in 2014 _ yes movement and ate no movement in 2014 it _ yes movement and ate no movement in 2014 it is _ yes movement and ate no movement in 2014 it is early— yes movement and ate no movement in 2014. it is early days _ yes movement and ate no movement in 2014. it is early days for— yes movement and ate no movement in 2014. it is early days for that. _ yes movement and ate no movement in 2014. it is early days for that. but - 2014. it is early days for that. but ithink— 2014. it is early days for that. but i think what— 2014. it is early days for that. but i think what we _ 2014. it is early days for that. but i think what we are _ 2014. it is early days for that. but i think what we are going - 2014. it is early days for that. but i think what we are going to - 2014. it is early days for that. but i think what we are going to see l 2014. it is early days for that. but| i think what we are going to see is a more _ i think what we are going to see is a more fragmented _ i think what we are going to see is a more fragmented unionist- i think what we are going to see is a more fragmented unionist side i a more fragmented unionist side because — a more fragmented unionist side because tast _ a more fragmented unionist side because last time _ a more fragmented unionist side because last time we _ a more fragmented unionist side because last time we had - a more fragmented unionist sidej because last time we had labour a more fragmented unionist side i because last time we had labour and the conservatives— because last time we had labour and the conservatives getting _ because last time we had labour and the conservatives getting together. the conservatives getting together to push— the conservatives getting together to push the — the conservatives getting together to push the no— the conservatives getting together to push the no message, - the conservatives getting together to push the no message, the i the conservatives getting together to push the no message, the pro i to push the no message, the pro union— to push the no message, the pro union message, _ to push the no message, the pro union message, and _ to push the no message, the pro union message, and i— to push the no message, the pro union message, and i don't i to push the no message, the pro union message, and i don't think we're _ union message, and i don't think we're going — union message, and i don't think we're going to _ union message, and i don't think we're going to that _ union message, and i don't think we're going to that again. - union message, and i don't think we're going to that again. will. union message, and i don't think we're going to that again. will they aet we're going to that again. will they get together? _ we're going to that again. will they get together? i _ we're going to that again. will they get together? i don't _ we're going to that again. will they get together? i don't think - we're going to that again. will they get together? i don't think they i get together? i don't think they will this time. _ get together? i don't think they will this time. you _ get together? i don't think they will this time. you don't - get together? i don't think they will this time. you don't think i get together? i don't think they i will this time. you don't think they are auoin will this time. you don't think they are going to _ will this time. you don't think they are going to get — will this time. you don't think they are going to get together - will this time. you don't think they are going to get together in - will this time. you don't think they are going to get together in the i are going to get together in the same _ are going to get together in the same way this time. would that be a mistake? _ same way this time. would that be a mistake? i_ same way this time. would that be a mistake? ~ ., ., ,., mistake? i think from the labour perspective. _ mistake? i think from the labour perspective. they _ mistake? i think from the labour perspective, they have _ mistake? i think from the labour perspective, they have really i mistake? i think from the labour perspective, they have really gotj perspective, they have really got quite _ perspective, they have really got quite a _ perspective, they have really got quite a hammering _ perspective, they have really got quite a hammering in— perspective, they have really got quite a hammering in scotland i perspective, they have really gotl quite a hammering in scotland for the fact— quite a hammering in scotland for the fact that — quite a hammering in scotland for the fact that they— quite a hammering in scotland for the fact that they aligned - quite a hammering in scotland for the fact that they aligned with i quite a hammering in scotland for the fact that they aligned with the conservatives— the fact that they aligned with the conservatives in— the fact that they aligned with the conservatives in 2014, _ the fact that they aligned with the conservatives in 2014, and - the fact that they aligned with the conservatives in 2014, and even i conservatives in 2014, and even though— conservatives in 2014, and even though they— conservatives in 2014, and even though they share _ conservatives in 2014, and even though they share the _ conservatives in 2014, and even though they share the same i conservatives in 2014, and evenl though they share the same view conservatives in 2014, and even i though they share the same view on independence, — though they share the same view on independence, i_ though they share the same view on independence, i don't— though they share the same view on independence, i don't think -
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though they share the same view on independence, i don't think labouri independence, i don't think labour and the _ independence, i don't think labour and the conservatives _ independence, i don't think labour and the conservatives are - independence, i don't think labour and the conservatives are going i independence, i don't think labour and the conservatives are going to| and the conservatives are going to form _ and the conservatives are going to form one _ and the conservatives are going to form one group— and the conservatives are going to form one group together- and the conservatives are going to form one group together in - and the conservatives are going to form one group together in the i and the conservatives are going to i form one group together in the same way that— form one group together in the same way that they — form one group together in the same way that they did _ form one group together in the same way that they did in _ form one group together in the same way that they did in 2014 _ form one group together in the same way that they did in 2014 again - form one group together in the same way that they did in 2014 again if- way that they did in 2014 again if there _ way that they did in 2014 again if there is— way that they did in 2014 again if there is a — way that they did in 2014 again if there is a future _ way that they did in 2014 again if there is a future independence . there is a future independence campaign _ there is a future independence campaign-— there is a future independence camaiun. �* , , , ., ., campaign. and very briefly, what do ou think campaign. and very briefly, what do you think the _ campaign. and very briefly, what do you think the mood _ campaign. and very briefly, what do you think the mood of— campaign. and very briefly, what do you think the mood of voters - campaign. and very briefly, what do you think the mood of voters is i you think the mood of voters is right— you think the mood of voters is right now? _ you think the mood of voters is right now? do you think even the most _ right now? do you think even the most ardent pro—independence voters are really— most ardent pro—independence voters are really up for the idea of thinking _ are really up for the idea of thinking about, talking about another— thinking about, talking about another independence referendum at this stage? i another independence referendum at this stare? ., this stage? i would say the most ardent independent _ this stage? i would say the most ardent independent supporters i ardent independent supporters definitety— ardent independent supporters definitely are _ ardent independent supporters definitely are up _ ardent independent supporters definitely are up for— ardent independent supporters definitely are up for it, - ardent independent supporters definitely are up for it, today. ardent independent supporters. definitely are up for it, today and any day — definitely are up for it, today and any day. but— definitely are up for it, today and any day. but i_ definitely are up for it, today and any day. but i would _ definitely are up for it, today and any day. but i would say- definitely are up for it, today and any day. but i would say the i any day. but i would say the majority _ any day. but i would say the majority of _ any day. but i would say the majority of the _ any day. but i would say the majority of the scottish i any day. but i would say the i majority of the scottish people would — majority of the scottish people would be — majority of the scottish people would be happy— majority of the scottish people would be happy with _ majority of the scottish people would be happy with nicola i would be happy with nicola sturgeon's _ would be happy with nicola sturgeon's view— would be happy with nicola sturgeon's view of - would be happy with nicola sturgeon's view of focusing would be happy with nicola i sturgeon's view of focusing on would be happy with nicola - sturgeon's view of focusing on the pandemic— sturgeon's view of focusing on the pandemic at— sturgeon's view of focusing on the pandemic at the _ sturgeon's view of focusing on the pandemic at the moment - sturgeon's view of focusing on the pandemic at the moment and i sturgeon's view of focusing on the i pandemic at the moment and waiting. we are _ pandemic at the moment and waiting. we are seeing— pandemic at the moment and waiting. we are seeing that _ pandemic at the moment and waiting. we are seeing that in _ pandemic at the moment and waiting. we are seeing that in opinion- pandemic at the moment and waiting. we are seeing that in opinion polls. i we are seeing that in opinion polls. the majority— we are seeing that in opinion polls. the majority would _ we are seeing that in opinion polls. the majority would not _ we are seeing that in opinion polls. the majority would not want - we are seeing that in opinion polls. the majority would not want this, l the majority would not want this, looking _ the majority would not want this, looking at — the majority would not want this, looking at an _ the majority would not want this, looking at an independence - looking at an independence referendum _ looking at an independence referendum right _ looking at an independence referendum right now, i looking at an independencej referendum right now, they looking at an independence - referendum right now, they want to -et referendum right now, they want to get through— referendum right now, they want to get through the _ referendum right now, they want to get through the pandemic - referendum right now, they want to get through the pandemic first, i referendum right now, they want to get through the pandemic first, the| get through the pandemic first, the pandemic— get through the pandemic first, the pandemic is— get through the pandemic first, the pandemic is the _ get through the pandemic first, the pandemic is the top _ get through the pandemic first, the pandemic is the top priority. - get through the pandemic first, the pandemic is the top priority. it i pandemic is the top priority. it equally, — pandemic is the top priority. it equally. we _ pandemic is the top priority. it equally. we see _ pandemic is the top priority. it equally, we see from - pandemic is the top priority. it equally, we see from the - pandemic is the top priority. it equally, we see from the vote | pandemic is the top priority. it - equally, we see from the vote that there _ equally, we see from the vote that there are _ equally, we see from the vote that there are plenty— equally, we see from the vote that there are plenty of _ equally, we see from the vote that there are plenty of people - equally, we see from the vote that there are plenty of people who - equally, we see from the vote that. there are plenty of people who would want it _ there are plenty of people who would want it over _ there are plenty of people who would want it over the _ there are plenty of people who would want it over the slightly—
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there are plenty of people who would want it over the slightly longer- want it over the slightly longer term _ want it over the slightly longer term of— want it over the slightly longer term of this _ want it over the slightly longer term of this parliament, - want it over the slightly longer term of this parliament, and l want it over the slightly longer term of this parliament, and ii want it over the slightly longer- term of this parliament, and i think that is_ term of this parliament, and i think that is what— term of this parliament, and i think that is what we _ term of this parliament, and i think that is what we are _ term of this parliament, and i think that is what we are going _ term of this parliament, and i think that is what we are going to - term of this parliament, and i think that is what we are going to see - term of this parliament, and i think that is what we are going to see ini that is what we are going to see in terms _ that is what we are going to see in terms of— that is what we are going to see in terms of timing _ that is what we are going to see in terms of timing.— that is what we are going to see in terms of timing. really good to talk to ou. terms of timing. really good to talk to yom thank— terms of timing. really good to talk to you. thank you _ terms of timing. really good to talk to you. thank you very _ terms of timing. really good to talk to you. thank you very much - terms of timing. really good to talk to you. thank you very much for- terms of timing. really good to talk. to you. thank you very much for your time _ to you. thank you very much for your time its— to you. thank you very much for your time. it's interesting, going back to what— time. it's interesting, going back to what gordon brown has been saying. — to what gordon brown has been saying. his _ to what gordon brown has been saying, his think tank have been doing _ saying, his think tank have been doing some polling, and obviously polls always come with the inevitable caveats, but his think tank— inevitable caveats, but his think tank says — inevitable caveats, but his think tank says that around 30% of the scottish — tank says that around 30% of the scottish electorate is pro—independence, around 30% pro union. _ pro—independence, around 30% pro union. but— pro—independence, around 30% pro union, but then he says that there are a _ union, but then he says that there are a big _ union, but then he says that there are a big chunk of the electorate, 40%. _ are a big chunk of the electorate, 40%, who — are a big chunk of the electorate, 40%, who are not persuaded one way or the _ 40%, who are not persuaded one way or the other, — 40%, who are not persuaded one way or the other, so potentially a lot of hearts — or the other, so potentially a lot of hearts and minds for both sides to focus— of hearts and minds for both sides to focus on— of hearts and minds for both sides to focus on i do try to win over in the event — to focus on i do try to win over in the event of— to focus on i do try to win over in the event of another vote. from the moment, _ the event of another vote. from the moment, from holyrood back to the studio _ rail passengers are being warned to expect further disruption on long—distance routes this week ,
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after 183 high—speed trains were taken out of service for safety checks. all hitachi 800 trains are being inspected, after some were found to have cracks, in the chassis during routine checks. great western railway is advising people not to travel today — and london north eastern railway says passengers should check their bookings before travelling. let's talk to our business presenter, ben thompson. ben, what's the situation this morning? yeah, much as you described. good morning. those problems that were identified over the weekend continuing into the start of a new week. as you say, the travel advice is simply not to take those train services if you can help it. for those that do need to travel, real replacement services are being offered, refunds offered to others, and it's because of a small crack that was identified underneath the train. hitachi says this is the part of the train that attaches the main carriage where we will all sit to the part underneath that contains the part underneath that contains the wheels. they say there is no
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risk to passengers but they are concerned that parts of it could break off, and that could in turn cause chaos on the network if parts are falling off onto the tracks, so what they have had to do is come up with a fix. that fix could be pretty lengthy, it could mean that there are further delays well into the weeks ahead. that's because they need to take those carriages out of service to make sure that they are safe. as you say, 183 trains taken out of service on the weekend. that is normally a little bit quieter, so there are concerns about what it could mean as services in theory start to ramp up as people start to get back to the office, get back to work and are able to travel again. this perhaps coming at a very bad time indeed. great western railway that operates along the west, to bristol and cardiff, down that sort of direction into london paddington, they are most badly affected. they have got most of these trains, 93 of
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them, and they were the first to bring them into service. so those are the first that will need looking at. but also the east coast main line, the l and those are also badly disrupted. the service that takes passengers from king's cross up to scotland, also affected by that. they are looking at how they can resolve this problem. inevitably, it will mean that trains and carriages need to be taken out of service, and because so many were cancelled every weekend, trains and staff are in the wrong place. so it means that, even now, as some of those trains get back into service, they will be ongoing delays and ongoing cancellations.— ongoing delays and ongoing cancellations. . ,, , ., , . cancellations. thank you very much for that. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood.
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we have already got showers in eastern areas. they moving up into the northern isles and gusty across england and wales, gusting up to a0 mild an hour. temperatures 9—17. overnight showers emerging over northern ireland and pushing into scotland where we still have rain in the north but largely dry the west of the uk and is not a cold night. temperatures falling to between five and 9 degrees. no issues with frost. low pressure dominating tomorrow. the showers rotating around it and notjust the showers rotating around it and not just to tomorrow the showers rotating around it and notjust to tomorrow but into wednesday and the west of the week it remains forecast sunshine and showers but not as blustery as today. hello this is bbc news. the headlines:
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a shake—up in labour's top team —— after the party's disappointing election results in england. the newly re—elected manchester mayor, says the party needs to stop the infighting within its ranks. labour has got to stop the civil war between those on the left of the party and those on the right of the party. from my point of view that is absolutely pointless and disruptive. from my point of view that is absolutely pointless and disruptive. the prime minister is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england — with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. nicola sturgeon says the snp�*s win in the scottish elections means a second independence referendum is a "matter of when, not if". dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish nationalist march. a whale — stranded in the river thames — has escaped from rescuers as they tried to take it to safety.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good morning. they might have been lifting the women's super league title for a fourth time yesterday, but chelsea are back in training this morning we're told with a potential quadruple on the horizon it was two goals from fran kirby in a 5—0 win over reading that ended manchester city's hopes of pipping them to the title on the final day. sam kerr added another, a golden boot winner this season. with the league cup in the bag, they have a champions league final to prepare for this weekend, and are still in the fa cup. we and are still in the fa cup. knew when we came ba time we knew when we came back in this time that we wanted to lift that trophy for real this time and i think then when we all sat in our apartment during the christmas break and new years we said we are not finishing the season without winning every trophy so that is our plan. we have got two more to go and it is
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amazing right now. we have got two more to go and it is amazing right now. from those celebrations to those still on ice, manchester city are being made to wait for the premier league title after manchester united avoided the defeat that would have handed the league to their rivals. edinson cavani scoring in a 3—1 win over aston villa, the only sour note an injury to harry maguire with the europa league final and euros ahead. united could trim the gap to city to four points with a game against leicester tommorow and liverpool on thursday. sam allardyce says it's too early to talk about his future after his first relegation from the premier league as west brom dropped out of the top filght with a 3—1 defeat at arsenal david moyes says that west ham will keep pushing for a champions league place, despite their top four hopes taking a blow after losing 1—0 at home to everton. elsewhere wolves beat brighton 2—1. england rugby has confirmed three home mens matches this summer. an england a side will face scotland a in leicester on sunday the 27th ofjune, then eddiejones�* side will play tests at twickenham against the usa
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on sunday ath july and canada on saturday 10 july. fans will be admitted for the first time since december, with at least 10,000 able to attend each match at twickenham. he's had a great clay court season so far — but dan evans has lost in the opening round of the rome masters this morning after being beaten by america's taylor fritz in straight sets. the british number one, ranked a career high 26th, beat novak djokovic in monte carlo on his way to the semis. he reached the last 16 in madrid last week. but a first round defeat for him here in rome as he lost 6—3, 6—2 to fritz who is ranked five places below him in the world. lewis hamilton says he wants to sign his next mercedes deal by the summer, suggesting that this season may not be his last in formula one. hamilton agreed only a one—year contract extension just six weeks before the start of his championship defence. on the track hamilton remains in ruthless form, turning his 100th pole into the 98th
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win of his career.. it wasn't easy at the spanish grand prix with max verstappen overtaking him at the first corner. the world champion hit back thanks to fresher tyres, taking the lead with six laps remaining to extend his lead in the championship to 1a points. rory mcilroy is back in the world's top 10 after winning for the first time in 18 months. this putt saw him win the the wells fargo championship by a stroke, in front of a packed 18th green in north carolina. the crowd loved it. it's the northern irishman's first tournament win since november 2019 — and look what it meant to him. you know, when we came back from the pandemic i thought i would enjoy the peace and quiet a little bit and i soon realised to bring the best out of myself i need this. and i feed off the energy so much and, you
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know, maybe hear more so than anywhere else just because it is the first place i have won three times and so the crowd has just been awesome all week. and finally some baseball from the us — this is jake cronenworth making a splash with a home run in san franciso. he connected with this pitch playing for the san diego padres against the san francisco giants. and it made it all the way out into the bay where a giants fan very nearly caught it in her kayak. a near miss and a ball retrieved and quite a souvenir even if her team did lose 11—1. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. there have been more clashes between israeli police and hundreds of palestinians in one of the most sensitive areas ofjerusalem, following 3 nights of unrest. police fired stun grenades to disperse crowds in the temple mount —
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which is considered sacred to jews and muslims. thousands of police have been deployed across the city, ahead of a planned march, which is held each year byjewish nationalists to celebrate israels capture of eastjerusalem in 1967. a little earlier our middle east correspondent, tom bateman, described the clashes he saw this morning. already have the last three or four hours there had been very violent confrontations right here at this site which lies at the heart of jerusalem's most sensitive holy areas. you could see the golden dome. i can post here before 9am and already israeli police were firing at palestinians who were throwing stones and rocks and other objects and some of those confrontations had reached inside the mosque itself.
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that went on for two hours are silent in the meantime we had, outside the old city walls, phones were stone at a passing car with some israelis inside and that car lost control and crashed into a barrier. injuring one of the palestinians. and the driver himself had minor injuries as well so it has been very very tense morning. what is happening now is that palestinians are preparing prayer again in the plaza there and we just heard the call to prayer. we have also had a few volleys of stun grenades near a religious shrine as well so i think we have an amendment where we are waiting for this in the afternoon. whether or not it will go through some of the sensitive areas of the old city remains to be seen. people are fearful of the volatile mix here. detectives have been granted more time to question a man over the murder of a police community support officer in kent. julia james was attacked while walking her dog near her home
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on april the 27th. police have until tonight to question the man, who comes from the canterbury area. our correspondent, simonjones is in kent with the latest. this is day 1a of the murder investigation. officers arrested a man on friday evening at around 9:30pm, he is in his 20s and from the canterbury area. yesterday lunchtime, police were given more time to question him on an additional 36 hours. that pretty much takes them up to the end of today. at that point the police will have to decide whether to charge him, whether to release him, or whether to ask for a final 2a hours to question him. there's no letup in the police activity around this area. just down the road from here, officers stand guard outside a house in aylesham. yesterday we saw forensic teams coming and going from the property. they were searching through a skip outside the house. through the garden, they were lifting up the paving slabs. police haven't said how this has
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belongs to but it does form part of this investigation. now, julia james was killed almost two weeks ago. she had been working from home that day. she took her dog toby for a walk when she was attacked. she suffered serious head injuries. people in this area still remain concerned. officers are advising them when they go out to make sure they have their phones with them, to make sure they tell someone where exactly they are going and how long they are expected to be gone for. julia james's say are keeping all fingers crossed just in the hope that there will be some positive developments in this case. around 9 million adults in the uk can read and write simple words, but can't do things like reading a medicine label or filling out a job application. bbc radio slive is launching a project called " word matters' in the hope of starting the biggest conversation across the uk about adult literacy in a decade.
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today is the first day and i am delighted to say that we can speak now tojoanne o'gormley — a mum of one from glasgow who has struggled over the years with dyslexia. thank you forjoining us here. i wonder if you could take us back to that moment where you realised that something was not right. iretell. that moment where you realised that something was not right.— something was not right. well, i was in school when _ something was not right. well, i was in school when it _ something was not right. well, i was in school when it happened. - something was not right. well, i was in school when it happened. i - something was not right. well, i was in school when it happened. ijust i in school when it happened. ijust thought i was lazy. and it wasn't until i got into high school and i found it really hard. so they kind of helped a wee bit of it but not a lot but my mum was mostly big part of the more help that i got. istallion lot but my mum was mostly big part of the more help that i got. when we talk about help _ of the more help that i got. when we talk about help in _ of the more help that i got. when we talk about help in school _ of the more help that i got. when we talk about help in school you - talk about help in school you obviously have a daughter now and
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when you reflect on what she went through, i do think the school could have done more to help you? what do you wish had been there? i wish you wish had been there? i wish there was _ you wish had been there? i wish there was more _ you wish had been there? i wish there was more help _ you wish had been there? i wish there was more help for - you wish had been there? i wish there was more help for people | you wish had been there? i wish . there was more help for people like myself. i want my daughter to grow up myself. i want my daughter to grow up and be able to read and variety and be able to tell someone that she is struggling. haifa and be able to tell someone that she is struggling-— is struggling. how difficult is it to talk about _ is struggling. how difficult is it to talk about it? _ is struggling. how difficult is it to talk about it? we're - is struggling. how difficult is it to talk about it? we're talking | is struggling. how difficult is it - to talk about it? we're talking now about mental health, for example, but there has always been the stigma around mental health and i think also i have read that there is some shame attached to having bad literacy skills. how easy difficult did you find to talk about the subject? i did you find to talk about the sub'ect? ., . , . subject? i found it really hard, especially _ subject? i found it really hard, especially in — subject? i found it really hard, especially in school _ subject? i found it really hard, especially in school because i l subject? i found it really hard, i especially in school because i got bullied for it in school for being the lowest in the class and it was
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hard and i don't want that for my wee girl offer anybody. what hard and i don't want that for my wee girl offer anybody. what impact had on your— wee girl offer anybody. what impact had on your life _ wee girl offer anybody. what impact had on your life through _ wee girl offer anybody. what impact had on your life through the - wee girl offer anybody. what impact had on your life through the years? | had on your life through the years? how is it affected the choices that you have made? the how is it affected the choices that you have made?— how is it affected the choices that you have made? the big decisions i have made — you have made? the big decisions i have made in _ you have made? the big decisions i have made in my _ you have made? the big decisions i have made in my life. _ you have made? the big decisions i have made in my life. i _ you have made? the big decisions i have made in my life. i thought- you have made? the big decisions i have made in my life. i thought i i have made in my life. i thought i would not have a job because of the way i was in school. but i managed to do my level three in childcare. where i workjust now the girls and my bosses all help with it and so did my family and friends. isphere did my family and friends. were aroin to did my family and friends. were going to leave _ did my family and friends. were going to leave it _ did my family and friends. were going to leave it there - did my family and friends. were going to leave it there for - did my family and friends. were going to leave it there for now but thank you very much and congratulations on obtaining those skills. the headlines on bbc news: a shake—up in labour's top team ——
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after the party's disappointing election results in england. the prime minister is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england —— with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. nicola sturgeon says the snp�*s win in the scottish elections means a second independence referendum is a 'matter of when, not if�*. the us government has declared a state of emergency — after the country's largest fuel pipeline was hit by a cyber attack. reports suggest the group responsible is demanding ransom money to restore services. the emergency status will allow fuel to be transported by road instead. our cyber reporter, joe tidyjoins me now... how would such attacks have taken
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place? what details do you know? irate place? what details do you know? , know that van somewhere, and it is worth praising the company. we know that hackers have gained entry to the system so usually cyber attack style with a knee bail so one of the staff accidentally clicked on a malicious link in an e—mail and that allowed the hackers inside the system and they would have spend weeks or months looking around the computer system at colonial pipeline, working out whether vulnerabilities are, the weaknesses, take on any data they think is valuable and that and get a copy for themselves and then effectively infected the entire computer network and we don't know the extent to which that attack has brought down the company but we know that they have taken a precautionary measure of disconnecting a lot of their
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computer systems to perhaps stop the spread of the van somewhere throughout their system. it seems these hackers do want some money. people are talking about fuel prices climbing in the us that when you get down to this is a case of national security because you are looking attack on key infrastructure. how normal are attacks like this? the?t normal are attacks like this? they are very unusual. _ normal are attacks like this? they are very unusual. only _ normal are attacks like this? they are very unusual. only last - normal are attacks like this? ire: are very unusual. only last month there was a van somewhere task force launched to try to these type of attacks and tried to get action from governments. as you say, this is what we call critical national infrastructure and it is an area of cyber security that people have become increasingly concerned about. these are attacks on industrial control system so you might think that an oil pipeline is a very
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analogue system and it is oil running through pipes but over the years the systems of added valves and sensors and lots of eye ot, they call it. internet connected devices that enable these pipelines to flow freely and when an attack like this occurs on a place like that it can, as are seeing, bring a pipeline to a halt and affect the us in a big way. the family of a woman who died after errors in assessing her benefits are to bring legal action against the government. the bbc has found that the death of philippa day in 2019 was one of at least 150 cases the department for work and pensions has reviewed in recent years — following claims their processes had contributed to the death or injury of claimants. here's our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan.
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lam in so i am in so much debt, i have nothing to eat. philippa pleaded with benefits officials for help. her money had been cut. they insisted she cannot have a benefits assessment at home so in despair the 27—year—old mother took a fatal overdose leaving her sister to fight her case. it overdose leaving her sister to fight her case. ., . overdose leaving her sister to fight her case. . , , her case. it was absolutely preventable. _ her case. it was absolutely preventable. it _ her case. it was absolutely preventable. it was - her case. it was absolutely preventable. it was due i her case. it was absolutely preventable. it was due to | her case. it was absolutely - preventable. it was due to the impact of the claim. the governor said claiming benefit should not be a risk to life and it was. than a risk to life and it was. an inquest — a risk to life and it was. an inquest found _ a risk to life and it was. an inquest found 28 hours in the processing her application. the
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family are suing the department for work and pensions.— work and pensions. there were s stemic work and pensions. there were systemic issues _ work and pensions. there were systemic issues which - work and pensions. there were systemic issues which had - work and pensions. there were systemic issues which had not l work and pensions. there were - systemic issues which had not been addressed for a long time. as it was not first to die, she was one of many. and clearly lessons have not been learned. per many. and clearly lessons have not been learned.— been learned. per death is one of scores that _ been learned. per death is one of scores that families _ been learned. per death is one of scores that families have - been learned. per death is one of scores that families have blamed | been learned. per death is one of i scores that families have blamed on the stresses of the benefit system including ten, david and jodie. research by the bbc found that at least 150 reviews of death or serious harm to claimants has been carried out. the government told us they take each tragic case seriously and review them in case there are lessons to learn. ben mcdonald who died took his own life after being found fit for work. a labour mp read out some of the names of those who died. she said the government is
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marking its own homework. is died. she said the government is marking its own homework. is this what we should _ marking its own homework. is this what we should be _ marking its own homework. is this what we should be expecting - marking its own homework. is this what we should be expecting from| marking its own homework. i3 try 3 what we should be expecting from our social security system? i say no. it is not fit for purpose. it is not a safety net and we are seriously letting people down. campaigners say there should be _ letting people down. campaigners say there should be an _ letting people down. campaigners say there should be an independent - there should be an independent public enquiry on how many benefit claimants died while seeking support. a rescue operation has taken place to free a small whale that became stranded in the river thames. large crowds gathered at richmond lock, in south—west london, to watch divers and fire crews — who took four hours to move the minke whale to a safe location. matt graveling reports. trying to turn the tide. as the thames recedes,
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it leaves behind a minke whale, grounded in richmond lock. first responders hosed water over its weak body. hours earlier, the whale had first been spotted a few miles upriver, near barnes bridge. no way! but, by 5pm, it was stuck in richmond, sparking a big emergency response and an even bigger crowd. they don't rate its chances too much. i don't know what the tides are like, but there's a lot of shallows, as well. the tide seems up at the moment, but, yes, it is probably going to be a sad outcome, i think. i hope he's going to be ok. it's heartbreaking if you think they're in danger. _ but as day turned to night, the rescue continued. on land, the police controlled the crowds. in the water, the fire brigade and rnli looked after the whale. they have taken it to an area where there is no tide, in a secure area, so they can work on the whale, make sure it's calm and make sure that the best
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interests are taken for the animal. unfortunately the transportation of the whale to a safe place didn't quite go to plan, and about one mile up the river in around the isleworth area, the whale got agitated and came free from its inflatable cushions. the london port authority are now asking for anybody who may have seen the whale to please get in touch with them, as they want to find it and assess it. matt graveling, bbc news. well, our correspondent tim muffett is there for us now. what's the latest tim? indeed, he is still nursing. this is the spot where the rescue attempts were made. the wail was taken up from these ramps. as he was being pulled away up river that is when he has broken free. the port of london authorities say there have been unconfirmed sightings of the wail. they are not confirmed yet tend to
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be honest, it is quite difficult if you just see a glance of something in the water to know whether or not thatis in the water to know whether or not that is this particular wail. so they're looking into those sightings. as we heard in the report to the wail was taken up forever that way towards the sea, effectively. these sightings have been between here and teddington which is actually downriver so clearly the animal is swimming around somewhere in this area and no one quite knows where. there was a lot of concern about its well—being. many people have stressed it is really not in condition so they are very very worried about its welfare. yesterday there were crowds of people gathering and they really urge people to move away because they didn't want to upset the animal any more. we have seen wales and the terms before, haven't we? there was a bottlenose whale famously swum in the centre of london. this is much further. this is 90 miles away from the scene the port of london authority believe this is the furthest a wail has ever swum. the
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riori is furthest a wail has ever swum. the priority is to _ furthest a wail has ever swum. the priority is to move the wail to deeper water. other tides working against that? it is deeper water. other tides working against that?— against that? it is no tide at the moment and — against that? it is no tide at the moment and high _ against that? it is no tide at the moment and high tide - against that? it is no tide at the moment and high tide is - against that? it is no tide at the l moment and high tide is expected around 330 so that could have an effect. it is hoped. obviously it is a very strong tide in the thames and i will clearly have some impact on where the animal ears but as you say, there was a lot of concern about its well—being and really the facts it was this far upriver in the first place clearly it was distressed. there was hope that when a rescue attempt got under way it was being able to be pulled away to safety and be assessed that this was going to have a happy ending but there's quite a bit of concern about whether they can indeed find the animal and treated. trier? whether they can indeed find the animal and treated. very quickly, it is obviously — animal and treated. very quickly, it is obviously completely _ animal and treated. very quickly, it is obviously completely off - animal and treated. very quickly, it is obviously completely off course. | is obviously completely off course. this wail be right now?— this wail be right now? typically ou find this wail be right now? typically you find them — this wail be right now? typically you find them in _ this wail be right now? typically you find them in the _ this wail be right now? typically you find them in the north - this wail be right now? typically i you find them in the north atlantic and the pacific so it is way off course, as you say. to have swum all
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the way from the north sea through central london and where we are now by richmond, 90 miles or so from the sea. a very very long way. writers here, people really don't know. there are lots of theories but the time being the priority is to try and spot the creature, get it to safety and give it the treatment it clearly needs.— clearly needs. thank you for that u date. thank you for that update. now it's time for a look at the weather with carol kirkwood. hello again. this week really we're looking at unsettled week, forecast to be one of sunshine and showers. some of the showers will be heavy and thundery, some of them with hail, today blustery around the showers in england and wales in particular, where we could have gusts of wind as much as a0 mph. we have also got rain pushing up the north sea getting into the northern isles. showers continuing in the west. some getting over towards the east. and as i mentioned, some heavy with hail and thunder. it should dry up later on across parts of the south east and southern england. gusty around those showers, temperatures today 9—17 . as we head on through the evening
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and overnight, some of the showers will fade but some will merge to give some longer spells of rain across northern ireland, pushing on across parts of scotland where we still have some rain in the north. a lot of dry weather, though, and not a cold night. those are our overnight lows, sevens and eights, so no issues with frosts tonight, in fact, no issues with frost this week. low pressure still very much driving our weather tomorrow. the showers still rotating around it in an anticlockwise direction. they have been coming in from the south—west pushing north—eastwards and then there's another system waiting in the wings from the south—west for wednesday. you can see the effect on the temperatures, still in this and milder air around the area of low pressure, so temperatures are still roughly where they should be at this stage in may. so for tuesday's forecast we start off on a largely dry note, then all the showers come in from the south—west pushing north—eastwards. we've still got some rain across the north. but in between there will be some bright skies, or indeed some sunshine with highs 10—16.
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moving on through the week, we still have that combination of bright skies, sunshine and showers, but you can see very little system coming on across the south—west, bringing in some more persistent rain across the isles of scilly, the channel islands, devon and cornwall. but there will still be some sunshine to look forward to during the course of wednesday and temperatures again roughly where they should be at this time of year, 10—16 , north to south. as we head on towards the latter part of this working week, we continue with the unsettled theme. and in fact, we still are looking at sunshine and showers. one change is it would be quite as windy as it is going to be at the start of the week and temperatures slipping slightly.
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this is bbc news, the headlines... the prime minister is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england — with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. a shake—up in labour's top team — after the party's disappointing election results in england. the newly re—elected manchester mayor says the party needs to stop the infighting within its ranks. labour's got to stop this sort of internalfocus, you know, the civil war between those on the left of the party, those on the right of the party. it'sjust, from my point of view, that's absolutely pointless and disruptive. nicola sturgeon says the snp�*s win in the scottish elections means a second independence referendum
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is a "matter of when, not if". meanwhile, former premier lister gordon brown has been making the case for the defence of the union. i'm at the scottish parliament, where today we are asking how ready really are both sides to put the question of independence to the voters again? the family of a woman who died after errors in assessing her benefits are to bring legal action against the government. dozens of people have been injured in fresh clashes between israeli police and palestinians injerusalem, ahead of a planned jewish nationalist march. a cyber attack has shut down the largest fuel pipeline in the us. fuel prices are on the rise after the colonial pipeline was completely knocked offline. a whale — stranded in the river thames — has escaped from rescuers as they tried to take it to safety.
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good afternoon, welcome to bbc news. ministers are meeting this morning to discuss whether to proceed with the next stage of lockdown easing in england. borisjohnson will hold a press conference at five o'clock — when he is expected to say, the data supports a further relaxing of the measures. pubs, restaurants and other hospitality are set to re—open on may 17th — as well as venues such as cinemas and soft play areas. and it's also thought the prime minister will announce that it's "ok" to hug
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friends and family — after the government said it wanted to see "friendly contact" between people restored. speaking this morning the health minister, nadine dorries, said it was important the right balance was struck. caution is the byword. the data is excellent but the prime minister will set out where we are going next. but caution over arches everything that we do and we think about in terms of easement of the road map. we do have variants of concern on one hand, on the other hand we have the capacity to lateral flow twice test everybody in the uk and we have the capacity to surge test in localised areas where we see those variants of concern and where we know problems may be rising. so we have that in our armoury now, which we never had before. but we still need to be cautious. we're incredibly aware that everybody wants to get together, that people want to hug each other, that people want to entertain in their own homes. because we all want to do that and we understand that, and that is why we have a road map that
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people can follow, and that's why we can see those steps very clearly in front of us. we will be getting there, we will be moving along that road map, the prime minister will be announcing this afternoon the next stage, but the important thing is that we are all aware that as we move into each step of easement that there may be an increase in the _ variants or there may be an increase in the virus, and our objective is to nail that virus, to make sure that we are never, as a country, in the position we were last year again. and that we move out of this cautiously and safely. susan michie is professor of health psychology and director of the centre for behaviour change at university college london. thank you very much for speaking to us. what do you make of this next step in the easing of restrictions? how do you see it playing out? i
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how do you see it playing out? i think with the hugging, people are obviously— think with the hugging, people are obviously desperate to huddle up once again, it's incredibly important. think about who the most important _ important. think about who the most important people you want to hug, because _ important people you want to hug, because the reality is that the more people _ because the reality is that the more people you — because the reality is that the more people you hog, the more likely you are to _ people you hog, the more likely you are to pass— people you hog, the more likely you are to pass on infection or get infected _ are to pass on infection or get infected. so think about the key people — infected. so think about the key people you want to hug, then think about— people you want to hug, then think about where you hug them, it's much safer to _ about where you hug them, it's much safer to do _ about where you hug them, it's much safer to do than indoors. and think about— safer to do than indoors. and think about how— safer to do than indoors. and think about how you do it. if you put your hands _ about how you do it. if you put your hands behind someone's shoulders and you look— hands behind someone's shoulders and you look away from them, and they look away _ you look away from them, and they look away from you, as you hug, then you won't— look away from you, as you hug, then you won't have face—to—face contact. if you won't have face—to—face contact. if someone _ you won't have face—to—face contact. if someone is— you won't have face—to—face contact. if someone is infectious, and remember ao% if someone is infectious, and rememberao% are if someone is infectious, and remember ao% are infectious without knowing _ remember ao% are infectious without knowing they are, if you are looking in another— knowing they are, if you are looking in another direction so they are not breathing _ in another direction so they are not breathing into your face, then it is much _ breathing into your face, then it is much less— breathing into your face, then it is much less risky. the other thing is, really— much less risky. the other thing is, really be _ much less risky. the other thing is, really be aware of who has been vaccinated. if you have had both of your doses — vaccinated. if you have had both of your doses of vaccination, the
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person— your doses of vaccination, the person you are hugging has, it's obviously— person you are hugging has, it's obviously much, much safer than if that is— obviously much, much safer than if that is not— obviously much, much safer than if that is not the case. i think the thing _ that is not the case. i think the thing to— that is not the case. i think the thing to do— that is not the case. i think the thing to do now is to take a risk management approach to all of our behaviours. you also asked about staying _ behaviours. you also asked about staying over indoors. actually, i think— staying over indoors. actually, i think that — staying over indoors. actually, i think that is potentially more risky. — think that is potentially more risky, because as evidence has been accumulated, the importance of the aerosol— accumulated, the importance of the aerosol transmission, tiny droplets that hang _ aerosol transmission, tiny droplets that hang around in the air for many hours. _ that hang around in the air for many hours. has — that hang around in the air for many hours, has become more evident. and this means _ hours, has become more evident. and this means that if somebody was to be infected and is sharing the same space _ be infected and is sharing the same space then — be infected and is sharing the same space then that is increasing risk. in space then that is increasing risk. in those _ space then that is increasing risk. in those situations, if you are taking — in those situations, if you are taking that risk, do make sure that you open— taking that risk, do make sure that you open windows and open doors. ventilation— you open windows and open doors. ventilation is key. it�*s you open windows and open doors. ventilation is key.— ventilation is key. it's fascinating the way you _ ventilation is key. it's fascinating the way you have _ ventilation is key. it's fascinating the way you have laid _ ventilation is key. it's fascinating the way you have laid it - ventilation is key. it's fascinating the way you have laid it out. - ventilation is key. it's fascinating | the way you have laid it out. many people, though, it will sound confusing. and a hug is a hug. do you think this is coming too soon?
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do you think we should have waited a bit longer? irate do you think we should have waited a bit loner? ~ . ., do you think we should have waited a bit loner? ~ . . _, , bit longer? we are in a complicated situation. the _ bit longer? we are in a complicated situation. the vaccination _ bit longer? we are in a complicated situation. the vaccination roll-out l situation. the vaccination roll—out is going _ situation. the vaccination roll—out is going incredibly well with really -ood is going incredibly well with really good results, we can really see huge reductions— good results, we can really see huge reductions in hospitalisations and deaths _ reductions in hospitalisations and deaths. the number of new transmissions is pretty static and has been — transmissions is pretty static and has been for quite a while. but the vaccination — has been for quite a while. but the vaccination roll—out is good news. but on _ vaccination roll—out is good news. but on the — vaccination roll—out is good news. but on the other hand, unfortunately, the variant that was identified _ unfortunately, the variant that was identified in india, e 16172, is taking — identified in india, e 16172, is taking hold in communities. across london. _ taking hold in communities. across london. we — taking hold in communities. across london, we have several pockets come across _ london, we have several pockets come across the _ london, we have several pockets come across the whole country, and there are outbreaks. the other worrying thing _ are outbreaks. the other worrying thing about that is the doubling rate appears to be every week. we have two _ rate appears to be every week. we have two things going on. in those circumstances, we just need to carry on being _
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circumstances, we just need to carry on being cautious. it is such a shame — on being cautious. it is such a shame to _ on being cautious. it is such a shame to their away all the games we've _ shame to their away all the games we've got— shame to their away all the games we've got byjust rushing anything too quickly. and we have seen the tragic— too quickly. and we have seen the tragic situation in india, how this virus _ tragic situation in india, how this virus can— tragic situation in india, how this virus canjust get tragic situation in india, how this virus can just get out of control very— virus can just get out of control very quickly. this is why i'm saying. _ very quickly. this is why i'm saying. if— very quickly. this is why i'm saying, if these restrictions are to be lifted. — saying, if these restrictions are to be lifted. it— saying, if these restrictions are to be lifted, it doesn't mean that there — be lifted, it doesn't mean that there is— be lifted, it doesn't mean that there is a _ be lifted, it doesn't mean that there is a light switch, you go from off to _ there is a light switch, you go from off to on. _ there is a light switch, you go from off to on, you suddenly go around hugging _ off to on, you suddenly go around hugging everybody. all i'm saying is, hugging everybody. all i'm saying is. the _ hugging everybody. all i'm saying is, the very careful, the very cautious. _ is, the very careful, the very cautious, think about who, how often. — cautious, think about who, how often, where you do any of these things— often, where you do any of these things that brings you into close contact — things that brings you into close contact with other people. this must have been a — contact with other people. this must have been a fascinating _ contact with other people. this must have been a fascinating 12 _ contact with other people. this must have been a fascinating 12 months i have been a fascinating 12 months for you, observing human behaviour like this and studying the implications of it as well. once we start these small steps in human contact, in terms of risk management, what would be the most risky behaviour that would raise the
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most concern for you?— most concern for you? being in crowded unventilated _ most concern for you? being in crowded unventilated indoor i most concern for you? being in - crowded unventilated indoor spaces. those _ crowded unventilated indoor spaces. those have — crowded unventilated indoor spaces. those have been shown to be the most risky place _ those have been shown to be the most risky place. and we are coming to a situation _ risky place. and we are coming to a situation where we are going to be able to— situation where we are going to be able to go— situation where we are going to be able to go into pubs, restaurants, theatres. — able to go into pubs, restaurants, theatres, cinemas. the important thing _ theatres, cinemas. the important thing is _ theatres, cinemas. the important thinq is to— theatres, cinemas. the important thing is tojust theatres, cinemas. the important thing is to just check out how crowded _ thing is to just check out how crowded it is and the extent of ventilation. if you are sitting in a pup ventilation. if you are sitting in a pup with — ventilation. if you are sitting in a pup with the windows and doors open, not a big _ pup with the windows and doors open, not a big problem. if you are in a crowded — not a big problem. if you are in a crowded indoor space where there is no obvious— crowded indoor space where there is no obvious ventilation, that is a bil no obvious ventilation, that is a big problem. one of the tricky things. — big problem. one of the tricky things. i— big problem. one of the tricky things, i think, big problem. one of the tricky things, ithink, is how big problem. one of the tricky things, i think, is how do we tell what _ things, i think, is how do we tell what is _ things, i think, is how do we tell what is a — things, i think, is how do we tell what is a well ventilated building and what's not? because with modern ventilation. _ and what's not? because with modern ventilation, sometimes the ventilation, sometimes the ventilation system isn't obvious. ideally. — ventilation system isn't obvious. ideally. i— ventilation system isn't obvious. ideally, i would like some kind of sign. _ ideally, i would like some kind of sign. just— ideally, i would like some kind of sign, just as we had the hygiene ratings — sign, just as we had the hygiene ratings in — sign, just as we had the hygiene ratings in restaurants and pubs to
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be publicly— ratings in restaurants and pubs to be publicly displayed, it would be really— be publicly displayed, it would be really good to have the information about _ really good to have the information about any— really good to have the information about any of the buildings that we are going — about any of the buildings that we are going to go into. in terms of how— are going to go into. in terms of how well— are going to go into. in terms of how well ventilated it is or not. i certainly— how well ventilated it is or not. i certainly would be very hesitant about _ certainly would be very hesitant about going into indoor spaces when i felt about going into indoor spaces when i felt there _ about going into indoor spaces when i felt there might be a chance of it is not _ i felt there might be a chance of it is not being well ventilated. canl is not being well ventilated. can i 'ust 'um is not being well ventilated. can i justjump in _ is not being well ventilated. can i justjump in very _ is not being well ventilated. can i justjump in very quickly, - is not being well ventilated. can i just jump in very quickly, because justjump in very quickly, because this may change what you are thinking or your lines of thought at the moment. we arejust hearing thinking or your lines of thought at the moment. we are just hearing that the moment. we are just hearing that the uk chief medical officers, nhs england national medical director, have advised in the light of the most recent data that the uk alert level should move from level four to level should move from level four to level three. let mejust level should move from level four to level three. let me just reduce some of what they are saying, "thanks to the efforts of the uk public in social distancing, and the impact we are starting to see from the vaccination programme, case numbers,
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deaths and covid hospital pressures have fallen consistently. however, covid still circulating for people and catching and spreading the virus every day we all need to continue to be vigilant. this remains a major pandemic locally." —— globally. does that change anything of what you have been thinking and saying? h0. have been thinking and saying? no, it doesn't. have been thinking and saying? no, it doesn't- l — have been thinking and saying? no, it doesn't. i think all i'm saying is that— it doesn't. i think all i'm saying is that whatever the change in restrictions is, everybody should try to _ restrictions is, everybody should try to take — restrictions is, everybody should try to take responsibility for being as cautious as possible. we have to remind _ as cautious as possible. we have to remind ourselves that not only do we have these _ remind ourselves that not only do we have these new variants, and these are more _ have these new variants, and these are more infectious and they can take _ are more infectious and they can take off— are more infectious and they can take off quite quickly, but our test. — take off quite quickly, but our test, trace and isolate system still isn't functioning well, and that is a cornerstone of managing these outbreaks, which are happening. schools— outbreaks, which are happening. schools are already closing with
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outbreaks of this new variant. and border— outbreaks of this new variant. and border control system is quite leaky~ — border control system is quite leaky~ if — border control system is quite leaky. if you take all of these things— leaky. if you take all of these things into consideration, then yes, of course. _ things into consideration, then yes, of course. if— things into consideration, then yes, of course, if everybody comes together. _ of course, if everybody comes together, all of the scientists say this is— together, all of the scientists say this is the — together, all of the scientists say this is the next stage, we should go to it _ this is the next stage, we should go to it what— this is the next stage, we should go to it what i— this is the next stage, we should go to it. what i should say is, actually. _ to it. what i should say is, actually, as the british public have done _ actually, as the british public have done all— actually, as the british public have done all the way along, they have interpreted the rules according to their own — interpreted the rules according to their own situations primarily, not everybody. — their own situations primarily, not everybody, but the great majority of people _ everybody, but the great majority of people actually have been quite cautious — people actually have been quite cautious. but we need the information so that people can think about. _ information so that people can think about. is— information so that people can think about, is this setting risky, also began _ about, is this setting risky, also began asking people, have you been vaccinated. — began asking people, have you been vaccinated, have you had two vaccinations? because that could change _ vaccinations? because that could change the way people with interact in terms _ change the way people with interact in terms of— change the way people with interact in terms of how close they would get to somebody. because nobody wants to be unwittingly spreading this horrible disease.—
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be unwittingly spreading this horrible disease. thank you very much for that. _ horrible disease. thank you very much for that. thank _ horrible disease. thank you very much for that. thank you. - horrible disease. thank you very much for that. thank you. let'sl horrible disease. thank you very i much for that. thank you. let's just remind our audience of the latest line coming to us. following guidance from the uk chief medical officers and nhs england national medical director. the alert level for the uk regarding covid—19 and the pandemic, they are saying should be moved from level four to level three. this is following advice in light of the most recent data. so the uk alert level is moving from level four to level three. it'll be interesting to see what the prime minister says about this later today. 5pm, there will be a press conference, and we will bring that to you then. that will get the latest data on the pandemic. also, coming to us, the latest breaking news, we understand that boris johnson is to be investigated by the mp standards watchdog over the
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funding of his caribbean holiday in late 2019. that will be conducted by katherine stone, who is confirmed the investigation. we will have more of this coming up right here on bbc news, don't go away. the labour leader, sir keir starmer, says he hopes his "refreshed and renewed" frontbench team will help the party bounce back, after poor local election results in england. among the changes — angela rayner, the deputy leader, was sacked from her role as party chair on saturday, before being handed more senior roles last night. anneliese dodds lost herjob as shadow chancellor — she takes up the position of party chair in place of ms rayner. ms dodds was replaced as shadow chancellor by rachel reeves. and wes streeting, considered to be a strong media performer, was promoted to the shadow cabinet, in charge of the child poverty brief.
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andy burnham was re—elected as the labour mayor of greater manchester over the weekend. he described the so—called "civil war" within the labour party as pointless and destructive. labour's got to stop this civil war between those on the left and those on the right of the party. from my point of view, that is absolutely pointless and disruptive. we have got a fantastic vision here in greater manchester. this is labour in power showing what we can do. buses under public control. these are labour policies. is it not time the party started celebrating these things?
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we have got a new woman mayor in west yorkshire. labour mayor is elected at the weekend, and across the country there are now ten. labour has been way too lukewarm about english devolution so far, i did now enthusiastically needs to get behind it. the party this morning, the shadow cabinet, everybody, needs to listen what the public were saying at the weekend. they like devolution here, they want more of it. and the party now needs to listen to that and show that it understands it. our political correspondent helen catt explained how important the reshuffle was. not a major overhaul, not a major reshuffle, but it took a very long time to announce from that first news coming out on saturday night about angela rayner being removed from her position as party chair and in charge of running campaigns. it was then about 24 hours before the news came out of what herjob was then going to be. what that did was to allow this feeling that there is a dispute between sir keir starmer and angela rayner to develop, it gave
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a of space for the critics of keir starmer to come out and really dominates the _ airwaves while that was happening, so there are some concerns in the party about how that was handled, the politics of it, the political management, and there is a bit of frustration as you heard in andy brennan's clip that that also overshadows some of those better results for labour that they saw over the weekend, with things like the election of tracy brabin to the _ west yorkshire mayoralty. well, many labour mps have also this morning been speaking about the move forward. "we need to move forward now." when we look at that reshuffle, is there any indication of the direction that sir keir starmer wants to move in? absolutely, they want to move forward. and actually, they've got to move forward pretty swiftly, too. because one of the consequences of tracy brabin winning the mayor of west yorkshire is that she is stepping down as an mp in westminster. of course, what does that mean? that means another by—election. it is a seat that labour has held for about 20 years,
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but in 2019 the majority was pretty slim, so it's going to be another very swift electoral test that sir keir starmer and his new team are going to have to face. now, we've heard a lot of talk from them about listening to voters, about changing, about moving and engaging with communities. i think the question is going to be, how much can they do that before they have to go into this next electoral test, and where do they then go after that? more from her later, i'm sure. sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon.
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uefa is set to decide by wednesday whether to switch the champions league final to wembley. the match between manchester city and chelsea is scheduled to be played in istanbul on sat may 29th, but the uk government has placed turkey on the red list for international travel. players involved in the final would need to quarantine at a government—approved hotel for 10 days on their return — potentially imnpacting on their preparation for the delayed euro 2020. a wembley champions league final would require the uk government to be flexible in allowing people into england, given the various stakeholders who would expect to attend. england rugby has confirmed three home mens matches this summer. an england side will face scotland in leicester on sunday the 27th ofjune, then eddiejones�* side will play tests at twickenham against the usa on sunday ath july and canada on saturday 10 july. fans will be admitted for the first time since december, with at least 10,000 able to attend each match at twickenham. he's had a great clay court season so far — but dan evans has lost in the opening round of
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the rome masters this morning after being beaten by america's taylor fritz in straight sets. the british number one, ranked a career high 26th, beat novak djokovic in monte carlo on his way to the semis. he reached the last 16 in madrid last week. but a first round defeat for him here in rome as he lost 6—3, 6—2 to fritz who is ranked five places below him in the world. australia have started vaccinating their athletes against covid—19, ahead of this summer's olympics and paralympics. the country has been slow to roll out the vaccine for the general population, but have decided to let their athletes jump the queue to give them what they say is "comfort and certainty" in their final preparations for the games in tokyo. olympic swimmer cate campbell was among the first to receive the vaccine. it's a huge weight off your shoulders to be able to have access to this _ shoulders to be able to have access to this vaccine. i want to thank the federal— to this vaccine. i want to thank the federal government for allowing us to have _ federal government for allowing us to have this extra line of protection, because we are going into a _ protection, because we are going into a pretty unknown situation over into a pretty unknown situation over in tokyo. _ into a pretty unknown situation over in tokyo. so— into a pretty unknown situation over in tokyo, so to have this little
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band-aid _ in tokyo, so to have this little band—aid is a huge weight of everyone's shoulders. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the re—elected first minister of scotland, nicola sturgeon, has told borisjohnson that another vote on scottish independence is inevitable. the snp leader also suggested that she could begin the process as early as next spring. my colleague, annita mcveigh, is outside holyrood this morning. thank you. well, alongside that messaging from nicola sturgeon yesterday saying as regards another referendum, it is when, not if. today we have former prime minister gordon brown making the case for the union. and let mejust quote gordon brown making the case for the union. and let me just quote some of what he said, warning borisjohnson against what gordon brown calls, " muscular unionism stop". nicola
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sturgeon was talking yesterday about possibly bringing forward a referendum bill, potentially as soon as next spring. so no time to be lost for either side in beginning to make their cases again. let's hear a little bit more about what gordon brown has been saying. irate little bit more about what gordon brown has been saying.— little bit more about what gordon brown has been saying. we got to get around a table — brown has been saying. we got to get around a table and _ brown has been saying. we got to get around a table and see _ brown has been saying. we got to get around a table and see what - brown has been saying. we got to get around a table and see what can - brown has been saying. we got to get around a table and see what can be i around a table and see what can be done _ around a table and see what can be done boris— around a table and see what can be done. borisjohnson should offer a permanent— done. borisjohnson should offer a permanent forum, discussing all of the big _ permanent forum, discussing all of the big issues of the day. and an investigation into what independence means _ investigation into what independence means his _ investigation into what independence means. his muscular unionism just won't _ means. his muscular unionism just won't work. — means. his muscular unionism just won't work, project fear won't work. he has— won't work, project fear won't work. he has got— won't work, project fear won't work. he has got to change, he's got to realise _ he has got to change, he's got to realise that there is a big change for constitutional change. he's got to realise — for constitutional change. he's got to realise that there is a no forum for cooperation, so there is a stand-off— for cooperation, so there is a stand—off between scotland and the
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rest of _ stand—off between scotland and the rest of the uk. he's got to recognise that if he needs to explain — recognise that if he needs to explain the benefits of the united kingdom, he has got to go out and do it and _ kingdom, he has got to go out and do it and show— kingdom, he has got to go out and do it and show how independence just won't _ it and show how independence just won't work — it and show how independence just won't work. you got a political promise — won't work. you got a political promise nicola sturgeon has made without— promise nicola sturgeon has made without legal backing. and i think you've _ without legal backing. and i think you've got — without legal backing. and i think you've got to get around the table to sort _ you've got to get around the table to sort this — you've got to get around the table to sort this out. this cannot be sorted — to sort this out. this cannot be sorted out _ to sort this out. this cannot be sorted out in the courts. the cuts will tell— sorted out in the courts. the cuts will tell you — sorted out in the courts. the cuts will tell you what you can do, but you've _ will tell you what you can do, but you've got — will tell you what you can do, but you've got to work out what you can do by _ you've got to work out what you can do by negotiation and discussion. nick. _ do by negotiation and discussion. nick. what — do by negotiation and discussion. nick, what do you think this is going to look like? i nick, what do you think this is going to look like?— going to look like? i think the otential going to look like? i think the potential clash _ going to look like? i think the potential clash between - going to look like? i think the l potential clash between london going to look like? i think the - potential clash between london and edinburgh _ potential clash between london and edinburgh is — potential clash between london and edinburgh is going _ potential clash between london and edinburgh is going to _ potential clash between london and edinburgh is going to be _ potential clash between london and edinburgh is going to be a - potential clash between london and edinburgh is going to be a slow- edinburgh is going to be a slow burner. — edinburgh is going to be a slow burner, frankly. _ edinburgh is going to be a slow burner, frankly. nicola - edinburgh is going to be a slow. burner, frankly. nicola sturgeon's team _ burner, frankly. nicola sturgeon's team are — burner, frankly. nicola sturgeon's team are adamant _ burner, frankly. nicola sturgeon's team are adamant that _ burner, frankly. nicola sturgeon's team are adamant that the - burner, frankly. nicola sturgeon's team are adamant that the first i team are adamant that the first hundred — team are adamant that the first hundred days— team are adamant that the first hundred days of— team are adamant that the first hundred days of the _ team are adamant that the first hundred days of the new - team are adamant that the first - hundred days of the new government
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is going _ hundred days of the new government is going to _ hundred days of the new government is going to be — hundred days of the new government is going to be about— hundred days of the new government is going to be about pandemic- is going to be about pandemic recovery _ is going to be about pandemic recovery but _ is going to be about pandemic recovery. but after— is going to be about pandemic recovery. but after that, - is going to be about pandemic| recovery. but after that, there is going to be about pandemic. recovery. but after that, there is definitely— recovery. but after that, there is definitely going _ recovery. but after that, there is definitely going to _ recovery. but after that, there is definitely going to be _ recovery. but after that, there is definitely going to be a - recovery. but after that, there is definitely going to be a clash. i recovery. but after that, there is. definitely going to be a clash. and you can _ definitely going to be a clash. and you can see — definitely going to be a clash. and you can see at— definitely going to be a clash. and you can see at the _ definitely going to be a clash. and you can see at the moment - definitely going to be a clash. and you can see at the moment that i definitely going to be a clash. and i you can see at the moment that both sides are _ you can see at the moment that both sides are happy— you can see at the moment that both sides are happy to— you can see at the moment that both sides are happy to leave _ you can see at the moment that both sides are happy to leave it _ you can see at the moment that both sides are happy to leave it to - you can see at the moment that both sides are happy to leave it to the i sides are happy to leave it to the medium — sides are happy to leave it to the medium term _ sides are happy to leave it to the medium term. there _ sides are happy to leave it to the medium term. there are - sides are happy to leave it to the medium term. there are a i sides are happy to leave it to the i medium term. there are a couple of reasons— medium term. there are a couple of reasons for— medium term. there are a couple of reasons for that. _ medium term. there are a couple of reasons for that. one _ medium term. there are a couple of reasons for that. one is _ medium term. there are a couple of reasons for that. one is exactly i reasons for that. one is exactly what _ reasons for that. one is exactly what you — reasons for that. one is exactly what you just _ reasons for that. one is exactly what you just heard _ reasons for that. one is exactly what you just heard from i reasons for that. one is exactly. what you just heard from gordon brown _ what you just heard from gordon brown it— what you just heard from gordon brown it is— what you just heard from gordon brown. it is that _ what you just heard from gordon brown. it is that tension - what you just heard from gordon brown. it is that tension within i what you just heard from gordon i brown. it is that tension within the unionist _ brown. it is that tension within the unionist movement. _ brown. it is that tension within the unionist movement. boris - brown. it is that tension within the unionist movement. borisjohnson unionist movement. boris johnson wanting _ unionist movement. boris johnson wanting to — unionist movement. boris johnson wanting to talk _ unionist movement. borisjohnson wanting to talk a _ unionist movement. borisjohnson wanting to talk a lot _ unionist movement. borisjohnson wanting to talk a lot more - unionist movement. borisjohnson wanting to talk a lot more about i unionist movement. borisjohnson. wanting to talk a lot more about the uk government's— wanting to talk a lot more about the uk government's role _ wanting to talk a lot more about the uk government's role in— wanting to talk a lot more about the uk government's role in scotland, l uk government's role in scotland, wanting _ uk government's role in scotland, wanting to — uk government's role in scotland, wanting to spend _ uk government's role in scotland, wanting to spend money— uk government's role in scotland, wanting to spend money here, i uk government's role in scotland, i wanting to spend money here, wanting to put— wanting to spend money here, wanting to put more _ wanting to spend money here, wanting to put more flags — wanting to spend money here, wanting to put more flags on _ wanting to spend money here, wanting to put more flags on things. _ wanting to spend money here, wanting to put more flags on things. gordon. to put more flags on things. gordon brown _ to put more flags on things. gordon brown saying. — to put more flags on things. gordon brown saying. it _ to put more flags on things. gordon brown saying, it ain't _ to put more flags on things. gordon brown saying, it ain't going - to put more flags on things. gordon brown saying, it ain't going to i brown saying, it ain't going to work — brown saying, it ain't going to work you _ brown saying, it ain't going to work you can _ brown saying, it ain't going to work. you can see _ brown saying, it ain't going to work. you can see that - brown saying, it ain't going to work. you can see that therei brown saying, it ain't going toi work. you can see that there is brown saying, it ain't going to i work. you can see that there is a bil work. you can see that there is a big disagreement— work. you can see that there is a big disagreement there - work. you can see that there is a big disagreement there about i work. you can see that there is a i big disagreement there about what the strategy— big disagreement there about what the strategy to— big disagreement there about what the strategy to keep _ big disagreement there about what the strategy to keep the _ big disagreement there about what the strategy to keep the uk - big disagreement there about what i the strategy to keep the uk together is. the strategy to keep the uk together is 0n— the strategy to keep the uk together is on the _ the strategy to keep the uk together is. on the independent— the strategy to keep the uk together is. on the independent side, - the strategy to keep the uk together is. on the independent side, there i is. on the independent side, there are a _ is. on the independent side, there are a lot _ is. on the independent side, there are a lot of— is. on the independent side, there are a lot of questions _ is. on the independent side, there are a lot of questions to _ is. on the independent side, there are a lot of questions to be - are a lot of questions to be answered _ are a lot of questions to be answered. nicola - are a lot of questions to be answered. nicola sturgeonj are a lot of questions to be - answered. nicola sturgeon admitted time and _ answered. nicola sturgeon admitted time and time — answered. nicola sturgeon admitted time and time again— answered. nicola sturgeon admitted time and time again during - answered. nicola sturgeon admitted time and time again during the i time and time again during the election— time and time again during the election campaign— time and time again during the election campaign that - time and time again during the election campaign that she i time and time again during the election campaign that she did | time and time again during the i election campaign that she did not have all— election campaign that she did not have all of— election campaign that she did not have all of the _ election campaign that she did not have all of the answers _ election campaign that she did not have all of the answers to - election campaign that she did not have all of the answers to how i election campaign that she did not have all of the answers to how to i have all of the answers to how to keep _ have all of the answers to how to keep the — have all of the answers to how to keep the border— have all of the answers to how to keep the border with _ have all of the answers to how to keep the border with england i have all of the answers to how to i keep the border with england open if scotland _ keep the border with england open if scotland rejoins _ keep the border with england open if scotland rejoins the _ keep the border with england open if scotland rejoins the eu _ keep the border with england open if scotland rejoins the eu as _ keep the border with england open if scotland rejoins the eu as an - scotland rejoins the eu as an independent _ scotland rejoins the eu as an independent country, - scotland rejoins the eu as an independent country, how. scotland rejoins the eu as an i independent country, how quickly scotland rejoins the eu as an - independent country, how quickly you were going _ independent country, how quickly you were going to— independent country, how quickly you were going to move _ independent country, how quickly you were going to move to— independent country, how quickly you were going to move to a _ independent country, how quickly you were going to move to a new- independent country, how quickly you were going to move to a new scottish| were going to move to a new scottish
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currency~ _ were going to move to a new scottish currency the — were going to move to a new scottish currency. the economic— were going to move to a new scottish currency. the economic picture. if- currency. the economic picture. if you learned — currency. the economic picture. if you learned anything _ currency. the economic picture. if you learned anything over- currency. the economic picture. if you learned anything over the i currency. the economic picture. if you learned anything over the last year it— you learned anything over the last year it is— you learned anything over the last year it is that _ you learned anything over the last year it is that events _ you learned anything over the last year it is that events can - you learned anything over the last year it is that events can change l year it is that events can change quite _ year it is that events can change quite rapidly— year it is that events can change quite rapidly and _ year it is that events can change quite rapidly and that _ year it is that events can change quite rapidly and that means i year it is that events can change | quite rapidly and that means that the economic— quite rapidly and that means that the economic prospectus - quite rapidly and that means that the economic prospectus for i quite rapidly and that means that the economic prospectus for the i quite rapidly and that means that i the economic prospectus for the snp came up— the economic prospectus for the snp came up with — the economic prospectus for the snp came up with a — the economic prospectus for the snp came up with a couple _ the economic prospectus for the snp came up with a couple of _ the economic prospectus for the snp came up with a couple of years i the economic prospectus for the snp came up with a couple of years ago i came up with a couple of years ago is pretty— came up with a couple of years ago is pretty much— came up with a couple of years ago is pretty much out _ came up with a couple of years ago is pretty much out of— came up with a couple of years ago is pretty much out of the _ came up with a couple of years ago is pretty much out of the window. is pretty much out of the window now _ is pretty much out of the window now they— is pretty much out of the window now. they need _ is pretty much out of the window now. they need to _ is pretty much out of the window now. they need to rethink i is pretty much out of the window now. they need to rethink it. i is pretty much out of the window. now. they need to rethink it. don't expect— now. they need to rethink it. don't expect this — now. they need to rethink it. don't expect this independence - now. they need to rethink it. don't i expect this independence referendum to happen _ expect this independence referendum to happen in — expect this independence referendum to happen in the — expect this independence referendum to happen in the next _ expect this independence referendum to happen in the next 2—3 _ expect this independence referendum to happen in the next 2—3 years. i expect this independence referendum to happen in the next 2—3 years. do . to happen in the next 2—3 years. do you expect — to happen in the next 2—3 years. do you wed in — to happen in the next 2—3 years. do you exoect in the _ to happen in the next 2—3 years. do you expect in the medium—term - to happen in the next 2—3 years. do you expect in the medium—term fori you expect in the medium—term for those _ you expect in the medium—term for those clashes — you expect in the medium—term for those clashes to _ you expect in the medium—term for those clashes to start _ you expect in the medium—term for those clashes to start happening. . those clashes to start happening. ultimately, — those clashes to start happening. ultimately, scottish _ those clashes to start happening. ultimately, scottish politics- those clashes to start happening. ultimately, scottish politics has. ultimately, scottish politics has -ot ultimately, scottish politics has got to— ultimately, scottish politics has got to a — ultimately, scottish politics has got to a point— ultimately, scottish politics has got to a point now _ ultimately, scottish politics has got to a point now where - ultimately, scottish politics has got to a point now where it's . ultimately, scottish politics has- got to a point now where it's almost stuck _ got to a point now where it's almost stuck the _ got to a point now where it's almost stuck. the result _ got to a point now where it's almost stuck. the result of _ got to a point now where it's almost stuck. the result of the _ got to a point now where it's almost stuck. the result of the election- got to a point now where it's almost stuck. the result of the election is. stuck. the result of the election is fairly— stuck. the result of the election is fairly similar— stuck. the result of the election is fairly similarto_ stuck. the result of the election is fairly similar to the _ stuck. the result of the election is fairly similar to the 2016 - stuck. the result of the election is fairly similar to the 2016 election, | fairly similar to the 2016 election, the couhtry— fairly similar to the 2016 election, the country is _ fairly similar to the 2016 election, the country is clearly _ fairly similar to the 2016 election, the country is clearly still - fairly similar to the 2016 election, the country is clearly still split - the country is clearly still split when — the country is clearly still split when it — the country is clearly still split when it comes _ the country is clearly still split when it comes to _ the country is clearly still split when it comes to the - the country is clearly still split - when it comes to the constitution, and ttoth_ when it comes to the constitution, and both sides _ when it comes to the constitution, and both sides are _ when it comes to the constitution, and both sides are trying - when it comes to the constitution, and both sides are trying to - when it comes to the constitution, and both sides are trying to figure| and both sides are trying to figure out what — and both sides are trying to figure out what to— and both sides are trying to figure out what to do _ and both sides are trying to figure out what to do to _ and both sides are trying to figure out what to do to end _ and both sides are trying to figure out what to do to end that - and both sides are trying to figure| out what to do to end that logjam. thank _ out what to do to end that logjam. thank you — out what to do to end that logjam. thank you very _ out what to do to end that logjam. thank you very much. _ out what to do to end that logjam. thank you very much. picking - out what to do to end that logjam. thank you very much. picking up. out what to do to end that logjam. . thank you very much. picking up what nick was saying they are beyond the logical, academic, technical, legal, economic cases for independence, or for the union. ultimately it's what to do the voters think, what are the voters prepared to back or not. and i think all the parties in the scottish parliament are going to be
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listening to what voters are saying very, very carefully. do they have in appetite in the near future for another referendum when clearly scotland is still in a pandemic recovery phase. that is a question that has been put to people. tiny;t that has been put to people. they are hunting _ that has been put to people. they are hunting for— that has been put to people. they are hunting for treasure on the windswept beach in ayr. so far i've got two pennies, a 5p, a secret message in a little bottle. this election sends a message, says nicola sturgeon, that scotland has a mandate for a second independence referendum. david agrees. if there was an independence referendum tomorrow, i'd be very much for being independent and being in charge of our own destiny. so you would vote yes if there were a referendum tomorrow. and you would vote? i'm on the fence at the moment. i'm on the fence. do you guys, when you are searching through the sand here on ayr beach, ever discuss politics? not generally, no. it's like how many ring pulls did you find?
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how many bottle caps did you find? ayr saw one of the most dramatic results in this election, with the seat switching from the conservatives to the snp, who won by 170 votes. these swimmers staying cheerful, even though they are disappointed. well, i'm a tory voter, so i'm not too happy about the snp being back in. so i'm not very happy. however, you've got to go with the majority. nicola sturgeon says she wants to be the first minister to lead scotland to independence. no. personally, we wouldn't survive. so with the question of scotland's future taking off again, is there more to politics here than the constitution? is scotland like a single issue country now? i don't know if it is. we spoke about this. i think when you look at some of the feedback, it's been you either voted snp for independence, or you voted with another party for the union. and i voted labour. labour is my preference, but would still be in favour of independence. at the town's sunday market, among some, passions are running high.
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i just want to show my badge. that's all i need to say. i wear it all the time and have worn it and i will wear it for ever more until we get independence. while for others there is a weary resignation about what the next few years might hold. i think it'sjust going to overshadow everything else, but what can we do? it's another five years of it. that will be nearly two decades, won't it? just wait and see. what is this? a baby's bottle. when is that from? probably 19505, '60s. it is thoughts about the future that are the deciding factor for this pro—independence voter. i want it for my grandchildren. it's not for me, is for my grandkids. why's that? well, let's put it this way. would you be happy to let the woman next door to you to hold
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the purse strings? for everyone in favour of independence here, there is someone else who wants the union to remain. and how do you feel about the idea of another referendum? it makes me nervous. it really does make me nervous. and the fact that i just, personally, i wouldn't want to be away from the rest of great britain. i think we are better off staying united. what lies ahead is far from clear. the first minister insists the question of a referendum is now a matter of when, not if. lorna gordon, bbc news, ayr. and with me here now in edinburgh is the member of the scottish parliament, neil gray, formerly westminster mp for the party. you have tteen— westminster mp for the party. you have been having your induction this morning _ have been having your induction this morning. how's that been going? it�*s morning. how's that been going? it's been morning. how's that been going? been going morning. how's that been going? it�*s been going great. as you say, having moved from westminster to holyrood, i'm not used to working here. so it feels a little bit like coming home
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and reorienting myself with the new parliament, but the staff already in holyrood have been fantastic, well—organised, and it is great to be here. well-organised, and it is great to be here. �* , well-organised, and it is great to be here. 3 well-organised, and it is great to be here. �*, . . , ., be here. let's look at it a bit more about what — be here. let's look at it a bit more about what nicola _ be here. let's look at it a bit more about what nicola sturgeon - be here. let's look at it a bit more about what nicola sturgeon has i be here. let's look at it a bit more i about what nicola sturgeon has been saying. _ about what nicola sturgeon has been saying, obviously focusing on pandemic recovery but very clearly talking _ pandemic recovery but very clearly talking about another independence referendum again. if she was to introduce — referendum again. if she was to introduce another referendum bill, and introduce another referendum bill, end that— introduce another referendum bill, and that was passed here, what then? well, _ and that was passed here, what then? welt, then— and that was passed here, what then? well, then we move on to dealing with the referendum campaign, but first and foremost the priority is obviously dealing with the covid pandemic. and making sure that we get our recovery right. the first 100 days, 3.5 months, is going to be dealing with that. then we set out very clearly all of our priorities there. so i'm looking forward to supporting the scottish government in that ambitious programme. thereafter, scotland has a decision to make about our economic recovery and you get to take those decisions, who gets to set those priorities. is it going to be borisjohnson are the democratically elected scottish
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government?— democratically elected scottish government? , , . ., democratically elected scottish government? , . ., government? presumably want to make the case that — government? presumably want to make the case that snp _ government? presumably want to make the case that snp has _ government? presumably want to make the case that snp has handled - government? presumably want to make the case that snp has handled this, - the case that snp has handled this, can handle — the case that snp has handled this, can handle the referendum as well. what _ can handle the referendum as well. what next — can handle the referendum as well. what next in terms of looking to boris _ what next in terms of looking to borisjohnson for his what next in terms of looking to boris johnson for his response? what next in terms of looking to borisjohnson for his response? he either— borisjohnson for his response? he either accepts that, think the bill has been — either accepts that, think the bill has been passed, or he challenges it in the _ has been passed, or he challenges it in the courts. do you think that that— in the courts. do you think that that is— in the courts. do you think that that is where this could end up? | that is where this could end up? certainly that is where this could end up? i certainly hope not. any democrat that recognises the outcome and respects the outcome of elections has to respect the outcome of this one, and there is a pro—independence majority in holyrood, an overwhelming mandate for nicola sturgeon and the snp. the most ever constituency seats by a single party. there is a clear mandate for nicola sturgeon to govern on that manifesto, which included a commitment to hold an independence referendum. sol commitment to hold an independence referendum. so i think borisjohnson is going to have the questions to answer about respecting the outcome of democratic events and respecting the votes of the people of scotland.
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there is an legal argument, though, isn't there? — there is an legal argument, though, isn't there? and that may have to be resolved _ isn't there? and that may have to be resolved first, even though probably for any— resolved first, even though probably for any party, any politician, that is not _ for any party, any politician, that is not what — for any party, any politician, that is not what they want this to end up for in _ is not what they want this to end up for in the _ is not what they want this to end up for in the courts. as is not what they want this to end up for in the courts. fisl is not what they want this to end up for in the courts.— for in the courts. as i say, there are very clear— for in the courts. as i say, there are very clear mandate - for in the courts. as i say, there are very clear mandate from - for in the courts. as i say, therej are very clear mandate from the outcome of a democratic election that took place, i reiterate, on a record high turnout for holyrood, a record high turnout for holyrood, a record number of votes cast, and the snp had a landslide victory there. so i think borisjohnson is going to have to respect the outcome of that election and not take this into the courts. �* , , ._ election and not take this into the courts. �* , , . , , ,, courts. but presumably, the snp would want _ courts. but presumably, the snp would want a _ courts. but presumably, the snp would want a clear— courts. but presumably, the snp would want a clear legal- courts. but presumably, the snp would want a clear legal footing l courts. but presumably, the snp. would want a clear legal footing to proceed _ would want a clear legal footing to proceed. let's talk a little bit about — proceed. let's talk a little bit about timing if we may. crucial that you get— about timing if we may. crucial that you get the — about timing if we may. crucial that you get the timing right on this. do you get the timing right on this. do you think— you get the timing right on this. do you think next spring is overly optimistic— you think next spring is overly optimistic in terms of bringing forward —
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optimistic in terms of bringing forward a _ optimistic in terms of bringing forward a referendum bill? because, if you _ forward a referendum bill? because, if you go— forward a referendum bill? because, if you go to _ forward a referendum bill? because, if you go to early in this process, and the — if you go to early in this process, and the voters aren't quite there yet, gordon brown saying this morning — yet, gordon brown saying this morning that ao% of the electorate are undecided on the issue of independence, or staying in the union. — independence, or staying in the union. if— independence, or staying in the union, if you went to early, and you did not— union, if you went to early, and you did not get— union, if you went to early, and you did not get the vote that you wanted, _ did not get the vote that you wanted, would that be an end to the question— wanted, would that be an end to the question of— wanted, would that be an end to the question of another independence referendum? the question of another independence referendum?— question of another independence referendum? , ., ., referendum? the timing is going to be important _ referendum? the timing is going to be important about _ referendum? the timing is going to be important about making - referendum? the timing is going to be important about making sure - referendum? the timing is going to l be important about making sure that we can do this safely. we want to make sure that we get through the health impacts of the pandemic first, and then we can discuss how we want to recover from an economic perspective and make sure that the people of scotland have the choice over their future. people of scotland have the choice over theirfuture. the first minister set a target for the first part of this parliament, and if we are able to do it in that timescale i would be very happy. i look forward and relish the opportunity to be able to discuss the merits of scottish independence and the benefits that would bring to the evil of scotland.— benefits that would bring to the evil of scotland. thank you very much for your— evil of scotland. thank you very
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much for your time. _ heavily caveat being that there are many other factors to consider and front and centre of that his recovery from the pandemic. we will have more from hollywood later but right now back to the studio. we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers today. some of those showers will be heavy and thundery with the chance of some home slipping in bad too. we have already got some showers especially in western areas. they will continue to travel east and we will see home—grown ones in the east as well. rain moving up into the northern isles and gusty winds around particularly across england and wales gusting up to a0 mild an hour. temperatures 9—17. through this evening and overnight showers emerging and pushing into scotland
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where we still have some rain in the north but largely dry for the west of the uk and not a cold night. temperatures forming between about five and 9 degrees so we are not anticipating issues with frost. low pressure dominating tomorrow. showers rotating around it and not just tomorrow but into wednesday and the west of the week for that matter it remains unsettled. the forecast is sunshine and showers but not as blustery as today. hello this is bbc news. the headlines... the prime minister is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england, with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. a shake—up in labour's top team, after the party's disappointing election results in england. the newly re—elected manchester mayor, says the party needs to stop the infighting within its ranks. labour has got to stop the civil war between those on the left of the
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party and those on the right of the party. from my point of view that is absolutely pointless and disruptive. nicola sturgeon says the snp�*s win in the scottish elections means a second independence referendum is a 'matter of when, not if�*. the family of a woman who died after errors in assessing her benefits are to bring legal action against the government. police search continues at a house in aylesham, about a mile from where the body of pcso julia james was found. police have been seen examining guttering at the top of the house. a whale — stranded in the river thames — has escaped from rescuers as they tried to take it to safety. let's ta ke
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let's take you to the latest pictures of the river thames about the search is being conducted for the search is being conducted for the wail. it has gone missing again. they did manage to tie it down to one area, not literally tie it down but bring it closer to shore and hoseit but bring it closer to shore and hose it down. they were assessing it and trying to move it closer to the sea but it broke away and is now missing. in the water that we're showing you there we have sight of a vessel that was, we presume, searching for the wail. we think we saw a shadow that looked like the missing while in the water. there are a number of bodies now involved in searching for this baby wail. the royal national lifeboat institute, the rnli, also add that in marine specialists who are there as well. the concern is that it is now broken away under swimming the concern is that it is now broken away underswimming in the concern is that it is now broken away under swimming in the wrong
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direction. we believe there was a sighting a little earlier and there is concern that there are injuries that the wail has sustained. the pressure and stress is what is concerning the marine biologists. this is something that was said earlier and we understand that the wail was displaying concerning behaviours and experts were concerned that it may be unwell. a couple of hundred miles off course. it should be around the north sea or sometimes around the pacific ocean sometimes around the pacific ocean so a lot of questions as to what it is doing in the river thames and how it broke away from its powered. that, we believe, is the latest search area for the wail. has not been seen yet all found but last seen swimming upstream in the wrong direction. it was first sighted when it became stuck and this was
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richmond lock at wear and it became stuck on there and that is where we saw some officials hosing it down trying to calm it down and assess injuries and then it disappeared, broke away and disappeared. as soon as we have more on this, a lot of people are following the story, we will of course bring it to you. people are following the story, we will of course bring it to you. there have been more clashes between israeli police and hundreds of palestinians in one of the most sensitive areas ofjerusalem, following three nights of unrest. police fired stun grenades to disperse crowds in the temple mount, which is considered sacred to jews and muslims. thousands of police have been deployed across the city, ahead of a planned march, which is held each year byjewish nationalists to celebrate israel's capture of eastjerusalem in 1967. a little earlier our middle east correspondent, tom bateman, described the clashes he saw this morning. over the past three to four hours, there have been very violent confrontations right here at this
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site which lies at the heart of jerusalem's most sensitive holy areas. you can see the golden dome of the al—aqsa mosque. i came passed here before nine o'clock in the morning local time and already israeli police were firing vollies of stun grenades at palestinians who were throwing stones and rocks and other objects. that went on for two hours or so and in the meantime outside the old city walls stones were thrown by palestinians at a passing car with some israelis inside and that car lost control and crashed into a barrier, injuring one of the palestinians. and the driver himself had minor injuries as well so it has been a very tense morning. what is happening now is that palestinians are preparing for prayer again on the plaza there. wejust
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are preparing for prayer again on the plaza there. we just heard the call to prayer from the the plaza there. we just heard the call to prayerfrom the mask the plaza there. we just heard the call to prayer from the mask which suggests a lull though we have had a few volleys of stun grenades near the religious shrine as well. so i think, know, we are in a moment where we have waiting for the flag parade in the afternoon. whether or not it will go to sensitive areas of the old city remains to be seen but certainly people are fearful of the volatile mix here. detectives have been granted more time to question a man over the murder of a police community support officer in kent. julia james was attacked while walking her dog near her home on april the 27th. police have until tonight to question the man, who comes from the canterbury area. our correspondent, simonjones, is in kent with the latest. this is day 1a of the murder investigation. officers arrested a man on friday evening at around 9:30pm, he is in his 20s and from the canterbury area. yesterday lunchtime, police were given more time to question him on an additional 36 hours. that pretty much takes them up
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to the end of today. at that point the police will have to decide whether to charge him, whether to release him, or whether to ask for a final 2a hours to question him. there's no letup in the police activity around this area. just down the road from here, officers stand guard outside a house in aylesham. yesterday we saw forensic teams coming and going from the property. they were searching through a skip outside the house. through the garden, they were lifting up the paving slabs. police haven't said how this has belongs to but it does form part of this investigation. now, julia james was killed almost two weeks ago. she had been working from home that day. she took her dog toby for a walk when she was attacked. she suffered serious head injuries. people in this area still remain concerned. officers are advising them when they go out to make sure they have their phones with them, to make sure they tell someone where exactly they are going and how long they are expected to be gone for. julia james's say are keeping all fingers crossed just in the hope
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that there will be some positive developments in this case. police have actually searching the guttering at the house which is an able shim, which is all part of the investigation into the murder of julia james. more on that as we get it. the family of a woman who died after errors in assessing her benefits are to bring legal action against the government. the bbc has found that the death of philippa day in 2019 was one of at least 150 cases the department for work and pensions has reviewed in recent years — following claims their processes had contributed to the death or injury of claimants. here's our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan. i am in so much debt, i have nothing to eat. philippa pleaded with benefits
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officials for help. her money had been cut. they insisted she cannot have a benefits assessment at home so in despair the 27—year—old mother took a fatal overdose leaving her sister to fight her case. it was absolutely preventable. it was due to the impact of the claim. the coroner said claiming benefit should not be a risk to life and it was. an inquest found 28 hours in the processing of her application. the family are suing the department for work and pensions. there were systemic issues which had not been
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addressed for a long time. as it was not first to die, she was one of many. and clearly lessons have not been learned. per death is one of scores that families have blamed on the stresses of the benefit system including ten, david and jodie. research by the bbc found that at least 150 reviews of death or serious harm to claimants has been carried out. the government told us they take each tragic case seriously and review them in case there are lessons to learn. ben mcdonald who died took his own life after being found fit for work. a labour mp read out some of the names of those who died. she said the government is marking its own homework. is this what we should be expecting from our social security system? i say no. it is not fit for purpose. it is not a safety net and we are seriously
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letting people down. campaigners say there should be an independent public enquiry on how many benefit claimants died while seeking support. the headlines on bbc news. the prime minister is expected to confirm the next stage of lockdown easing in england , with indoor hospitality and household mixing set to return next week. a shake—up in labour's top team, after the party's disappointing election results in england. nicola sturgeon says the snp�*s win in the scottish elections means a second independence referendum is a 'matter of when, not if�*. the us government has declared a state of emergency — after the country's largest fuel
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pipeline was hit by a cyber attack. reports suggest the group responsible is demanding ransom money to restore services. the emergency status will allow fuel to be transported by road instead. our cyber reporter, joe tidy, explains what we know about the attack so far well, we know that it is run somewhere. unusually. and it is worth praising the company. they say they have been attacked and it is run somewhere which means that we know that the hackers have gained entry to the system of the company so usually cyber attacks start with an e—mail so perhaps one of the staff accidentally clicked on a malicious link in an e—mail and that allowed the hackers inside the system. they were to spend weeks or months looking around the computer system at colonial pipeline and working out where the vulnerabilities are, the weaknesses, then take on any data they think is
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valuable and encrypted that, kept a and then effectively encrypted the entire system of colonials computer network and we don't know the extent to which that attack has brought down the company but we do know that they had taken precautionary measure of disconnecting a lot of the computer systems to perhaps spread, stop the spread of the run somewhere throughout the systems and now we don't know whether or not they are negotiating but it seems these hackers do want some money until they can restore the systems. people are talkin: they can restore the systems. people are talking about _ they can restore the systems. people are talking about the _ they can restore the systems. people are talking about the fuel _ they can restore the systems. people are talking about the fuel price - are talking about the fuel price climbing in the us but when you get down to it this is a case of national security because you are looking at an attack on key infrastructure. how normal are attacks like this?— infrastructure. how normal are attacks like this? luckily there are very unusual- _ attacks like this? luckily there are very unusual. we _ attacks like this? luckily there are very unusual. we know _ attacks like this? luckily there are very unusual. we know companies around the world are being hit with run somewhere increasingly. only last month there was a a task force launched to try to prevent these types of attacks and get action from
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the government to stop these criminal organisations from bringing companies to their knees but as you say this is what we call critical national infrastructure and it is an area of cyber security that people have become increasingly concerned about. these are attacks on industrial control systems so you might think an oil pipeline is a very analogue system. oil running through pipes. but over the years the systems of added vials and sensors and lots of iota, internet connected devices that enable these pipelines to flow freely. and of course when an attack like this occurs in a place like that it can, as we are seeing, bringing a pipeline to a halt and affect the us in a big way. 2.5 million gallons of oil pump through this east pipeline and now it seems it has been massively affected. the former gogglebox star and i'm a celebrity winner scarlett moffatt has revealed how trolling led to her phoning
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the samaritans for support. scarlett now wants to use her experience to help others, so she's become an ambassador for the charity. jayne mccubbin went to meet her. did you, are you allowed bums on bbc? are you allowed bums on bbc? look straight into the camera. i can't really do serious. just do a smile. i think people would presume that i'm super outgoing, super bubbly, happy all of the time. you do want to portray yourself as this positive bubbly person because that makes other people happy, even if it's just for that half an hour or hour. because when you've felt sad yourself, you don't want anyone else to ever feel that way.
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and you have felt really sad? i have felt really, i have felt really sad. just a few hours in scarlett moffatt�*s company and you realise she's warm, smart, kind, funny... queen of the jungle is scarlett moffatt! a personality which saw her crowned queen of thejungle in 2016. but that is when life started to unravel. when i came out of the jungle, i was on top of the world. i finally felt accepted. with all those positive things,came a lot of negativity, and before long, it was just consuming me, this sadness was just consuming every part of my body. i'd get a lot of trolling about the way that i looked. specifically about my weight, about being very slim.
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then i got bigger, people didn't like that. people saying i should just... go and kill yourself, i shouldn't have to look at you on my tv. and ijust thought, i can't do this any more. that's when scarlett took action. she picked up the phone. she dialled 116123. six numbers which didn'tjust change her life, but saved her life. do you remember that first voice? yeah, ido. yeah. this is going to sound really dramatic, but you do feel like it's just, like hope, that's what it sounded like, like hope. just hearing somebody say, like, "hello, samaritans. "what's wrong?" i felt really sad. i spoke to samaritans, i got help from my gp,
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and now i'm in such a good place with my little dog and my boyfriend and my friends and family, and ijust love life. feel like i'm the old scarlett again, the 18—year—old scarlett that was carefree. i feel like i'm that girl again. you're back. i'm back. here they are, danny and lisa! two people whose mental health journey also led them to samaritans. my name is lisa nealan and i hit a real low in my life when my marriage broke down. i was a single parent, and sadly, because of a stammer, i found that i couldn't communicate. i'm danny, i'm 28 years old, and i was at a low ebb. - i didn't want to go out and do the things i enjoyed. - i found myself staying in bed quite often, just not wanting to get up. which was affecting my personal life and working life as well. _ it was just a very, very dark time.
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while scarlett reached out by phone, lisa and danny sought help by e—mail. i remember ringing, and just hearing this little voice of hope on the other end of the phone and going, "help us." that's literally, ijust remember going, "help us." i remember giving a fake name, because i didn't dare say my name. and then just for the first time ever, having a decent night's sleep. just relief, i think, isn't it? just to have that load lifted. and, like, the power ofjust that human connection when you're at your lowest is so strong, isn't it? i think that's how i felt, just relief. have either of you still got that first e—mail, that first... yeah, definitely. here's the first one that i sent, was on 17th december 2018, i the first line i can see says, i "hi, i'm having a really tough
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time at the moment." | like you said about the relief, | getting that off your shoulders and just have someone on the other end who can listen, _ whereas obviously, sometimes it's a little bit more difficult to speak. to family, friends. actually, when i told my mum and dad, "i've spoken to samaritans," they were like, "why didn't you come to us?" but for me it was just like, it was just being a pure stranger, i think there's something really lovely about them not knowing anything about you and just being like, this is the issue. one phone call, one e—mail, that was all it took to put them on a road to recovery. today lisa is a volunteer with samaritans. and scarlett has become an official ambassador. like, we've all been in such a rubbish place, and, like, probably at the time felt like there was no escape but we knew we wanted to escape it. and we've done that. with the help of samaritans, family and friends are important but we have done that. we are little legends. everyone who's rang samaritans
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is a little legend, aren't they? i don't know what i would have done if i didn't call samaritans. thank you. that was the first step of myjourney of feeling better. i realised, no, you're wonderful just being you, scarlett. that's my telling off face! i've never been in a place where i wanted to project that much hate onto someone. so whenever i do get trolled really badly, i send them a private message, and i'll give them the number for samaritans. i'll say, are you ok? call this number if you need help. and i would say 99% of the time, they apologise and they say, yeah, i will. and if you've been affected by any of the issues raised in that interview, you can find details
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of organisations offering help and support on the bbc action line website. in a moment, the bbc news at one with ben brown but now it's time for a look at the weather. hello again. an unsettled day when most of you will see a shower at some point during the day. quite a few of you will see several showers with the rain on and off pretty much all day and the change in weather fortunes because it was particularly dry in april. because it was particularly dry in aril. a, , because it was particularly dry in aril. , ., . , april. may is more than making up for it. april. may is more than making up for it- here — april. may is more than making up for it. here it— april. may is more than making up for it. here it is— april. may is more than making up for it. here it is one _ april. may is more than making up for it. here it is one of _ april. may is more than making up for it. here it is one of the - for it. here it is one of the wettest places in the uk and had well over a month's worth of rain and we are only ten days into may. that may not be extensive as we go to the west of the week. it is going to the west of the week. it is going to be a particularly wet spell of
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weather and it is all down to this area of low pressure. this low pressure, normally the lows would move out of the way so they would not hang around so this one cannot move to the north and east because they have got this blocking area of high pressure and so instead the laser be over our heads all week bringing those shower clouds in. showers extensive today and it may well ease off our time across southern england. a bit more sunshine but we will see another batch of showers crossing from france particularly into sussex and kent. heaviershowers france particularly into sussex and kent. heavier showers today. france particularly into sussex and kent. heaviershowers today. some france particularly into sussex and kent. heavier showers today. some of them have hail and thunder mist in and temperatures round about 1a—16 . overnight rain for a time pushing into scotland but across inland areas though showers will clear. temperature is around six or 7 degrees overnight. tuesday, early rain clears out of the way in scotland and good chunk of the day should be reasonable here. however
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further south though showers really start to develop and through the afternoon they will dry northwards across the whole of england and wales. again, some thunderstorms mist in with these heavy downpours and temperatures for most of us still around 1a—16 . those winds tend to die away a little bit on wednesday. another day of sunshine and showers but this time weather showers from, they will be slower to move. temperatures still 1a—16 . to the west of the week it stays unsettled. may is making up for that dry april.
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the uk lowers its covid alert level as the prime minister prepares to announce a major easing of lockdown restrictions in england. it's understood he'll say that from next monday there can be a return to indoor hospitality and household mixing and people can hug each other again. i would really, really appreciate giving my gran and my mum and my sister and my loved ones a hug again. it's a good thing, i think we need to hug our children, our grandchildren. i've got a granddaughter now, that's why i said that! yeah, it's a good thing, it's good that we're allowed to start getting back to normal. we'll have the latest from our health editor. also this lunchtime. after labour's crushing by election defeat, a reshuffled shadow cabinet meets amid calls for an end to infighting. labour's got to stop this sort of internal focus,
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the civil war between those on the left of the party,

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