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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 8, 2021 6:00am-10:00am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the snp wins key seats but its chances of winning an overall majority in the scottish parliament remain on a knife edge. counting continues in england. the conservatives follow up their by—election win in hartlepool with significant gains over labour. it's better news for labour in wales as it matches its best—ever senedd election result. holiday bookings surge as 12 countries are added to the uk's green travel list but the industry says it's too cautious. talking of which, but travel list.
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—— talking of which, that travel list. "don't go to istanbul", fans of chelsea and manchester city are told, and they're now calling on uefa to move the champions league final to wembley after the uk government added turkey to its travel red list. weatherwise, in the company of low pressure introducing a settled story —— unsettled story but those temperatures are rising. i will return with all of the details. it's saturday the eighth of may. our top story: the snp's hopes of an outright majority in the scottish parliament still lie in the balance today. with votes still being counted, the party needs another 26 seats to win total control, but two key targets of dumbarton and eastwood have been missed. with all the details, here's our scotland editor sarah smith. angus robertson, scottish national party, 16,276. angus robertson, scottish national party. 16.276.— party, 16,276. every seat that has chanced party, 16,276. every seat that has changed hands — party, 16,276. every seat that has changed hands in _ party, 16,276. every seat that has changed hands in scotland - party, 16,276. every seat that has changed hands in scotland has - party, 16,276. every seat that has | changed hands in scotland has gone to the snp. the dramatic victory ins
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canberra central prefilter held by former tory leader ruth davidson. i took air and a low from labour. it is a return for one of the snp's big hitters. in is a return for one of the snp's big hitters. , .,, is a return for one of the snp's big hitters. , , ., , ., is a return for one of the snp's big hitters. , , .,, ., ., hitters. in this most european of capital cities, people have - capital cities, people have resoundingly rejected the party of brexit and boris johnson. resoundingly rejected the party of brexit and borisjohnson. the public has rejected all of the parties that want to block an independence referendum.— want to block an independence j referendum._ nicola referendum. well done. nicola sturueon referendum. well done. nicola sturgeon is _ referendum. well done. nicola sturgeon is confident - referendum. well done. nicola sturgeon is confident she - referendum. well done. nicola sturgeon is confident she will i referendum. well done. nicola i sturgeon is confident she will win referendum. well done. nicola - sturgeon is confident she will win a mandate to hold another vote on leaving the uk and secure a remarkable fourth term in government. if remarkable fourth term in government.— remarkable fourth term in government. remarkable fourth term in covernment. ., , government. if that is indeed the outcome of _ government. if that is indeed the outcome of this _ government. if that is indeed the outcome of this election, - government. if that is indeed the outcome of this election, i - government. if that is indeed the l outcome of this election, i pledged today to get back to work immediately, to continue to steer this country through the crisis of covid—19, to lead this country into recovery from covid—19 and then, when the time is right, to offer this country the choice of a better
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future. ., , ., ., �* ., future. voters who don't want independence _ future. voters who don't want independence appeared - future. voters who don't want independence appeared to - future. voters who don't want independence appeared to be| future. voters who don't want - independence appeared to be using their votes to aclei to back unionist parties. in dumbarton, labour held on as tory switch to the party most likely to beat the snp. while in done fresher, after a power cut and some emergency lighting, the tories increased their vote at the expense of the labour party. the constitution _ expense of the labour party. tue: constitution was expense of the labour party. tte: constitution was put expense of the labour party. tt2 constitution was put front and centre in this campaign by the snp and their desire to divide scotland all over again but cottage conservatives had aclei ambitious plan what we can do in the next parliament if we can get rid of the threat of another referendum. the snp have made gains but tactical voting by unionist and some of the key seats they hope to take it now looks difficult if not impossible for them to achieve an overall majority. with the addition of the scottish greens and the snp, it seems clear there will be a pro—independence majority in the next parliament. a feline interloper had to be carefully injected from the account in orkney is the snp
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held on to airdrie and shots, he go's wife treated a request he bring home milk. and he did as he was told. anna has only been scottish leader for less than three months and in that short time, it appears he has not yet transformed waiver�*s really poor recent results. he has not yet transformed waiver's really poor recent results. compared to where we — really poor recent results. compared to where we were _ really poor recent results. compared to where we were just _ really poor recent results. compared to where we were just ten _ really poor recent results. compared to where we were just ten weeks - really poor recent results. compared| to where we were just ten weeks ago when i took over this job to where we were just ten weeks ago when i took over thisjob it is to where we were just ten weeks ago when i took over this job it is a magnificent turnaround. i'm not pretending this journey is but complete and the project is complete. complete and the pro'ect is completefi complete and the pro'ect is comlete. ., , , ~ complete. former first minister alex allan ho -e complete. former first minister alex allan hope to — complete. former first minister alex allan hope to make _ complete. former first minister alex allan hope to make a _ complete. former first minister alex allan hope to make a comeback- complete. former first minister alex allan hope to make a comeback with his alba party but now admits they are unlikely to win a single seat. sarah smith, bbc news. alexandra mackenzie is at holyrood for us this morning. alexandra, when are we likely to know whether or not the snp have hit that crucial number of 65 seats needed for a majority? good morning. that is the big question today and we are likely to get an answer a bit later on. we
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keep hearing that it is very much on a knife edge. a total of 129 seats in the scottish parliament behind me, 48 of these seats have already been declared, we are likely to get all of the other results today. the snp have got 39 seats so far, so far they have not lost any of their seats and gained two from the tories and one from labour but as sarah said, they have missed out on a couple of seats that they were targeting, one, dumbarton, the most marginal seat in scotland, so because of that, it is possibly looking less likely that they may not get the overall majority but we are not likely to know that until a bit later on. nicola sturgeon won her seat very comfortably in glasgow southside yesterday. she said she was looking forward to getting back to work. she also made reference to a possible second referendum and she said, she talked about the choice
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for a betterfuture but boris johnson in the daily telegraph today has said he is not going to change his mind, he is not going to grant that second independence referendum. indeed, conversations continue. thank you very much. at 7:30, we'll speak to one of the snp's victorious candidates, the deputy first minister, john swinney. conversations continue, counting continues as well! across england, more results are expected over the weekend, and labour will be hoping for victories in the mayoral contests in london, greater manchester and the west midlands after some bruising defeats yesterday. so far, the conservatives have made significant gains, including taking hartlepool from the opposition for the first time in more than 60 years. the prime minister has called results "encouraging". here's our political correspondentjessica parker. look at this guy... borisjohnson popped up in hartlepool look at this guy... boris johnson popped up in hartlepool yesterday in more ways than one. tories riding
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high after taking a that labour had held for decades. tt is high after taking a that labour had held for decades.— held for decades. it is a mandate for us to continue _ held for decades. it is a mandate for us to continue to _ held for decades. it is a mandate for us to continue to deliver- held for decades. it is a mandate for us to continue to deliver for. for us to continue to deliver for notjust for us to continue to deliver for not just the for us to continue to deliver for notjust the people of hartlepool and notjust the people of the north—east but across the whole of the country. the public want politicians to get on with focusing on their needs and their priorities. it signalled the conservatives taking another bite out of traditional labour territory. so, a toughjaffa keir starmer traditional labour territory. so, a tough jaffa keir starmer in traditional labour territory. so, a toughjaffa keir starmer in his first big electoral test as leader. while, i'm bitterly disappointed in the results. and, you know, i take full responsibility for the result and i will take full response ability forfixing and i will take full response ability for fixing things. we and i will take full response ability forfixing things. we have changed as a party but we have not set out a strong enough case to the country. set out a strong enough case to the count . ., set out a strong enough case to the count . . ., ,., ., ~ . ~ set out a strong enough case to the count . . ., ., , country. can labour take back towns like hartlepool? _ country. can labour take back towns like hartlepool? 0r— country. can labour take back towns like hartlepool? or look— country. can labour take back towns like hartlepool? or look to - country. can labour take back towns like hartlepool? or look to break- like hartlepool? or look to break new ground was not big questions
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loom with divided views on where the answers lie. loom with divided views on where the answers lie-— answers lie. underlying all of this, and it has come _ answers lie. underlying all of this, and it has come up in _ answers lie. underlying all of this, and it has come up in your - answers lie. underlying all of this, and it has come up in your early i and it has come up in your early reports, is a disconnect, i have to say, between the middle class more metropolitan side of our party, very much based in our cities with london dominating, a couple of square miles in north london very often, with our more working—class voters, and they are the bedrock. more working-class voters, and they are the bedrock.— are the bedrock. councils will continue counting _ are the bedrock. councils will continue counting today - are the bedrock. councils will continue counting today with | are the bedrock. councils will. continue counting today with the tories so far taking control of a handful of further authorities. the greens have made gains to in terms of seats with the lid is claiming pockets of progress. mayoral and police and crime commission accounts will also run on through the weekend. it really is a marathon, not a sprint. jessica parker, bbc news. labour is set to stay in power in wales after matching its best—ever senedd election result by taking 30 of the 60 seats in the welsh parliament. first minister mark drakeford said his party had "exceeded
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expectations" after ending friday just one seat short of a majority. counting will continue today. our wales correspondent tomos morgan reports. after 22 years after 22 yea rs in after 22 years in charge, mark drakeford's welsh labour was dra keford's welsh labour was predicted drakeford's welsh labour was predicted to be on the defensive in this election. but they have to fight the polls and pundits holding onto 27 constituency seats, the same result as 2016. t onto 27 constituency seats, the same result as 2016-_ result as 2016. i will do whatever i can do to make — result as 2016. i will do whatever i can do to make sure _ result as 2016. i will do whatever i can do to make sure that - result as 2016. i will do whatever i can do to make sure that wales i result as 2016. i will do whatever i l can do to make sure that wales has the government it needs — stable and progressive. find the government it needs - stable and progressive-— progressive. and like in england, it a - ears progressive. and like in england, it appears that _ progressive. and like in england, it appears that led — progressive. and like in england, it appears that led to _ progressive. and like in england, it appears that led to them _ progressive. and like in england, it appears that led to them leaving i appears that led to them leaving before winning 765 years ago has been split between labour and conservatives. the tories have benefited by gaining two seats and labour increased their share. mark drakeford's — labour increased their share. mark drakeford's was _ labour increased their share. mark drakeford's was labour _ labour increased their share. t— drakeford's was labour has quietly subverted expectations of how well the party would be doing. it is not a repeat of what has happened in england, this is a very distinctly well selection and it is not panned
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out as some would have, might have thought. out as some would have, might have thou:ht. ., out as some would have, might have thou:ht. . ., , , thought. claude khonry will be lickin: thought. claude khonry will be licking their — thought. claude khonry will be licking their wounds, losing i licking their wounds, losing their leader and failing to make any leave. after losing the only constituency, the lib dems regained original seat. as wales begins to return to some sort of normality, this year's result may have proven that wales has been satisfied with labour's stewardship throughout the pandemic and have voted for another round. tomos morgan, bbc news. there's been a surge of holiday bookings after 12 destinations — including portugal, gibraltar and israel — were added to the government's green list. that means travellers returning to england from those countries will no longer have to self—isolate from the 17th of may. however some travel firms have called the list "overly cautious", as our business correspondent katy austin reports. it has been months since holidays to places like this were allowed.
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international leisure trips will be allowed again from the 17th of may but there will still be restrictions in place under the traffic light system. this is the list of the 12 countries, the green list, where they will not be a requirement to quarantine when returning to england, although people will need to take a pcr test. it does not mean though that all of these destinations are currently welcoming british tourist. some, like australia, are not. in portugal, being classed as green was welcome news. �* , . ., , ., news. the british community and the british population _ news. the british community and the british population in _ news. the british community and the british population in terms _ news. the british community and the british population in terms of - british population in terms of tourism industry plays a massive role in the portuguese economy. this is a happy moment for us. a happy moment for everyone. happy moment for portugal, for england. it is coming back together again and this isjust great news.— isjust great news. major airlines have already announced extra i isjust great news. major airlines - have already announced extra flights but there is huge frustration in the travel industry that today's list is not longer. it will be reviewed
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every three weeks. t’m not longer. it will be reviewed every three weeks. i'm already seeinr every three weeks. i'm already seeing on _ every three weeks. i'm already seeing on speculation - every three weeks. i'm already seeing on speculation that - every three weeks. i'm already l seeing on speculation that there every three weeks. i'm already - seeing on speculation that there has been a big demand into portugal as an example so we are adding on as much capacity as we can bear. and then also to add a destination that is on the green list but of course now, i think also that within the next three weeks the government will need to also then add on a number of other european countries on their and we're going to prepare ourselves also for that. the and we're going to prepare ourselves also for that-— also for that. the transport secretary — also for that. the transport secretary said _ also for that. the transport secretary said was - also for that. the transport i secretary said was important. also for that. the transport - secretary said was important. we have to secretary said was important. 2 have to turn the key slowly. and green list countries will be placed on a watchlist. if we start to have any concerns. and if it is necessary because of a new upswing in cases or a new variant, will not hesitate to act fast and withdraw green status. yesterday's announcement has provided clarity for some but not others. alan has cancelled his plan to drive across europe to the netherlands in earlyjune.
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to drive across europe to the netherlands in early june. mainly because of the uncertainty. - netherlands in early june. mainly because of the uncertainty. but l because of the uncertainty. but coupled very closely with the increased costs of the pcr test, whether we would be actually stranded overseas and the next time i think the government said they were going to look at the traffic light list is not going to be for another three weeks at least so we are thinking of travelling on the sixth ofjune so it is just not viable for us unfortunately. progress on vaccinations is now a big factor determining the future growth of that green country list. for now, holidays are back but the options are limited. katy austin, bbc news. police investigating the murder of community support officer julia james say they have identified the man whose picture had been shared yesterday as part of their investigation. julia died from significant head injuries while out walking her dog last month. our reporter sean dilley is in aylesham, the village julia was from. sean, what is the latest
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update from police? morning. clearly, police had described the man who had been pictured is potentially key to unlocking the murder ofjulia james. they say they have identified that man. there have been more specific details on that and we will keep you “p details on that and we will keep you up to date with any updates that happen but what they are saying is they would very much still like any other information to anybody on the 27th, julia went missing between one pm and 430 the area, may be felt uneasy, may be felt they had to change the route or were compelled to cross the road, and information, police say, would be extremely helpful. and we are reminded ofjust how muchjulia's death has touched the community here in the market square of this village with dozens of tributes behind us. it is very poignant when you read through the tributes here, everything from letters addressed to auntie, to
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people who clearly did not know julia, and they are all calling for justice forjulia so clearly it is something the community feel strongly about, and police are really reiterating that message though that if you have any information, whatever it may be, dashcam, cctv, information, please get in touch with police.— get in touch with police. thank you, sean. get in touch with police. thank you, sean- speak — get in touch with police. thank you, sean- speak to _ get in touch with police. thank you, sean. speak to you _ get in touch with police. thank you, sean. speak to you later. _ here's owain with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you! is it warming up? i wanted warm up. tt is good morning to you! is it warming up? i wanted warm up.— good morning to you! is it warming up? i wanted warm up. it is going to warm u- up? i wanted warm up. it is going to warm up but — up? i wanted warm up. it is going to warm up but unfortunately _ up? i wanted warm up. it is going to warm up but unfortunately that - up? i wanted warm up. it is going to i warm up but unfortunately that comes hand in hand with something less settled, it is rather typical, considering it is the weekend. t considering it is the weekend. i will take it. those _ considering it is the weekend. i | will take it. those temperatures | considering it is the weekend. i | will take it. those temperatures will take it. those temperatures will rise through _ will take it. those temperatures will rise through today - will take it. those temperatures will rise through today and - will take it. those temperatures will rise through today and this | will take it. those temperaturesl will rise through today and this is what is going on with the big jar. an area of low pressure is swirling these weather fronts away. these will bring very heavy spells of rain for some of us today, potentially dangerous conditions and blustery winds as well but this is also what is drawing up that milder airfrom the south so you're losing his cold air mass that we have gotten used to over the past couple of days and
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moving into something colder. really, wherever we are, but is a headline for the weekend — mike settled but not as cold. this is the picture at present, northern parts of england had much of scotland think some dry weather here and chile as well and then the weather front tilts up, putting most part, i think many of us will escape the rain today and will all notice the strength of the wind as well. writing up a little bit later on, southern, eastern parts of england, and milder here as well with temperatures reaching 18 or 19 celsius, still called to the north with some wintering is on hills but of course must also mention the strength of the wind, and in those wind gusts today reaching 35 or maybe even 40 mph so these are damaging gusts. the low pressure thatis damaging gusts. the low pressure that is responsible for this unsettled spell of weather remains with us through tomorrow, through monday, and actually as we head through this coming week, it sticks around so brother unsettled over the next couple of days but it will not be as cold and i will keep you posted of course.
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over the past year, millions of households have welcomed a four—legged friend into the family, but the demand for pets has led to a rise in animal thefts. calls have been made for tougher laws and now, the government has set up a taskforce to tackle the growing issue. dan johnson reports. this is what it means having a stolen dog back home full tried to be calm but we couldn't because we were so excited and alljust burst out crying. nall was missing for a
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month after be taking from her dog walker�*s van. t month after be taking from her dog walker's van-— walker's van. i didn't even eat. it is torture- _ walker's van. i didn't even eat. it is torture. that _ walker's van. i didn't even eat. it is torture. that is _ walker's van. i didn't even eat. it is torture. that is the _ walker's van. i didn't even eat. it is torture. that is the only - walker's van. i didn't even eat. it is torture. that is the only way i l is torture. that is the only way i can think about it is torture. your mind is going at 1000 miles an hour and even when you are asleep i wake up and even when you are asleep i wake up and i remember having packet —— panic attacks because i was worrying about the worst of the worst happening to her. bhd about the worst of the worst happening to her.— about the worst of the worst happening to her. and it is a rurowin happening to her. and it is a growing problem _ happening to her. and it is a growing problem was - happening to her. and it is a growing problem was not. happening to her. and it is a i growing problem was not these happening to her. and it is a - growing problem was not these dogs, more than 80 of them, work recovered in rates in ipswichjust a week ago. most are waiting to be reunited with their owners. some police forces are already taking it more seriously. t already taking it more seriously. i believe i'm the first four dogs already taking it more seriously. t believe i'm the first four dogs left in the country. bre believe i'm the first four dogs left in the country-— in the country. are you a spin insurer? _ in the country. are you a spin insurer? i— in the country. are you a spin insurer? i have _ in the country. are you a spin insurer? i have been - in the country. are you a spin insurer? i have been called i in the country. are you a spin i insurer? i have been called that little bit doesn't _ insurer? i have been called that little bit doesn't mean - insurer? i have been called that little bit doesn't mean i - insurer? i have been called that little bit doesn't mean i am - little bit doesn't mean i am investigating all dog theft offences but i have an overview of them. the new task force _ but i have an overview of them. the new task force will bring together police and other experts to stop thefts and better investigate and prosecute the dog mappers. for amy, this is personal as well as
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professional tanks due pink, jasper and josie. t professional tanks due pink, jasper and josie. ., , , , and josie. i love these three bits and josie. i love these three bits and i and josie. i love these three bits and i can't _ and josie. i love these three bits and i can't imagine _ and josie. i love these three bits and i can't imagine that - and josie. i love these three bits and i can't imagine that feeling, | and josie. i love these three bits l and i can't imagine that feeling, if the dog were to be taken or stolen. the heartache that people and families must go through is unimaginable and what i want to do as part of my role in nottinghamshire is to put support in place for people for when pets go missing or they are taken away from families because yeah, that does need wreck rising, they are not an item of property, they are the family. —— recognising. item of property, they are the family. -- recognising.- item of property, they are the family. -- recognising. have you got advice for dog _ family. -- recognising. have you got advice for dog owners? _ family. -- recognising. have you got advice for dog owners? most - family. -- recognising. have you got advice for dog owners? most that i family. -- recognising. have you got| advice for dog owners? most that we are seeinr advice for dog owners? most that we are seeing is — advice for dog owners? most that we are seeing is taking _ advice for dog owners? most that we are seeing is taking -- _ advice for dog owners? most that we are seeing is taking -- dogs - advice for dog owners? most that we are seeing is taking -- dogs being i are seeing is taking —— dogs being taken from the front garden so that will help people if people can shore up will help people if people can shore up their boundaries. s it is heartbreaking. t up their boundaries. s it is heartbreaking.— up their boundaries. s it is heartbreaking. up their boundaries. s it is heartbreakinu. ., ., ., heartbreaking. i tried to ask dog owners about — heartbreaking. i tried to ask dog owners about this _ heartbreaking. i tried to ask dog owners about this problem. i heartbreaking. i tried to ask dog owners about this problem. do i heartbreaking. i tried to ask dog i owners about this problem. do you think it should be taken more seriously?— think it should be taken more seriousl ? , , , seriously? definitely, it definitely should. seriously? definitely, it definitely should- their _ seriously? definitely, it definitely should. they are _ seriously? definitely, it definitely should. they are part _ seriously? definitely, it definitely should. they are part of- seriously? definitely, it definitely should. they are part of your i should. they are part of your family, aren't they? lim especially if someone of his being robbed on
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the street. what is it coming to? police should always do more but i understand — police should always do more but i understand they _ police should always do more but i understand they are _ police should always do more but i understand they are busy. - police should always do more but i understand they are busy. and i police should always do more but ll understand they are busy. and they have got _ understand they are busy. and they have got more _ understand they are busy. and they have got more serious— understand they are busy. and they have got more serious crimes - understand they are busy. and they have got more serious crimes to- have got more serious crimes to content — have got more serious crimes to content with _ have got more serious crimes to content with. we _ have got more serious crimes to content with.— have got more serious crimes to content with. ~ ., ., content with. we are worried when he is off lead and — content with. we are worried when he is off lead and we _ content with. we are worried when he is off lead and we can't _ content with. we are worried when he is off lead and we can't see _ content with. we are worried when he is off lead and we can't see him, i is off lead and we can't see him, even coming so far safe, somewhere like here that we are just very cautious about it. find like here that we are “ust very cautious about it._ like here that we are “ust very cautious about it. and there are calls for pet _ cautious about it. and there are calls for pet left _ cautious about it. and there are calls for pet left to _ cautious about it. and there are calls for pet left to be _ cautious about it. and there are calls for pet left to be made i calls for pet left to be made offence or at least for tougher punishment. tote offence or at least for tougher punishment-— offence or at least for tougher unishment. ~ ., , ,., , punishment. we absolutely need the sentencin: punishment. we absolutely need the sentencing guidelines _ punishment. we absolutely need the sentencing guidelines to _ punishment. we absolutely need the sentencing guidelines to reflect i punishment. we absolutely need the sentencing guidelines to reflect the i sentencing guidelines to reflect the fact that these are irreplaceable, priceless family pets and when they are stolen it comes at a huge amount of emotional harm and burden to the owner but i'm usually in some cases as well there is also issues in terms of welfare for that individual animal being taken. tiara terms of welfare for that individual animal being taken.— animal being taken. two these are not wheelbarrows _ animal being taken. two these are not wheelbarrows or _ animal being taken. two these are not wheelbarrows or mobile i animal being taken. two these are i not wheelbarrows or mobile phones, these are our babies and our families. s people need to know that if the dog gets stolen they can call up if the dog gets stolen they can call up to the police and they will get it taken seriously, that is all they
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want. �* , , , it taken seriously, that is all they want. , , , want. because she is irreplaceable. oh maxxia want. because she is irreplaceable. 0h maxxia is _ want. because she is irreplaceable. oh maxxia is irreplaceable, - want. because she is irreplaceable. oh maxxia is irreplaceable, she i want. because she is irreplaceable. oh maxxia is irreplaceable, she is l 0h maxxia is irreplaceable, she is the love _ oh maxxia is irreplaceable, she is the love of— oh maxxia is irreplaceable, she is the love of my— 0h maxxia is irreplaceable, she is the love of my life, _ 0h maxxia is irreplaceable, she is| the love of my life, definitely. she is my— the love of my life, definitely. she is my best — the love of my life, definitely. she is my best friend. _ is my best friend. experience in not having her around was the - having her around was the worst thing _ having her around was the worst thing ever~ — dan johnson, bbc news. i never realised it was homes and gardens— i never realised it was homes and gardens that _ i never realised it was homes and gardens that most _ i never realised it was homes and gardens that most dogs - i never realised it was homes and gardens that most dogs are - i never realised it was homes andj gardens that most dogs are taken from _ gardens that most dogs are taken from, ,, ., ., gardens that most dogs are taken from. ., ~ ., ., . , from. someone i know who recently not a do from. someone i know who recently got a dog was _ from. someone i know who recently got a dog was also _ from. someone i know who recently got a dog was also told _ from. someone i know who recently got a dog was also told because i from. someone i know who recently| got a dog was also told because lots of dog walkers help each other when they meet up in the parks, wherever they meet up in the parks, wherever they are walking, saying don't have too long a leash. because the dog mappers snip the lead. just be careful and don't take anyone's dog! now it's time for the travel show with ade adepitan. coming up on this week's travel show, we'll be finding out how tech will change the way
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we all travel in the future. hello and welcome to the travel show, with me, ade adepitan. this week we are in london's hyde park where the sun is out and it's absolutely stunning here. even the ducks and the swans have come to say hello. in the uk we are slowly beginning to come out of lockdown so maybe we can start thinking about travel again. over the last few weeks, we've been looking at how the covid pandemic has affected things like our attitudes to travel and about how we spend our money when booking online. this week we can look at how tech could and probably will change how we all travel in the future. it wasn't so long ago that travel was a very different experience. you would probably flip through some brochures, pop into a travel agent and write a cheque before heading out to a place
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you barely knew anything about, of course with little more to help you along your way than a paper map and a guidebook. today, technology has changed things. but what about in say, i don't know, ten years' time? if technology can change how we travel so quickly, how different can we expect it to be when we explore the world in the near future? well, one big driverfor change will be what's known as the internet of things. its predicted that by 2025, 42 billion devices will be capturing data on how we live and move through the world. some say the internet of things will play a big part in a fourth industrial revolution and that the covid crisis has accelerated technological advances. the internet of things the way of describing how more and more objects
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will with each other in an increasingly interconnected world. our bags will tell us where they are in the world if they get lost, for example. it is what will enable us to open more hotel rooms with our phones and once inside, use a tablet or your voice to switch the lights on, change the temperature and control the television. but that is just the start. public transport becomes more smarter, then you need less roads and less car parks to open it up to more green spaces, so actually the internet of things and getting different systems to speak to each other has a big knock on effect for travelling and smart cities in the future. is also a part of what will enable other technological changes to our travels that have been accelerated during the pandemic. imagine going through an airport and checking in with in with facial recognition.
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you continue want to baggage drop—off, authenticating in the same way, head—on through facial recognition security and then finally going through the boarding gates, doing it all completely contactless. in fact, even your passport might not be around for too much longer as you know it. right now we are piloting digital passports for air europa, for travelling to spain, so they will have their digital information on their mobile and in addition to their biometric and nation on their mobile as well so i think it is really speeding up innovation because we need to have these technologies to make people feel confident to travel. it's just one example of how biometrics and contactless technology will change the way we travel. though, of course, this data—hungry world will mean giving more and more of our information, which could come with a risk to our privacy. thankfully now, lots of the technology in this
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biometric space stores a representation of your information. so not literally every principal copy but a recipe book to enable you to validate it. so this for me is actually one of the positives to come through this period that will improve people's digital security overall, but we have some education issues to work through so people can feel comfortable with this technology and the benefits that it brings. technology, like having global maps in our smart phones, makes exploring the world much more simple and the technology of the future will look to make things even easier. but is that necessarily such a good thing? are we losing the spirit of adventure? whether you are in the us or injapan, these online maps have exactly the same interfaces, and i think this can give you the impression that the world is everywhere the same, it's the same pastel landscape
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that you're navigating using your mobile, but also, the virtual places that we inhabit really are like places. if you have flown from london to new york but you spend the whole time on facebook, it's as though you haven't left your virtual environment, you are kind of cocooned in the technology. but the technology of the near future will also open up new ways to see the world. during the pandemic, some destinations took the chance to show off their location in immersive virtual reality and some people think this will accelerate the take—up of this technology in the future, as well as things like augmented reality. technology might soon make the process of travel far easier, but what's really exciting is it might give us completely new opportunities for exploration that simply didn't exist before. a travel experience that reveals the history of that destination right before our eyes. for example, imagine being able to visit ancient roman baths and seeing the history of the unique place
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unfold in front of you using your mobile phone. we've been working in collaboration with the bbc, we've been able to really get to grips with history and bring it to life. looking back through the roman era where there was the fall of the roof, so through the app you can actually see the roof fall down and cave down in front of you which is really exciting, you get to see people actually react in front of you, it was lovely. some of this technology is already available in some form, but the question is, what will really take off to become the new normal of travel? now it's time to head to spain and the waters around formentera to meet a man whose passion is the protection if some of the most oldest
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living organisms in the world. they play an important but little—known role in sustaining our planet's natural environment. the posidonia is maybe the most efficient carbon sink in the planet. i remember perfectly my first contact with the posidonia and it was in october of 1992 in this place, and i came here with a sailboat and the first thing i saw is this amazing posidonia seagrass, and i really fell in love, and since then i am completely dedicated to the study, filming and spreading the value of this plant. the water that we see
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is like this because of of a plant, a superior plant, posidonia oceanica it is not a seaweed, it is not in algae, it is a real plant with roots, leaves, flowers, and this plant arrived to this place 80,000 years ago conquered completely the underwater bottom around the shore. the posidonia is giving a lot of things to us. it's purifying the water, at the same time it's contributing to the beaches. most of the sand we have on the beaches comes from the skeletons of millions of organic things that live inside the posidonia jungle. from a small island in the middle of the mediterranean, if we have stable beaches, it's think to the underwater reefs that the posidonia is building along centuries. in this 30 years i'm witnessing how the posidonia is more and more endangered.
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we are spilling millions of tons of sewage into waters from our towns and our cities. so we are intoxicating the underwater world. another problem here in formentera is it is a boat destination. i think that immigration is really the way to change the future, and it is educating the youth and this is why in the summertime we have hundreds of kids, and they learn how to dive, they learn how to do underwater photography, and they are learning the things we are doing wrong and how to do in a good way. i don't like to be using an apocalyptic message. the option to change, its in our hands. if we don't change and maybe
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ten years most of the posidonia here and many species will be gone, but if we start changing we will have the possibility to recover the nature in the mediterranean and in many other places in this planet. that's all for this week. coming up next week: carmen's looking back at some of our best moments injapan, including the time she trained like a ninja. and rajan went to visit what has to be one of the strangest classrooms in the world. join us for that if you can, and in the meantime, don't forget you can keep up with all our adventures on the bbc iplayer. but until next time, from me, ade adepitan, and all the travel show team here in hyde park, it's goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay.
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good morning to you. it is just after 6:30. thousands of votes are still being counted across britain with more results expected later today, and in some cases on sunday and monday. there is no end to it, it goes on and on and on. there's plenty to work through. let's get the latest with newsnight�*s policy editor lewis goodall. he has his touchscreen ready to go. does he? , .,, does he? does he? it has 'et fuel, it'll be does he? does he? it has 'et fuel, on be fine. — does he? does he? it has 'et fuel, it'll be fine. as i does he? does he? it has 'et fuel, it'll be fine. as you i does he? does he? it has 'et fuel, it'll be fine. as you are i does he? does he? it has jet fuel, it'll be fine. as you are saying, i does he? does he? it has jet fuel, it'll be fine. as you are saying, we | it'll be fine. as you are saying, we were _ it'll be fine. as you are saying, we were about — it'll be fine. as you are saying, we were about halfway through the english — were about halfway through the english councils and 86 of 143 declared, lots of fun to go and a real development this morning of what _ real development this morning of what we — real development this morning of what we were starting to see with the early — what we were starting to see with the early contours of yesterday which — the early contours of yesterday which is — the early contours of yesterday which is a _ the early contours of yesterday which is a really stonking performance by the conservative party, _ performance by the conservative party. up — performance by the conservative party, up 159 seats, 1387, laboured down _ party, up 159 seats, 1387, laboured down 192 — party, up 159 seats, 1387, laboured down 192. as yesterday, this is an down192. as yesterday, this is an unusual— down 192. as yesterday, this is an unusual picture in an 11th year of an administration you would expect
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to see these two things' for the opposition to be making significant gains, _ opposition to be making significant gains, for— opposition to be making significant gains, for the governing party to make _ gains, for the governing party to make losses. it is not like that at the moment. look at that, we were thinking _ the moment. look at that, we were thinking about it yesterday with their— thinking about it yesterday with their he — thinking about it yesterday with their be a lib dem revival? so far, not much — their be a lib dem revival? so far, not much sign of that. the greens are having — not much sign of that. the greens are having a — not much sign of that. the greens are having a creditable performance in england. — are having a creditable performance in england, up 51 seats, very happy with some — in england, up 51 seats, very happy with some of the things that are going _ with some of the things that are going on— with some of the things that are going on so far across the country. some _ going on so far across the country. some of— going on so far across the country. some of the — going on so far across the country. some of the councils, talking about the lilr— some of the councils, talking about the lib dem performance, cornwall, hi-h the lib dem performance, cornwall, high hopes— the lib dem performance, cornwall, high hopes there, remember they used to dominate _ high hopes there, remember they used to dominate in the west country. they— to dominate in the west country. they are — to dominate in the west country. they are going backwards quite significantly. the conservatives are dominating that council. lib dem is lost 16— dominating that council. lib dem is lost 16 thinks overnight. another thing we — lost 16 thinks overnight. another thing we were talking about after hartlepool, another sign of the progress — hartlepool, another sign of the progress the conservatives are making — progress the conservatives are making like in places like wakefield. labour continued to dominate and have so many seats, one
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third of— dominate and have so many seats, one third of the _ dominate and have so many seats, one third of the council seats were up for grabs— third of the council seats were up for grabs but the conservatives made further— for grabs but the conservatives made further inroads, six labour losses, ipswich— further inroads, six labour losses, ipswich in— further inroads, six labour losses, ipswich in the east of england, a seat went, — ipswich in the east of england, a seat went, labour party had until 2019 and if they have any hope of returning — returning to government they have to win in ipswich and keep control of the council, labour, but they have lost six _ the council, labour, but they have lost six seats and the conservatives gain but it isn't about england only and we _ gain but it isn't about england only and we will talk today a lot about scotland — and we will talk today a lot about scotland. overall it is static. most of the _ scotland. overall it is static. most of the seats are coming back as they did last _ of the seats are coming back as they did last time, in 2016, mostly for the snp — did last time, in 2016, mostly for the snp but there have been some changes _ the snp but there have been some changes. three snp games, two conservative losses, one labour loss as well— conservative losses, one labour loss as well and _ conservative losses, one labour loss as well and if we dive into that bit more, _ as well and if we dive into that bit more, rememberthe snp as well and if we dive into that bit more, remember the snp are looking, what they— more, remember the snp are looking, what they really want is 65 seats. that will— what they really want is 65 seats. that will get a majority overall. thev _ that will get a majority overall. they needed about six marginal constituencies in order to achieve that _
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constituencies in order to achieve that. edinburgh central, a very good performance by the snp, angus robertson takes ruth davidson's seat, _ robertson takes ruth davidson's seat. she — robertson takes ruth davidson's seat, she was until recently the leader— seat, she was until recently the leader of— seat, she was until recently the leader of the scottish conservatives. they start to come unstuck _ conservatives. they start to come unstuck a — conservatives. they start to come unstuck a bit in dumbarton, we saw yesterday— unstuck a bit in dumbarton, we saw yesterday the labour party hanging on, yesterday the labour party hanging on. and _ yesterday the labour party hanging on, and how do they hang on? this is the story— on, and how do they hang on? this is the story across quite a bit of the seats _ the story across quite a bit of the seats across scotland, there is a series _ seats across scotland, there is a series of— seats across scotland, there is a series of unionist tactical voting, conservatives voting for the labour party— conservatives voting for the labour party in _ conservatives voting for the labour party in order to keep the snp out, and as— party in order to keep the snp out, and as a _ party in order to keep the snp out, and as a result in various constituencies across scotland it is looking _ constituencies across scotland it is looking less and less likely the snp will he _ looking less and less likely the snp will be able to get crucial majority on their— will be able to get crucial majority on their own so they will be looking example _ on their own so they will be looking example to — on their own so they will be looking example to the green party who are also pro—independence help them govern— also pro—independence help them govern and to agitate for another independence referendum. thank you ve much independence referendum. thank you very much indeed. _ independence referendum. thank you very much indeed. it _ independence referendum. thank you very much indeed. it worked! - independence referendum. thank you very much indeed. it worked! it i very much indeed. it worked! it worked beautifully! _ very much indeed. it worked! it worked beautifully! just - very much indeed. it worked! it worked beautifully! just keep i worked beautifully! just keep looking after it, be kind to it and
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it will reward you.— looking after it, be kind to it and it will reward you. absolutely. and if not, keep _ it will reward you. absolutely. and if not. keep the — it will reward you. absolutely. and if not, keep the receipt! _ it will reward you. absolutely. and if not, keep the receipt! time i it will reward you. absolutely. and if not, keep the receipt! time for i if not, keep the receipt! time for some sport with mike. good morning! talking about where will the champions league final end up being played? it is planned for instable in turkey but fans of manchester city and chelsea are being told not to go there so maybe let's move it to go there so maybe let's move it to england or london? will common sense prevail? common sense in football? ufo told istanbul it could hold it last year and then it didn't because covid, it was moved to the bubble —— uefa. they said you can haveit bubble —— uefa. they said you can have it this year and they had sent to chelsea and manchester city you can bring some fans but. crosstalk. at the moment there is no talk planned about moving it but we will see what effect the lobbying will have. there's growing pressure on uefa to move the venue of the champions league finalfrom istanbul
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after turkey was added to the uk government's red travel list. their supporters are trying to ramp up their supporters are trying to ramp up that pressure. it starts in three weeks, by the way, on the 29th. uefa had hoped to give each club at least 4,000 tickets for the game, but chelsea and manchester city fans have been told not to go there for the final. their supporters will now lobby uefa to move the final, which is three weeks today. the situation is pretty heavy in turkey at the moment. i think anything can change quite rapidly these days so let's be open. in the moment we prepared for the travel to turkey. there's one trophy manchester city can win today — they'll be crowned premier league champions if they beat chelsea at the etihad. chelsea got the better of them in the fa cup, knocking them out in the semi—finals, and that ended city's chances of a quadruple. the city manager says the premier league title is the most important one of all and is relaxed knowing a win today would finally put his side beyond the reach of manchester united.
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if we win, its over. so honestly, with these four games left, with the premier league, there is one thing or thought about what united are going to do. it is in our hands and we have the first match and if it does not happen, we have another one, another one, another one to take the two points, so, to be champion. there was a really important result in the premier league last night — newcastle won 4—2 at leicester, which means they're one point from safety. callum wilson scored twice for newcastle, denting leicester's champions league hopes, but it's a huge sigh of relief now for steve bruce's side, as they are almost certain now to avoid the drop. now, nine of the original european super league clubs, including the premier league's 'big six', have been given a fine of around £1.4 million each as their punishment from uefa. the payment will be used to benefit children's and grassroots football across europe. they'll also have 5% of their income from uefa competitions withheld for one season. however, real madrid, barcelona and juventus have refused to renounce the breakaway league, so they're likely to face different and possibly more severe action.
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lewis hamilton will be hoping to claim the 100th pole position of his career in qualifying for the spanish grand prix this afternoon. the world champion set the pace in practice yesterday in barcelona. he was a tenth of a second faster than his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas. sale are up to second in rugby union's premiership after beating leicester. aj macginty starred for sale, setting up scotland wing byron mcguigan for their opening try, and kicked 16 points, in their 26—10 victory. that takes them above exeter in the table, although the chiefs do have a game in hand. the first of cycling's three grand tours starts today — the giro d'italia. 2162 miles of racing over three weeks. ouch! and through those mountains as well! britain's simon yates is joint favourite for the winner's pink jersey, but having led for two weeks and then cracking in the closing
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stages three years ago. he came so close, didn't he? he says this could be his time. he says he'll wait until the time is right before going all out. without much mileage, knowing when to go all out... bhd without much mileage, knowing when to go all out- - -— to go all out... and it is overshadowed - to go all out... and it is overshadowed a - to go all out... and it is overshadowed a bit i to go all out... and it is overshadowed a bit by i to go all out... and it is i overshadowed a bit by the to go all out... and it is - overshadowed a bit by the tour to go all out... and it is _ overshadowed a bit by the tour de france but it is spectacular. from personal experience i remember the pain of those mountains. i didn't compete, i did one day with the cavendish team. i did cheat and got in the van halfway up. do cavendish team. i did cheat and got in the van halfway up.— in the van halfway up. do not tell an one in the van halfway up. do not tell anyone that! _ in the van halfway up. do not tell anyone that! could _ in the van halfway up. do not tell anyone that! could have - in the van halfway up. do not tell| anyone that! could have guessed! in the van halfway up. do not tell i anyone that! could have guessed! we will talk later. — anyone that! could have guessed! we will talk later, about _ anyone that! could have guessed! we will talk later, about the _ anyone that! could have guessed! we will talk later, about the champions l will talk later, about the champions league final and where it will be held. but one big european event which will definitely take place in rotterdam... in just two weeks time, james newman will be aiming to do what no—one has managed for almost 25 years — win the eurovision song contest for the uk. what are the chances? you say that, you say that. i have not said
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anything! though our track record at the competition hasn't been great in recent years, the current title holder knows it's not impossible. in 2019, duncan laurence took home the top prize for the netherlands look at this, the current and next european women together! yes! hello, james. nice european women together! yes! hello, james- nice to — european women together! yes! hello, james. nice to meet _ european women together! yes! hello, james. nice to meet you _ european women together! yes! hello, james. nice to meet you finally! - james. nice to meet you finally! duncan laurence _ james. nice to meet you finally! duncan laurence delivered i james. nice to meet you finally! duncan laurence delivered the i duncan laurence delivered the netherlands a first revision when 44 years. netherlands a first revision when 44 ears. ., netherlands a first revision when 44 ears. 2, y ., , netherlands a first revision when 44 ears. ., , ., , ., netherlands a first revision when 44 ears. ., i. , ., .,, ., years. loving you is a losing game. out of the — years. loving you is a losing game. out of the embers, _ years. loving you is a losing game. out of the embers, you _ years. loving you is a losing game. out of the embers, you and - years. loving you is a losing game. out of the embers, you and i... i out of the embers, you and i... james— out of the embers, you and i... james is— out of the embers, you and i... james is having to repeat the feat and change the uk's fortunes. they have one other thing in common, they both wrote their own entries. last time we met, you said to me if the
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uk wants to do better at he revision, we should start by sending an act with an actual connection to the song they are singing. stand an act with an actual connection to the song they are singing. and you listened! you _ the song they are singing. and you listened! you did! _ the song they are singing. and you listened! you did! thank— the song they are singing. and you listened! you did! thank god! i i listened! you did! thank god! i would've to see the uk artist that is just himself and just does his own thing and not get bothered too much by oh, this is going to work because it is a eurovision sound or whatever. i am so allergic for eurovision sound so i'm happy you guys chose james! james, i'm so happy you are going!— guys chose james! james, i'm so happy you are going! thank you, i really appreciate _ happy you are going! thank you, i really appreciate that, _ happy you are going! thank you, i really appreciate that, it - happy you are going! thank you, i really appreciate that, it is - happy you are going! thank you, i really appreciate that, it is nice i really appreciate that, it is nice of you — really appreciate that, it is nice of you to — really appreciate that, it is nice of you to say. really appreciate that, it is nice of you to say-— really appreciate that, it is nice of you to say. james, you've been livin: of you to say. james, you've been living this — of you to say. james, you've been living this contest _ of you to say. james, you've been living this contest now— of you to say. james, you've been living this contest now for, - of you to say. james, you've been living this contest now for, like, l living this contest now for, like, well over a year. have your kind of opinions on the contest changed during that time? t opinions on the contest changed during that time?— during that time? i think i have really learned _ during that time? i think i have really learned a _ during that time? i think i have really learned a lot _ during that time? i think i have really learned a lot about i really learned a lot about eurovision and the community and the fans, eurovision and the community and the fans. how— eurovision and the community and the fans, how amazing they are supportive they are. and i think for me, it isjust the opportunity to come back— me, it isjust the opportunity to come back and have another go and
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come _ come back and have another go and come with— come back and have another go and come with a — come back and have another go and come with a different kind of song and kind _ come with a different kind of song and kind of— come with a different kind of song and kind of connect with people more _ and kind of connect with people more it's— and kind of connect with people more. it's an amazing opportunity, i think _ more. it's an amazing opportunity, i think i_ more. it's an amazing opportunity, i think. i mean, it's a bit ofa silver— think. i mean, it's a bit ofa silver lining, you know? think. i mean, it's a bit of a silver lining, you know? leather trousers are _ silver lining, you know? leather trousers are it. _ silver lining, you know? leather trousers are it. nearly _ silver lining, you know? leather trousers are it. nearly a - silver lining, you know? leather trousers are it. nearly a quarterj silver lining, you know? leather. trousers are it. nearly a quarter of a century has _ trousers are it. nearly a quarter of a century has now— trousers are it. nearly a quarter of a century has now passed - trousers are it. nearly a quarter of a century has now passed since i a century has now passed since katrina and the waves last brought the trophy... katrina and the waves last brought the trophy- - -_ katrina and the waves last brought the trophy... who does not love the eurovision? — the trophy. .. who does not love the eurovision? i— the trophy... who does not love the eurovision? i love _ the trophy... who does not love the eurovision? i love birmingham! i the trophy... who does not love the eurovision? i love birmingham! and the inevitable _ eurovision? i love birmingham! and the inevitable hosting _ eurovision? i love birmingham! and the inevitable hosting duties - eurovision? i love birmingham! and the inevitable hosting duties to i the inevitable hosting duties to back to the uk. the reality is the show, held here in 1998, had bears only passing resemblance to the modern contest. the number of countries taking part has increased massively. there is now semi—finals. no orchestra. and the winning song has to impress the jury of music experts as well as viewers at home. how many of you were born when the uk one in 97 with katrina and the waves? 2, , 2, uk one in 97 with katrina and the waves? . , ., . ., uk one in 97 with katrina and the waves? . , . . ., waves? the fans have changed too. 87! 97, three — waves? the fans have changed too. 87! 97, three of— waves? the fans have changed too.
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87! 97, three of us. _ waves? the fans have changed too. 87! 97, three of us. the _ waves? the fans have changed too. 87! 97, three of us. the show- waves? the fans have changed too. 87! 97, three of us. the show nowi 87! 97, three of us. the show now attracts a larger— 87! 97, three of us. the show now attracts a larger share _ 87! 97, three of us. the show now attracts a larger share of - 87! 97, three of us. the show now attracts a larger share of the i attracts a larger share of the younger tv audience, who are engaging with the contest in their millions on social media and they have opinions. the millions on social media and they have opinions.— millions on social media and they have opinions. the past couple of ears have opinions. the past couple of years have _ have opinions. the past couple of years have been _ have opinions. the past couple of years have been valid, _ have opinions. the past couple of years have been valid, ballad, i years have been valid, ballad, ballad, and as much as we love ballads, to the uk really do them as well as we think they do? you ballads, to the uk really do them as well as we think they do?— well as we think they do? you have to want to compete _ well as we think they do? you have to want to compete and _ well as we think they do? you have to want to compete and when i well as we think they do? you have to want to compete and when you i well as we think they do? you have i to want to compete and when you are going _ to want to compete and when you are going to _ to want to compete and when you are going to compete you kind of legal software _ going to compete you kind of legal software with the possibility that you software with the possibility that ou mirht lose. ~ ., ., , , you might lose. we need more artists like james newman going into the first of the — like james newman going into the first of the contract _ like james newman going into the first of the contract and _ like james newman going into the first of the contract and treating i first of the contract and treating it with the utmost professionalism and ultimately going _ it with the utmost professionalism and ultimately going on _ it with the utmost professionalism and ultimately going on believingi and ultimately going on believing they can — and ultimately going on believing they can wih _ and ultimately going on believing they can win. the _ and ultimately going on believing they can win-— and ultimately going on believing the can win. ., ., they can win. the uk need to let go of all of those _ they can win. the uk need to let go of all of those rules _ they can win. the uk need to let go of all of those rules and _ they can win. the uk need to let go of all of those rules and formulas i of all of those rules and formulas and have more fun with it and maybe to tell more personal stories through the song as well. fine to tell more personal stories through the song as well. one thing about eurovision _ through the song as well. one thing about eurovision has _ through the song as well. one thing about eurovision has not _ through the song as well. one thing about eurovision has not changed i through the song as well. one thing i about eurovision has not changed and thatis about eurovision has not changed and that is the songs that win and the song that people are playing years later. they are the ones that people feel like they can sing along and be part of it. tt feel like they can sing along and be art of it. , ,., :: part of it. it is something in 50 languages _ part of it. it is something in 50 languages so _ part of it. it is something in 50 languages so when _ part of it. it is something in 50 languages so when people i part of it. it is something in 50 i languages so when people sing... part of it. it is something in 50 - languages so when people sing... it is crazy, but i have heard so many different covers and all sorts of languages. just scales, like, it is
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incredible so no, it never gets boring or old. incredible so no, it never gets borin: or old. ., ., , . ., ., , boring or old. i do a section of my son: boring or old. i do a section of my song when _ boring or old. i do a section of my song when you — boring or old. i do a section of my song when you don't _ boring or old. i do a section of my song when you don't need - boring or old. i do a section of my song when you don't need to - boring or old. i do a section of my| song when you don't need to know boring or old. i do a section of my - song when you don't need to know the lyrics to _ song when you don't need to know the lyrics to sing _ song when you don't need to know the lyrics to sing along and be part of the song — lyrics to sing along and be part of the song to enjoy it, you know? so the song to enjoy it, you know? so the thing _ the song to enjoy it, you know? so the thing for — the song to enjoy it, you know? so the thing for me is anybody can get in the _ the thing for me is anybody can get in the mix. — the thing for me is anybody can get in the mix, you know, and listen to it and _ in the mix, you know, and listen to it and sing — in the mix, you know, and listen to it and sing along and dance. out of the embers, you and i going to light up the embers, you and i going to light upthe— the embers, you and i going to light up the room. i think that is on the right— up the room. i think that is on the right key~ — up the room. i think that is on the right key~ is— up the room. i think that is on the right key. is it in the right key? out of— right key. is it in the right key? out of the _ right key. is it in the right key? out of the embers... eurovision's success is — out of the embers... eurovision's success is not _ out of the embers... eurovision's success is not easy _ out of the embers... eurovision's success is not easy but _ out of the embers... eurovision's success is not easy but victory - out of the embers... eurovision's| success is not easy but victory will leave the fans and the act the uk sends to be singing the same song. but is definitely true this year. you have got to throw yourself into it. ., , ., ., , you have got to throw yourself into it. that is going to be your ear won't for _ it. that is going to be your ear won't for the _ it. that is going to be your ear won't for the day. _ it. that is going to be your ear won't for the day. -- - it. that is going to be your ear won't for the day. -- ear - it. that is going to be your ear. won't for the day. -- ear worm. here's owain with a look
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at this morning's weather. i think 646 is too early for a singalong. i was fully embracing it. you are in for a change. we are turning the page and going from the cold conditions we have seen over the past couple of days to something milder but also something much less settled and that comes courtesy of this area of low pressure weather fronts away. we are likely to see very heavy spells across some parts, a yellow whether whaling is across parts of south wales but that is —— snapshot. it is straight from northern ireland affecting much of wales and down towards the south—east. zooming into take a closer look, it should brighten up across south—western parts of england but unsettled rain reaches the north of england and southern parts of scotland eventually but
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ripening up across northern ireland. i think scotland, we will hang onto some drier weather at a time. it will be a chilly start of the day here as well but not many of us will escape the weather front as it continues on its journey towards the north as we had through this afternoon and of course it will be a windy one because of the low pressure being nearby. i think top temperatures today are a bit of a contrast here. in the south—east we get 18 or 19 celsius and further north we are not quite in the warmer air. eight or nine celsius. but wind gusts today reaching 40 or 45 mph and these are damaging gusts. but it will brighten up but remaining pretty windy here. overnight, further heavy downs paul's but a little bit more in the way of rightness. some of us, anyway. some of us are going _ rightness. some of us, anyway. some of us are going to _ rightness. some of us, anyway. some of us are going to enjoy _ rightness. some of us, anyway. some of us are going to enjoy some - rightness. some of us, anyway. some of us are going to enjoy some of it. allen yes, a taste of it tomorrow. headlines at the top of the hour. now it's time for click with spencer kelly and lara lewington.
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hey, welcome to click. this week we're going to talk about locking stuff up and keeping stuff safe, which is why lara currently has a safe on her lap. well, it's a safe with a bit of a difference. you know when you're at the dining table and it feels like everybody has a reason that they have to do something on their phone there and then? laughs, yeah, yeah, yeah. well, this aims to overcome that. it's somewhere to lock away your devices so that you can have some good quality family time. laughs, right! so does it have a key,
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a combination, or is it on a timer, what? ok, well, that is the problem. because there are timer options, you can set it for an hour, overnight, for 24 hours, but there's also a passcode to be able to open it in an emergency, so whoever knows the passcode needs to also be the person with the willpower not to open it. right. plus, it's not exactly the sturdiest of devices, so if you got really desperate... well, you're the boss of the safe in your house, yeah? obviously. ok, so that's locking up your phone, now we're going to talk about something even bigger to lock up — your bike, which no matter how good your bike lock is, runs the risk of being damaged or vandalised or having bits nicked off of it. well, tom brada has been looking at the latest tech aiming to keep your cycle secure. over the past year, there has been a cycling boom, with shops struggling to keep up with the sheer scale of demand. but at the same time, there has been a steady flow of bike crime. last year, there were more than 80,000 incidents of bike theft, and many, many thousands more going unreported.
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like many people living in a big city, i often leave my poor bike left locked up outside, fending for itself. and unfortunately, over the last 12 months, it's received a lot of unwanted attention. all looks normal except, oh, where are the handlebars? there's the brake cable snipped. so, my personal woes got me thinking — what pieces of tech are out there to help keep my bike safe? first up, you have the motion sensor alarm system. this is the kinoee, and it's a fairly simple device. you attach it to your saddle post using cable ties, then set the alarm using a handy remote control. device beeps. and then if somebody decides to move the bike, this starts going off over 100 decibels. if you decide to move the bike once... alarm blares.
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..then it gives off a single warning shriek. if you move the bike again within ten seconds, then it goes off blaring for around a minute. siren wails. right. and if you decide to keep on moving the bike, well, it simply keeps on going off. and then, you simply want to run away with it? we're gonna run away with it! it's not worth it! at 20 quid, i'd say that's a pretty effective deterrent. on the flipside, the batteries — they're not rechargeable so you do have to replace them every few months, and if a criminal really wants to, and they do work out a source of the noise, they could disable it with a bit of brute force. it probably isn't very good idea. alarm beeps. that's one. siren wails. got it! and that, is how it's done. next up, we have the skunk lock, and from its name, you can probably guess what it has in store for me.
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its creators claim it is the only bike lock in the world which will literally fight back. so inside the carbon steel frame is a hollow chamber, according to the creators, if you cut about 30% of the way inside, the gas should spray out and the sheer stench alone should be enough to send any criminals running. so, let's put that to the test. saw buzzes. that smells pretty disgusting. it does absolutely stink. coughs. i'm not sure whether that would send me running, but i think i am changing my mind every second. the problem with the lock is, any part of your bike that isn't still locked up, you know, like if the front wheel wasn't locked up as well, then
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that's not going to be kept safe by that lock. and, coughs, the gas isn't refillable, so once you've cut through that one time, you're going to need to get yourself a complete another lock. um, yeah. finally we have a piece of kit which combines some of the tech we've already seen. this is the vanmoof 53. first of all, the lock is built into the bike itself. you'll spot a little silver button here... give a kick, and the bike immobilises, and the internal alarms are activated. so a little bit like the kinoee, if you move the bike, it should give you... alarm beeps. ..a rather loud warning. and, like the kinoee, the more you mess with it,
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the louder the warning gets until, eventually, this goes into a theft mode, and that's where things get really interesting because they provide a peace of mind service. peace of mind service is, if your bike should get stolen and we can't find it in two weeks of getting stolen, you will get a new bicycle provided by vanmoof. after trying out all this tech, i wanted to find out what the professionals think. i love technology, and anything that i think will help us stop crime is music to my ears. a lot of companies come to us saying, "oh, we've got this latest product," so we run a bit of an innovation panel so what we will do is look at it, we will provide a bit of advice as to whether it's a viable product — and i invest in some of this stuff myself — but you know what? the best crime prevention is i don't lock my bike up, i take it home with me every day. each of these devices have their pros and their cons, and there are plenty more clever pieces of kit out there. sadly, you can never 100% guarantee the safety of your bike, but investing in a piece of tech can provide
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an extra layer of security and give you a little bit more peace of mind. that was tom brada smashing and angle grinding stuff! brilliant! that's a way to work out your lockdown frustration, isn't it! so, as tom said, bike shops have been doing pretty well over the last year, but in general, it's been a terrible time for the high street. so lara has been out and about this week to find out whether this could be just the moment to put some cutting—edge retail tech to the test. for some time now, retailers have been trying to combine the online experience with the physical one, to create something that people actually want to use. and here in this concept store called cornershop, a few ideas are being put to the test. a bluetooth beacon recognises that you've arrived via your smartphone, which effectively then become your remote control for the store.
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now i come to the grocery counter where i could have preselected what i wanted in the app and then it will just work as a click and collect, but if i want to have a browse, see what i might fancy, then i can do that on these screens or by using the app. on a small shelf like this, the benefit isn't going to be huge. but when this shoreditch store opens next month, it's set to become a place to experiment with lots of different retail technologies, without the risk of upsetting current customers or the other limitations that regular stores have. this actually works by the app knowing your location, that's through a mix of bluetooth beacons and also lidar sensors have been used to create a digital twin of the store, so putting together those two bits of information, the phone will know exactly what you're looking at and whether you might want it or not. we've got a lot of computer learning models going on, so as people engage in the stores and we learn their preferences and their behaviours, we're able to vary what they experience when they come
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to different touch points, so we don't just use simplistic 'just because you bought x you suddenly get y' — we take in the different combinations of signals that we get. central to the experience here is the use of data. this can provide a shopping trip starting online and continuing here, or vice—versa. but the aim is for transparency, for the customer to understand the information that they're giving and what they're going to get back in return. when customers on—board into the store, it's a very open dialogue that we have with them. you share x, you share your location and we'll do this for you, we'll seamlessly recognise you when you come in the store. but move these ideas out of a concept store and into a regular one and not everyone may feel so comfortable. is the customer doesn't - understand what the technology is doing, and doesn't trust what it's doing i in the background, they may be
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afraid to engage with it - and interact with it. so retailers need toi be really clear about why the technology is there and how it's being used. i and now onto the clothes shopping bit. here, the system is using digi.me so that you can virtually try on clothes. if i'd like to try this on, i scan the qr code, the app will already have a virtual me stored in it, so it means i should be able to try this on me, there i am! my neck is looking very long, but i'm wearing the top. but what's different about this experience is, i'm also getting to feel the fabric, i can actually see what the clothes are like in the flesh, and do that, although it might be easier to just go to a fitting room? i don't think that suits me, really... anyway, it was fun to try. this isn't about the ideas or the technology being perfect, though. its purpose is to learn what customers might want, or not want, from the shops of the future.
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did you buy the rugby shirt in the end? just curious? no, it's not very me. i thought you'd say that. anyway, that's it for the shortcut of click for this week, the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. and as ever you can keep up with the team on social media — find us on youtube, instagram, facebook and twitter @bbc click. thanks for watching and we'll see you soon. bye— bye. sends to be singing the same song. but is definitely true this year. good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the snp wins key seats but its chances of winning an overall majority
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in the scottish parliament remain on a knife edge. and what will this result mean for another scottish independence referendum? another scottish independence referendum ? we're another scottish independence referendum? we're here to take the temperature and speak to people on both of the debate. counting continues in england. the conservatives follow up their by—election win in hartlepool, with significant gains over labour. it's better news for labour in wales as it matches its best—ever senedd election result. holiday bookings surge as 12 countries are added to the uk's green travel list, but the industry says it's too cautious. talking of travel, chelsea and manchester city fans call on uefa to move the champions league finalfrom istanbul to england after being told they shouldn't go to turkey with the country now added to the government's red list. and weather—wise, we're in the company of low pressure, introducing an unsettled story
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across much of the uk, but we also notice those temperatures rise. i'll return with all of the details. it's saturday the 8th of may. our top story: the snp's hopes of an outright majority in the scottish parliament still hang in the balance today. with votes still being counted, the party needs another 26 seats to win total control, but two key targets of dumbarton and eastwood have been missed. with all the details, here's our scotland editor sarah smith. angus robertson, scottish national party —16,276. cheering and applause. every seat that has changed hands in scotland has gone to the snp with a dramatic victory in edinburgh central, previously held by former tory leader ruth davidson. they also took ayre from the tories and east lothian from labour. cheering and applause. well done. nicola sturgeon is confident she will win a mandate to hold
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another vote on leaving the uk and secure a remarkable fourth term in government. if that is, indeed, the outcome of this election, i pledge today to get back to work immediately, to continue to steer this country through the crisis of covid, to lead this country into recovery from covid and then, when the time is right, to offer this country the choice of a better future. voters who don't want independence appeared to be using their votes tactically to back unionist parties. in dumbarton, labour held on as tories switched to the party most likely to beat the snp. while in dumfriesshire, after a power cut and some emergency lighting, the tories increased their vote at the expense of the labour party. the constitution was put front and centre in this campaign by the snp and their desire to divide scotland all over again, but scottish conservatives had a clear, ambitious plan what we can do in the next parliament if we can get rid of the threat of another independence referendum.
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anas sarwar has only been scottish labour leader for less than three months. in that short time, it appears he has not yet transformed labour's really poor recent results. compared to where we were just ten weeks ago when i took over this job, it is a magnificent turnaround. but i'm not pretending this journey is complete, i'm not pretending the project to change the labour party is complete. former first minister alex salmond had hoped to make a comeback with his new alba party but now admits they are unlikely to win a single seat. sarah smith, bbc news. life to holyrood. alexandra mackenzie is there for us this morning. alexandra, that majority so important for the snp when it comes to their desire for a second referendum on independence? yes, good morning. absolutely. today is a big day for everyone but especially for the snp. the key figure is 65 out of 129 seats, that
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is what the snp needs for an overall majority and so far, 48 seats have been declared so there is an awful lot still to come today and 39 have already gone to the snp, they have taken two from the tories and one from labour but they did not win a couple of key seats that could be crucial for that overall majority and other parties today, they will start to pick up seats as we start to get results from the regional lists, and the snp are less likely just because of the system to get more seats from the lists there, likely to get more from the constituencies, but there are more constituency seats to be declared today. the greens are likely to get most of, if not all their seats, from the list and pending on how many seats they get, it is likely that there will be at least an independence majority within the
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scottish parliament. if not, that crucial overall majority for the snp. as you say, that is on a knife edge. snp. as you say, that is on a knife edae. �* ., , _ snp. as you say, that is on a knife edae.�* ., , _ snp. as you say, that is on a knife ed.e_�* ., , ,y ., snp. as you say, that is on a knife edie, ., ,,y ., edge. another busy day for you! thank you _ edge. another busy day for you! thank you indeed. _ that's the picture in scotland — a majority for the snp could bolster calls for another independence referendum. we're joined now by our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. morning to you! i hope you managed to get some sleep. adam, what challenges could this pose for boris johnson? morning, borisjohnson morning, boris johnson has morning, borisjohnson has done an interview with the telegraph, i think while he was in hartlepool yesterday, celebrating the conservative sector in the by—election, and says now is not the time for an independence referendum in scotland and he describes that as being a reckless thing to do. notice he says not now, not not ever. and the challenge for the prime minister when he responds to the final results of the scottish parliament later today is to sound like he is
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the prime minister of the united kingdom rather than the prime minister of england. and ijust really remember being in glasgow the morning after the independence referendum and david cameron, the prime minister then, coming out of downing street and saying right, thatis downing street and saying right, that is enough of that and now we have to talk about this issue of making sure i'm english mps get to vote on english laws and it annoyed everyone in scotland, whether you were in favour of independence or not it gives you a bit of an idea of what these moments can feel like. elsewhere in the united kingdom, i think labour will be hoping they have a better day today because today will be the day when they will do better because we will get the results of the mayoralty is in manchester, in london and in bristol where labour are expected to win, and the final picture in wales where it looks like the welsh labour party have managed to hold off challenges from the other parties which may mean that keir starmer wakes up a little bit less sad today and he did yesterday. i}!(!
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little bit less sad today and he did esterda . ., ~ , ., , . let's stay with what adam was talking about. labour is set to stay in power in wales after matching its best—ever senedd election result by taking 30 of the 60 seats in the welsh parliament. first minister mark drakeford said his party had "exceeded expectations" after ending friday just one seat short of a majority. counting will continue today. let's speak to our reporter tomos morgan. tomos, a much better result for labour than in wales what was initially predicted. why are people saying that labour have done better there? aha, why are people saying that labour have done better there?— why are people saying that labour have done better there? a couple of reasons. have done better there? a couple of reasons- back— have done better there? a couple of reasons. back in _ have done better there? a couple of reasons. back in 2016, _ have done better there? a couple of reasons. back in 2016, you - have done better there? a couple of reasons. back in 2016, you keep - reasons. back in 2016, you keep party one —— ukip one cynthia and yuko voted to leave at that point and what has happened is those ukip votes in wales like in england have
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been split somewhat between labour and the conservatives. that has actually strengthened labour's hold on a number of seats and even so they lost one of the constituency in they lost one of the constituency in the north, they gained one in the regional list and they are equalling their best ever result, one shy of a majority now, and the talk of coalition is most of the cards now because they only need one more seat but democrats who looked like they may be getting wiped out and losing their only constituency actually gained late last night a regional seat so one would potentially imagine that one option for mark drakeford, he said he would want to majority really looks unlikely to it himself and potentially one could look at a deal with the lib dems, it could take them over the threshold, but the tories really a good night for them, but the tories really a good night forthem, having but the tories really a good night for them, having taken some seats, extra seats, but really not really breaking through in the red wall area, just kind of cracking it a bit
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rather than really changing the colour of that red wall and i suppose a night for plaid cymru, losing their leader, former leader leanne wood, and not making much ground there, adam price, a few questions about his leadership but it is said he will stay firm. for now, it is said he will stay firm. for now. thank — it is said he will stay firm. for now, thank you _ it is said he will stay firm. for now, thank you indeed. it looks like it is chucking it down there already, is it?— it is chucking it down there alread , is it? , , , ., already, is it? yes, it is beautiful welsh weather. _ already, is it? yes, it is beautiful welsh weather. i— already, is it? yes, it is beautiful welsh weather. i am _ already, is it? yes, it is beautiful welsh weather. i am glad - already, is it? yes, it is beautiful welsh weather. i am glad we - already, is it? yes, it is beautiful welsh weather. i am glad we are j welsh weather. i am glad we are outside! stay _ welsh weather. i am glad we are outside! stay dry! _ welsh weather. i am glad we are outside! stay dry! the _ welsh weather. i am glad we are outside! stay dry! the weather i outside! stay dry! the weather forecast the whole of the uk shortly but i think there is a lot of rain coming, isn't there? certainly is. there's been a surge of holiday bookings after 12 destinations — including portugal, gibraltar and israel — were added to the government's 'green list�*. that means travellers returning to england from those countries will no longer have to self—isolate from the 17th of may. however, travel firms have expressed disappointment over the list which they say is 'overly cautious'. police investigating the murder of community support officer julia james say they have identified the man whose picture had been
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shared yesterday as part of their investigation. julia died from significant head injuries while out walking her dog last month. our reporter sean dilley is in aylesham, the village julia was from. sean, what is the latest update from police? morning. to a degree, it is a little bit of a puzzle _ morning. to a degree, it is a little bit of a puzzle because _ morning. to a degree, it is a little bit of a puzzle because kent - morning. to a degree, it is a little | bit of a puzzle because kent police have indeed said that they have identified this man who they have said could have held the key to unlocking julia's murder. we know they are still appealing for information from anybody here in aylsham or anyone in the area on tuesday the 27th. julia left her home just a few minutes from where we are in the market square at the moment, around three pm with a jack russell called toby. it was eight minutes past for that afternoon that julia's body was found, or at least thatis julia's body was found, or at least
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that is the point that please have been called, is in our detectives are saying if you are in the area between one o'clock in the afternoon and half past four, if you maybe saw someone who made you feel uncomfortable or maybe you felt you had to cross the road or change your route, debbie if you have cctv or dashcam, any of that could be crucial information and people are invited and asked to call kent police with any information and behind us obviously busy and outpouring of support forjulia as a person, from relatives, families, but also as a community support officerfor but also as a community support officer for the but also as a community support officerfor the police in the community. the tributes there, the feeling is palpable with repeated messages ofjustice feeling is palpable with repeated messages of justice for feeling is palpable with repeated messages ofjustice forjulia. indeed, sean, thank you. 12 minutes past seven and thank you forjoining us, saturday morning on breakfast and we saw tomos in cardiff in wales. . , and we saw tomos in cardiff in wales. ., , ., , �* and we saw tomos in cardiff in wales. . , . , �* wales. he was delighted, wasn't he? the rain hammering _ wales. he was delighted, wasn't he? the rain hammering down _ wales. he was delighted, wasn't he? the rain hammering down and - wales. he was delighted, wasn't he? the rain hammering down and it - wales. he was delighted, wasn't he? the rain hammering down and it will| the rain hammering down and it will hit many people today? it is the rain hammering down and it will hit many people today?— hit many people today? it is like we're turning — hit many people today? it is like we're turning a _ hit many people today? it is like we're turning a page, _ hit many people today? it is like l
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we're turning a page, weatherwise hit many people today? it is like - we're turning a page, weatherwise it has been cold and no—go, said temperatures are rising and you are happy about that. you temperatures are rising and you are happy about that-— happy about that. you have to take something! — happy about that. you have to take something! take _ happy about that. you have to take something! take those _ happy about that. you have to take something! take those positives i happy about that. you have to take i something! take those positives when the are something! take those positives when they are presented _ something! take those positives when they are presented to _ something! take those positives when they are presented to you, _ something! take those positives when they are presented to you, darling! i they are presented to you, darling! absolutely! the warm air gets to us because there is an area of low pressure moving in which is why we saw the rain earlier in cardiff with tomos. many of us are seeing the rain, weatherfront tomos. many of us are seeing the rain, weather front draped across parts of the uk and it is yet to arrive for some of us, perhaps you open your curtains and thought what is he on about? it is fine! sunshine across parts of scotland and it will remain that way for a bit. the area of low pressure here with some weather fronts, of low pressure here with some weatherfronts, the of low pressure here with some weather fronts, the warmer air reaching all of us as we head through today. it is an unsettled story, as you can see. northern ireland, much of england, through wales, pretty heavy spells of rain. weather warning in force across south wales will be could buy tonight see 100 millimetres of rain. quite windy out there as well, we could see some winter mess over hills and the cold air is still with
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us across parts of scotland so a frosty start to the day here and a bright start as well with a showers around. weatherfront bright start as well with a showers around. weather front as you can see will slowly tilt towards the north as we head through the day. behind this, something brighter on offer across parts of northern ireland, south—eastern parts of england potentially but we hang onto the rain across the south—west of england, through wales and the midlands and then it reaches scotland, a temperature contrast today with cooler to the north but where we start to import the milder air everyone, we get to about 18 or 19 celsius. it is a showery story tomorrow, still in the milder air but pretty wet and windy over the next couple of days and i will keep you posted. i next couple of days and i will keep you posted-— next couple of days and i will keep ou osted. ., . i. you posted. i notice where you ended u -. we're you posted. i notice where you ended up- we're to — you posted. i notice where you ended up. we're to scotland. _ the west coast of scotland was looking cloudy but dry on owain's map — ideal weather for a dip in an outdoor pool. vincennes outside swim? i don't think that is _ vincennes outside swim? i don't think that is what _
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vincennes outside swim? i don't i think that is what lorna has in mind this morning. == think that is what lorna has in mind this morning-— this morning. -- fancy an outside swim? first, she's helping us digest the election results we've seen so far. morning, lorna. it does look very cold even though it is so beautiful there. it is it does look very cold even though it is so beautiful there.— it is so beautiful there. it is very beautiful here. _ it is so beautiful there. it is very beautiful here. but _ it is so beautiful there. it is very beautiful here. but you - it is so beautiful there. it is very beautiful here. but you know, . beautiful here. but you know, actually. _ beautiful here. but you know, actually. i _ beautiful here. but you know, actually, i did stick my hand in the pool this _ actually, i did stick my hand in the pool this morning and it is surprisingly warm. so i might be tempted — surprisingly warm. so i might be tempted a — surprisingly warm. so i might be tempted a little later on. we are here _ tempted a little later on. we are here to — tempted a little later on. we are here to talk about the election and to talk— here to talk about the election and to talk about those results that have _ to talk about those results that have been coming in. they will continue — have been coming in. they will continue throughout the day. it looks _ continue throughout the day. it looks like — continue throughout the day. it looks like it is on a knife edge. willie — looks like it is on a knife edge. willie snp win outright or will they have to combine with the greens? we have daniel_ have to combine with the greens? we have daniel mccloskey who is
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conservative advisor. daniel, first, the resutt— conservative advisor. daniel, first, the result is— conservative advisor. daniel, first, the result is on a knife edge but it looks_ the result is on a knife edge but it looks like — the result is on a knife edge but it looks like the snp will form the fourth _ looks like the snp will form the fourth government. people like what they heard? i fourth government. people like what the heard? ., �* fourth government. people like what the heard? ,, ., , they heard? i don't know if they did because the — they heard? i don't know if they did because the snp _ they heard? i don't know if they did because the snp were _ they heard? i don't know if they did because the snp were going - they heard? i don't know if they did because the snp were going for- they heard? i don't know if they did because the snp were going for a l because the snp were going for a majority and certainly from the results yesterday looks like they will fall short. results yesterday looks like they will fallshort. is results yesterday looks like they will fall short. is what experts are saying. so i think it is likely they might not win the majority of also there are still a couple of sheep don pyke seats in play. —— some seat in play. i don't think a result can be predicted at this stage although certainly most experts seem to think they don't have an overall majority. the prounion parties have so far not made _ the prounion parties have so far not made inroads? the the prounion parties have so far not made inroads?— the prounion parties have so far not made inroads? the prounion parties have had a difficult _ made inroads? the prounion parties have had a difficult challenge i have had a difficult challenge undoubtedly going against a leader that has unlimited airtime during a pandemic and has led the country. and as we see from south of the border where borisjohnson has led
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the uk, led the country through the pandemic in england, his popularity has soared as we have seen in some of the by—election results recently in england. the first ministers had that benefit going into this election in scotland. certainly from my perspective as a conservative party, our results are looking like they could be much better than we initially thought they would have been six months ago. what initially thought they would have been six months ago.— initially thought they would have been six months ago. what do you make of what _ been six months ago. what do you make of what is _ been six months ago. what do you make of what is happening - been six months ago. what do you make of what is happening so i been six months ago. what do you make of what is happening so far l make of what is happening so far these in this election? we make of what is happening so far these in this election?— these in this election? we can't naturally call — these in this election? we can't naturally call this _ these in this election? we can't naturally call this election i these in this election? we can't naturally call this election yet i naturally call this election yet because — naturally call this election yet because many— naturally call this election yet because many eyes _ naturally call this election yet because many eyes will- naturally call this election yet because many eyes will be i naturally call this election yetj because many eyes will be on naturally call this election yet i because many eyes will be on the regional— because many eyes will be on the regional seats _ because many eyes will be on the regional seats and _ because many eyes will be on the regional seats and there - because many eyes will be on the regional seats and there are i because many eyes will be on the regional seats and there are a i because many eyes will be on the regional seats and there are a lot| regional seats and there are a lot of the _ regional seats and there are a lot of the unknowns _ regional seats and there are a lot of the unknowns around - regional seats and there are a lot of the unknowns around that. i regional seats and there are a lot| of the unknowns around that. the regional seats and there are a lot i of the unknowns around that. the snp have pushed _ of the unknowns around that. the snp have pushed the — of the unknowns around that. the snp have pushed the snp— of the unknowns around that. the snp have pushed the snp line. _ of the unknowns around that. the snp have pushed the snp line. some - have pushed the snp line. some people _ have pushed the snp line. some people say— have pushed the snp line. some people say they— have pushed the snp line. some people say they will _ have pushed the snp line. some people say they will be - have pushed the snp line. some people say they will be wasted . have pushed the snp line. some i people say they will be wasted votes but you _ people say they will be wasted votes but you can — people say they will be wasted votes but you can never— people say they will be wasted votes but you can never tell— people say they will be wasted votes but you can never tell when - people say they will be wasted votes but you can never tell when the i but you can never tell when the votes _ but you can never tell when the votes will — but you can never tell when the votes will be _ but you can never tell when the votes will be wasted _ but you can never tell when the votes will be wasted because i but you can never tell when the i votes will be wasted because that depends— votes will be wasted because that depends on— votes will be wasted because that depends on the _ votes will be wasted because that depends on the constituency. i votes will be wasted because that depends on the constituency. a i depends on the constituency. a manrity— depends on the constituency. a majority at _ depends on the constituency. a majority at holyrood _ depends on the constituency. a majority at holyrood is - depends on the constituency. a majority at holyrood is a - depends on the constituency. a majority at holyrood is a very . majority at holyrood is a very unusual— majority at holyrood is a very unusual thing. _ majority at holyrood is a very unusual thing. it _ majority at holyrood is a very unusual thing. it is _ majority at holyrood is a very unusual thing. it is an - majority at holyrood is a very - unusual thing. it is an achievement for any— unusual thing. it is an achievement for any party — unusual thing. it is an achievement for any party so _ unusual thing. it is an achievement for any party so it— unusual thing. it is an achievement for any party so it shouldn't - unusual thing. it is an achievement for any party so it shouldn't be i for any party so it shouldn't be expected — for any party so it shouldn't be expected that _ for any party so it shouldn't be expected that anyone - for any party so it shouldn't be expected that anyone will- for any party so it shouldn't be expected that anyone will getl for any party so it shouldn't be i expected that anyone will get that even though— expected that anyone will get that even though they _ expected that anyone will get that even though they might _ expected that anyone will get that even though they might aspire i expected that anyone will get that even though they might aspire toi expected that anyone will get that l even though they might aspire to it. and for— even though they might aspire to it. and for those — even though they might aspire to it.
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and for those who _ and for those who don't understand the scottish system which is probably most people in scotland as well, it— probably most people in scotland as well, it is— probably most people in scotland as well, it is collocated with top the snp picked up two seats yesterday but that _ snp picked up two seats yesterday but that might mean they go down on the list _ but that might mean they go down on the list today. yes but that might mean they go down on the list today-— the list today. yes and you can see de endina the list today. yes and you can see depending on _ the list today. yes and you can see depending on the _ the list today. yes and you can see depending on the angle _ the list today. yes and you can see depending on the angle of - the list today. yes and you can see depending on the angle of the i depending on the angle of the commentary. _ depending on the angle of the commentary, oh, _ depending on the angle of the commentary, oh, bad - depending on the angle of the commentary, oh, bad times. depending on the angle of the i commentary, oh, bad times for the snp that— commentary, oh, bad times for the snp that they — commentary, oh, bad times for the snp that they have _ commentary, oh, bad times for the snp that they have won _ commentary, oh, bad times for the snp that they have won this - commentary, oh, bad times for the snp that they have won this seat i commentary, oh, bad times for the i snp that they have won this seat and of course _ snp that they have won this seat and of course it— snp that they have won this seat and of course it is— snp that they have won this seat and of course it is not— snp that they have won this seat and of course it is not a _ snp that they have won this seat and of course it is not a bad _ snp that they have won this seat and of course it is not a bad to _ snp that they have won this seat and of course it is not a bad to win- snp that they have won this seat and of course it is not a bad to win any. of course it is not a bad to win any seat _ of course it is not a bad to win any seat but _ of course it is not a bad to win any seat but it — of course it is not a bad to win any seat but itiust _ of course it is not a bad to win any seat but itjust has _ of course it is not a bad to win any seat but itjust has an— of course it is not a bad to win any seat but itjust has an implicationl seat but itjust has an implication for the _ seat but itjust has an implication for the list — seat but itjust has an implication for the list it— seat but itjust has an implication for the list. it equally— seat but itjust has an implication for the list. it equally do - seat but itjust has an implication for the list. it equally do not- seat but itjust has an implication for the list. it equally do not gain a seat _ for the list. it equally do not gain a seat might— for the list. it equally do not gain a seat might mean— for the list. it equally do not gain a seat might mean getting - for the list. it equally do not gain a seat might mean getting a i for the list. it equally do not gain a seat might mean getting a seat for the list. it equally do not gain i a seat might mean getting a seat on the list _ a seat might mean getting a seat on the list in _ a seat might mean getting a seat on the list in that— a seat might mean getting a seat on the list in that area _ a seat might mean getting a seat on the list in that area so _ a seat might mean getting a seat on the list in that area so that - a seat might mean getting a seat on the list in that area so that is - a seat might mean getting a seat on the list in that area so that is why i the list in that area so that is why it is too— the list in that area so that is why it is too early— the list in that area so that is why it is too early to _ the list in that area so that is why it is too early to say. _ the list in that area so that is why it is too early to say. there - the list in that area so that is why it is too early to say. there is i the list in that area so that is why it is too early to say. there is noi it is too early to say. there is no requirement— it is too early to say. there is no requirement on— it is too early to say. there is no requirement on the _ it is too early to say. there is no requirement on the snp - it is too early to say. there is no requirement on the snp to i it is too early to say. there is no i requirement on the snp to achieve a majority— requirement on the snp to achieve a majority in _ requirement on the snp to achieve a majority in order— majority in order to put into action their manifesto pledges if they i majority in order to put into action| their manifesto pledges if they can .et their manifesto pledges if they can get the _ their manifesto pledges if they can get the support— their manifesto pledges if they can get the support of— their manifesto pledges if they can get the support of another- their manifesto pledges if they can get the support of another party. get the support of another party which _ get the support of another party which will— get the support of another party which will probably— get the support of another party which will probably be _ get the support of another party which will probably be the - get the support of another party. which will probably be the equally pro—independence _ which will probably be the equally pro—independence greens. - which will probably be the equally pro—independence greens. the i which will probably be the equally pro-independence greens. the prime ministers already _ pro-independence greens. the prime ministers already weighed _ pro-independence greens. the prime ministers already weighed in. - pro-independence greens. the prime ministers already weighed in. he i pro-independence greens. the prime ministers already weighed in. he has| ministers already weighed in. he has written _ ministers already weighed in. he has written in _ ministers already weighed in. he has written in the telegraph this morning _ written in the telegraph this morning that he does not think this is the _ morning that he does not think this is the time — morning that he does not think this is the time to have more constitutional wrangling. constitutionalwrangling. well, he would say that. _ constitutionalwrangling. well, he would say that. of _ constitutionalwrangling. well, he would say that. of course - constitutionalwrangling. well, he would say that. of course he i constitutional wrangling. well, he i would say that. of course he wasn't bothered _ would say that. of course he wasn't bothered about _ would say that. of course he wasn't bothered about having _ would say that. of course he wasn't bothered about having dramatic - bothered about having dramatic constitutional— bothered about having dramatic constitutional change _ bothered about having dramatic constitutional change in - bothered about having dramatic constitutional change in the -
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bothered about having dramatic . constitutional change in the middle of a constitutional change in the middle ofa pandemic _ constitutional change in the middle of a pandemic. he _ constitutional change in the middle of a pandemic. he was— constitutional change in the middle of a pandemic. he was fine - constitutional change in the middle of a pandemic. he was fine with . of a pandemic. he was fine with that _ of a pandemic. he was fine with that it — of a pandemic. he was fine with that it is — of a pandemic. he was fine with that it is no _ of a pandemic. he was fine with that. it is no surprise _ of a pandemic. he was fine with that. it is no surprise that- of a pandemic. he was fine with that. it is no surprise that boris| that. it is no surprise that boris johnson — that. it is no surprise that boris johnson wilt _ that. it is no surprise that boris johnson will be _ that. it is no surprise that boris johnson will be coming - that. it is no surprise that boris johnson will be coming up - that. it is no surprise that boris johnson will be coming up with| that. it is no surprise that boris- johnson will be coming up with that sort of— johnson will be coming up with that sort of tine — johnson will be coming up with that sort of line and _ johnson will be coming up with that sort of line and i— johnson will be coming up with that sort of line and i don't— johnson will be coming up with that sort of line and i don't think- johnson will be coming up with that sort of line and i don't think his- sort of line and i don't think his line sort of line and i don't think his tine wilt— sort of line and i don't think his tine will be _ sort of line and i don't think his line will be any— sort of line and i don't think his line will be any different. - sort of line and i don't think his line will be any different. he i sort of line and i don't think his. line will be any different. he will make _ line will be any different. he will make hay— line will be any different. he will make hay if_ line will be any different. he will make hay if the _ line will be any different. he will make hay if the everyone - line will be any different. he will make hay if the everyone do - line will be any different. he will make hay if the everyone do not| line will be any different. he will - make hay if the everyone do not get the majority— make hay if the everyone do not get the majority but _ make hay if the everyone do not get the majority but that _ make hay if the everyone do not get the majority but that was _ make hay if the everyone do not get the majority but that was always - the majority but that was always a hi i the majority but that was always a big ambition — the majority but that was always a big ambition from _ the majority but that was always a big ambition from them _ the majority but that was always a big ambition from them to - the majority but that was always a big ambition from them to begin i the majority but that was always a i big ambition from them to begin with anywat _ big ambition from them to begin with an a . anyway. daniel, the premise to make these comments _ anyway. daniel, the premise to make these comments today _ anyway. daniel, the premise to make these comments today but _ anyway. daniel, the premise to make these comments today but this - anyway. daniel, the premise to make these comments today but this was l these comments today but this was his message throughout and at the beginning — his message throughout and at the beginning of the campaign as well. yes it— beginning of the campaign as well. yes it absolutely was. i think this is the best approach the prime minister can take especially with what appears to be... flan minister can take especially with what appears to be. . .— what appears to be... can he maintain _ what appears to be... can he maintain that _ what appears to be... can he maintain that position - what appears to be... can he maintain that position of - what appears to be... can he - maintain that position of though? if there _ maintain that position of though? if there is— maintain that position of though? if there is a _ maintain that position of though? if there is a pro—independence majority with the _ there is a pro—independence majority with the snp alongside the greens, can the _ with the snp alongside the greens, can the prime minister continue to say that— can the prime minister continue to say that they won't be another scottish— say that they won't be another scottish referendum? the say that they won't be another scottish referendum? the snp said the would scottish referendum? the snp said they would need _ scottish referendum? the snp said they would need a _ scottish referendum? the snp said they would need a snp _ scottish referendum? the snp said they would need a snp majority - scottish referendum? the snp said| they would need a snp majority put in that referendum. trio it they would need a snp ma'ority put in that referendum.�* ifl in that referendum. no it didn't. if ou look in that referendum. no it didn't. if you look at — in that referendum. no it didn't. if you look at the — in that referendum. no it didn't. if you look at the pro _ in that referendum. no it didn't. if you look at the pro ashcroft - in that referendum. no it didn't. if you look at the pro ashcroft poll, l in that referendum. no it didn't. ifj you look at the pro ashcroft poll, i
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don't think an independent majority as it has been put from the snp and the greens, it doesn't mean a guaranteed referendum. the snp's argument at the election was vote for us and we will have a referendum and it doesn't look like they will get that majority so therefore it doesn't look like a mandate for independence. it is doesn't look like a mandate for independence.— independence. it is simply not correct. independence. it is simply not correct we — independence. it is simply not correct. we can't _ independence. it is simply not correct. we can't have - independence. it is simply not correct. we can't have this - independence. it is simply not - correct. we can't have this mandate where _ correct. we can't have this mandate where you _ correct. we can't have this mandate where you have _ correct. we can't have this mandate where you have to _ correct. we can't have this mandate where you have to have _ correct. we can't have this mandate where you have to have a _ correct. we can't have this mandate where you have to have a better- correct. we can't have this mandate| where you have to have a better and tletter— where you have to have a better and better result — where you have to have a better and better result every _ where you have to have a better and better result every time. _ where you have to have a better and better result every time. the - where you have to have a better and better result every time. the snp i better result every time. the snp other— better result every time. the snp other party— better result every time. the snp other party of— better result every time. the snp other party of independence. - better result every time. the snp. other party of independence. when the conservative _ other party of independence. when the conservative got _ other party of independence. when the conservative got a _ other party of independence. when the conservative got a majority- the conservative got a majority which _ the conservative got a majority which is — the conservative got a majority which is a — the conservative got a majority which is a much _ the conservative got a majority which is a much easier- the conservative got a majority which is a much easier thing i the conservative got a majority which is a much easier thing to| the conservative got a majority. which is a much easier thing to do at westminster, _ which is a much easier thing to do at westminster, they _ which is a much easier thing to do at westminster, they had - which is a much easier thing to do at westminster, they had an - which is a much easier thing to do at westminster, they had an eu l at westminster, they had an eu referendum _ at westminster, they had an eu referendum. they— at westminster, they had an eu referendum. they are _ at westminster, they had an eu referendum. they are not - at westminster, they had an eu referendum. they are not the l at westminster, they had an eu . referendum. they are not the party of eurocent— referendum. they are not the party of eurocent -- _ referendum. they are not the party of eurocent —— euroscepticism. - referendum. they are not the party of eurocent —— euroscepticism. thej of eurocent —— euroscepticism. the snp other— of eurocent —— euroscepticism. the snp other party— of eurocent —— euroscepticism. the snp other party of— of eurocent —— euroscepticism. the snp other party of independence . snp other party of independence so people do know— snp other party of independence so people do know what _ people do know what they are getting when they are voting for the - people do know what they are getting when they are voting for the snp - people do know what they are getting when they are voting for the snp and| when they are voting for the snp and an "— when they are voting for the snp and an -- in— when they are voting for the snp and an —— in unprecedented _ when they are voting for the snp and an —— in unprecedented numbers, . when they are voting for the snp and i an —— in unprecedented numbers, they are doing _ an —— in unprecedented numbers, they are doing that — an —— in unprecedented numbers, they are doing that. regardless— an —— in unprecedented numbers, they are doing that. regardless of- an —— in unprecedented numbers, they are doing that. regardless of a - are doing that. regardless of a majority— are doing that. regardless of a majority or— are doing that. regardless of a majority or not _ are doing that. regardless of a majority or not.— are doing that. regardless of a majority or not. are doing that. regardless of a ma'ori or not. �* ., ., , ., ., majority or not. both of you, in one word if you — majority or not. both of you, in one word if you can. _ majority or not. both of you, in one word if you can, if— majority or not. both of you, in one word if you can, if you _ majority or not. both of you, in one word if you can, if you were - majority or not. both of you, in one word if you can, if you were a - word if you can, if you were a betting — word if you can, if you were a betting person, will there be another— betting person, will there be another referendum within the next two years? — another referendum within the next
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two ears? , another referendum within the next two years? yes. absolutely not. i wish i could _ two years? yes. absolutely not. i wish i could ask _ two years? yes. absolutely not. i wish i could ask you _ two years? yes. absolutely not. i wish i could ask you why! what we are out— wish i could ask you why! what we are out of— wish i could ask you why! what we are out of time. prounion commentator, and joe from a pro—independence paper. thank you forjoining _ pro—independence paper. thank you forjoining us down here at guru paut _ forjoining us down here at guru paut the — forjoining us down here at guru paul. the spirit —— the swimmers will be _ paul. the spirit —— the swimmers will be coming in. because of a covert— covert they will have to block slots but i covert they will have to block slots but i think— covert they will have to block slots but i think around 60 at any one time _ but i think around 60 at any one time and — but i think around 60 at any one time and we think the pool is going to be _ time and we think the pool is going to be busy— time and we think the pool is going to be busy even if the sun doesn't shine _ to be busy even if the sun doesn't shine i _ to be busy even if the sun doesn't shine. .., , , to be busy even if the sun doesn't shine. , , .., , shine. i can see it 'ust coming up over the hills — shine. i can see itjust coming up over the hills now, _ shine. i can see itjust coming up over the hills now, over - shine. i can see itjust coming up over the hills now, over the - over the hills now, over the mountains.— over the hills now, over the mountains. ., ., ., ,, ., , mountains. lorna might take a dip herself, mountains. lorna might take a dip herself. you _ mountains. lorna might take a dip herself, you know. _ mountains. lorna might take a dip herself, you know. we _ mountains. lorna might take a dip herself, you know. we will - mountains. lorna might take a dip herself, you know. we will make i mountains. lorna might take a dip i herself, you know. we will make her! i2 holiday destinations — including portugal, gibraltar and israel have been added to the government's 'green list�*— meaning travellers returning to england from those countries will no longer have to self—isolate from the 17th of may. airlines have put on extra flights to meet the surge in demand following yesterday's announcement,
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as our business correspondent katy austin reports. it has been months since holidays to places like this are allowed. international leisure trips will be allowed again from the 17th of may but they will still be restrictions in place under the traffic light system. this is the list of the 12 countries the green list, where they won't be a requirement to quarantine when returning to england, although people will need to take a pcr test. that doesn't mean, though, that all of these destinations are currently welcoming british tourists. some, like australia, are not. in portugal, being classed as green was welcome news. the portugal, being classed as green was welcome news— portugal, being classed as green was welcome news. the british community and the british — welcome news. the british community and the british population _ welcome news. the british community and the british population in _ welcome news. the british community and the british population in terms - and the british population in terms of tourism industry plays a massive role in the portuguese economy. this is a happy moment for now, it is a happy moment for everyone, happy moment for portugal, for england. it is coming back together again and
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this isjust great is coming back together again and this is just great news. is coming back together again and this isjust great news.— this isjust great news. ma'or airlines have i this isjust great news. ma'or airlines have already i this isjust great news. major i airlines have already announced extra flights but there is huge frustration in the travel industry that today's list isn't longer. it will be reviewed every three weeks. allen we have already seen on speculation that there has been big demand into portugal as an example. —— so we are adding on as much capacity as we can there, and also to other destinations that is on that green list. but of course now, we did in the next few weeks, the government is going to need to add a number of other european countries on that we need to prepare ourselves for that. the on that we need to prepare ourselves for that. ., , , . ., , for that. the transport secretary said caution _ for that. the transport secretary said caution was _ for that. the transport secretary said caution was important. - for that. the transport secretary said caution was important. we | for that. the transport secretary - said caution was important. we have to turn the key _ said caution was important. we have to turn the key slowly _ said caution was important. we have to turn the key slowly and _ said caution was important. we have to turn the key slowly and green - to turn the key slowly and green list countries will be placed on a watchlist if we start to have any concerns. and if it's necessary because of a new upswing in cases or a new variant, will not hesitate to act fast and with draw green status.
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yesterday's announcement has provided clarity for some but not others. allen has cancelled his plan to drive across europe to the netherlands in earlyjune. to drive across europe to the netherlands in early june. mainly because of— netherlands in early june. mainly because of the _ netherlands in early june. mainly because of the uncertainty - netherlands in early june. mainly i because of the uncertainty coupled very closely with the increased's costs of the pcr test. whether we will be actually stranded overseas and the next time i think the government said they were going to look at the traffic light list is not going to be for another three weeks at least so we are thinking of travelling on the sixth ofjune though it's just not viable for us unfortunately. though it'sjust not viable for us unfortunately.— unfortunately. progress on vaccinations _ unfortunately. progress on vaccinations is _ unfortunately. progress on vaccinations is now - unfortunately. progress on vaccinations is now a - unfortunately. progress on vaccinations is now a big i unfortunately. progress on - vaccinations is now a big factor determining the future growth of that green country list stop for now, all the days are back at the options are limited. katy austin, bbc news. millions more people in the uk will be offered an alternative to the oxford—astrazeneca jab — because of concerns over rare blood clots. adults aged under 30 had already been offered a different vaccine, but now this has
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been expanded to include all those under a0. let's get more on this with our gp dr sarahjarvis. thanks for joining us on breakfast. if you are listening to this now, what does this mean in reality for when you turn up to get yourjab? well, turn up to get your 'ab? well, than the t turn up to get yourjab? well, that's the problem, _ turn up to get yourjab? well, that's the problem, i- turn up to get yourjab? well, that's the problem, i have - turn up to get yourjab? well, that's the problem, i have to l turn up to get yourjab? well, i that's the problem, i have to say because at the moment what we have seen is for instance pregnant women and people under the age of 30 have been told that if they haven't had a vaccine yet they should be trying to get or they should be getting if at all possible, a non— astrazeneca vaccine. now, we know, predictably, where the astrazeneca vaccines are going to be because pharmacies for instance don't have the storage, the ultra cold storage to store the maternal or the pfizer vaccine. what we don't know is whether pfizer and
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madonna vaccines are going to be and the gps and the national looking centre haven't been able to say that so we are hoping that the government is now going to work very rapidly on making it clear which centres have got which vaccine and allowing people to book one of the non— astrazeneca centres if they haven't got that. now, it does say it is only if other versions are available and only if having an alternative wouldn't cause substantial delays and the reason for that is that this really is a tiny risk. we now have 28 million people who have had a first vaccine of which 249 had one of these very rare clock and about 49 have died. ad clot 's. of 6 million people people, six have had one of these very rare clots. have, by the end of march alone, in england alone, we have saved 10.5
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thousand lives with the vaccination. so the risk is tiny, the risk of getting that same clot if you get covid is eight — ten times higher thanif covid is eight — ten times higher than if you had the vaccine but this is really because we've got an alternative vaccine that people are being offered the choice. i alternative vaccine that people are being offered the choice.— being offered the choice. i hear that and much _ being offered the choice. i hear that and much of— being offered the choice. i hear that and much of that - being offered the choice. i hear that and much of that is - being offered the choice. i hear - that and much of that is reassuring. i suppose if you are younger, though, and less likely to get severe complications from getting covid, you will hear words like risk and clot and death, even if the figures don't really bear it out, and you are going to worry about this. do you worry this will have an impact on vaccine take—up among the younger age groups. i do impact on vaccine take-up among the younger age groups-— younger age groups. i do worry about that. it is amazing _ younger age groups. i do worry about that. it is amazing how _ younger age groups. i do worry about that. it is amazing how strong - that. it is amazing how strong confidence has been even in the most recent figures and even among the younger age groups. almost 90% have said they have either had the vaccine or are planning to have the vaccine. but i think it is really important for them to remember, they are notjust protecting other people by doing this, we not protecting all
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of us by working towards herd immunity. if they want to protect themselves having another lockdown and it is really important that as many people as possible get the vaccine. �* ., ., , vaccine. been going through the list of countries — vaccine. been going through the list of countries on _ vaccine. been going through the list of countries on the _ vaccine. been going through the list of countries on the green _ vaccine. been going through the list of countries on the green list - vaccine. been going through the list of countries on the green list and i of countries on the green list and the amber list and read list. i know there have been concern among some doctors and scientists over the last few weeks about exactly how much foreign travel will be allowed. when you see the list the government has come up with, are you reassured by this? is it cautious enough for you? from a science basis i think it makes a great deal of sense. of course, the irony is that three of the 12 countries we have heard of, singapore, australia and new zealand, one of the reasons their cases is so low is because they won't welcome anybody including us. you can go to iceland and of course you can go to portugal. yes, i do think that they are cautious enough because all of those countries have got a combination of low case rates
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and or high vaccination rates and or little or no concern about variant at the moment and or good testing to test what is genomic sequencing, the genomic fingerprint of the virus, so they can find out quickly if new variants do come in.— they can find out quickly if new variants do come in. thank you so much forjoining _ variants do come in. thank you so much forjoining us _ variants do come in. thank you so much forjoining us on _ variants do come in. thank you so much forjoining us on breakfast i much forjoining us on breakfast this morning, thanks for your time. stay with us, plenty more still to come on breakfast.
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it isa it is a wet saturday in places but we are looking forward to the weekend. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. it is just it isjust coming it is just coming to half past seven. good morning. thousands of votes are still being counted across britain with more results expected later today, and in some cases on sunday and monday. there's plenty to work through. plenty more over the next few hours. let's get the latest with newsnight�*s policy editor lewis goodall. it is all loaded into his screen, all the data.— all the data. let's look at wales, havin: all the data. let's look at wales, having looked at england and - having looked at england and scotland before and wales is fascinating. we saw the welsh, the snp has a long stay in holyrood but nothing compared to labour in wales, in office since the welsh parliament, the assembly as it was, was created in 1999, and it looks like and in fact it is certain that they are heading now for a fifth, gets fifth, term in office. 52 of
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the 60 declared seats, a few left to go and the magic number you need is 60 seats in the senate and the magic number you need because of the presiding officer is inaudible. —— senedd. a good performance and clyde, a little more disappointing, they were hoping for a breakthrough and down one but it is certain that labour as i say will be having a fifth term in office so they will be there for another five years. how do they do it? partly as a result of making really big gains in places against plaid cymru, if we talk about this seat, their former leader leanne wood in 2016 during the time of the last elections and labour really absolutely storm atiyah, a majority of 5497, —— absolutely stormed in here. i really big swing, 19% to the labour party. impressive.
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labour were really worried going into the campaign because in wales into the campaign because in wales in the 2019 general election the tories did extremely well, particularly up in this corner of north—east wales, we have heard a lot about the red all in england and there was a red wall in north wales and seat after seat, whether it was wrexham or the vale of fluid, since like that fell to the conservatives at the general election and you could see the same thing happened here in the senate but only in the vale of clwyd, since like wrexham for example, it didn't happen this time, the labour party on extremely well managed to increase their majority in a seat like that, conservatives did all right, plaid cymru did 0k conservatives did all right, plaid cymru did ok but only a tiny swing of 0.3% so that is how the labour party in wales has hung onto majority and interesting over all that if you look at what has happened over the election, in wales
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and scotland and england, it seems as if the incumbent party in each of those places, the snp in scotland, labour in wales or the conservatives in england, they seem to have done rather well so there is suggestion there has been some sort of covid—19 incumbency effect where people have seen their ministers, whether in wales for example notable how much better labour have done in wales by comparison to the rest of the country and pretty much the only bright spot for the labour party is wales, they have seen mark drakeford and senior minister and the first minister there and polls suggest they approve of his performance and that seems to be roughly in accord with different parts of the uk so who would have thought when we were talking about politics a year or so ago, it seems perhaps to be some sort of covid—19 incumbency bonus for the parties in the different parts of great britain in this election. ~ . .~' parts of great britain in this election-— parts of great britain in this election. ~ . a ., it was a good day for the scottish national party yesterday, which is on course to form the government at holyrood for a fourth consecutive term. however, with plenty of votes
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still to be counted, we still don't know if it will take enough seats for an outright majority or if an alliance with a junior partner will be needed. the deputy first ministerjohn swinney, who held his seat for the snp, joins us now from perthshire. good morning to you and thank you for your time this morning. shall i start first of all, have you got in mind, the snp got in mind who and which party it would ally with if it needs one to make up a full majority?— needs one to make up a full ma'ori ? ~ ., ., ., , ., majority? we would have to see what the election outcome _ majority? we would have to see what the election outcome is _ majority? we would have to see what the election outcome is as _ majority? we would have to see what the election outcome is as to - majority? we would have to see what the election outcome is as to what. the election outcome is as to what the election outcome is as to what the arrangements will be post—election. it is very clear that the scottish national party is going to be the largest party in the scottish parliament by a very significant margin. we don't know whether we would have an overall majority yet, but will become clearer in the course of today. i
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would imagine. but is an astonishing achievement for us, given the fact that we are now about to embark on a fourth consecutive term in government. after 14 years and three terms of leading the people of scotland. i think we have had a tremendous success in the election yesterday and we will see what comes in the course of today but the signals are very good indeed and obviously we will then turn our minds to the region post—election. for the arrangements. if you win more than 65 seat, will you be arguing still that you have a mandate for a second independence referendum? it mandate for a second independence referendum?— referendum? it will come down to essentially — referendum? it will come down to essentially to _ referendum? it will come down to essentially to what _ referendum? it will come down to essentially to what is _ referendum? it will come down to essentially to what is the - referendum? it will come down to | essentially to what is the electoral uptake of the scottish parliament and willeke me a majority of —— will it be a snp or a pro— independent parliament? that is the way it works where no party is supposed to end up with an overall majority. we have a
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post—election system which is designed to avoid that situation happening, it has happened once before in 2011 and it may happen again in the course of what we find out today. but i think what matters now, and the question you asked me about a mandate for a referendum, is what is the position of those who are elected to the parliament and will there be an overall majority of members elected committed to the hosting of an independence referendum and i'm very confident that will be the case.— that will be the case. boris johnson. — that will be the case. boris johnson. you _ that will be the case. boris johnson, you would - that will be the case. boris johnson, you would be - that will be the case. boris i johnson, you would be aware, that will be the case. boris - johnson, you would be aware, has told the daily telegraph he would reject any calls for a second referendum. he says that your party's wisely, i will quote him, moved away from that idea. is that correct? . . moved away from that idea. is that correct? .. ., moved away from that idea. is that correct? ., �* ., , moved away from that idea. is that correct? ., _ ., correct? the fact that boris johnson tells somebody _ correct? the fact that boris johnson tells somebody on _ correct? the fact that boris johnson tells somebody on the _ correct? the fact that boris johnson tells somebody on the daily - tells somebody on the daily telegraph is hardly sensational news and it seems to be a kind of constant stream of consciousness but the snp has said that we will host a
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referendum on independence once we have got the covid—19 situation under control and once we are past the immediate risk of the pandemic. the first minister said in her response to the election result yesterday that she will be back to work on monday, leading scotland in tackling covid—19 —— first minister. that is what we pledged to do in the campaign and that is what we will do, we will get back to tackling covid—19 as we have been during the past few years and will keep the country safe and build the recovery but at the right moment, we will move on having a referendum on independence and the people of scotland look to me to have voted emphatically for that in the election and we will need to see the precise arithmetic around the point but they have given an emphatic support to members of the parliament, who have committed to that objective. parliament, who have committed to that objective-— that objective. using the word em - hatic that objective. using the word emphatic is — that objective. using the word emphatic is interesting - that objective. using the word | emphatic is interesting because that objective. using the word - emphatic is interesting because you failed to get two key target seats, dumbarton which was labour and
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eastwood which is conservative, and some observers say that is because there was a reaction against the move towards a second referendum. and that there were unionists who actually voted, prounion voters there showed their hand and that is why you failed to get that so do you think there is a message that needs to be listened to as well? let’s to be listened to as well? let's look at the _ to be listened to as well? let's look at the statistics _ to be listened to as well? let's look at the statistics from - look at the statistics from yesterday, and the outcomes. the snp gained 3 cents yesterday. the conservatives lost two and the labour party lost one, that is the extent to which things have changed hands and scotland, the snp has gained three and the labour and conservative unionist parties have lost three. so that rather suggests to me that the snp... lost three. so that rather suggests to me that the snp. .. crosstalk. there were _ to me that the snp. .. crosstalk. there were two — to me that the snp. . . crosstalk. there were two that _ to me that the snp. . . crosstalk. there were two that you _ to me that the snp. . . crosstalk. there were two that you are - there were two that you are targeting which way dumbarton and eastwood which you didn't get. yes, you got three, you could have got more, this is the question i'm putting to you that there were
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prounion voters who were showing their hand and their objections to their hand and their objections to the snp's commitment to another referendum. i the snp's commitment to another referendum-— the snp's commitment to another referendum. .., , , , ., referendum. i completely understand the fact that — referendum. i completely understand the fact that there _ referendum. i completely understand the fact that there are _ referendum. i completely understand the fact that there are people - referendum. i completely understand the fact that there are people in - the fact that there are people in scotland who don't want there to be a referendum around independence but there are many other people who do and that's what democracy is designed to resolve. what we will find, ithink, at designed to resolve. what we will find, i think, at the conclusion of polling, the precise composition is that there will be a majority of members elected to the scottish parliament who will be committed to the hosting of an independence referendum. a fundamental democratic point. that's what the people of scotland will have voted for. and borisjohnson, to go back to your earlier question, should just accept democracy in scotland, except the fact that people in scotland will have voted for that policy position to be taken forward after we have dealt with the immediacy of covid—19, and... dealt with the immediacy of covid-19, and... ,, ,, . , ., covid-19, and... crosstalk. do you uenuinel covid-19, and... crosstalk. do you genuinely think— covid-19, and... crosstalk. do you genuinely think people _ covid-19, and... crosstalk. do you genuinely think people voted - covid-19, and... crosstalk. do you genuinely think people voted for - covid-19, and... crosstalk. do you genuinely think people voted for the | genuinely think people voted for the snp because they want to vote for a
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referendum? they did not vote for the snp for example because of your policies or because of your handling of the pandemic?— of the pandemic? people will vote for political _ of the pandemic? people will vote for political partners _ of the pandemic? people will vote for political partners for _ of the pandemic? people will vote for political partners for a - of the pandemic? people will vote for political partners for a variety l for political partners for a variety of different reasons and the same applies to any other political parties, there will be a range of commitments that are central to the manifesto commitment and ours was the proposition of there being a referendum of independence during this parliamentary term when we have the covid—19 situation in a more stable position. that was the position we talk to the election and i'm confident that there will be a majority of such a proposition in the scottish parliament after the election. and at that stage, the democratic will of the people of scotland needs to be acted upon and borisjohnson should support us in the process. teiiii boris johnson should support us in the process-— the process. tell me, if boris johnson blocks _ the process. tell me, if boris johnson blocks scotland - the process. tell me, if boris i johnson blocks scotland having the process. tell me, if boris - johnson blocks scotland having a referendum, if he says no, will you legislate for one?— legislate for one? we've said that we will take _ legislate for one? we've said that we will take forward _ legislate for one? we've said that we will take forward the - legislate for one? we've said that. we will take forward the legislation to do so, to have a level
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recommendation —— illegal referendum and we have put in place some of the legislative arrangements that process and we will embark on such an agenda, should there be a majority for such a proposition in the scottish parliament. so majority for such a proposition in the scottish parliament.- the scottish parliament. so you would legislate _ the scottish parliament. so you would legislate for _ the scottish parliament. so you would legislate for one? - the scottish parliament. so you would legislate for one? we - the scottish parliament. so you i would legislate for one? we have the scottish parliament. so you - would legislate for one? we have set our case. thank— would legislate for one? we have set our case. thank you _ would legislate for one? we have set our case. thank you very _ would legislate for one? we have set our case. thank you very much, - would legislate for one? we have set our case. thank you very much, john | our case. thank you very much, john swinne , our case. thank you very much, john swinney. deputy _ our case. thank you very much, john swinney, deputy first _ our case. thank you very much, john swinney, deputy first minute - our case. thank you very much, john swinney, deputy first minute of- our case. thank you very much, john swinney, deputy first minute of -- l swinney, deputy first minute of —— deputy first minister of scotland. time for some sport and we have been speaking about the implications of the new rules on travel to international travel, and talking about holidays but it has implications for sport and the champions league final, mike? exactly right, good morning. where should be held now other turkeys on red list? chelsea and manchester city fans are going to lobby uefa to move it. chelsea and manchester city fans are calling for the champions league final to be played in england rather than turkey
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after the country was added to the uk government's red travel list and fans were told not to go to istanbul. uefa was planning to give each club at least 4,000 tickets for the game which is three weeks today, and there are no plans at the moment to move the venue. the clubs are just trying to stay focused on their preparations. lam i am pretty sure uefa will decide the best, you know, for everyone, for to go to instable will be a pleasure and i think only situation right now is depends on the situation of the pandemic there in covid and if they decide to move or stay here in this country or another place, we will take the plane or the bus and we will be there. the city manager added the premier league title is still the most important one to win, and city can reclaim that trophy today if they can avoid a repeat of what happened in the fa cup semi—finals, when chelsea knocked them out and ended city's chances of a quadruple. city—chelsea kicks off at 5:30. it's celebrations of a different kind for newcastle fans. real relief. their team managed a remarkable 4—2
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win at leicester last night and it means they're almost certain now of another season in the premier league. callum wilson scored twice for newcastle to dent leicester's champions league hopes and give his manager a huge sense of relief. i have said for weeks now, quietly, look, i think we would be ok, when our players are fit and that has been the case, you know, i mean, people have worked tirelessly, my staff, to make sure we have got to this position because you know, four, five, six weeks ago, everybody was baying for us so we have turned it around and at the right time. and it around and at the right time. and it means as well for them could be done on monday if they lose at home to burnley. st helens are into rugby league's challenge cup semi—finals after they came from behind to beat huddersfield, who led at half—time, before regan grace turned it around by completing a hat trick. what a fitting way to celebrate signing a new contract. 23—18 it finished. warrington are also through after beating catalan dragons. and in golf, england's matt wallace
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is thejoint leader as he continues his search for a first title on the american tour. wallace is six under par in the wells fargo championship in north carolina. and the chasing pack includes rory mcilroy, who is just two shots behind at this halfway stage, thanks to a round of 66. a monter putt here — so close! that is agony to watch, isn't it! but this is the first time for two months that mcllory has made the cut. you have been there, haven't you. —— michael roy. —— rory mcilroy. great to see him making the cut and to see him back, it has been a difficult two months. thank you so much. getting reports of some pity blustery and wet weather out there.
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it absolutely is. and we're getting some pictures in. i love a pet picture. some pictures in. i love a pet icture. ~ ., ., , �* some pictures in. i love a pet picture-_ this i some pictures in. i love a pet picture._ this is j some pictures in. i love a pet - picture._ this is teddy. picture. who doesn't? this is teddy. tedd is a picture. who doesn't? this is teddy. teddy is a dog _ picture. who doesn't? this is teddy. teddy is a dog which _ picture. who doesn't? this is teddy. teddy is a dog which is _ picture. who doesn't? this is teddy. teddy is a dog which is understood, | teddy is a dog which is understood, but what is not understood is... the glass is wet. if you look to the side there. — glass is wet. if you look to the side there, it. _ glass is wet. if you look to the side there, it. the _ glass is wet. if you look to the side there, it. the teddy - glass is wet. if you look to the i side there, it. the teddy mystery continues. taste side there, it. the teddy mystery continues-— side there, it. the teddy mystery continues. ., ., ., ., continues. we have a deep area of low pressure _ continues. we have a deep area of low pressure swinging _ continues. we have a deep area of low pressure swinging weather i continues. we have a deep area of i low pressure swinging weather fronts our way. we are seeing some. we have a weather warning in place across parts of south wales whereby tonight we could see up to 100 millimetres of rainfall. it is pretty miserable.
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the weather front clearing parts of northern ireland ripening up here later on, yet to arrive parts of scotland where we are seeing parts of wet weather and it is a chilly start of the day and the wind is a feature today. where we are likely to see something a bit drier is behind the weatherfront to see something a bit drier is behind the weather front potentially after receipt set debbie how —— heavy downpours. cloudy here with further spells of rain. as i mentioned northern ireland. temperatures reaching 18 or 19 celsius today. i think that is about as good as it will get which is much higher of course then what we have seen over the past couple of days. as i said, the wind is a feature with wind gusts reaching 40 or 45 mph. heading through the rest of this afternoon if we move the graphics on, we are certainly going to see more than unsettled weather. tonight there is more of a showery story. the low pressure is just hubie and me, swelling into northern ireland and western parts of
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scotland. these are our lows tonight and actually these temperatures are what some of us have been seen by day over the last few days if we have been lucky. caller to the north. over the next few days as the low pressure remains nearby, it is unsettled but it is feeling milder and there is at least some brightness on offer but it is a premium. it brightness on offer but it is a premium-— brightness on offer but it is a remium. , , , premium. it gets brighter. teddy will be happy- — premium. it gets brighter. teddy will be happy. teddy _ premium. it gets brighter. teddy will be happy. teddy will- premium. it gets brighter. teddy will be happy. teddy will be i will be happy. teddy will be delighted- _ now it's time for newswatch with samira ahmed. hello, and welcome to newswatch, with me, samira ahmed. coming up, what will the reorganisation of bbc news and the move of some staff out of london mean for viewers? and could there be a conflict of interest when bbcjournalists are paid by commercial organisations to speak at external events? it's been a big week for the bbc�*s elections team with votes
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still being counted in a whole host of contests across england, wales and scotland. in the build up to thursday's vote, it was the election for the scottish parliament that occupied much of the airtime including the live broadcast on tuesday night of the final leaders' debate from edinburgh. we'd like the leaders to engage in a respectful debate and that means, not talking over one another, so at the outset, can we all agree on that? agreed. yeah, promise? yep. okay, i'm going to hold you to that, thank you. no surprise that that promise wasn't entirely kept. the election in scotland may have implications for all parts of the united kingdom if it makes independence more likely, so that's presumably why that debate along with analysis and interviews before and afterwards was broadcast to news channel viewers across the uk. but ian frost, for one, still couldn't understand that decision.
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now, when we were off the air in march because of the restrictions to programme production brought on by covid, the bbc�*s director—general tim davy announced a blueprint for what he called the corporation's biggest transformation in decades. the headline ambition was to move its creative and journalistic centre away from london, which means more editions of newsnight and the today programme being presented from around the uk. there's also a restructuring in news involving the creation of so—called "story teams", including climate and science which will move to cardiff, technology which goes to glasgow and learning and identity which will be based in leeds.
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daniel sj expressed his concern. and, costs are being cut with 150 jobs being lost in news on top of over 500 post closures announced last year. these results, from a reduction in the bbc�*s income after license fee settlements with the government, including arrangements for payments by the over 755. some of the cuts are in the business unit, prompting jamie bullen to write: so, what does this mean for news audiences? let's askjonathan munroe who's the deputy director of bbc news. jonathan, this is all driven by budget cuts, isn't it? why insist on calling
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it modernisation? well, it's both, in truth, samira. there are some cuts and we've been very open about that because of licence fee settlements over the years and costs in this industry and many other industries, but it is a modernisation at the same time, and that's driven by audience behaviours changing, for example, more people coming to bbc news on digital platforms and online than used to be the case and fewer people coming to us and what we call linear platforms, radio and television. however you present it, though, you are cutting the number ofjournalists, so fewer business reporters for example. how can that be better? we have to live within our means and business is an interesting point. i totally agree with your viewer who said that business is vital to the bbc�*s editorial mix, he's absolutely right. that's why even after the cuts we're
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still going to have a very sizeable business unit. it's about 20 jobs in total coming out of a unit of around 160, but every part of the bbc is being asked to work more efficiently and we can't put a ring around certain areas and say this bit is protected because that simply means we're going to have to dig even deeper somewhere else, so efficiencies do have to apply across the board but we are absolutely committed to business programming and business coverage. if you've got fewer journalists, there's a danger that you might be missing important stories that no—one else would be doing, so that would be serving licence fee payers less well? you can make that argument of course, whatever size your newsroom is, you can always add more and say you need more and from that point of view, you can have an infinite supply ofjournalism and we've got to make some decisions relative to what we can afford to do within the license fee envelope. we're keen to protect the three guiding principles of what we do well on bbc news. global, because we're,
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in most parts of the world, whether it's in burma at the moment, for example, or across the americas or in india which is so badly hit by covid. local, local radio, regional television, network correspondence all over the uk, and what i call knowledgeable, in other words the analysis and expertise to go with those subjects to make sense of them in the modern world. now, those can't be infinite pools of people, infinite costs, but we are very well—resourced in the newsroom, we're one of the biggest news operations in the world, so it is usually possible if we try really hard to find efficiencies, and for your audience who are licence fee payers, i hope that gives them confidence that we are spending public money wisely and that we are conscious that we need to do so within the money that has been allocated to us. this commitment to make a certain number of the additions of the today programme and newsnight from outside london around the uk, that's sending people outside of london for the day. that's just tourism, isn't it? it's really important that we make sure it isn't just tourism. it's obviously notjust
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the presenter who goes to anchor a programme, whether it's today or newsnight or pm on radio 4 which is going to have a role in this. we need to make sure that there's journalism coming out into the programmes from the area from which they are broadcasting and we're talking to our colleagues for example in local radio across the uk about supporting that journalistic effort on the pm programme when that project gets underway. you're spending money setting up these new subject hubs, so tech in glasgow and science to cardiff. to viewers, these locations just seem random. well, they're not random. to take an example from outside news, people will know the work of the natural history unit that the bbc runs in bristol. it's not a random location, it's been there for many, many years and works extremely well. and all sorts of departments from the bbc are spread around.
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a number of years ago now, bbc children's moved to salford, so did bbc sport and parts of bbc news, and they build a relationship with audiences in different parts of the uk. and here's a critical point as well, they also encourage people tojoin the bbc who will turn into our experts in the future who don't want to come to london to pursue their career. they want to have a career that they can balance their work and family obligations outside london, and at the moment the structures are still too london—centric. you talk about expertise, there are already some very experienced journalists leaving because they cannot relocate, so you're going to lose a lot of this expertise. ourjournalists, like anyone else in any business, have big decisions to take if businesses relocate and those decisions aren'tjust professional decisions, they've got families, children, parents, whatever, and we recognise that and we're working through that with the individuals. we very much hope that the vast majority of our experts on these specialist
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topics will move with us to cardiff, leeds, glasgow, wherever, but i would also expect some turnover and i'd expect that to mean there are some opportunities for new recruits coming in, and over time they will become familiar experts. jonathan munroe, thank you. since 2017, the bbc has published each year the salaries of its top—earning presenters, having resisted the idea at first but being forced to do so by the government. this week, for the first time, it revealed which of its on—air newsjournalists had been paid by outside organisations for hosting or participating in external events and something about the sums involved. the move follows controversies in recent years over a paid speech given by north american editor john sopel to the tobacco company philip morris and another given by the then—editorial director kamal ahmed at a hedge fund conference for which he received £12,000, a sum he later paid back. then there was the
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insurance industry event two years ago at which hugh edwards was paid to interview borisjohnson and where the latter said he would stand for the conservative party leadership. you want the job, yes? i mean, i think i'm, i'm going to go for it, of course i'm going to go for it. laughter. applause. following those rows, the bbc�*s new external engagements register will now be published quarterly, listing who's been paid by whom and whether the fee was more or less than £5,000. among those receiving more than that amount in the first three months of the year were — the today program'sjustin webb with four such paid engagements, bbc news home editor mark easton who chaired a panel for the national housing federation, and the presenter of click, spencer kelly, for performing a similar role for the technology company cisco. nick wright wondered:
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michael cuddington was also concerned: we asked the bbc if someone would address these questions in an interview, but our request was declined. we were pointed towards a statement in which the register was described as:
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thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see or hear on bbc news on tv, radio, online and social media, e—mail: that's all from us, we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the snp wins key seats, but its hopes of winning an overall majority in the scottish parliament remain on a knife edge. counting continues in england. the conservatives follow up their by—election win in hartlepool, with significant gains over labour. good morning from the oldest warship still good morning from the oldest warship stilt afloat _ good morning from the oldest warship still afloat in europe. we are in hartlepool reflecting on an extraordinary set of election results _ extraordinary set of election results here. extraordinary set of election results here. it's better news
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for labour in wales, as it matches its best—ever senedd election result. holiday bookings surge as 12 countries are added to the uk's green travel list, but the industry says it's too cautious. and weather—wise, we are in the company of low pressure, introducing an unsettled story across much of the uk, but we also notice those temperatures rise. i'll return with all the details. it's saturday the 8th of may. our top story is that the snp's hopes of an outright majority in the scottish parliament still hang in the balance today. with votes still being counted, the party needs another 26 seats to win total control — but two key targets of dumbarton and eastwood have been missed. with all the details, here's our scotland editor sarah smith. angus robertson, scottish national party, 16,276. every seat that has changed hands
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in scotland has gone to the snp. with a dramatic victory in edinburgh central, previously held by former tory leader ruth davidson. they also took ayr from the tories and east lothian from labour. nicola sturgeon is confident she will win a mandate to hold another vote on leaving the uk and secure a remarkable fourth term in government. if that is indeed the outcome of this election, i pledge today to get back to work immediately to continue to steer this country through the crisis of covid, to lead this country into a recovery from covid, and then, when the time is right, to offer this country the choice of a better future. voters who do not want independence appeared to be using their votes tactically to back unionist parties. in dumbarton, labour held on, as tories switched to the party most likely to beat the snp. while in dumfriesshire,
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after a power cut and some emergency lighting, the tories increased their vote at the expense of the labour party. the constitution was put front and centre in this campaign by the snp and their desire to divide scotland all over again, but scottish conservatives had a clear, ambitious plan for what we can do in the next parliament if we can get rid of the threat of another independence referendum. anas sarwar has only been scottish labour leader for less than three months. in that short time, it appears he has not yet transformed labour's really poor recent results. compared to where we were just ten weeks ago when i took over this job, it's a magnificent turnaround, but i'm not pretending this journey is complete, i'm not pretending the project to change the labour pa rty�*s complete. former first minister alex salmond had hoped to make a comeback with his new alba party, but now admits they are unlikely to win a single seat. sarah smith, bbc news, edinburgh. we're joined now by our political correspondent nick eardley, who is at holyrood this morning. nick, how has the result so far been interpreted in scotland? we interviewed the snp'sjohn
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swinney earlier asking him how he sees the votes going. yes. swinney earlier asking him how he sees the votes going.— sees the votes going. yes, good mornin: , sees the votes going. yes, good morning. and — sees the votes going. yes, good morning, and it _ sees the votes going. yes, good morning, and it is _ sees the votes going. yes, good morning, and it is interesting i morning, and it is interesting becausejohn swinney kept morning, and it is interesting because john swinney kept saying that it was, that there was still a while to go on this and he thinks the snp will be the biggest party. he thinks there will be a pro—independence referendum, but was not ruling out the idea that the snp could sneak the majority, the magic number of 65. there are a couple of ways they could do it. i have been figuring out how they could do it, and i think there are still a couple of ways. it will be really hard and they will have to win some seats which do not look hugely likely at the moment. it is interesting because there are several interpretations. here are some scottish newspapers this morning. the daily telegraph thinks a majority is unlikely but the pro—independence newspaper here thinks that it is on track. if you
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add on the greens, who are also pro—independence, there will almost certainly be a pro—independence referendum by the end of the day to day. it begs the question of what happens next. what do the snp and scottish parliaments do to try and secure another referendum? boris johnson says he will not allow one, but listen tojohn swinney on what the snp thinks of that. what but listen to john swinney on what the snp thinks of that.— but listen to john swinney on what the snp thinks of that. what we will find at the conclusion _ the snp thinks of that. what we will find at the conclusion of— the snp thinks of that. what we will find at the conclusion of polling i find at the conclusion of polling day is _ find at the conclusion of polling day is that there will be a majority of members elected to the scottish parliament who will be committed to the hosting of an independence referendum. that is a fundamental democratic— referendum. that is a fundamental democratic point, it is what the scottish— democratic point, it is what the scottish people will have voted for and boris — scottish people will have voted for and borisjohnson, to go back to your— and borisjohnson, to go back to your earlier _ and borisjohnson, to go back to your earlier question, should accept democracy— your earlier question, should accept democracy in scotland.— your earlier question, should accept democracy in scotland. soever there is an snp majority — democracy in scotland. soever there is an snp majority or _ democracy in scotland. soever there is an snp majority or not, _ democracy in scotland. soever there is an snp majority or not, if - democracy in scotland. soever there is an snp majority or not, if there i is an snp majority or not, if there is an snp majority or not, if there is an snp majority or not, if there is a pro—independence majority, it will continue to be a big issue in
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scottish and uk politics. it was also interesting in your interview when askjohn if they would legislate for a referendum here. so they could be a big legal battle about whether another referendum happens. the issue of independence is not going away. lats happens. the issue of independence is rrot going away-— is not going away. lots of questions to be asked- — is not going away. lots of questions to be asked. keep _ is not going away. lots of questions to be asked. keep that _ is not going away. lots of questions to be asked. keep that abacus i is not going away. lots of questions to be asked. keep that abacus at i to be asked. keep that abacus at hand! you will need it. you will need it. across england, more results are expected over the weekend — and labour will be hoping for victories in the mayoral contests in london, greater manchester and the west midlands after some bruising defeats yesterday. the prime minister has called results so far encouraging after the conservatives made significant gains, including taking hartlepool from the opposition for the first time in more than 60 years. counting will resume today.
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labour also lost control of several councils, and the tories made gains. so what's behind the shift? our political correspondent chris mason is in hartlepool for us this morning. he is on board ship. explain, chris. good morning. this ship is in hartlepool at the royal navy national museum here. it is an extraordinary boat, this. it has failed — extraordinary boat, this. it has failed 100,000 miles around the world, _ failed 100,000 miles around the world, first set sail in 1817. it's never— world, first set sail in 1817. it's never saw— world, first set sail in 1817. it's never saw active service, which is maybe _ never saw active service, which is maybe why — never saw active service, which is maybe why it is still afloat, the oldest — maybe why it is still afloat, the oldest warship still a floating europe _ oldest warship still a floating europe. a board boat like this, you 'ust europe. a board boat like this, you just think. — europe. a board boat like this, you just think, what stories has it seen? — just think, what stories has it seen? extraordinary stories here as well as— seen? extraordinary stories here as well as far— seen? extraordinary stories here as well as far as the local election results — well as far as the local election results are concerned, the by—election, the real action of a
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conservative mayor in the tees valley — conservative mayor in the tees valley. let's reflect on a few of the key— valley. let's reflect on a few of the key themes, really, that are emerging — the key themes, really, that are emerging as faras the key themes, really, that are emerging as far as the picture more broadly— emerging as far as the picture more broadly in _ emerging as far as the picture more broadly in the north of england is concerned, and in particular on teesside _ concerned, and in particular on teesside. we can speak to an undoubted expert from bbc tees,. looking _ undoubted expert from bbc tees,. looking at — undoubted expert from bbc tees,. looking at these results yesterday, 73% for _ looking at these results yesterday, 73% for the conservative winner. i was staggered by that. usa new and not surprised. it is was staggered by that. usa new and rrot surprised-— not surprised. it is an incredible -- ou not surprised. it is an incredible -- you were _ not surprised. it is an incredible -- you were saying _ not surprised. it is an incredible -- you were saying you - not surprised. it is an incredible -- you were saying you were i not surprised. it is an incredible | -- you were saying you were not —— you were saying you were not surprised. i thought it would be 66 to 68%. but it emphasises what people not from this area should understand. the key thing is not borisjohnson or keir starmer, it is the mayo here. and that result
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emphasises that. there are a number of reasons why this is happening. it is not really a shock. there is so much going on here. government has thrown a lot at the tees valley, the freeport, they have moved treasury jobs from whitehall to darlington. there is a lot going on here. the conservatives are very much in the ascendancy in that sense. but labour have got problems that stretch back along way. it is notjust about keir starmer orjeremy corbyn. they find it hard, the austerity programme affected this region, but people seem to be blaming the labour party rather than the current government. welcome in terms of how things are changing _ welcome in terms of how things are changing here, we can talk to gemma. your reflections as we wake up in
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hartlepool, conservative mp here for the first _ hartlepool, conservative mp here for the first time since the 1960s. | hartlepool, conservative mp here for the first time since the 1960s. i am uenuinel the first time since the 1960s. i am genuinely devastated. _ the first time since the 1960s. i —n genuinely devastated. really, truly i am. that is because ijust fear for the people who stand in line outside my church every thursday waiting to be fed because they cannot afford to heat their house, feed their kids, and just i am really worried for those most in needin really worried for those most in need in the town. mit? really worried for those most in need in the town.— really worried for those most in need in the town. why should you be worried when — need in the town. why should you be worried when they _ need in the town. why should you be worried when they clearly _ need in the town. why should you be worried when they clearly endorsed i need in the town. why should you be j worried when they clearly endorsed a conservative mp and mayor, people clearly— conservative mp and mayor, people clearly believe in that? yes, conservative mp and mayor, people clearly believe in that?— clearly believe in that? yes, and the biggest _ clearly believe in that? yes, and the biggest shock— clearly believe in that? yes, and the biggest shock for _ clearly believe in that? yes, and the biggest shock for me i clearly believe in that? yes, and the biggest shock for me was i clearly believe in that? yes, and. the biggest shock for me was that the biggest shock for me was that the conservative was not 52%. even if the other parties had clubbed together, they still would have won. that shows for me that westminster are thinking about westminster and hartlepool are hoping that that might impact on the town and i hope that it does, but i fear that it won't. ~ ., .,
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that it does, but i fear that it won't. ~ . . that it does, but i fear that it won't. ~ ., ., ., won't. we will have a quick word with a father _ won't. we will have a quick word with a father and _ won't. we will have a quick word with a father and son _ won't. we will have a quick word with a father and son combo. i won't. we will have a quick word | with a father and son combo. this won't. we will have a quick word i with a father and son combo. this is scott _ with a father and son combo. this is scott and _ with a father and son combo. this is scott and malcolm. scott, you are conservative voter, did it surprise you what — conservative voter, did it surprise you what happened here? no,| you what happened here? no, i exected you what happened here? no, i expected and — you what happened here? no, i expected and hoped _ you what happened here? no, i expected and hoped that i you what happened here? no, i expected and hoped that that i you what happened here? tip, i expected and hoped that that is what would happen and that is positive for me. ., , ,., ., would happen and that is positive for me. ., , ., ., for me. now there is something of a family divide. _ for me. now there is something of a family divide, because, _ for me. now there is something of a family divide, because, malcolm, i for me. now there is something of a | family divide, because, malcolm, you are a traditional labour voter. how you reflect — are a traditional labour voter. how you reflect on this by—election and how you _ you reflect on this by—election and how you decided to vote in the end? for hartlepool and labour, it stems back to your grandad, your dad, and it is passed on to you voting labour because we are working class etc. and now we are getting to a stage where you think to yourself, we have had enough of labour. they have just wrecked it. everything. totally. the
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hospital, we haven't even got a cell where we can lock someone up on a night, we haven't got a court where we can take them to court. what is that all about? you have got to have these facilities, the police and... the hospital was the one for us because — the hospital was the one for us because we _ the hospital was the one for us because we had _ the hospital was the one for us because we had the _ the hospital was the one for us because we had the option i the hospital was the one for us because we had the option to l the hospital was the one for us i because we had the option to give birth in— because we had the option to give birth in hartlepool— because we had the option to give birth in hartlepool but— because we had the option to give birth in hartlepool but decided i birth in hartlepool but decided against — birth in hartlepool but decided against it— birth in hartlepool but decided against it because _ birth in hartlepool but decided against it because there - birth in hartlepool but decided against it because there were i birth in hartlepool but decided . against it because there were no doctors — against it because there were no doctors and _ against it because there were no doctors and we _ against it because there were no doctors and we didn't _ against it because there were no doctors and we didn't want i against it because there were no doctors and we didn't want to i against it because there were noi doctors and we didn't want to run the risk — doctors and we didn't want to run the risk. ., ., ., , ., ., the risk. you told me that you have had a busy — the risk. you told me that you have had a busy lockdown, _ the risk. you told me that you have had a busy lockdown, because i the risk. you told me that you have had a busy lockdown, because you| had a busy lockdown, because you have _ had a busy lockdown, because you have had _ had a busy lockdown, because you have had two children in the space of one _ have had two children in the space of one pandemic. that have had two children in the space of one pandemic.— of one pandemic. that is right. three lockdowns _ of one pandemic. that is right. three lockdowns and _ of one pandemic. that is right. three lockdowns and two i of one pandemic. that is right. three lockdowns and two kids. | three lockdowns and two kids. nonstop — three lockdowns and two kids. nonstop for— three lockdowns and two kids. nonstop for us. _ three lockdowns and two kids. nonstop for us. which - three lockdowns and two kids. nonstop for us. which is i three lockdowns and two kids. nonstop for us. which is why i three lockdowns and two kids. | nonstop for us. which is why it three lockdowns and two kids. i nonstop for us. which is why it is not particularly early for you now! thank _ not particularly early for you now! thank you — not particularly early for you now! thank you for having us and your
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expertise — thank you for having us and your expertise. we we're back for openings _ expertise. we we're back for openings hartlepool on this magnificent boat at around 9:30am. it is magnificent. thank you, chris. three lockdowns, two kids, and one magnificent boat. you three lockdowns, two kids, and one magnificent boat.— three lockdowns, two kids, and one magnificent boat. you can hear a lot of disappointment _ magnificent boat. you can hear a lot of disappointment with _ magnificent boat. you can hear a lot of disappointment with labour i magnificent boat. you can hear a lot of disappointment with labour in i of disappointment with labour in hartlepool. it is not the only key area that was lost. sir keir starmer says he takes full responsibility for the party's performance — and that he'll do whatever it takes to rebuild trust. but how will the party move forward? we'rejoined now by shadow home secretary, nick thomas—symonds. ido i do not know if you managed to catch much of what one of our guests there said. this was malcolm in hartlepool, obviously one of the key areas that labour failed to hold onto. he was saying just there that, we haven't got a cell, we haven't got a court, labour has wrecked it.
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how does that make you feel? i how does that make you feel? i couldn't catch all of what malcolm said, _ couldn't catch all of what malcolm said. but — couldn't catch all of what malcolm said, but clearly i am very concerned to hear his views on it. it concerned to hear his views on it. it reflects — concerned to hear his views on it. it reflects the devastating defeat that we — it reflects the devastating defeat that we suffered in hartlepool, and we have _ that we suffered in hartlepool, and we have two respond now to that. keir starmer has started changing the labour party over the past 12 months — the labour party over the past 12 months. he now will be accelerating that process of change. we have to look very— that process of change. we have to look very deeply as to why it is that— look very deeply as to why it is that in— look very deeply as to why it is that in hartlepool, and i knock on doors _ that in hartlepool, and i knock on doors in _ that in hartlepool, and i knock on doors in hartlepool during the campaign, why was it that people did not feel— campaign, why was it that people did not feel that labour spoke to their priorities— not feel that labour spoke to their priorities for the future? that is what _ priorities for the future? that is what we — priorities for the future? that is what we have to address. we can learn _ what we have to address. we can learn lessons too from around the country _ learn lessons too from around the country. here in wales, for example, where _ country. herein wales, for example, where i_ country. here in wales, for example, where i am _ country. here in wales, for example, where i am speaking to you from, we had an— where i am speaking to you from, we had an excellent result yesterday where _ had an excellent result yesterday where people clearly did feel labour spoke _ where people clearly did feel labour
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spoke for— where people clearly did feel labour spoke for the future. what i want to see now— spoke for the future. what i want to see now is _ spoke for the future. what i want to see now is the keir starmer i know. he has— see now is the keir starmer i know. he has not— see now is the keir starmer i know. he has not had the chance to actually _ he has not had the chance to actually speak to a room of people over the _ actually speak to a room of people over the past 12 months as leader of the labour— over the past 12 months as leader of the labour party, and i know throughout his career, i was inspired _ throughout his career, i was inspired to back him as a lever teader— inspired to back him as a lever leader because tackling inequality and now— leader because tackling inequality and now i— leader because tackling inequality and now i am looking forward to him conducting _ and now i am looking forward to him conducting a — and now i am looking forward to him conducting a policy review and trying — conducting a policy review and trying to — conducting a policy review and trying to reconnect with those in hartlepool, for example, who we have lost touch— hartlepool, for example, who we have lost touch with.— lost touch with. what is the labour party changing _ lost touch with. what is the labour party changing into? _ lost touch with. what is the labour party changing into? because i lost touch with. what is the labour party changing into? because a i lost touch with. what is the labour party changing into? because a lotj party changing into? because a lot of voters are saying they do not know what labour stands for. labour's values will never change. we will— labour's values will never change. we will fundamentally always believed in building a more equal society— believed in building a more equal society where every single person in that society is valued for their contribution to it and what they bring _ contribution to it and what they bring to— contribution to it and what they bring to our society. that will always — bring to our society. that will always be _ bring to our society. that will always be labour's central values. what _ always be labour's central values. what we _ always be labour's central values. what we have to do is reimagine...|
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what we have to do is reimagine... genuinely what we have to do is reimagine... i genuinely don't know what that means. ., y ., genuinely don't know what that means. ., , ., ., means. how... let me give you a secific means. how... let me give you a specific example _ means. how... let me give you a specific example of _ means. how... let me give you a specific example of what - means. how... let me give you a specific example of what that i means. how... let me give you a i specific example of what that means. we have _ specific example of what that means. we have seen our front line workers throughout — we have seen our front line workers throughout the pandemic not actually now being _ throughout the pandemic not actually now being rewarded for what they had done _ now being rewarded for what they had done they— now being rewarded for what they had done. they put themselves on the line, _ done. they put themselves on the line. they— done. they put themselves on the line, they have gone to work day in, day out _ line, they have gone to work day in, day out and — line, they have gone to work day in, day out and have been rewarded with a pay— day out and have been rewarded with a pay freeze. that is not valuing people's— a pay freeze. that is not valuing people's contribution, what they bring _ people's contribution, what they bring to— people's contribution, what they bring to our society, that is not creating — bring to our society, that is not creating a _ bring to our society, that is not creating a more equal society, and that is— creating a more equal society, and that is one — creating a more equal society, and that is one thing that shows the difference in values between us and the conservatives. at and difference in values between us and the conservatives. a— the conservatives. at and that has ha--ened the conservatives. at and that has happened under— the conservatives. at and that has happened under a _ the conservatives. at and that has happened under a conservative i happened under a conservative government, it is a 1% pay rise for nhs workers, but the conservative party has taken labour seats. it is party has taken labour seats. it is a -a rise party has taken labour seats. it is a pay rise when — party has taken labour seats. it is a pay rise when you take into account — a pay rise when you take into account inflation. but you are putting — account inflation. but you are putting your finger on precisely what _ putting your finger on precisely what we — putting your finger on precisely what we are having to deal with. we have to _ what we are having to deal with. we
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have to ask— what we are having to deal with. we have to ask ourselves why it is that people _ have to ask ourselves why it is that people have not seen labour as the answer— people have not seen labour as the answer to— people have not seen labour as the answer to problems they face in their— answer to problems they face in their everyday lives and injustices we see _ their everyday lives and injustices we see. that is my about what has happened — we see. that is my about what has happened over the last four defeats in general— happened over the last four defeats in general elections, where it is in hartlepool. — in general elections, where it is in hartlepool, other places as well, where _ hartlepool, other places as well, where people do not now see labour as answering those concerns. that is now what _ as answering those concerns. that is now what we — as answering those concerns. that is now what we have to reflect on and why we _ now what we have to reflect on and why we have to change. keir starmer has started _ why we have to change. keir starmer has started that process over the last has started that process over the tast12 _ has started that process over the last 12 months, has led courageously on things— last 12 months, has led courageously on things like tackling anti—semitism in the labour party. now it _ anti—semitism in the labour party. now it is _ anti—semitism in the labour party. now it is a — anti—semitism in the labour party. now it is a question of moving on, reviewing — now it is a question of moving on, reviewing our policies, economically setting _ reviewing our policies, economically setting out — reviewing our policies, economically setting out the difference, that we will not _ setting out the difference, that we will not go back to the insecure economy— will not go back to the insecure economy of the past and reimagine our economy. and also make sure we are changing— our economy. and also make sure we are changing our party so that our party— are changing our party so that our party is _ are changing our party so that our party is connected in communities in all of— party is connected in communities in all of the _ party is connected in communities in all of the country.—
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all of the country. what you make of the assertion — all of the country. what you make of the assertion that _ all of the country. what you make of the assertion that sir— all of the country. what you make of the assertion that sir keir— all of the country. what you make of the assertion that sir keir starmer. the assertion that sir keir starmer and the labour party has focused too much on internal politics or attacking the conservative party rather than putting a message across to the voters that they matter more than politics? taste to the voters that they matter more than politics?— than politics? we certainly have to seak than politics? we certainly have to s - eak to than politics? we certainly have to speak to the _ than politics? we certainly have to speak to the country, _ than politics? we certainly have to speak to the country, absolutely. l speak to the country, absolutely. but, _ speak to the country, absolutely. but, as _ speak to the country, absolutely. but, as in— speak to the country, absolutely. but, as in most things in politics, it is about — but, as in most things in politics, it is about a — but, as in most things in politics, it is about a balance. we absolutely have to _ it is about a balance. we absolutely have to hold the conservatives to account _ have to hold the conservatives to account when we think about the cronyism — account when we think about the cronyism with contracts... the prime minister. _ cronyism with contracts... the prime minister. who— cronyism with contracts... the prime minister, who actually won't even tell us— minister, who actually won't even tell us who — minister, who actually won't even tell us who paid an invoice for the redecoration of his flat and lacks that fundamental transparency, those are things _ that fundamental transparency, those are things we absolutely have to hold the — are things we absolutely have to hold the government to account on. coming _ hold the government to account on. coming to— hold the government to account on. coming to balance, obviously we need to, to _ coming to balance, obviously we need to, to a _ coming to balance, obviously we need to, to a far— coming to balance, obviously we need to, to a far greater extent, set out our vision _ to, to a far greater extent, set out our vision for— to, to a far greater extent, set out
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our vision for the future. we have been _ our vision for the future. we have been right— our vision for the future. we have been right in the pandemic to offer constructive opposition, to support the government when it gets things right, _ the government when it gets things right, like _ the government when it gets things right, like with the furlough scheme or public— right, like with the furlough scheme or public health messaging, that was within— or public health messaging, that was within the _ or public health messaging, that was within the public interest. we have called _ within the public interest. we have called them out when they had been wrong _ called them out when they had been wrong as— called them out when they had been wrong as well, but when we move out that of— wrong as well, but when we move out that of the _ wrong as well, but when we move out that of the pandemic, we will be setting _ that of the pandemic, we will be setting out to a greater extent our vision — setting out to a greater extent our vision of— setting out to a greater extent our vision of the future. keir starmer know— vision of the future. keir starmer know that — vision of the future. keir starmer know that has spent his life tackling _ know that has spent his life tackling inequality, tackling injustice, and i am looking forward to him _ injustice, and i am looking forward to him doing that in the months and years— to him doing that in the months and years ahead — to him doing that in the months and years ahead so we have a radical credible — years ahead so we have a radical credible offer to put to the electorate in the next election. shadow— electorate in the next election. shadow defence minister has quit after saying that keir starmer�*s front bench, he has accused them of being the most london boudoirs e. he says they have taken over london with brigades of woke social media warriors. is it time for a
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reshuffle?— warriors. is it time for a reshuffle? , ., ., reshuffle? first of all, he left the front bench _ reshuffle? first of all, he left the front bench weeks _ reshuffle? first of all, he left the front bench weeks ago _ reshuffle? first of all, he left the front bench weeks ago and i i reshuffle? first of all, he left the front bench weeks ago and i do i reshuffle? first of all, he left the i front bench weeks ago and i do not agree _ front bench weeks ago and i do not agree with — front bench weeks ago and i do not agree with his interpretation, actually _ agree with his interpretation, actually. however, ido agree with his interpretation, actually. however, i do think that we need — actually. however, i do think that we need to— actually. however, i do think that we need to change. keir starmer has started _ we need to change. keir starmer has started that — we need to change. keir starmer has started that process and he will now be accelerating that process. in terms _ be accelerating that process. in terms of— be accelerating that process. in terms of a _ be accelerating that process. in terms of a reshuffle, that is always an issue _ terms of a reshuffle, that is always an issue for— terms of a reshuffle, that is always an issue for the labour leader and it is about — an issue for the labour leader and it is about who keir starmer wishes to have _ it is about who keir starmer wishes to have serving him in his shadow cabinet _ to have serving him in his shadow cabinet. but there is a wider fundamental issue here we are talking — fundamental issue here we are talking about. we have lost connection with people in hartlepool, and indeed in other parts _ hartlepool, and indeed in other parts of— hartlepool, and indeed in other parts of the country, and what we have _ parts of the country, and what we have to _ parts of the country, and what we have to do — parts of the country, and what we have to do is something far more fundamental, which is reimagining the policy— fundamental, which is reimagining the policy offer we put forward and how we _ the policy offer we put forward and how we move forward in the post pandemic— how we move forward in the post pandemic age. how we move forward in the post pandemic age-— pandemic age. what has mark drakeford got _ pandemic age. what has mark drakeford got that _ pandemic age. what has mark drakeford got that sir - pandemic age. what has mark drakeford got that sir keir i pandemic age. what has mark i drakeford got that sir keir starmer
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hasn't? i drakeford got that sir keir starmer hasn't? ., �* ~' , drakeford got that sir keir starmer hasn't? ., �* ,, , ., hasn't? i don't think it is a question _ hasn't? i don't think it is a question of— hasn't? i don't think it is a question of one _ hasn't? i don't think it is a question of one having i hasn't? i don't think it is a i question of one having quality is another— question of one having quality is another tax. but question of one having quality is another tam— question of one having quality is another tax. but it is reflected in the numbers. — another tax. but it is reflected in the numbers, isn't— another tax. but it is reflected in the numbers, isn't it? _ another tax. but it is reflected in the numbers, isn't it? what i another tax. but it is reflected in the numbers, isn't it? what it. another tax. but it is reflected in i the numbers, isn't it? what it shows in the numbers _ the numbers, isn't it? what it shows in the numbers in _ the numbers, isn't it? what it shows in the numbers in wales _ the numbers, isn't it? what it shows in the numbers in wales is _ the numbers, isn't it? what it shows in the numbers in wales is that i the numbers, isn't it? what it shows in the numbers in wales is that we i in the numbers in wales is that we can leam— in the numbers in wales is that we can learn lessons from here in wales — can learn lessons from here in wales. here in wales, welsh labour is embedded in communities up and down _ is embedded in communities up and down wales and we had, firstly, mark drakeford's_ down wales and we had, firstly, mark drakeford's leadership during the pandemic, his careful leadership which _ pandemic, his careful leadership which has — pandemic, his careful leadership which has been so important. but also, _ which has been so important. but also, welsh labour offering that vision _ also, welsh labour offering that vision for— also, welsh labour offering that vision for the future. living wage for carers, — vision for the future. living wage for carers, guaranteed jobs for young — for carers, guaranteed jobs for young people, which is something that keir— young people, which is something that keir starmer has spoken out in favour_ that keir starmer has spoken out in favour of— that keir starmer has spoken out in favour of as— that keir starmer has spoken out in favour of as well. but building a low carbon _ favour of as well. but building a low carbon homes. the model we hear have in— low carbon homes. the model we hear have in welsh labour is something we can build _ have in welsh labour is something we can build on— have in welsh labour is something we can build on at a uk level going forward — can build on at a uk level going forward. ., ~ can build on at a uk level going forward. . ,, , ., can build on at a uk level going forward. . ~' , ., , can build on at a uk level going forward. . ,, i. , . can build on at a uk level going forward. . ~ ,, , . ., forward. thank you very much for our time
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forward. thank you very much for your time with — forward. thank you very much for your time with us _ forward. thank you very much for your time with us on _ forward. thank you very much for your time with us on bbc - forward. thank you very much for. your time with us on bbc breakfast this morning. labour are set to stay in power after matching their best ever set of election results twice taking 30 of election results twice taking 30 of the 60 seats in the senedd. and mark of the 60 seats in the senedd. jifuc mark drakeford said they exceeded expectations. tomosjoins us now from cardiff. so far it's been a much better result for labour than what was initially predicted? why has it worked there? i think mark drakeford _ why has it worked there? i think mark drakeford will _ why has it worked there? i think mark drakeford will definitely i why has it worked there? i think| mark drakeford will definitely get some _ mark drakeford will definitely get some plaudits and it is interesting to see _ some plaudits and it is interesting to see what the re—elected member of the senedd _ to see what the re—elected member of the senedd said, he said that mark drakeford — the senedd said, he said that mark drakeford was definitely an asset on that ticket— drakeford was definitely an asset on
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that ticket and might come across as a bit professor like, but thanks god for him _ a bit professor like, but thanks god for him i_ a bit professor like, but thanks god for him. i think the pandemic, never before _ for him. i think the pandemic, never before has— for him. i think the pandemic, never before has a — for him. i think the pandemic, never before has a first minister had such recognitioh — before has a first minister had such recognition. the pandemic has thrust the home _ recognition. the pandemic has thrust the home nation leaders to the forefront — the home nation leaders to the forefront of the minds of the welsh public, _ forefront of the minds of the welsh public, really, and i think we have seen _ public, really, and i think we have seen bolts— public, really, and i think we have seen polls that suggested the welsh public— seen polls that suggested the welsh public favoured the way mark drakeford was dealing with the pandemic compared to boris johnson over the _ pandemic compared to boris johnson over the border. pandemic compared to boris johnson overthe border. no pandemic compared to boris johnson over the border. no doubt that has had an— over the border. no doubt that has had an impact here, a strong showing for them _ had an impact here, a strong showing for them. the other thing, had an impact here, a strong showing forthem. the otherthing, as had an impact here, a strong showing for them. the other thing, as i mentioned _ for them. the other thing, as i mentioned earlier, if you remember back in— mentioned earlier, if you remember back in 2016, the vote in wales took place _ back in 2016, the vote in wales took place just— back in 2016, the vote in wales took place just a — back in 2016, the vote in wales took place just a few weeks before the eu referendum, and wales was the only other— referendum, and wales was the only other nation that voted to leave and ukip got _ other nation that voted to leave and ukip got seven seats here in wales. the ukip _ ukip got seven seats here in wales. the ukip vote has been spread between — the ukip vote has been spread between labour and the tories, so the labour— between labour and the tories, so the labour vote here has gone up this year—
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the labour vote here has gone up this year and they have strengthened their stronghold here. the tories have _ their stronghold here. the tories have made — their stronghold here. the tories have made some ground, but have not been able _ have made some ground, but have not been able to— have made some ground, but have not been able to breakdown the red wall in the _ been able to breakdown the red wall in the north—east of wales. the only other— in the north—east of wales. the only other mention is for plaid cymru, they lost— other mention is for plaid cymru, they lost their leader leanne wood, and labour— they lost their leader leanne wood, and labour took that. austin marks over -- _ and labour took that. austin marks over —— question marks over that. but mark— over —— question marks over that. but mark drakeford been front and centre _ but mark drakeford been front and centre of— but mark drakeford been front and centre of that campaign, it shows he is a strong _ centre of that campaign, it shows he is a strong leader for wales and that strategy has paid off for them. services on two of the country's busiest rail lines are facing severe disruption this morning. lner is asking passengers not to travel on the east coast main line for the rest of the day. most great western trains to and from london paddington have also been cancelled.
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this is just this isjust emerging in this is just emerging in the last few minutes. this isjust emerging in the last few minutes. let's get more on this with our correspondent, jon donnison. what is happening? for anyone travellin: what is happening? for anyone travelling on — what is happening? for anyone travelling on those _ what is happening? for anyone travelling on those routes - what is happening? for anyone l travelling on those routes today, what is happening? for anyone . travelling on those routes today, it will be _ travelling on those routes today, it will be pretty difficult. this is affecting great western trains between london, bristol, penzance, cardiff, _ between london, bristol, penzance, cardiff, and — between london, bristol, penzance, cardiff, and then also the main east coast _ cardiff, and then also the main east coast tine _ cardiff, and then also the main east coast line between london, the north east of— coast line between london, the north east of england and scotland. a spokesperson for the railway said this is— spokesperson for the railway said this is due — spokesperson for the railway said this is due to hairline cracks being found _ this is due to hairline cracks being found in— this is due to hairline cracks being found in the suspension units of a number— found in the suspension units of a number of— found in the suspension units of a number of its class 800 intercity trains _ number of its class 800 intercity trains and — number of its class 800 intercity trains and all such trains are having — trains and all such trains are having to _ trains and all such trains are having to be checked. he said it was the same _ having to be checked. he said it was the same problem being faced by lner k lima _ the same problem being faced by lner k lima trains. these trains are made by hitachi. _ k lima trains. these trains are made by hitachi, they are relatively new, assembled — by hitachi, they are relatively new, assembled here in the uk in the north—east of england, but clearly they have — north—east of england, but clearly they have got a problem and this comes— they have got a problem and this comesjust as people they have got a problem and this comes just as people are
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they have got a problem and this comesjust as people are probably beginning — comesjust as people are probably beginning to travel around the country— beginning to travel around the country a _ beginning to travel around the country a bit more. for anyone on those _ country a bit more. for anyone on those routes _ country a bit more. for anyone on those routes today, a pretty difficult _ those routes today, a pretty difficult weekend.— those routes today, a pretty difficult weekend. thank you very much. difficult weekend. thank you very much- over _ difficult weekend. thank you very much. over the _ difficult weekend. thank you very much. over the last _ difficult weekend. thank you very much. over the last year, - difficult weekend. thank you very much. over the last year, many l difficult weekend. thank you very | much. over the last year, many of difficult weekend. thank you very - much. over the last year, many of us have welcomed a four—legged friend into our household. but the demand for pets has led to a rise in animal thefts. calls have been made for tougher laws, and now the government has set up a task force to tackle the growing issue. dan johnson reports. she came to the door and she was so happy to see all of us that we alljust cried. this is what it means having a stolen dog back home. we tried to be calm, but we couldn't because we were so excited and we alljust burst out crying. nala was missing for a month after being taken from her dog walker's van. i didn't even eat. it's torture. that's the only way i can think about it. it's torture.
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your mind is going 1000 miles an hour, and even when you are asleep, you wake up, and i remember having panic attacks when i woke up because i was worried about the worst happening to her. and it's a growing problem. these dogs, more than 80 of them, were recovered in raids in ipswich a few weeks ago. most are still to be reunited with their owners. some police forces are already taking this more seriously. i'm the lead for dog theft within nottinghamshire. i believe i'm the first within the country. so are you ace ventura for the east midlands? i've been called that. it doesn't mean that i'm investigating all dog theft offences, but i have an overview of them. the new task force will bring together police and other experts to stop thefts and better investigate and prosecute the dognappers. for amy, this is personal as well as professional. thanks to tink, jasper and josey. i love these three to bits and i can't imagine that feeling if a dog were to be taken or stolen
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— the heartache that people and families must go through is unimaginable. and what i want to do as part of my role in nottinghamshire is to put support in place for people, for when pets go missing or they are taken away from families, because that does need recognising. they are not an item of property, they are part of the family. have you got advice for dog owners? most offences that we are seeing are animals being taken from the garden or from the home, so if people can secure fences, gates and garden boundaries, that will really help people. for people that's got the dogs, it's heartbreaking. _ i tried to ask dog owners about this problem. do you think it should be taken more seriously, then? 0h, definitely. it definitely should. they're part of your family, aren't they? especially when you read where people are being robbed in the street, having their dogs taken off them in the street. what is it coming to? the police should always do more but i understand they are busy.
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and they've got more serious crimes to contend with. - we worry when he is off the lead and we can't see him. even coming somewhere like here, which has been perfectly safe so far for him, but we are just very cautious about it. and there are calls for pet theft to be made a specific offence, or at least for tougher punishment. we absolutely need sentencing guidelines to reflect the fact that these are irreplaceable, priceless family pets, and when they are stolen it comes at a huge amount of emotional harm and burden to the owner. but obviously, in some cases as well, there's also issues in terms of welfare for that individual animal being taken as well. our dogs are not mobile phones. our dogs are not wheelbarrows. they are living beings who are basically our babies, ourfamily, and to some people, that is all they have. soto know that if their dog gets stolen, they can call up the police, they can call someone, and then get taken seriously is all they want. because she is irreplaceable. she is irreplaceable. she is the love of my life.
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she is my best friend. she's got me through so many things and i think experiencing not having her around was the worst thing ever. dan johnson, bbc news. really interesting how they said most of those effects happen on people's own property, from the house garden. you people's own property, from the house garden.— people's own property, from the house garden. you have to be so careful. house garden. you have to be so careful- it _ house garden. you have to be so careful- it is _ house garden. you have to be so careful. it is a _ house garden. you have to be so careful. it is a 30 _ house garden. you have to be so careful. it is a 30 am. _ house garden. you have to be so careful. it is a 30 am. we - house garden. you have to be so careful. it is a 30 am. we will. house garden. you have to be so careful. it is a 30 am. we will be back shortly. —— it is 8:30am.
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thanks forjoining us on breakfast. good morning to you. thousands of votes are still being counted across britain with more results expected later today — and in some cases on sunday and monday. there's plenty to work through — let's get the latest with newnight�*s policy editor, lewis goodall. given we have been talking about scotland — given we have been talking about scotland and what is going to happen now regarding another independence referendum, it mightjust be worth looking _ referendum, it mightjust be worth looking at— referendum, it mightjust be worth looking at it a little more detail. specifically, can the snp still get to the _ specifically, can the snp still get to the magic number, which is 65. thats— to the magic number, which is 65. that's the — to the magic number, which is 65. that's the number they have said they need — that's the number they have said they need for a majority on their own _ they need for a majority on their own. something that they dearly wanted — own. something that they dearly wanted. let's be clear, it has been a very— wanted. let's be clear, it has been a very good — wanted. let's be clear, it has been a very good night for the snp, they are clearly— a very good night for the snp, they are clearly going to form the next government, they are going to have another— government, they are going to have another term government, they are going to have anotherterm in government, they are going to have another term in office. they have won three — another term in office. they have won three additional constituency seats _ won three additional constituency seats you — won three additional constituency seats. you can see there are still some _ seats. you can see there are still some to — seats. you can see there are still some to be — seats. you can see there are still some to be filled in. some of which
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are constituency seats. the snp will take most— are constituency seats. the snp will take most of those. in order to get to 65. _ take most of those. in order to get to 65, thev— take most of those. in order to get to 65, they need to effectively take six of— to 65, they need to effectively take six of the _ to 65, they need to effectively take six of the really marginal constituencies. they have done some of that _ constituencies. they have done some of that they— constituencies. they have done some of that. they have taken east lothian — of that. they have taken east lothian from labour, edinburgh central— lothian from labour, edinburgh central from the conservatives. they have started to run into some difficultv _ have started to run into some difficulty. they did not take dumbarton, their top number one. they— dumbarton, their top number one. they didn't — dumbarton, their top number one. they didn't take them free share, that was— they didn't take them free share, that was a — they didn't take them free share, that was a conservative hold. that doesn't _ that was a conservative hold. that doesn't leave them much to play with, _ doesn't leave them much to play with. it _ doesn't leave them much to play with, it really doesn't. in order to have _ with, it really doesn't. in order to have any— with, it really doesn't. in order to have any hopes of getting to 65, that means they must take galloway and aberdeenshire west. what is the problem _ and aberdeenshire west. what is the problem with doing that? the problem is that— problem with doing that? the problem is that they— problem with doing that? the problem is that they need quite a considerable swing in these constituencies in order to get there — constituencies in order to get there. the problem is, in the other
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constituencies, they actually had a pretty— constituencies, they actually had a pretty small swing to them or a small— pretty small swing to them or a small swing away from them. in the seat of— small swing away from them. in the seat of dumfriesshire, there was a swing _ seat of dumfriesshire, there was a swing awav— seat of dumfriesshire, there was a swing away from the snp to the conservatives of 3.3%. there was a swing _ conservatives of 3.3%. there was a swing to _ conservatives of 3.3%. there was a swing to the — conservatives of 3.3%. there was a swing to the conservatives in eastwood of 0.4%. the problem with that is, _ eastwood of 0.4%. the problem with that is, if— eastwood of 0.4%. the problem with that is, if you compare with what they— that is, if you compare with what they need — that is, if you compare with what they need in galloway for example, they need in galloway for example, they need _ they need in galloway for example, they need about 2% swing in galloway in order— they need about 2% swing in galloway in order to _ they need about 2% swing in galloway in orderto take they need about 2% swing in galloway in order to take that seat. that is obviously— in order to take that seat. that is obviously much bigger than the swing that they— obviously much bigger than the swing that they had in the other seats. if we have _ that they had in the other seats. if we have a — that they had in the other seats. if we have a look at aberdeenshire west, _ we have a look at aberdeenshire west, again they need a bigger swing here then _ west, again they need a bigger swing here then that they achieved in the conservative constituencies that have _ conservative constituencies that have already been held. these are difficult _ have already been held. these are difficult seats for them to win by comparison to the conservative held seats _ comparison to the conservative held seats that _ comparison to the conservative held seats that they have already had. so it is a _ seats that they have already had. so it is a really— seats that they have already had. so it is a really difficult thing. in order— it is a really difficult thing. in order to _ it is a really difficult thing. in order to get that 65, they are going to have _ order to get that 65, they are going to have to— order to get that 65, they are going to have to take aberdeenshire west, galloway. _ to have to take aberdeenshire west, galloway, and even then, they need
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to take _ galloway, and even then, they need to take a _ galloway, and even then, they need to take a seat on the original proportion list in the highlands and islands _ proportion list in the highlands and islands it— proportion list in the highlands and islands. it is possible they still could — islands. it is possible they still could do— islands. it is possible they still could do it, but it is a narrow and tortuous— could do it, but it is a narrow and tortuous path for them. it is likely they are _ tortuous path for them. it is likely they are going to get close to that magical— they are going to get close to that magical line, maybe 263, 64, probably— magical line, maybe 263, 64, probably around 62 or 63, but not 65. probably around 62 or 63, but not 65 which — probably around 62 or 63, but not 65. which means that there will be very likely. — 65. which means that there will be very likely, with the scottish greens, _ very likely, with the scottish greens, who are pro independence as well, _ greens, who are pro independence as well, there _ greens, who are pro independence as well, there is— greens, who are pro independence as well, there is likely to be a pro—independence majority in holyrood, but less likely to be an snp only— holyrood, but less likely to be an snp only one, which some say will allow— snp only one, which some say will allow boris — snp only one, which some say will allow borisjohnson, make it easier for boris _ allow borisjohnson, make it easier for borisjohnson to allow borisjohnson, make it easier for boris johnson to avoid the question— for boris johnson to avoid the question of another referendum. thank— question of another referendum. thank you — question of another referendum. thank you very much indeed. it was a day of historic victories in labour s former heartlands yesterday, as the conservatives made major gains across england following thursday's bumper set of elections. on it goes.
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counting is still ongoing — including in wales and in scotland, where a strong performance for the snp will likely bolster calls for a second vote on independence. whether they get an overall majority or not. we'rejoined now by the environment secretary, george eustice. thank you forjoining us. it is easy to focus on your victory in hartlepool. which was clearly historic, but when you zoom out and look at that bigger picture, particularly in scotland, and the conservatives failure to make the progress that you might have done in scotland, allowing the snp it seems to form some kind of majority, you must be less satisfied? to form some kind of ma'ority, you must be less satisfied?_ to form some kind of ma'ority, you must be less satisfied? look, we are a -a must be less satisfied? look, we are a party and — must be less satisfied? look, we are a party and a — must be less satisfied? look, we are a party and a government _ must be less satisfied? look, we are a party and a government that - a party and a government that believes passionately in the uk, it is the most successful union in history. we have had a shared endeavour for hundreds of years and we desperately want to make sure
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that the uk union stays together. that is why we are trying to improve the way that policies are coordinated across the uk, why we want to make sure that having left the eu, every part of the uk benefits from the new freedoms that we gain and the new policy areas where we can exercise judgment. and also that we have that ability to be able to work right across the uk, fund projects across the uk as the uk government, and that is what we are seeking to do. we really need to take this opportunity to rebuild the cohesion and the purpose of the uk union. but cohesion and the purpose of the uk union. �* ,, ~' union. but with the snp looking like it is auoin union. but with the snp looking like it is going to — union. but with the snp looking like it is going to be _ union. but with the snp looking like it is going to be returned _ union. but with the snp looking like it is going to be returned to - union. but with the snp looking like it is going to be returned to power. it is going to be returned to power in scotland, either on its own with an overall majority or in a coalition, that union of the united kingdom is looking more precarious, isn't it? ~ . , , isn't it? well, that is why the government _ isn't it? well, that is why the government has _ isn't it? well, that is why the government has got - isn't it? well, that is why the government has got a - isn't it? well, that is why the government has got a lot - isn't it? well, that is why the government has got a lot ofl isn't it? well, that is why the - government has got a lot of policies to really try to strengthen the union, to make sure that every part of our kingdom has economic growth,
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prosperity, to make sure that there are areas where we work together and improve policy coordination, and don't have this approach where if a policy is devolved we don't even work together in partnership. we should do. so we are looking at lots of areas like that. there was also a referendum that took place just a little over five years ago. that was described as a once in a generation opportunity for people to debate these issues, and they did. and i think, as we try to come out of the pandemic and get economic recovery going, it is the wrong time to have yet another divisive referendum and yet another divisive referendum and yet another divisive referendum and yet another bout of constitutional argument on a matter such as this. but since that last independence referendum, there has been brexit, hasn't there? scotland overall voted to remain in the european union and you could say that that is a fundamental change in british politics and it is right to throw it back to the people of scotland. john
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swinney told us here at breakfast this morning, from the snp, that it is a fundamental democratic point to allow at least a referendum. it's hard for a prime minister who is only in hisjob because of a referendum on exit, to deny the people of scotland a referendum if thatis people of scotland a referendum if that is what they voted for. taste people of scotland a referendum if that is what they voted for. we had a referendum _ that is what they voted for. we had a referendum five _ that is what they voted for. we had a referendum five years _ that is what they voted for. we had a referendum five years ago. - that is what they voted for. we had a referendum five years ago. the i a referendum five years ago. the important thing is, i think, a referendum five years ago. the important thing is, ithink, now that we have left the european union, yes it was quite a divisive debate, there's no getting away from that, but it mean that whole swathes of policy area, particularly the one i deal with on of policy area, particularly the one ideal with on the environment and animal welfare, there is now more power going to scotland and wales and northern ireland and they have ever had before. areas of policy that have been occupied in a eu competence over the last 40—50 years are now policy is that the devolved administrations will be able to exercisejudgment on. i administrations will be able to exercise judgment on. i think that
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is going to be really important. we need to see how things are better down, and i think it isjust the wrong time to be having another referendum on scottish independence. john swinney told us that even if borisjohnson does not agree to a referendum that the snp in holyrood will begin the process of trying to do it through law, trying to legislate to allow it to happen. how far would you be prepared to go to stop it? could this end up in the courts? ., ., ~' stop it? could this end up in the courts? �* ., . . , courts? look, i'm not a lawyer. la ers courts? look, i'm not a lawyer. lawyers will— courts? look, i'm not a lawyer. lawyers will look— courts? look, i'm not a lawyer. lawyers will look at _ courts? look, i'm not a lawyer. lawyers will look at these - courts? look, i'm not a lawyer. l lawyers will look at these things. courts? look, i'm not a lawyer. i lawyers will look at these things. i think it is getting ahead of ourselves. we will have to see how the results pan out later today. it is questionable at the moment whether the snp will get a majority or not. we will have to wait and see when the results come through. the uk government's position is very strong on this. we don't think there is another case for a referendum, particularly now when we try to chart our way out of the pandemic. we will obviously deal with whatever we have to deal with once these selections are settled and once the
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new scottish administration decides what it wants to do. i new scottish administration decides what it wants to do.— what it wants to do. i was really struck hearing _ what it wants to do. i was really struck hearing from _ what it wants to do. i was really struck hearing from malcolm . what it wants to do. i was really struck hearing from malcolm in | struck hearing from malcolm in hartlepool who was talking to our correspondent chris about half an hour or so ago. he said he had voted for the conservative candidate, who indeed won, because he wanted more police officers on the street of hartlepool. he wanted better medical care, a court. he has really high expectations that you now are going to deliver for hartlepool and places like that. and that is going to cost an awful lot of money as well as political interest, isn't it? the expectation is that you are dealing with are enormous and quite dangerous for you if you fail to deliver. �* . . , dangerous for you if you fail to deliver. �*, . , . deliver. it's a very important responsibility _ deliver. it's a very important responsibility that _ deliver. it's a very important responsibility that we - deliver. it's a very important responsibility that we have. | deliver. it's a very important - responsibility that we have. parts of the country that have not voted conservative before, at least for decades in some cases, are now putting their trust in this prime minister and this government, and
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yes, that is a big responsibility. we cannot let people down. that is why the premise ministers put so much emphasis on levelling up, making sure that we have balanced growth in this country. making sure that those areas that were left behind after they lost their manufacturing industry and have struggled in recent decades actually get new industries, better paid jobs, better infrastructure, and thatis jobs, better infrastructure, and that is exactly what we will be trying to deliver in the years ahead. it is a big responsibility for us. we don't take at all for granted that these people put their faith and confidence in us, and we intend not to let them down. it is also going _ intend not to let them down. it is also going to _ intend not to let them down. it 3 also going to cause a huge amount of money at a time when you have already spent billions and billions on furlough and dealing with the pandemic, and for every person that wants you to spend in places like hartlepool there are others that say, "hang on, you can't keep spending money like this." fit spending money like this." of course, yes, we have had to spend quite a lot of money on the pandemic and there are challenges. but we do
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also have plans for quite an active regional policy in that we have got a community renewalfund regional policy in that we have got a community renewal fund that has already been announced and we are piloting ideas for a new shared prosperity fund. that has been government policy, we want to make sure that we have more balanced growth in our country. we can't have the situation we've had in recent years where all of the growth has beenin years where all of the growth has been in london, the city, the south—east. and it's been a sort of country into house in many ways. we can't have that. we need the whole country, every part of a united kingdom, to share in the prosperity and economic growth that we are trying to achieve.— and economic growth that we are trying to achieve. let's talk about a name of trying to achieve. let's talk about a game of two — trying to achieve. let's talk about a game of two halves. _ trying to achieve. let's talk about a game of two halves. football. l trying to achieve. let's talk about a game of two halves. football. i | a game of two halves. football. i know the prime minister was only too keen to wade into the super league debate a couple of weeks ago. what about this question of where the champions league final should be held. it is due to be in turkey, but
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two english sides who can't go to turkey, the fans can't go to turkey, so doesn't it make sense for the prime minister to say, "can be hosted here at home, please?" i understand that discussions are ongoing with uefa. it is a decision that uefa would take, but i think oliver dowden at the department for culture and media is looking at this issue and the uk i think has made this offer that we could hosted here, but it will ultimately be a decision for uefa. it is regrettable. we have had to put turkey on the red list, but we do have to make these judgments based on the science and risk of individual countries.- on the science and risk of individual countries. that is a formal offer _ individual countries. that is a formal offer that _ individual countries. that is a formal offer that has - individual countries. that is a formal offer that has gone i individual countries. that is a l formal offer that has gone into uefa? ~ , , . , formal offer that has gone into uefa? g , . , . uefa? my understanding is that there have been some _ uefa? my understanding is that there have been some discussions - uefa? my understanding is that there have been some discussions and - uefa? my understanding is that there have been some discussions and that| have been some discussions and that the football league here in england have made that offer, and there are some discussions with uefa about whether that would be a possibility. but it will ultimately be a final
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decision for uefa. flan but it will ultimately be a final decision for uefa.— but it will ultimately be a final decision for uefa. can i 'ust ask ou decision for uefa. can i 'ust ask you about i decision for uefa. can i 'ust ask you about pot * decision for uefa. can i just ask you about pet passports. - decision for uefa. can i just ask you about pet passports. in - decision for uefa. can i just ask. you about pet passports. in terms decision for uefa. can i just ask- you about pet passports. in terms of protecting pets. because we have been dealing with this this morning hearing the heartbreak from some pet owners about dog theft in particular. what can you as a government do to make pet owners and pets themselves are safer? there government do to make pet owners and pets themselves are safer?— pets themselves are safer? there has been some worrying _ pets themselves are safer? there has been some worrying trends, - pets themselves are safer? there has been some worrying trends, here. - been some worrying trends, here. although the data... it's difficult to get a handle on it. the estimates we have suggested that petty theft may have perhaps doubled in the last 12 months. some put it even higher than that. —— pet theft. people have been spending more time at home, perhaps suffering from loneliness, so they have sought to get a pet. there do appear to be a rise sometimes of organised gangs stealing pets in order to sell them. that is why we have set up a pet theft task force. we need to get to
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grips with the data so we can understand the problem. also see if we can improve coordination and intelligence sharing between police forces. there have been some successful raids and operations in places like hertfordshire and essex. we want to learn from those successes to make sure that we can catch those involved with this terrible crime which causes a huge trauma for people. it terrible crime which causes a huge trauma for people.— terrible crime which causes a huge trauma for people. it does. we have been hearing — trauma for people. it does. we have been hearing that _ trauma for people. it does. we have been hearing that trauma _ trauma for people. it does. we have been hearing that trauma this - been hearing that trauma this morning. thank you very much for joining us. morning. thank you very much for joining us— morning. thank you very much for 'oinino us. j~ . , g , joining us. 8:45am is the time. just one of the things _ joining us. 8:45am is the time. just one of the things i _ joining us. 8:45am is the time. just one of the things i think _ joining us. 8:45am is the time. just one of the things i think dan - joining us. 8:45am is the time. just one of the things i think dan is - one of the things i think dan is going to be taking a look at. good morning. really interesting to hear from mr hughes to stare. he says the final decision rests with uefa. it does seem a bit daft to send 8000 fans to travel to turkey when it is on the
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red list, and one of the that i think lots people have is that lots of people say common sense will dictate what happens here, but football and governments and common sense don't always go hand in hand. the champions league final. they face each other this weekend. it's 5:30pm today. lots to talk about the champions league final, but also whether they can beat chelsea. we will look at that. we will also talk about spurs. back in december, they were top of the league. now they have lost their manager atjose mourinho, a bit of uncertainty about where they will be one season from now. will harry kane still be their striker? what is going to happen with the euros? lots of things to discuss. he has been talking to kelly summers about spurs this
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season. ~ ., kelly summers about spurs this season. ~ . . ,, , season. we have had some good spells this season. — season. we have had some good spells this season. we — season. we have had some good spells this season, we have _ season. we have had some good spells this season, we have had _ season. we have had some good spells this season, we have had some - season. we have had some good spells this season, we have had some port . this season, we have had some port spells _ this season, we have had some port spells i_ this season, we have had some port spells. i think these last four games— spells. i think these last four games are a chance to give us a little _ games are a chance to give us a little bit — games are a chance to give us a little bit of— games are a chance to give us a little bit of a high to finish off the season. if we win all four, it might— the season. if we win all four, it might give — the season. if we win all four, it might give us a good chance to get into the _ might give us a good chance to get into the champions league. we can't io into the champions league. we can't go back— into the champions league. we can't go back in— into the champions league. we can't go back in time to change anything that has— go back in time to change anything that has happened, we just have to learn _ that has happened, we just have to learn from — that has happened, we just have to learn from this season as a whole and try— learn from this season as a whole and try to — learn from this season as a whole and try to finish strong.— learn from this season as a whole and try to finish strong. spurs take on leeds in — and try to finish strong. spurs take on leeds in the _ and try to finish strong. spurs take on leeds in the early _ and try to finish strong. spurs take on leeds in the early game - and try to finish strong. spurs take on leeds in the early game in - and try to finish strong. spurs take on leeds in the early game in the i on leeds in the early game in the premier league. we will also show you the goals from last night. huge with newcastle beating leicester with newcastle beating leicester with more goals to two. we've got a piece on pieters brett who came up from leaguei into the championship this season. we will look at the situation in spain. fascinatingly, the top for all play each other this weekend. and we will look at chelsea, at the women's team for chelsea, at the women's team for chelsea, who are on the verge of
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potential quadruple this season. also in the champions league final, just like the men's side. and we will look at the first ever women's fa cup final. from midday, we have lots to pack in. fa cup final. from midday, we have lots to pack im— lots to pack in. sounds really, really interesting. _ lots to pack in. sounds really, really interesting. have - lots to pack in. sounds really, really interesting. have you . really interesting. have you obviously been worrying about teddy, the dog? i obviously been worrying about teddy, the do ? . . obviously been worrying about teddy, the do ? , , , obviously been worrying about teddy, the do ? . . , ., , the dog? i missed this. the answer is es. the dog? i missed this. the answer is yes- how — the dog? i missed this. the answer is yes- how is _ the dog? i missed this. the answer is yes. how is teddy _ the dog? i missed this. the answer is yes. how is teddy the _ the dog? i missed this. the answer is yes. how is teddy the dog? - the dog? i missed this. the answer| is yes. how is teddy the dog? teddy has caused a — is yes. how is teddy the dog? teddy has caused a lot _ is yes. how is teddy the dog? teddy has caused a lot of— is yes. how is teddy the dog? teddy has caused a lot of worry _ is yes. how is teddy the dog? teddy has caused a lot of worry amongst . has caused a lot of worry amongst the team. i'm surprised it hasn't filtered down to you. see you later. we are also worried about teddy. we want we are also worried about teddy. , want an update. we are also worried about teddy. we want an update. is _ we are also worried about teddy. we want an update. is he _ we are also worried about teddy. we want an update. is he wet _ we are also worried about teddy. we want an update. is he wet or - we are also worried about teddy. we want an update. is he wet or isn't - want an update. is he wet or isn't he? i've had _ want an update. is he wet or isn't he? i've had an _ want an update. is he wet or isn't
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he? i've had an update. - want an update. is he wet or isn't he? i've had an update. here - want an update. is he wet or isn't l he? i've had an update. here teddy now. he's inside. _ he? i've had an update. here teddy now. he's inside. steve _ he? i've had an update. here teddy now. he's inside. steve tells - he? i've had an update. here teddy now. he's inside. steve tells me . now. he's inside. steve tells me that he — now. he's inside. steve tells me that he was— now. he's inside. steve tells me that he was actually trying to get in. ~ ., �* that he was actually trying to get in. . �* , that he was actually trying to get in. what i'm absolutely loving, i don't know— in. what i'm absolutely loving, i don't know if— in. what i'm absolutely loving, i don't know if it's _ in. what i'm absolutely loving, i don't know if it's a _ in. what i'm absolutely loving, i don't know if it's a utility - in. what i'm absolutely loving, i don't know if it's a utility room i in. what i'm absolutely loving, i l don't know if it's a utility room or the kitchen, that is the most glamorous chair for teddy to have with the washing machine behind. stylish steve. isaute with the washing machine behind. stylish steve-— stylish steve. we love a stylish do , and stylish steve. we love a stylish dog. and we — stylish steve. we love a stylish dog, and we love _ stylish steve. we love a stylish dog, and we love a _ stylish steve. we love a stylish dog, and we love a stylish - stylish steve. we love a stylish j dog, and we love a stylish chair stylish steve. we love a stylish - dog, and we love a stylish chair for a dog _ dog, and we love a stylish chair for a dog as _ dog, and we love a stylish chair for a dog as well. thank you for keeping us updated, — a dog as well. thank you for keeping us updated, steve. that's have a look _ us updated, steve. that's have a look at _ us updated, steve. that's have a look at the — us updated, steve. that's have a look at the situation weather—wise. it look at the situation weather—wise. it looks _ look at the situation weather—wise. it looks quite pretty on the satellite. it is not bringing us decent — satellite. it is not bringing us decent weather, i'm afraid. when the isobars are close together, it means _ when the isobars are close together, it means it's— when the isobars are close together, it means it's going to be windy. we are also— it means it's going to be windy. we are also drawing up this milder air mass _ are also drawing up this milder air mass from — are also drawing up this milder air
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mass from the south. this is what has been — mass from the south. this is what has been going on this morning. you can see _ has been going on this morning. you can see the — has been going on this morning. you can see the weather front direct from _ can see the weather front direct from northern ireland through much of england, where we will see some heavy— of england, where we will see some heavy rain _ of england, where we will see some heavy rain across parts of wales. a yellow _ heavy rain across parts of wales. a yellow weather warning in force across — yellow weather warning in force across south wales. join me on a tour— across south wales. join me on a tour as— across south wales. join me on a tour as we — across south wales. join me on a tour as we head up to scotland. it is remaining dry for now. we will see some — is remaining dry for now. we will see some sunshine for a as well. cold _ see some sunshine for a as well. cold after— see some sunshine for a as well. cold after a — see some sunshine for a as well. cold after a frosty start. that weather _ cold after a frosty start. that weather front moves up as we head through— weather front moves up as we head through the day. windy conditions as well. where it will improve is across— well. where it will improve is across northern ireland. the opportunity to see a bit of brightness here as we head to the day, perhaps across the south—east as welt~ _ day, perhaps across the south—east as welt~ top — day, perhaps across the south—east as well. top temperatures 18 celsius _ as well. top temperatures 18 celsius. dell cold up north, where we could — celsius. dell cold up north, where we could see some sleet or snow on hills _ we could see some sleet or snow on hills the _ we could see some sleet or snow on hills. the wind is a feature. wind gusts _ hills. the wind is a feature. wind gusts 45— hills. the wind is a feature. wind gusts 45 mph. here is the low pressure _ gusts 45 mph. here is the low pressure. you can see the wind introducing _
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pressure. you can see the wind introducing heavy showers to northern ireland, scotland. up towards— northern ireland, scotland. up towards the north—east of england as well. towards the north—east of england as welt~ it— towards the north—east of england as welt~ it will— towards the north—east of england as well. it will be a cold night with those _ well. it will be a cold night with those between ten and 12 celsius. thank— those between ten and 12 celsius. thank you — those between ten and 12 celsius. thank you very much. all those between ten and 12 celsius. thank you very much.— those between ten and 12 celsius. thank you very much. all that wet and windy weather _ thank you very much. all that wet and windy weather it _ thank you very much. all that wet and windy weather it might - thank you very much. all that wet and windy weather it might make | thank you very much. all that wet i and windy weather it might make you think about the summer and holidays. there has been a surge in bookings since those 12 destinations including portugal, gibraltar and india, which are all on the green list. ., ' ., we can now talk to maria elena rossi, the director of marketing and promotions at the italian tourism board. italy is on the amber list, so five days of quarantine needed. how do you feel about it? oh, maria, apologies, we are just having a few problems with your sound. we will
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try to get that organised. in the meantime, there are criticisms over the green list. we're joined now by garry wilson, the ceo of easyjet holidays. hopefully your sound is working. what did you make of this list? i know portugal is on there, but some other places i would struggle to find on a map, i have to admit. the aood find on a map, i have to admit. the good news — find on a map, i have to admit. the good news is _ find on a map, i have to admit. the good news is that travel is reopening and our customers can look forward _ reopening and our customers can look forward to— reopening and our customers can look forward to there as well and wrecks in the _ forward to there as well and wrecks in the summer. they have been waiting — in the summer. they have been waiting many months for. i think the very disappointing news isjust waiting many months for. i think the very disappointing news is just the number— very disappointing news is just the number of— very disappointing news is just the number of countries that are actually— number of countries that are actually on the list. as you say, if you look— actually on the list. as you say, if you look at — actually on the list. as you say, if you look at european countries, there _ you look at european countries, there are — you look at european countries, there are very few, and of those the major— there are very few, and of those the major holiday destination is portugal. we do think it is a very cautious. — portugal. we do think it is a very cautious, and it is really not aligned _ cautious, and it is really not aligned with the approach that the government has taken to domestic
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travel~ _ government has taken to domestic travel~ we — government has taken to domestic travel. we don't think it is backed up travel. we don't think it is backed up by— travel. we don't think it is backed up by the — travel. we don't think it is backed up by the science or the data. we really— up by the science or the data. we really expecting see very soon a lot of the _ really expecting see very soon a lot of the other major european holiday destinations opening up. we would call on _ destinations opening up. we would call on the — destinations opening up. we would call on the government to really make _ call on the government to really make sure — call on the government to really make sure that they look at this carefully— make sure that they look at this carefully and they get that done as done as— carefully and they get that done as done as quickly as possible. tiers; done as quickly as possible. very cautious, done as quickly as possible. very cautious. but _ done as quickly as possible. very cautious, but a _ done as quickly as possible. very cautious, but a lot _ done as quickly as possible. very cautious, but a lot of _ done as quickly as possible. , cautious, but a lot of people would say that is exactly what the government should be right now. absolutely. we have got to bear in mind _ absolutely. we have got to bear in mind these are green list countries, so in _ mind these are green list countries, so in order— mind these are green list countries, so in order to — mind these are green list countries, so in order to get on a green list country— so in order to get on a green list country there is a great number of criteria _ country there is a great number of criteria that — country there is a great number of criteria that have to be met. we believe — criteria that have to be met. we believe that looking at the science and the _ believe that looking at the science and the data that places like the greek— and the data that places like the greek islands, the canary islands, very popular holiday destinations actually — very popular holiday destinations actually do meet those criteria and should _ actually do meet those criteria and should be — actually do meet those criteria and should be on that list as well. and we will— should be on that list as well. and we will do — should be on that list as well. and we will do everything as an airline and as— we will do everything as an airline and as a _ we will do everything as an airline and as a tour operator to ensure that we _ and as a tour operator to ensure that we are — and as a tour operator to ensure that we are following the rules and that we are following the rules and that customers are brought on holiday— that customers are brought on holiday in— that customers are brought on holiday in a safe and secure way, but we _ holiday in a safe and secure way, but we have _ holiday in a safe and secure way, but we have to look at the data and the science — but we have to look at the data and
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the science, and simply does not back— the science, and simply does not back it _ the science, and simply does not back it up — the science, and simply does not back it up. especially when you look at how— back it up. especially when you look at how the _ back it up. especially when you look at how the government are looking to open the _ at how the government are looking to open the domestic market. so you can fly from _ open the domestic market. so you can fly from scotland to cornwall and you don't — fly from scotland to cornwall and you don't need to go through the rigorous — you don't need to go through the rigorous testing that you would need to -o rigorous testing that you would need to go to _ rigorous testing that you would need to go to a _ rigorous testing that you would need to go to a green country, even though— to go to a green country, even though the same principles apply to both _ though the same principles apply to both. con— though the same principles apply to both. ., though the same principles apply to both. . ., ., both. can we go to some practicalities. _ both. can we go to some practicalities. i'm - both. can we go to some practicalities. i'm just . both. can we go to some - practicalities. i'm just looking at the front page of the telegraph, and it's not a story that is a surprise really. the border force chief has been warning that holiday—makers are going to face airport delays because it is taking up to 15 times longer to check their travel documents. this is the border force chief warning. what advice are you giving to people who are booking at the moment? i to people who are booking at the moment? ., . to people who are booking at the moment? . , ,., to people who are booking at the moment? . , ., moment? i will answer the point on the border force, _ moment? i will answer the point on the border force, which _ moment? i will answer the point on the border force, which i— moment? i will answer the point on the border force, which i thought i the border force, which i thought was an— the border force, which i thought was an interesting and quite a disappointing statement that they made _ disappointing statement that they made. whilst we do fully respect the need and _ made. whilst we do fully respect the need and support you need to keep the border— need and support you need to keep the border safe, throughout the last
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1244— the border safe, throughout the last 12—14 months, all businesses within the aviation — 12—14 months, all businesses within the aviation and tourism sector have had to— the aviation and tourism sector have had to change their practices in order— had to change their practices in order to — had to change their practices in order to make sure that we are bringing — order to make sure that we are bringing customers on holiday and on flights— bringing customers on holiday and on flights and _ bringing customers on holiday and on flights and a very safe and secure way _ flights and a very safe and secure way. borderforce is flights and a very safe and secure way. border force is a government agency~ _ way. border force is a government agency. they have had more notice arguably— agency. they have had more notice arguably than any private business in order— arguably than any private business in order to — arguably than any private business in order to be able to put those processes— in order to be able to put those processes in place in order not to impact _ processes in place in order not to impact on — processes in place in order not to impact on customers, and you, now to say this— impact on customers, and you, now to say this is— impact on customers, and you, now to say this is going to be very difficult _ say this is going to be very difficult and customers are going to have to _ difficult and customers are going to have to wait 10—15 times longer, i don't _ have to wait 10—15 times longer, i don't think— have to wait 10—15 times longer, i don't think it is excusable. they have _ don't think it is excusable. they have had — don't think it is excusable. they have had time in order to put those processes— have had time in order to put those processes in— have had time in order to put those processes in place, which they've simply— processes in place, which they've simply not — processes in place, which they've simply not done. we will be talking to 0liver— simply not done. we will be talking to oliver customers. yesterday, we went— to oliver customers. yesterday, we went out— to oliver customers. yesterday, we went out to — to oliver customers. yesterday, we went out to other customers after the announcement in order to give them _ the announcement in order to give them the — the announcement in order to give them the options for their holidays, and we _ them the options for their holidays, and we just— them the options for their holidays, and we just advise them that they turn up _ and we just advise them that they turn up to— and we just advise them that they turn up to the airport in plenty of time _ turn up to the airport in plenty of time also — turn up to the airport in plenty of time. also that they are reminded of exactly— time. also that they are reminded of exactly what documentation will be needed _ exactly what documentation will be needed. ., exactly what documentation will be needed. . ., , .
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exactly what documentation will be needed. . ., '. , ., needed. yeah, the home office should sa , i needed. yeah, the home office should say. i should — needed. yeah, the home office should say. i should say. _ needed. yeah, the home office should say, i should say, are _ needed. yeah, the home office should say, i should say, are promising - needed. yeah, the home office should say, i should say, are promising to - say, i should say, are promising to provide more borderforce staff say, i should say, are promising to provide more border force staff and racing to integrate the electronic forms into their e gates. we are reporting a surge in bookings, holiday bookings. can you guarantee that customers aren't going to be ripped off? because this is an opportunity for holiday companies to say, right, the demand is there, we have got limited supply, we can wrap our prices up. the have got limited supply, we can wrap our prices up— our prices up. the one characteristic - our prices up. the one characteristic that - our prices up. the one characteristic that we | our prices up. the one - characteristic that we have at our prices up. the one _ characteristic that we have at the moment— characteristic that we have at the moment within aviation is that there is plenty— moment within aviation is that there is plenty of— moment within aviation is that there is plenty of spare capacity. plenty of planes — is plenty of spare capacity. plenty of planes sitting on the ground. when _ of planes sitting on the ground. when we — of planes sitting on the ground. when we got the announcement of the countries, _ when we got the announcement of the countries, we have about 1.5 million seats— countries, we have about 1.5 million seats that _ countries, we have about 1.5 million seats that go to the green destinations in europe. we have more capacity— destinations in europe. we have more capacity than any other airline. the last 24— capacity than any other airline. the last 24 hours, we have increased that~ _ last 24 hours, we have increased that we — last 24 hours, we have increased that. we will continue to look at the demand and we will continue to
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put more _ the demand and we will continue to put more capacity if need and asks for that _ put more capacity if need and asks for that. and just looking at last night _ for that. and just looking at last night and — for that. and just looking at last night and this morning, we still have _ night and this morning, we still have flights to portugal from 2999, and we _ have flights to portugal from 2999, and we still have holidays to portugal for under £250. we will do everything — portugal for under £250. we will do everything we can to make sure that we keep— everything we can to make sure that we keep flights and holidays as affordable as possible for our customers —— £29 99 p. affordable as possible for our customers -- £29 99 p. thank you very much- — we can now talk to maria elena rossi, the director of marketing and promotions at the italian tourism board. italy is on the amber list, so five days of quarantine needed. thanks forjoining us on breakfast. what did you make of this? well. thanks forjoining us on breakfast. what did you make of this? well, it is a disappointment, _ what did you make of this? well, it is a disappointment, although - what did you make of this? well, it is a disappointment, although we i is a disappointment, although we expected — is a disappointment, although we expected it. it is a disappointment because _ expected it. it is a disappointment because our prime minister has announced this week during the 620
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of tourism _ announced this week during the 620 of tourism the reopening of the ttalian — of tourism the reopening of the italian borders and an italian green pass starting from the 16th of may. so in _ pass starting from the 16th of may. so in that— pass starting from the 16th of may. so in that respect, we have opened to all— so in that respect, we have opened to all european countries, the us, and many— to all european countries, the us, and many other countries. and the fact that _ and many other countries. and the fact that we — and many other countries. and the fact that we are on the amber list is a pity. — fact that we are on the amber list is a pity, because for us, the uk market— is a pity, because for us, the uk market is— is a pity, because for us, the uk market is a _ is a pity, because for us, the uk market is a very important market. before _ market is a very important market. before the — market is a very important market. before the pandemic, we had more than 12_ before the pandemic, we had more than 12 million overnights coming from _ than 12 million overnights coming from the — than 12 million overnights coming from the uk. but we are very confident— from the uk. but we are very confident that the situation might change _ confident that the situation might chance. . . confident that the situation might chance. , , ., ., , change. this is going to be reviewed every three — change. this is going to be reviewed every three weeks. _ change. this is going to be reviewed every three weeks. what _ change. this is going to be reviewed every three weeks. what happens i change. this is going to be reviewed every three weeks. what happens in that interim period? what can you do? or do you simply have to hope that the data to satisfy the criteria that the uk government uses
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to determine which is on the green list, which is amber, which is read? well, italy is developing several covid _ well, italy is developing several covid three zones. a policy which has been — covid three zones. a policy which has been enforcing other countries. so that— has been enforcing other countries. so that is— has been enforcing other countries. so that is what we can do. and we are working — so that is what we can do. and we are working with the uk tourism industry— are working with the uk tourism industry to be ready as soon as possible — industry to be ready as soon as possible. and another aspect is that the season— possible. and another aspect is that the season will be extended. we have seen also _ the season will be extended. we have seen also last year, for a certain period. — seen also last year, for a certain period. the _ seen also last year, for a certain period, the possibility of extending the season also in the fall and in the season also in the fall and in the winter — the season also in the fall and in the winter. the tourism industry in italy the winter. the tourism industry in italy has— the winter. the tourism industry in italy has become very flexible and also adopted all the measures and the protocols necessary, and are looking _ the protocols necessary, and are looking forward very much to hosting
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uk travellers to italy.— uk travellers to italy. thank you forjoining _ uk travellers to italy. thank you forjoining us— uk travellers to italy. thank you forjoining us on _ uk travellers to italy. thank you forjoining us on the _ uk travellers to italy. thank you forjoining us on the bbc- uk travellers to italy. thank you forjoining us on the bbc this . forjoining us on the bbc this morning. we are looking very enviously at your sunshine in the background. it is a miserable, grey day here. so at least you have a sunny morning. thank you forjoining us. we will be back shortly. good morning.
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welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and jon kay. our headlines today: the snp wins key seats, but its hopes of winning an overall majority in the scottish parliament remain on a knife edge. wuot — remain on a knife edge. will what remain on a knife ed-e. will this result mean for another what will this result mean for another scottish independence referendum? we are at an outdoor pool that _ referendum? we are at an outdoor pool that only opened yesterday and the water _ pool that only opened yesterday and the water here is heating up at the same _ the water here is heating up at the same time — the water here is heating up at the same time as the political debate heats— same time as the political debate heats up — same time as the political debate heats up. we will be speaking to people _ heats up. we will be speaking to people on— heats up. we will be speaking to people on both sides of the independent divide. —— on the independence divide. —— on the independence divide. counting continues in england. the conservatives follow up their by—election win in hartlepool, with significant gains over labour. good morning from the oldest warship still afloat _ good morning from the oldest warship still afloat in europe. we are in hartlepool as we reflect on an extraordinary set of election results _ extraordinary set of election results here. extraordinary set of election results here. it's better news for labour in
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wales, as it matches its best—ever senedd election result. holiday bookings surge as 12 countries are added to the uk's green travel list, but the industry says it's too cautious. talking of travel, chelsea| and manchester city fans, call on uefa to move - the champions league final from istanbul to england, - after being told they shouldn't go to turkey, with the country now - added to the government's red list. and weather—wise, we are in the company of low pressure, introducing an unsettled story across much of the uk, but we also notice those temperatures rise. i'll return with all the details. it's saturday the 8th of may. our top story is that the snp's hopes of an outright majority in the scottish parliament still hang in the balance today. with votes still being counted, the party needs another 26 seats to win total control — but two key targets of dumbarton and eastwood have been missed. we're joined now by our political correspondent nick eardley, who is at holyrood this morning.
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he says he has been up all night with his abacus. what have you managed to assess about how this is looking? ih managed to assess about how this is lookin: ? . managed to assess about how this is lookin: ? , ., . ,, looking? in terms of an snp majority. — looking? in terms of an snp majority. it _ looking? in terms of an snp majority. it is _ looking? in terms of an snp majority, it is pretty - looking? in terms of an snp majority, it is pretty tight, i looking? in terms of an snp| majority, it is pretty tight, it could — majority, it is pretty tight, it could come down to one seat. some in the party— could come down to one seat. some in the party still— could come down to one seat. some in the party still think it is possible. we had the deputy first minister— possible. we had the deputy first minister on earlier saying he is not ruling _ minister on earlier saying he is not ruling it— minister on earlier saying he is not ruling it out — minister on earlier saying he is not ruling it outjust minister on earlier saying he is not ruling it out just yet, but minister on earlier saying he is not ruling it outjust yet, but it is going — ruling it outjust yet, but it is going to _ ruling it outjust yet, but it is going to be difficult. we probably will not _ going to be difficult. we probably will not know until later this afternoon. what looks more likely is that there _ afternoon. what looks more likely is that there will be a pro—independence majority in this place _ pro—independence majority in this place because when you add in the green _ place because when you add in the green party, who are also pro—independence, you are going to .et pro—independence, you are going to get probably if not above the 17 out of the _ get probably if not above the 17 out of the 129 _ get probably if not above the 17 out of the 129 msps. that raises the big question— of the 129 msps. that raises the big question about whether there will be another— question about whether there will be another referendum. let me show you another referendum. let me show you a couple _ another referendum. let me show you a couple of— another referendum. let me show you a couple of the papers and how they are translating the results so far.
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the daily— are translating the results so far. the daily telegraph says that nicola sturgeon _ the daily telegraph says that nicola sturgeon majority is unlikely. the national. — sturgeon majority is unlikely. the national, which is the pro—independence paper here, is saying _ pro—independence paper here, is saying yes, — pro—independence paper here, is saying yes, on track. it is glass half— saying yes, on track. it is glass half full, — saying yes, on track. it is glass half full, glass half empty for the independence movement depending on how you _ independence movement depending on how you look at it. what happens next? _ how you look at it. what happens next? whenjohn swinney how you look at it. what happens next? when john swinney was on how you look at it. what happens next? whenjohn swinney was on bbc breakfast _ next? whenjohn swinney was on bbc breakfast area, he was asked about what our— breakfast area, he was asked about what our majority would mean for a pro—independence referendum. there pro-independence referendum. there will be a majority _ pro-independence referendum. there will be a majority of _ pro—independence referendum. there will be a majority of members elected — will be a majority of members elected to— will be a majority of members elected to the _ will be a majority of members elected to the scottish - will be a majority of members - elected to the scottish parliament committed — elected to the scottish parliament committed to _ elected to the scottish parliament committed to the _ elected to the scottish parliament committed to the hosting - elected to the scottish parliament committed to the hosting of- elected to the scottish parliament committed to the hosting of an i committed to the hosting of an independence _ committed to the hosting of an independence referendum. - committed to the hosting of anl independence referendum. that committed to the hosting of an i independence referendum. that is committed to the hosting of an - independence referendum. that is a fundamental— independence referendum. that is a fundamental democratic _ independence referendum. that is a fundamental democratic point. - independence referendum. that is a fundamental democratic point. that| fundamental democratic point. that is what _ fundamental democratic point. that is what the — fundamental democratic point. that is what the scottish _ fundamental democratic point. that is what the scottish people - fundamental democratic point. that is what the scottish people will - is what the scottish people will have _ is what the scottish people will have voted _ is what the scottish people will have voted for— is what the scottish people will have voted for an _ is what the scottish people will have voted for an boris - is what the scottish people will. have voted for an borisjohnson, is what the scottish people will - have voted for an borisjohnson, to take it _ have voted for an borisjohnson, to take it back— have voted for an borisjohnson, to take it back to _ have voted for an borisjohnson, to take it back to your— have voted for an borisjohnson, to take it back to your earlier - take it back to your earlier question. _ take it back to your earlier question, should - take it back to your earlier question, should accept. take it back to your earlier - question, should accept democracy take it back to your earlier _ question, should accept democracy in scotland _ question, should accept democracy in scotland. ., . question, should accept democracy in scotland. . , ,, , scotland. that is the snp view. they have also said _ scotland. that is the snp view. they have also said they _ scotland. that is the snp view. they have also said they will— scotland. that is the snp view. they have also said they will pass - have also said they will pass legislation in holyrood for another referendum, which means they could
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be a big _ referendum, which means they could be a big political battle over the next _ be a big political battle over the next few — be a big political battle over the next few years and independence, potentially a big legal battle as welt~ _ potentially a big legal battle as well. the counting here get under way again— well. the counting here get under way again at 9am. i think it will go into the _ way again at 9am. i think it will go into the afternoon before we get the key result _ into the afternoon before we get the key result and it could be this evening — key result and it could be this evening before we have all of the final picture. but we will have it all on _ final picture. but we will have it all on the — final picture. but we will have it all on the bbc. that's the picture in scotland — a majority for the snp could bolster calls for another independence referendum. we'rejoined now by our chief political correspondent, adam fleming. good morning, adam. this referendum issueis good morning, adam. this referendum issue is not going away for boris johnson, is it? he has made it clear he is not up for it.— he is not up for it. yes, he has oiven he is not up for it. yes, he has given an _ he is not up for it. yes, he has given an interview— he is not up for it. yes, he has given an interview to - he is not up for it. yes, he has given an interview to say - he is not up for it. yes, he has given an interview to say he i he is not up for it. yes, he has - given an interview to say he would not be up for an independence referendum and it would not be responsible. his big challenge is how he looks like the prime minister of the united kingdom rather than just the prime minister of england. from his point of view, how does he react in a way that does not
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actually strengthen the snp's case? and their argument that he is anti—democratic? we got a little bit of a sense of what the prime minister might say later from the environment secretary. see minister might say later from the environment secretary.— minister might say later from the environment secretary. see how the results -an environment secretary. see how the results pan out _ environment secretary. see how the results pan out later— environment secretary. see how the results pan out later today, - environment secretary. see how the results pan out later today, it - environment secretary. see how the results pan out later today, it is - results pan out later today, it is questionable whether the snp will .et a questionable whether the snp will get a majority or not. we might have to wait— get a majority or not. we might have to wait and _ get a majority or not. we might have to wait and see. the uk government's position— to wait and see. the uk government's position is— to wait and see. the uk government's position is very clear, we do not think— position is very clear, we do not think there _ position is very clear, we do not think there is a case for another referendum, particularly now as we try to _ referendum, particularly now as we try to get _ referendum, particularly now as we try to get out of the pandemic and .et try to get out of the pandemic and get our— try to get out of the pandemic and get our economy going again. but we will obviously deal with whatever we have to _ will obviously deal with whatever we have to deal with once these elections are settled and once the new scottish administration decides what it— new scottish administration decides what it wants to do. a new scottish administration decides what it wants to do.— what it wants to do. a little clue at the end _ what it wants to do. a little clue at the end that _ what it wants to do. a little clue at the end that this _ what it wants to do. a little clue at the end that this is _ what it wants to do. a little clue at the end that this is not - what it wants to do. a little clue at the end that this is not an - what it wants to do. a little clue i at the end that this is not an issue that will be settled today or this weekend, that will rumble on for weeks and months and maybe even years. in terms of other things rumbling on, there are still more election results to come in in
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england. we will also get some places where things should go better for labour than they did yesterday. for example, the mayors in manchester, london and bristol, where labour will do much better than they did in english local authorities yesterday. but there is still quite a big row in the party about how to respond to all of this. one of keir starmer�*s allies is the shadow home secretary, and he gave us an idea about what keir starmer�*s thinking is to rescue the situation for labour. thinking is to rescue the situation for labour-— thinking is to rescue the situation for labour. ~ . . ., , ., for labour. what i want to see now is the keir— for labour. what i want to see now is the keir starmer _ for labour. what i want to see now is the keir starmer that _ for labour. what i want to see now is the keir starmer that i _ for labour. what i want to see now is the keir starmer that i know. - for labour. what i want to see now is the keir starmer that i know. he j is the keir starmer that i know. he has not _ is the keir starmer that i know. he has not had — is the keir starmer that i know. he has not had the chance to actually speak— has not had the chance to actually speak to _ has not had the chance to actually speak to a — has not had the chance to actually speak to a room of people over the past 12_ speak to a room of people over the past 12 months as leader of the labour— past 12 months as leader of the labour party. and i know throughout his career. _ labour party. and i know throughout his career. i— labour party. and i know throughout his career, i was inspired to back him as— his career, i was inspired to back him as leader because of tackling injustice — him as leader because of tackling injustice and inequality, and i am looking _ injustice and inequality, and i am looking forward to him now conducting that policy review and setting _ conducting that policy review and setting that out, trying to reconnect with people like those in hartlepool who we have lost touch
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with _ hartlepool who we have lost touch with it _ hartlepool who we have lost touch with. ,., , hartlepool who we have lost touch with. , ~' hartlepool who we have lost touch with. , ,, , with. it sounds like the big thing labour is planning _ with. it sounds like the big thing labour is planning to _ with. it sounds like the big thing labour is planning to do - with. it sounds like the big thing labour is planning to do is - with. it sounds like the big thing labour is planning to do is a - with. it sounds like the big thing i labour is planning to do is a policy review, looking at all their policies on everything, work out if they are the right ones and then come up with new ones if they feel they have to replace some of them. the problem with that, though, is that will annoy members of his own party who are opposed to some and not to others, meaning the next few months for labour might be dominated by another internal row. as long as keir starmer is spending time winning that argument, he is not spending time winning over the country. spending time winning over the count . ., . spending time winning over the count . . , , , spending time winning over the count . . , ,, , �* country. that is the issue, isn't it? thank— country. that is the issue, isn't it? thank you. _ country. that is the issue, isn't it? thank you, adam. - country. that is the issue, isn't it? thank you, adam. excuse l country. that is the issue, isn't i it? thank you, adam. excuse me. labour is set to stay in power in wales after matching its best—ever senedd election result by taking 30 of the 60 seats in the welsh parliament. first minister mark drakeford said his party had "exceeded expectations", after ending friday just one seat short of a majority. counting will continue today. our wales correspondent tomos morgan reports. after 22 years in charge,
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mark drakeford's welsh labour was predicted to be on the defensive in this election. but they have defied the polls and predictions, equalling their best ever results, with 30 seats — just one shy of a majority. i will do whatever i can do to make sure that wales has the government it needs — stable and progressive. and, like in england, it appears the ukip vote here that led to them winning seven seats five years ago has been split between labour and conservatives. thank you very much, returning officer. - the tories have benefited by gaining two seats, and labour increased their share. mark drakeford's welsh labour has very quietly subverted expectations of how well the party would be doing. it is not a repeat of what has happened in england. this is a very distinctly welsh election and it has not panned out as some might have thought. plaid cymru will be licking their wounds.
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they've lost former leader leanne wood and failed to make any gains. meanwhile, after losing their only constituency, the lib dems regained a regional seat. as wales begins to return to some sort of normality, this year's result may have proven that wales has been satisfied with labour's stewardship throughout the pandemic and have voted for another round. tomos morgan, bbc news. there's been a surge of holiday bookings after 12 destinations, including portugal, gibraltar and israel, were added to the government's 'green list�*. that means travellers returning to england from those countries will no longer have to self—isolate from the 17th of may. however, travel firms have expressed disappointment over the list — which they say is "overly cautious". great western railway services have been cancelled after hairline cracks were found in the suspension of a number of its high—speed trains. all such trains will now have to be checked and a spokesperson said all high—speed great western services between london, bristol,
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cardiff and penzance have been cancelled. it's also thought london north eastern railways, which operates the east coast main line, is facing similar problems. we will keep you updated on that throughout the day. police investigating the murder of community support officer julia james say they have identified the man whose picture had been shared yesterday as part of their investigation. julia died from significant head injuries while out walking her dog last month. our reporter sean dilley is in aylesham, the villagejulia was from. good morning, sean. what more do we know now as we get updates from the police? it know now as we get updates from the -olice? . ., know now as we get updates from the -olice? , . , , police? it is a little bit puzzling. we understand _ police? it is a little bit puzzling. we understand the _ police? it is a little bit puzzling. we understand the police - police? it is a little bit puzzling. we understand the police has i we understand the police has identified the man and they put the photograph out of. he said they would be key —— they said he would be key to the investigation. they will not be naming the individual concerned and have chosen to renew
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the appeal for any other information. they say the power of public information has helped this enquiry hugely. they do not need information on the identity of that gentleman any more, but they asking for anybody who was around on the 27th of april, the dayjulia james died, to contact police. anybody in the area between 1pm and 4:30pm specifically. potentially if you have —— can footage, cctv, something felt a little out of sorts for you that day and you and you felt you had to cross the road or change your route. we are in the centre of a ocean and it really is a small communityjust to my right. we have police officers and community support officers setting up a gazebo. behind us, many tributes to julia. they are really poignant because there are those that are clearly from relatives, mother, to a grandmother, to end any, and there are those who do not knowjulia
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aouar out or in grief for a community support officer who has lost her life. the message across many of them, justice forjulia. that message is very clear. if anybody is in the area at that time, anybody is in the area at that time, any feeling that something is just not right, tell the police. it is 9:13am and _ not right, tell the police. it is 9:13am and it _ not right, tell the police. it is 9:13am and it has _ not right, tell the police. it is 9:13am and it has been - not right, tell the police. it 3 9:13am and it has been pretty wild and wet in some places. a pretty wet weekend. a , and wet in some places. a pretty wet weekend. , ., , . and wet in some places. a pretty wet weekend. , . . . , weekend. many others have already seen the wet _ weekend. many others have already seen the wet and _ weekend. many others have already seen the wet and windy _ weekend. many others have already seen the wet and windy conditions i seen the wet and windy conditions already. i know for most this is not the kind of headline you want to see for a weekend, but it is going to be unsettled, but not as cold. temperatures rising over the next few days. let's look at the mechanics, if you like, as to why this is happening. to the west there
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is an area of low pressure, cloud swirling around in these bands and these are actually weather fronts. they tend to create cloud and rain and that is what they will do as we head through the next few days here. the low pressure will introduce blustery conditions, but it is also drawing up much milder air mass, so we have been in the cold air mass, but as we head through today, we will notice that warmer air getting to us. the rain is the main feature of the forecast, really. let's have a closer look. we have a web warning in force across parts of south wales, a yellow weather warning, but you can see the weather has draped towards the south—east. part of scotland still seeing some brightness after a chilly start. eventually that warm air will creep up. let run the graphics. as we head through the day, we will seek further rain. as far as an
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improvement, brightness and sunshine, northern ireland is the place to be as far as that is concerned. cloudy elsewhere, perhaps some sunshine across the south—east. heavy incessant rainfall across parts of wales and that reaches scotland as we progress through this afternoon. blustery day, top temperatures, a tongue —— a bit of a contrast here. we are still in the colder air in the north, temperatures struggling to get to 809 celsius. through this evening, the winds will strengthen and they are a feature of the forecast, with winds reaching 40 mph and the rain continues up north. behind this, we see this band of rain and this will tend to lose some of its energy. heavy showers across northern ireland into western parts of scotland as well. at the temperature for tonight, these are our lows,
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everyone. 12 or 13 celsius. over the past few days, we were lucky to get that for our top temperatures by day. it really will be mild. the showery story tomorrow. still windy, but still the opportunity for some of us to get some brightness and sunshine as well. temperatures on the up. in southern and south—eastern parts of england, we will see the highest of those temperatures. 20 or 21 celsius. lots of pictures of gazebos flying around, and garden furniture as well, semi—they are anchored down. and teddy as well, obviously. i well, semi-they are anchored down. and teddy as well, obviously.- and teddy as well, obviously. i have furniture that _ and teddy as well, obviously. i have furniture that is _ and teddy as well, obviously. i have furniture that is not _ and teddy as well, obviously. i have furniture that is not secure! - and teddy as well, obviously. i have furniture that is not secure! you - furniture that is not secure! you must watch _ furniture that is not secure! you must watch them! _ furniture that is not secure! guru. must watch them! strap them down. flying trampolines, umbrellas, we will see them all.
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from the announcement of the government's "green list" countries, to news that the under 405 will be offered an alternative vaccine to the oxford—astrazeneca jab. there's plenty to chat to our next two guests about this morning. they are — of course — professor of public health, linda bauld and the virologist dr chris smith. good morning to you both. shall we start with vaccines and this announcement about under 40 is being given an alternative to the astrazeneca? if you are under 40 and had been told you need something else, should you be worried? what should you think this morning? i think this was a decision taken by the committee on vaccination and immunisation with the medicines health— immunisation with the medicines health care regulatory agency to essentially say that, at the current time when — essentially say that, at the current time when the prevalence of the disease — time when the prevalence of the disease is — time when the prevalence of the disease is so low, in the uk, and there _ disease is so low, in the uk, and there has— disease is so low, in the uk, and there has been some incidents of these _ there has been some incidents of these very— there has been some incidents of these very rare blood clots, we know from the _ these very rare blood clots, we know from the data release there has been 'ust from the data release there has been just about _ from the data release there has been just about 240 at the mhra has
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identified, the balance of risk is that because we have got other vaccines, — that because we have got other vaccines, from which we have not seen _ vaccines, from which we have not seen these — vaccines, from which we have not seen these adverse events, pfizer and moderne, to be cautious and offer— and moderne, to be cautious and offer those deemed people as they come _ offer those deemed people as they come forward. but if a younger person— come forward. but if a younger person has— come forward. but if a younger person has already had an astrazeneca oxford vaccine, they will still _ astrazeneca oxford vaccine, they will still receive that for the second _ will still receive that for the second it goes because these adverse events— second it goes because these adverse events are _ second it goes because these adverse events are even rarer for the second dose _ events are even rarer for the second dose they— events are even rarer for the second dose. they should not be worried, it is done _ dose. they should not be worried, it is done with— dose. they should not be worried, it is done with caution and young people — is done with caution and young people will continue to get a safe and effective vaccine. do people will continue to get a safe and effective vaccine.— people will continue to get a safe and effective vaccine. do you agree with that? yes. — and effective vaccine. do you agree with that? yes, it _ and effective vaccine. do you agree with that? yes, it is _ and effective vaccine. do you agree with that? yes, it is based - and effective vaccine. do you agree with that? yes, it is based on - and effective vaccine. do you agree with that? yes, it is based on what| with that? yes, it is based on what the figures — with that? yes, it is based on what the figures show _ with that? yes, it is based on what the figures show us _ with that? yes, it is based on what the figures show us and _ with that? yes, it is based on what the figures show us and it - with that? yes, it is based on what the figures show us and it shows i the figures show us and it shows there _ the figures show us and it shows there is— the figures show us and it shows there is a — the figures show us and it shows there is a risk— the figures show us and it shows there is a risk below— the figures show us and it shows there is a risk below the - the figures show us and it shows there is a risk below the age - the figures show us and it shows there is a risk below the age of. the figures show us and it shows i there is a risk below the age of 40 and since — there is a risk below the age of 40 and since we — there is a risk below the age of 40 and since we have _ there is a risk below the age of 40 and since we have alternatives, i there is a risk below the age of 40 i and since we have alternatives, why not just _ and since we have alternatives, why not just switch — and since we have alternatives, why not just switch to _ and since we have alternatives, why not just switch to one _ and since we have alternatives, why not just switch to one of— and since we have alternatives, why not just switch to one of those - and since we have alternatives, why not just switch to one of those for. not just switch to one of those for those _ not just switch to one of those for those over— not just switch to one of those for those over age _ not just switch to one of those for those over age groups _ not just switch to one of those for those over age groups while - not just switch to one of those for those over age groups while we i not just switch to one of those for. those over age groups while we get more _ those over age groups while we get more data — those over age groups while we get more data on— those over age groups while we get more data on what _ those over age groups while we get more data on what the _ those over age groups while we get more data on what the mechanism i those over age groups while we get i more data on what the mechanism of this is? _ more data on what the mechanism of this is? we _ more data on what the mechanism of this is? we think— more data on what the mechanism of this is? we think we _ more data on what the mechanism of this is? we think we know— more data on what the mechanism of this is? we think we know what- more data on what the mechanism of this is? we think we know what is- this is? we think we know what is going _ this is? we think we know what is going on— this is? we think we know what is going on but— this is? we think we know what is going on but we _ this is? we think we know what is going on but we need _ this is? we think we know what is going on but we need more - going on but we need more clarification. _ going on but we need more clarification. meanwhile, i going on but we need more clarification. meanwhile, it| going on but we need more - clarification. meanwhile, it seems safe to— clarification. meanwhile, it seems safe to sing — clarification. meanwhile, it seems safe to sing to _ clarification. meanwhile, it seems safe to sing to do _ clarification. meanwhile, it seems
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safe to sing to do —— _ clarification. meanwhile, it seems safe to sing to do —— safe - clarification. meanwhile, it seems safe to sing to do —— safe thing i clarification. meanwhile, it seems safe to sing to do —— safe thing toj safe to sing to do —— safe thing to do. safe to sing to do —— safe thing to do some — safe to sing to do —— safe thing to do. some people _ safe to sing to do —— safe thing to do. some people will— safe to sing to do —— safe thing to do. some people will be - safe to sing to do —— safe thing to do. some people will be asking, ij do. some people will be asking, i have _ do. some people will be asking, i have had — do. some people will be asking, i have had one _ do. some people will be asking, i have had one dose, _ do. some people will be asking, i have had one dose, should - do. some people will be asking, i have had one dose, should i- do. some people will be asking, i have had one dose, should i have do. some people will be asking, i- have had one dose, should i have the second _ have had one dose, should i have the second one? — have had one dose, should i have the second one? the _ have had one dose, should i have the second one? the chances _ have had one dose, should i have the second one? the chances of- have had one dose, should i have the second one? the chances of having i have had one dose, should i have the second one? the chances of having a| second one? the chances of having a side effect _ second one? the chances of having a side effect if— second one? the chances of having a side effect if you _ second one? the chances of having a side effect if you did _ second one? the chances of having a side effect if you did not _ second one? the chances of having a side effect if you did not have - second one? the chances of having a side effect if you did not have it - side effect if you did not have it after _ side effect if you did not have it after the — side effect if you did not have it after the first _ side effect if you did not have it after the first are _ side effect if you did not have it after the first are very- side effect if you did not have it after the first are very rare - after the first are very rare indeed _ after the first are very rare indeed you _ after the first are very rare indeed. you can _ after the first are very rare indeed. you can be - after the first are very rare i indeed. you can be reassured after the first are very rare - indeed. you can be reassured that if you had _ indeed. you can be reassured that if you had the — indeed. you can be reassured that if you had the first _ indeed. you can be reassured that if you had the first dose, _ indeed. you can be reassured that if you had the first dose, you - indeed. you can be reassured that if you had the first dose, you will- indeed. you can be reassured that if you had the first dose, you will be i you had the first dose, you will be even _ you had the first dose, you will be even safer— you had the first dose, you will be even safer than— you had the first dose, you will be even safer than members- you had the first dose, you will be even safer than members of- you had the first dose, you will be even safer than members of the i even safer than members of the population— even safer than members of the population who _ even safer than members of the population who have _ even safer than members of the population who have not. - even safer than members of the population who have not. talking about second _ population who have not. talking about second doses, _ population who have not. talking about second doses, where - population who have not. talking about second doses, where are l population who have not. talking i about second doses, where are we population who have not. talking - about second doses, where are we at when it comes to, you know, there were lots of research being done for alternative manufacturers of the vaccine, like the vaccine and the astrazeneca second. where are we at on that? ., ., . . astrazeneca second. where are we at on that? . ., , _ on that? that has been led by colleagues — on that? that has been led by colleagues in _ on that? that has been led by colleagues in oxford. - on that? that has been led by colleagues in oxford. they i on that? that has been led by - colleagues in oxford. they started a couple _ colleagues in oxford. they started a couple of _ colleagues in oxford. they started a couple of months ago and are recruiting _ couple of months ago and are recruiting 800 also individuals. they— recruiting 800 also individuals. they are — recruiting 800 also individuals. they are doing two things —
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switching the vaccines, astrazeneca first and _ switching the vaccines, astrazeneca first and pfizer second. they also testing _ first and pfizer second. they also testing dosing arrangements. we should _ testing dosing arrangements. we should see the results of that trial soon~ _ should see the results of that trial soon i_ should see the results of that trial soon i do— should see the results of that trial soon. i do not think they will change — soon. i do not think they will change the advice on having the same vaccine _ change the advice on having the same vaccine for— change the advice on having the same vaccine for both doses for the vast majority— vaccine for both doses for the vast majority of— vaccine for both doses for the vast majority of people until we see the results _ majority of people until we see the results. finally, on that trial, it is being — results. finally, on that trial, it is being extended to what is looking at booster— is being extended to what is looking at booster vaccines that some may receive _ at booster vaccines that some may receive in — at booster vaccines that some may receive in the autumn that may be modified _ receive in the autumn that may be modified to respond slightly better to some _ modified to respond slightly better to some of the variants we have. important— to some of the variants we have. important research but we do not yet have the _ important research but we do not yet have the vat — important research but we do not yet have the vat findings.— have the vat findings. apparently many people _ have the vat findings. apparently many people booking _ have the vat findings. apparently many people booking holidays i many people booking holidays overnight as some countries are on the green list, countries we do not have to sell a slate after travelling. chris, you were worried about the governance being too speedy on this and —— you do not
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have to self—isolate after travelling. what do you make of this? . , , , , travelling. what do you make of this? . ,, , , . travelling. what do you make of this? , , ,, this? the approach seems a sensible one, this? the approach seems a sensible one. where — this? the approach seems a sensible one. where you _ this? the approach seems a sensible one, where you are _ this? the approach seems a sensible one, where you are taking _ this? the approach seems a sensible one, where you are taking into i one, where you are taking into account — one, where you are taking into account what _ one, where you are taking into account what the _ one, where you are taking into account what the activity- one, where you are taking into account what the activity of- one, where you are taking into| account what the activity of the virus _ account what the activity of the virus is — account what the activity of the virus is in — account what the activity of the virus is in the _ account what the activity of the virus is in the end _ account what the activity of the virus is in the end destination. account what the activity of the i virus is in the end destination and what _ virus is in the end destination and what the — virus is in the end destination and what the vaccine _ virus is in the end destination and what the vaccine status _ virus is in the end destination and what the vaccine status of- virus is in the end destination and what the vaccine status of the i what the vaccine status of the population _ what the vaccine status of the population in— what the vaccine status of the population in that _ what the vaccine status of the population in that end - what the vaccine status of the i population in that end destination is, and _ population in that end destination is, and what — population in that end destination is, and what the _ population in that end destination is, and what the variant _ population in that end destination is, and what the variant status i population in that end destination is, and what the variant status is. j is, and what the variant status is. what _ is, and what the variant status is. what we — is, and what the variant status is. what we are _ is, and what the variant status is. what we are worried _ is, and what the variant status is. what we are worried about, - is, and what the variant status is. what we are worried about, and i is, and what the variant status is. i what we are worried about, and this was echoed — what we are worried about, and this was echoed by— what we are worried about, and this was echoed by grant _ what we are worried about, and this was echoed by grant shapps - was echoed by grant shapps yesterday. _ was echoed by grant shapps yesterday. is _ was echoed by grant shapps yesterday, is that _ was echoed by grant shapps yesterday, is that a - was echoed by grant shapps yesterday, is that a lot - was echoed by grant shapps yesterday, is that a lot of i was echoed by grant shapps i yesterday, is that a lot of good work _ yesterday, is that a lot of good work has — yesterday, is that a lot of good work has been _ yesterday, is that a lot of good work has been put _ yesterday, is that a lot of good work has been put into- yesterday, is that a lot of good work has been put into putting| yesterday, is that a lot of good i work has been put into putting us in a strong _ work has been put into putting us in a strong position— work has been put into putting us in a strong position in— work has been put into putting us in a strong position in in— work has been put into putting us in a strong position in in this _ work has been put into putting us in a strong position in in this country. a strong position in in this country and we _ a strong position in in this country and we do — a strong position in in this country and we do not _ a strong position in in this country and we do not want _ a strong position in in this country and we do not want to— a strong position in in this country and we do not want to potentiallyl and we do not want to potentially endanger— and we do not want to potentially endanger that— and we do not want to potentially endanger that good _ and we do not want to potentially endanger that good work- and we do not want to potentially endanger that good work by- and we do not want to potentially- endanger that good work by importing back to _ endanger that good work by importing back to our— endanger that good work by importing back to our country _ endanger that good work by importing back to our country cases _ endanger that good work by importing back to our country cases of— back to our country cases of coronavirus _ back to our country cases of coronavirus that _ back to our country cases of coronavirus that could - back to our country cases of. coronavirus that could bypass back to our country cases of- coronavirus that could bypass the protection — coronavirus that could bypass the protection we _ coronavirus that could bypass the protection we have _ coronavirus that could bypass the protection we have given - coronavirus that could bypass the protection we have given our- protection we have given our population— protection we have given our population by— protection we have given our population by being - protection we have given our population by being a - protection we have given our population by being a variant protection we have given our. population by being a variant of some _ population by being a variant of some kind _ population by being a variant of some kind. the _ population by being a variant of some kind. the measures - population by being a variant of some kind. the measures we i population by being a variant of. some kind. the measures we have population by being a variant of- some kind. the measures we have been putting _ some kind. the measures we have been putting in— some kind. the measures we have been putting in place — some kind. the measures we have been putting in place are _ some kind. the measures we have been putting in place are sensible, _ some kind. the measures we have been putting in place are sensible, they- putting in place are sensible, they are measured _ putting in place are sensible, they are measured measures— putting in place are sensible, they are measured measures at - putting in place are sensible, they are measured measures at the i putting in place are sensible, they- are measured measures at the moment, but it is— are measured measures at the moment, but it is an _ are measured measures at the moment, but it is an unknown _ are measured measures at the moment, but it is an unknown bit _ are measured measures at the moment, but it is an unknown bit of— but it is an unknown bit of territory _ but it is an unknown bit of territory we _ but it is an unknown bit of territory we are _ but it is an unknown bit of territory we are going i but it is an unknown bit ofl territory we are going into. but it is an unknown bit of. territory we are going into. it but it is an unknown bit of- territory we are going into. it is important — territory we are going into. it is important we _ territory we are going into. it is important we take _ territory we are going into. it is important we take small - territory we are going into. it is important we take small stepsl territory we are going into. it is i important we take small steps and
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have measures _ important we take small steps and have measures in _ important we take small steps and have measures in place _ important we take small steps and have measures in place to- important we take small steps and l have measures in place to measure what _ have measures in place to measure what we _ have measures in place to measure what we are — have measures in place to measure what we are doing _ have measures in place to measure what we are doing so _ have measures in place to measure what we are doing so we _ have measures in place to measure what we are doing so we can- have measures in place to measure what we are doing so we can find i have measures in place to measure. what we are doing so we can find out whether— what we are doing so we can find out whether or— what we are doing so we can find out whether or not — what we are doing so we can find out whether or not they— what we are doing so we can find out whether or not they are _ whether or not they are proportionate _ whether or not they are proportionate or- whether or not they are _ proportionate or disproportionate, if it is _ proportionate or disproportionate, if it is heavy—handed, _ proportionate or disproportionate, if it is heavy—handed, we - proportionate or disproportionate, if it is heavy—handed, we can i proportionate or disproportionate, if it is heavy—handed, we can easej if it is heavy—handed, we can ease it off, _ if it is heavy—handed, we can ease it off, if— if it is heavy—handed, we can ease it off, if it— if it is heavy—handed, we can ease it off, if it is— if it is heavy—handed, we can ease it off, if it is too _ if it is heavy—handed, we can ease it off, if it is too light _ if it is heavy—handed, we can ease it off, if it is too light a _ if it is heavy—handed, we can ease it off, if it is too light a touch, i it off, if it is too light a touch, we can— it off, if it is too light a touch, we can tighten _ it off, if it is too light a touch, we can tighten things - it off, if it is too light a touch, we can tighten things up. i it off, if it is too light a touch, we can tighten things up. but| it off, if it is too light a touch, i we can tighten things up. but it is about— we can tighten things up. but it is about small— we can tighten things up. but it is about small steps _ we can tighten things up. but it is about small steps and _ we can tighten things up. but it is about small steps and learning i we can tighten things up. but it is about small steps and learning as we can tighten things up. but it is. about small steps and learning as we io about small steps and learning as we -o to about small steps and learning as we go to make _ about small steps and learning as we go to make the — about small steps and learning as we go to make the best— about small steps and learning as we go to make the best decisions - about small steps and learning as we go to make the best decisions going i go to make the best decisions going forward _ go to make the best decisions going forward to— go to make the best decisions going forward to put— go to make the best decisions going forward to put ourselves _ go to make the best decisions going forward to put ourselves in - go to make the best decisions going forward to put ourselves in the i go to make the best decisions going forward to put ourselves in the best| forward to put ourselves in the best position— forward to put ourselves in the best position not— forward to put ourselves in the best position notjust _ forward to put ourselves in the best position notjust for— forward to put ourselves in the best position not just for the _ forward to put ourselves in the best position notjust for the summer, . position notjust for the summer, but going — position notjust for the summer, but going ahead _ position notjust for the summer, but going ahead and _ position notjust for the summer, but going ahead and in _ position notjust for the summer, but going ahead and in the - position notjust for the summer, i but going ahead and in the autumn position notjust for the summer, - but going ahead and in the autumn as well. but going ahead and in the autumn as weii when_ but going ahead and in the autumn as well. when autumn _ but going ahead and in the autumn as well. when autumn comes, _ but going ahead and in the autumn as well. when autumn comes, this - but going ahead and in the autumn as well. when autumn comes, this putsi well. when autumn comes, this puts the pressure — well. when autumn comes, this puts the pressure back— well. when autumn comes, this puts the pressure back on _ well. when autumn comes, this puts the pressure back on again _ well. when autumn comes, this puts the pressure back on again and - well. when autumn comes, this puts the pressure back on again and we . well. when autumn comes, this putsi the pressure back on again and we do generativ— the pressure back on again and we do generally see — the pressure back on again and we do generally see an _ the pressure back on again and we do generally see an uptick _ the pressure back on again and we do generally see an uptick in _ the pressure back on again and we do generally see an uptick in seasonal. generally see an uptick in seasonal infections — generally see an uptick in seasonal infections them, _ generally see an uptick in seasonal infections them, including - generally see an uptick in seasonal infections them, including for- infections them, including for coronavirus _ infections them, including for coronavirus infections. - infections them, including for coronavirus infections. looking at our inbox this _ coronavirus infections. looking at our inbox this morning, _ coronavirus infections. looking at our inbox this morning, not - coronavirus infections. looking at i our inbox this morning, not netting in touch to say, hang on, we have had the vaccination, the most vulnerable have had it, what was the point in protecting ourselves if we cannot go on holiday to places where they might not be as safe as portugal, but maybe not that much riskier? some frustration this morning that the government is maybe
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being too cautious, not least from the travel industry. i being too cautious, not least from the travel industry.— the travel industry. i share that frustration _ the travel industry. i share that frustration and _ the travel industry. i share that frustration and i _ the travel industry. i share that frustration and i am _ the travel industry. i share that frustration and i am as - the travel industry. i share that l frustration and i am as frustrated as the _ frustration and i am as frustrated as the next— frustration and i am as frustrated as the next person _ frustration and i am as frustrated as the next person and _ frustration and i am as frustrated as the next person and would - frustration and i am as frustrated l as the next person and would love frustration and i am as frustrated - as the next person and would love to be going _ as the next person and would love to be going on— as the next person and would love to be going on holiday— as the next person and would love to be going on holiday as— as the next person and would love to be going on holiday as well. - as the next person and would love to be going on holiday as well. i- as the next person and would love to be going on holiday as well. i think. be going on holiday as well. i think the thing _ be going on holiday as well. i think the thing to— be going on holiday as well. i think the thing to bear— be going on holiday as well. i think the thing to bear in— be going on holiday as well. i think the thing to bear in mind _ be going on holiday as well. i think the thing to bear in mind with- be going on holiday as well. i think the thing to bear in mind with all. the thing to bear in mind with all of this— the thing to bear in mind with all of this is— the thing to bear in mind with all of this is that — the thing to bear in mind with all of this is that this _ the thing to bear in mind with all of this is that this is _ the thing to bear in mind with all of this is that this is a _ the thing to bear in mind with alli of this is that this is a short—term measure — of this is that this is a short—term measure and _ of this is that this is a short—term measure and this _ of this is that this is a short—term measure and this will— of this is that this is a short—term measure and this will improve. i of this is that this is a short—term i measure and this will improve. but if you _ measure and this will improve. but if you think— measure and this will improve. but if you think about _ measure and this will improve. but if you think about it _ measure and this will improve. but if you think about it in _ measure and this will improve. but if you think about it in the - if you think about it in the short—term, _ if you think about it in the short—term, while - if you think about it in the short—term, while we - if you think about it in the l short—term, while we have if you think about it in the _ short—term, while we have vaccinated our population. — short—term, while we have vaccinated our population, there _ short—term, while we have vaccinated our population, there are _ short—term, while we have vaccinated our population, there are places - short—term, while we have vaccinated our population, there are places on i our population, there are places on earth _ our population, there are places on earth where — our population, there are places on earth where there _ our population, there are places on earth where there are _ our population, there are places on earth where there are lots - our population, there are places on earth where there are lots of - our population, there are places on earth where there are lots of cases| earth where there are lots of cases of viruses — earth where there are lots of cases of viruses among _ earth where there are lots of cases of viruses among people _ earth where there are lots of cases of viruses among people and - earth where there are lots of cases of viruses among people and the l of viruses among people and the connection— of viruses among people and the connection to _ of viruses among people and the connection to india _ of viruses among people and the connection to india is _ of viruses among people and the connection to india is that - of viruses among people and the connection to india is that we - of viruses among people and the | connection to india is that we are seeing _ connection to india is that we are seeing in — connection to india is that we are seeing in our— connection to india is that we are seeing in our country— connection to india is that we are seeing in our country now, - connection to india is that we are. seeing in our country now, tossing and import— seeing in our country now, tossing and import of— seeing in our country now, tossing and import of variant _ seeing in our country now, tossing and import of variant from - seeing in our country now, tossing and import of variant from india i and import of variant from india which _ and import of variant from india which is — and import of variant from india which is spreading. _ and import of variant from india which is spreading. what - and import of variant from india which is spreading. what we - and import of variant from india . which is spreading. what we don't want _ which is spreading. what we don't want to— which is spreading. what we don't want to do— which is spreading. what we don't want to do is— which is spreading. what we don't want to do is send _ which is spreading. what we don't want to do is send people - which is spreading. what we don't want to do is send people who - which is spreading. what we don't i want to do is send people who have been _ want to do is send people who have been vaccinated _ want to do is send people who have been vaccinated overseas _ want to do is send people who have been vaccinated overseas because, | want to do is send people who have i been vaccinated overseas because, if you think— been vaccinated overseas because, if you think about — been vaccinated overseas because, if you think about it, _ been vaccinated overseas because, if you think about it, the _ been vaccinated overseas because, if you think about it, the only— been vaccinated overseas because, if you think about it, the only case - been vaccinated overseas because, if you think about it, the only case of. you think about it, the only case of virus _ you think about it, the only case of virus coming — you think about it, the only case of virus coming back— you think about it, the only case of virus coming back with _ you think about it, the only case of virus coming back with one - you think about it, the only case of virus coming back with one of- you think about it, the only case ofi virus coming back with one of those people _ virus coming back with one of those people is— virus coming back with one of those peopte is one — virus coming back with one of those people is one that _ virus coming back with one of those people is one that can _ virus coming back with one of those people is one that can bypass - virus coming back with one of those people is one that can bypass the l people is one that can bypass the protection — people is one that can bypass the protection conferred _ people is one that can bypass the protection conferred by _ people is one that can bypass the protection conferred by their- protection conferred by their vaccine, _ protection conferred by their vaccine, so _ protection conferred by their vaccine, so they— protection conferred by their vaccine, so they can - protection conferred by their. vaccine, so they can potentially that back — vaccine, so they can potentially that back and _ vaccine, so they can potentially that back and spread _ vaccine, so they can potentially that back and spread it- vaccine, so they can potentially that back and spread it again i vaccine, so they can potentially that back and spread it again ini vaccine, so they can potentially - that back and spread it again in the country _ that back and spread it again in the country that — that back and spread it again in the country. that is _ that back and spread it again in the country. that is what _ that back and spread it again in the country. that is what the _ that back and spread it again in the . country. that is what the government and public— country. that is what the government and public health _
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country. that is what the government and public health doctors _ country. that is what the government and public health doctors are - country. that is what the government and public health doctors are most i and public health doctors are most worried _ and public health doctors are most worried about. _ and public health doctors are most worried about. we _ and public health doctors are most worried about. we must— and public health doctors are most worried about. we must ensure i and public health doctors are most| worried about. we must ensure we and public health doctors are most. worried about. we must ensure we do not do _ worried about. we must ensure we do not do that _ worried about. we must ensure we do not do that it — worried about. we must ensure we do not do that it is — worried about. we must ensure we do not do that. it is all— worried about. we must ensure we do not do that. it is all about _ worried about. we must ensure we do not do that. it is all about small - not do that. it is all about small steps _ not do that. it is all about small steps white _ not do that. it is all about small steps. while there _ not do that. it is all about small steps. while there are - not do that. it is all about smalli steps. while there are countries like india — steps. while there are countries like india and _ steps. while there are countries like india and south— steps. while there are countries like india and south american. like india and south american countries _ like india and south american countries with— like india and south american countries with high _ like india and south american countries with high levels - like india and south american countries with high levels of. countries with high levels of disease _ countries with high levels of disease activity— countries with high levels of disease activity and - countries with high levels of disease activity and there i countries with high levels of disease activity and there is| countries with high levels of- disease activity and there is high risk, _ disease activity and there is high risk, it— disease activity and there is high risk, it could _ disease activity and there is high risk, it could undermine - disease activity and there is high risk, it could undermine the - risk, it could undermine the effectiveness— risk, it could undermine the effectiveness of— risk, it could undermine the effectiveness of the - risk, it could undermine the| effectiveness of the vaccine. risk, it could undermine the i effectiveness of the vaccine. in risk, it could undermine the - effectiveness of the vaccine. in the long-term, — effectiveness of the vaccine. in the long—term, these _ effectiveness of the vaccine. in the long—term, these are _ effectiveness of the vaccine. in the long—term, these are measures. effectiveness of the vaccine. in the i long—term, these are measures that work for— long—term, these are measures that work for now— long—term, these are measures that work for now and _ long—term, these are measures that work for now and will— long—term, these are measures that work for now and will not _ long—term, these are measures that work for now and will not be - long—term, these are measures that work for now and will not be here i work for now and will not be here forever, — work for now and will not be here forever, we — work for now and will not be here forever, we just _ work for now and will not be here forever, we just have _ work for now and will not be here forever, we just have to - work for now and will not be here forever, we just have to sit - work for now and will not be here forever, we just have to sit tighti forever, we just have to sit tight forever, we just have to sit tight for a _ forever, we just have to sit tight for a bit — forever, we just have to sit tight for a bit longer. _ forever, we just have to sit tight fora bit longer. i— forever, we just have to sit tight for a bit longer.— forever, we just have to sit tight for a bit longer. i think caution is the word as _ for a bit longer. i think caution is the word as well, _ for a bit longer. i think caution is the word as well, isn't _ for a bit longer. i think caution is the word as well, isn't it, - for a bit longer. i think caution is the word as well, isn't it, linda? | the word as well, isn't it, linda? yes, and the indian variance, there are over— yes, and the indian variance, there are over 500 — yes, and the indian variance, there are over 500 cases in the uk and 'ust are over 500 cases in the uk and just over— are over 500 cases in the uk and just over a — are over 500 cases in the uk and just over a third of them are linked to travellers and contact. there has been _ to travellers and contact. there has been community spread. we know that is a concern _ been community spread. we know that is a concern and we could have more of these _ is a concern and we could have more of these in _ is a concern and we could have more of these in the future. the new study _ of these in the future. the new study showed that against the south african _ study showed that against the south african variance, the pfizer vaccine was not _ african variance, the pfizer vaccine was not as — african variance, the pfizer vaccine was not as effective. it is about being _ was not as effective. it is about being cautious. if we were to point to one _
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being cautious. if we were to point to one thing, it would be concern with variants, that is why would international travel be still need to approach it with caution, do it gradually. — to approach it with caution, do it gradually, but look ahead to the longer— gradually, but look ahead to the longer term when we will be able to return _ longer term when we will be able to return to _ longer term when we will be able to return to those connections between countries _ return to those connections between countries. we return to those connections between countries. ~ ~ . . return to those connections between countries. ~ ~' , , , countries. we keep seeing inside both of your _ countries. we keep seeing inside both of your homes _ countries. we keep seeing inside both of your homes and - countries. we keep seeing inside both of your homes and your- countries. we keep seeing inside . both of your homes and your studios and you will know that senior government advisers are warning against permitting too much of a return to the office in the summer. again, caution is the word. where are you on this in terms of getting back out to the office and getting back out to the office and getting back out to colleagues and intends of advice chris mack ——, chris? there is something called video call fatigue _ there is something called video call fatigue and — there is something called video call fatigue and most _ there is something called video call fatigue and most people _ there is something called video call fatigue and most people are - there is something called video call fatigue and most people are sick. there is something called video call fatigue and most people are sick of| fatigue and most people are sick of staring _ fatigue and most people are sick of staring at _ fatigue and most people are sick of staring at a — fatigue and most people are sick of staring at a screen _ fatigue and most people are sick of staring at a screen and _ fatigue and most people are sick of staring at a screen and want - fatigue and most people are sick of staring at a screen and want to - staring at a screen and want to embrace — staring at a screen and want to embrace their— staring at a screen and want to embrace their colleagues - staring at a screen and want to embrace their colleagues on i staring at a screen and want to embrace their colleagues on a | staring at a screen and want to - embrace their colleagues on a social basisi _ embrace their colleagues on a social basis, face—to—face _ embrace their colleagues on a social basis, face—to—face again. _ embrace their colleagues on a social basis, face—to—face again. there - embrace their colleagues on a social basis, face—to—face again. there are some _ basis, face—to—face again. there are some things — basis, face—to—face again. there are some things that _ basis, face—to—face again. there are some things that are _ basis, face—to—face again. there are some things that are very— basis, face—to—face again. there are| some things that are very convenient and easy— some things that are very convenient and easy to _ some things that are very convenient and easy to do — some things that are very convenient and easy to do and _ some things that are very convenient and easy to do and it— some things that are very convenient and easy to do and it is— some things that are very convenient and easy to do and it is handy- some things that are very convenient and easy to do and it is handy to - some things that are very convenient and easy to do and it is handy to do i and easy to do and it is handy to do them _ and easy to do and it is handy to do them from — and easy to do and it is handy to do them from a — and easy to do and it is handy to do them from a computer. _ and easy to do and it is handy to do them from a computer. there - and easy to do and it is handy to do them from a computer. there are l them from a computer. there are
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other— them from a computer. there are other things — them from a computer. there are other things which _ them from a computer. there are other things which are _ them from a computer. there are other things which are much - them from a computer. there are i other things which are much harder to do— other things which are much harder to do except — other things which are much harder to do except in _ other things which are much harder to do except in person. _ other things which are much harder to do except in person. what - other things which are much harder to do except in person. what we i other things which are much harder. to do except in person. what we need is a balance — to do except in person. what we need is a balance. what _ to do except in person. what we need is a balance. what coronavirus - to do except in person. what we need is a balance. what coronavirus has- is a balance. what coronavirus has shown _ is a balance. what coronavirus has shown us— is a balance. what coronavirus has shown us is— is a balance. what coronavirus has shown us is we _ is a balance. what coronavirus has shown us is we can _ is a balance. what coronavirus has shown us is we can do _ is a balance. what coronavirus has shown us is we can do things - is a balance. what coronavirus has shown us is we can do things fromj shown us is we can do things from home. _ shown us is we can do things from home, outside— shown us is we can do things from home, outside the _ shown us is we can do things from home, outside the office, - shown us is we can do things from home, outside the office, but - shown us is we can do things from home, outside the office, but we| shown us is we can do things from . home, outside the office, but we are also missing — home, outside the office, but we are also missing out _ home, outside the office, but we are also missing out a _ home, outside the office, but we are also missing out a lot— home, outside the office, but we are also missing out a lot by— home, outside the office, but we are also missing out a lot by not- home, outside the office, but we are also missing out a lot by not being . also missing out a lot by not being able to— also missing out a lot by not being able to be — also missing out a lot by not being able to be in— also missing out a lot by not being able to be in that _ also missing out a lot by not being able to be in that community- able to be in that community situation~ _ able to be in that community situation. what— able to be in that community situation. what i— able to be in that community situation. what i foresee - able to be in that community situation. what i foresee is. able to be in that community situation. what i foresee is a mixture _ situation. what i foresee is a mixture of— situation. what i foresee is a mixture of the _ situation. what i foresee is a mixture of the two. - situation. what i foresee is a mixture of the two. there i situation. what i foresee is al mixture of the two. there will situation. what i foresee is a - mixture of the two. there will be things— mixture of the two. there will be things that — mixture of the two. there will be things that allows _ mixture of the two. there will be things that allows more - mixture of the two. there will be i things that allows more flexibility, we witt— things that allows more flexibility, we will be — things that allows more flexibility, we will be doing _ things that allows more flexibility, we will be doing more _ things that allows more flexibility, we will be doing more working - things that allows more flexibility, i we will be doing more working from homei _ we will be doing more working from home, and — we will be doing more working from home, and at— we will be doing more working from home, and at the _ we will be doing more working from home, and at the same _ we will be doing more working from home, and at the same time, - we will be doing more working from home, and at the same time, therej home, and at the same time, there will be _ home, and at the same time, there will be a _ home, and at the same time, there will be a return _ home, and at the same time, there will be a return to _ home, and at the same time, there will be a return to the _ home, and at the same time, there will be a return to the office - home, and at the same time, there will be a return to the office under. will be a return to the office under certain— will be a return to the office under certain circumstances— will be a return to the office under certain circumstances so - will be a return to the office under certain circumstances so we - will be a return to the office under certain circumstances so we can . certain circumstances so we can benefit — certain circumstances so we can benefit from _ certain circumstances so we can benefit from those _ certain circumstances so we can benefit from those closer- benefit from those closer face—to—face _ benefit from those closer face—to—face meetings, i benefit from those closer. face—to—face meetings, and benefit from those closer— face—to—face meetings, and showing people _ face—to—face meetings, and showing peopte how— face—to—face meetings, and showing peopte how to— face—to—face meetings, and showing peopte how to do— face—to—face meetings, and showing people how to do things, _ face—to—face meetings, and showing people how to do things, hands—on i people how to do things, hands—on type teaching — people how to do things, hands—on type teaching and _ people how to do things, hands—on type teaching and training - people how to do things, hands—on type teaching and training which i people how to do things, hands—on type teaching and training which is| type teaching and training which is realty— type teaching and training which is really hard — type teaching and training which is really hard to _ type teaching and training which is really hard to do _ type teaching and training which is really hard to do when _ type teaching and training which is really hard to do when you - type teaching and training which is really hard to do when you are - type teaching and training which is . really hard to do when you are doing it remotety~ — really hard to do when you are doing it remotely-— it remotely. linda, i suppose we will be elbow _ it remotely. linda, i suppose we will be elbow bumping, - it remotely. linda, i suppose we will be elbow bumping, we - it remotely. linda, i suppose we will be elbow bumping, we will i it remotely. linda, i suppose we i will be elbow bumping, we will not be handshaking again, but it is psychologically important to have human reaction.— human reaction. behaviourally, i think this year _ human reaction. behaviourally, i think this year has _ human reaction. behaviourally, i think this year has had _ human reaction. behaviourally, i think this year has had a - human reaction. behaviourally, i think this year has had a big - human reaction. behaviourally, i. think this year has had a big impact on so _ think this year has had a big impact on so many— think this year has had a big impact on so many of us and in so many
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ways _ on so many of us and in so many ways one— on so many of us and in so many ways one of— on so many of us and in so many ways. one of the things we have noticed — ways. one of the things we have noticed in— ways. one of the things we have noticed in academia and universities is existing _ noticed in academia and universities is existing collaborations have continued in a strong way, but maybe we haven't— continued in a strong way, but maybe we haven't formed new collaborations we haven't formed new collaborations we might— we haven't formed new collaborations we might have because we haven't been _ we might have because we haven't been able — we might have because we haven't been able to meet face—to—face. there _ been able to meet face—to—face. there is— been able to meet face—to—face. there is research showing that employers are thinking of a blended approach _ employers are thinking of a blended approach to the office and giving people. — approach to the office and giving people, where they can, much more of an option _ people, where they can, much more of an option to— people, where they can, much more of an option to work from home. let's take some — an option to work from home. let's take some positives away from this year _ take some positives away from this year we _ take some positives away from this year. we have been forced to work at home _ year. we have been forced to work at home in— year. we have been forced to work at home in some cases, and i believe in having _ home in some cases, and i believe in having a _ home in some cases, and i believe in having a mixed each sector. | home in some cases, and i believe in having a mixed each sector.- having a mixed each sector. i wonder when ou having a mixed each sector. i wonder when you two. _ having a mixed each sector. i wonder when you two, will— having a mixed each sector. i wonder when you two, will finally _ having a mixed each sector. i wonder when you two, will finally get - when you two, will finally get face—to—face. when you two, will finally get face-to-face._ when you two, will finally get face-to-face. ., . ., face-to-face. you will have to fix the weather! _ face-to-face. you will have to fix the weather! that _ face-to-face. you will have to fix the weather! that is _ face-to-face. you will have to fix the weather! that is not - face-to-face. you will have to fix the weather! that is not my - face-to-face. you will have to fix - the weather! that is not my problem. i will be inside, _ the weather! that is not my problem. i will be inside, you _ the weather! that is not my problem. i will be inside, you too _ the weather! that is not my problem. i will be inside, you too can _ the weather! that is not my problem. i will be inside, you too can be - i will be inside, you too can be inside. ., ., . , i will be inside, you too can be inside. ., , ., ,
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i will be inside, you too can be| inside-_ no. i will be inside, you too can be - inside._ no, we inside. that was my worry! no, we will make it _ inside. that was my worry! no, we will make it work. _ inside. that was my worry! no, we will make it work. goodbye - inside. that was my worry! no, we will make it work. goodbye for - inside. that was my worry! no, we i will make it work. goodbye for now. try sitting here! we have hardly had a human being in the studio. i don't remember what it is like. matt, what do you think i will say to you now? i matt, what do you think i will say to you now?— matt, what do you think i will say to ou now? ., . . , . , to you now? i thought that was a bit harsh on john! _ to you now? i thought that was a bit harsh on john! how— to you now? i thought that was a bit harsh on john! how are _ to you now? i thought that was a bit harsh on john! how are you? - to you now? i thought that was a bit harsh on john! how are you? you i harsh on john! how are you? you havin: harsh on john! how are you? you having an — harsh on john! how are you? you having an espresso? _ harsh on john! how are you? you having an espresso? at - harsh on john! how are you? you having an espresso? at least - harsh on john! how are you? you having an espresso? at least youj having an espresso? at least you have had a coffee.— have had a coffee. enough about coffee, have had a coffee. enough about coffee. our— have had a coffee. enough about coffee, our special— have had a coffee. enough about coffee, our special yesterday - have had a coffee. enough about coffee, our special yesterday is i coffee, our special yesterday is comedian— coffee, our special yesterday is comedian nish kumar. —— our special guest _ comedian nish kumar. —— our special guest today~ — comedian nish kumar. —— our special guest today. let's talk about food heaven _ guest today. let's talk about food heaven and food health. vegetables in the cake is _ heaven and food health. vegetables in the cake is disgusting. _ heaven and food health. vegetables
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in the cake is disgusting. two - heaven and food health. vegetables in the cake is disgusting. two great| in the cake is disgusting. two great chefs here as _ in the cake is disgusting. two great chefs here as well _ in the cake is disgusting. two great chefs here as well today. _ in the cake is disgusting. two great chefs here as well today. what - in the cake is disgusting. two great chefs here as well today. what is l in the cake is disgusting. two great| chefs here as well today. what is on the menu? — chefs here as well today. what is on the menu? a _ chefs here as well today. what is on the menu? a foolproof— chefs here as well today. what is on the menu? a foolproof carbonara. i chefs here as well today. what is on i the menu? a foolproof carbonara. i'm auoin to the menu? a foolproof carbonara. i'm going to be — the menu? a foolproof carbonara. i'm going to be cooking _ the menu? a foolproof carbonara. i'm going to be cooking some _ the menu? a foolproof carbonara. i'm going to be cooking some indoor- going to be cooking some indoor barbecued potatoes, salmon and broccoli — barbecued potatoes, salmon and broccoli with chili, peanuts and lime _ broccoli with chili, peanuts and lime. , . ~ broccoli with chili, peanuts and lime. , . . lime. very nice. we will need indoor barbecues- — lime. very nice. we will need indoor barbecues. helen, _ lime. very nice. we will need indoor barbecues. helen, ua— lime. very nice. we will need indoor barbecues. helen, ua are _ lime. very nice. we will need indoor barbecues. helen, ua are in - lime. very nice. we will need indoor barbecues. helen, ua are in charge| barbecues. helen, ua are in charge of drinks and gym today. —— you are in charge of gin and tonics today. they are all delicious and i'm very excited _ they are all delicious and i'm very excited about the botanicals today. you are _ excited about the botanicals today. you are being very professional there, helen! as usual, you guys decide what nish kumar eats. i there, helen! as usual, you guys decide what nish kumar eats. i have two requests. _ decide what nish kumar eats. i have two requests. can —
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decide what nish kumar eats. i have two requests, can you _ decide what nish kumar eats. i have two requests, can you ask— decide what nish kumar eats. i have two requests, can you ask if- decide what nish kumar eats. i have two requests, can you ask if i - decide what nish kumar eats. i have two requests, can you ask if i can i two requests, can you ask if i can be helen's friend? two requests, can you ask ifi can be helen's friend?— two requests, can you ask ifi can be helen's friend?- i - two requests, can you ask ifi can be helen's friend?- i want| two requests, can you ask if i can i be helen's friend?- i want to be helen's friend? weird. i want to be helen's friend? weird. i want to be her friend _ be helen's friend? weird. i want to be her friend for _ be helen's friend? weird. i want to be her friend for her— be helen's friend? weird. i want to be her friend for her assistance - be her friend for her assistance basically! and we have a question about how you do barbecue potatoes indoors. you about how you do barbecue potatoes indoors. ., . ., . indoors. you will have to wait, won't you? — indoors. you will have to wait, won't you? you _ indoors. you will have to wait, won't you? you will— indoors. you will have to wait, won't you? you will find - indoors. you will have to wait, won't you? you will find out! i indoors. you will have to wait, i won't you? you will find out! you ut them won't you? you will find out! you put them on _ won't you? you will find out! you put them on a — won't you? you will find out! you put them on a griddle, _ won't you? you will find out! you put them on a griddle, don't - won't you? you will find out! you | put them on a griddle, don't you? you have to staging and watch! thank god there are — you have to staging and watch! thank god there are some _ you have to staging and watch! thank god there are some people _ you have to staging and watch! thank god there are some people in - you have to staging and watch! thank god there are some people in the studio with some imagination, hey? see you later!— see you later! matters -- matt is off to recover _ see you later! matters -- matt is off to recover and _ see you later! matters -- matt is off to recover and he _ see you later! matters -- matt is off to recover and he will - see you later! matters -- matt is off to recover and he will be - see you later! matters -- matt is off to recover and he will be backj off to recover and he will be back at 10am. off to recover and he will be back atioam. headlines off to recover and he will be back at 10am. headlines coming up. you are naughty! 9:31am.
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thousands of votes are still being counted across britain with more results expected later today — and in some cases on sunday and monday. louis goodall�*s machine is steaming with all of that data. let’s louis goodall's machine is steaming with all of that data.— with all of that data. let's have a think about _ with all of that data. let's have a think about what _ with all of that data. let's have a think about what is _ with all of that data. let's have a think about what is going - with all of that data. let's have a think about what is going to - with all of that data. let's have a i think about what is going to happen for the _ think about what is going to happen for the next of dave. because we still have — for the next of dave. because we still have a — for the next of dave. because we still have a lot to come. in england. _ still have a lot to come. in england, we have had seven games for the conservative so far. labour have
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gone _ the conservative so far. labour have gone down _ the conservative so far. labour have gone down by four. but if view to keep— gone down by four. but if view to keep an — gone down by four. but if view to keep an eye on. lancashire, for example — keep an eye on. lancashire, for example. this was a county council that the _ example. this was a county council that the conservatives currently hold _ that the conservatives currently hold its — that the conservatives currently hold. it's the sort of council where, _ hold. it's the sort of council where, if— hold. it's the sort of council where, if labour were progressing, if labour— where, if labour were progressing, if labour looked like they were on their— if labour looked like they were on their way— if labour looked like they were on their way to form a government in their way to form a government in the next _ their way to form a government in the next general election, they should — the next general election, they should be doing really well in somewhere like lancashire. if the rest of— somewhere like lancashire. if the rest of the — somewhere like lancashire. if the rest of the seats are anything to go by, and _ rest of the seats are anything to go by, and it— rest of the seats are anything to go by, and it is— rest of the seats are anything to go by, and it is true that labour have been _ by, and it is true that labour have been doing — by, and it is true that labour have been doing a little bit better in the north—west than they have in the north-east, — the north—west than they have in the north—east, but if the performance is anything — north—east, but if the performance is anything to go by, we would expect— is anything to go by, we would expect the conservatives to be actually — expect the conservatives to be actually making advances in lancashire county council. a star we haven't _ lancashire county council. a star we haven't talked about as much is that the lib— haven't talked about as much is that the lib dems had really been hoping to make _ the lib dems had really been hoping to make some progress this election. so far. _ to make some progress this election. so far. they— to make some progress this election. so far, they have been going backwards. somewhere to be keeping an eye _ backwards. somewhere to be keeping an eye on _ backwards. somewhere to be keeping an eye on is _ backwards. somewhere to be keeping an eye on is working on. they should be making _ an eye on is working on. they should be making some progress there, but if results _ be making some progress there, but if results elsewhere are anything to id if results elsewhere are anything to go by— if results elsewhere are anything to go by that— if results elsewhere are anything to go by that isn't necessarily the
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case — go by that isn't necessarily the case. something that will be getting a lot of— case. something that will be getting a lot of attention is the london mayoralty. it is not a contest we have _ mayoralty. it is not a contest we have spoken much about because it has been _ have spoken much about because it has been perceived wisdom that sadik khan has _ has been perceived wisdom that sadik khan has it— has been perceived wisdom that sadik khan has it in the bag. of course, it does— khan has it in the bag. of course, it does look— khan has it in the bag. of course, it does look that in actual fact some — it does look that in actual fact some of— it does look that in actual fact some of the results show that the conservatives are doing a little bit better— conservatives are doing a little bit better by— conservatives are doing a little bit better by comparison to what we had expected _ better by comparison to what we had expected. up by about 2%, labour down _ expected. up by about 2%, labour down by— expected. up by about 2%, labour down by about 1%. that is for the london _ down by about 1%. that is for the london assembly. generally speaking, for the _ london assembly. generally speaking, for the mayoralty, doing quite well. if we for the mayoralty, doing quite well. if we think— for the mayoralty, doing quite well. if we think about scotland. for the rest of— if we think about scotland. for the rest of the — if we think about scotland. for the rest of the day, we will have the regional— rest of the day, we will have the regional seat results as well. this is the _ regional seat results as well. this is the current situation for them. plus _ is the current situation for them. plus three — is the current situation for them. plus three for the snp. lib dems. we will have _
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plus three for the snp. lib dems. we will have the regional list for the rest of— will have the regional list for the rest of the — will have the regional list for the rest of the day coming in from places— rest of the day coming in from places like north—east scotland. this makes the situation a little bit more — this makes the situation a little bit more proportional. in north—east scotland. _ bit more proportional. in north—east scotland, we will be keeping an eye on that _ scotland, we will be keeping an eye on that we — scotland, we will be keeping an eye on that. we have only had four out of ten _ on that. we have only had four out of ten declared so far. not least because — of ten declared so far. not least because we will see whether the alba party. _ because we will see whether the alba party, whether alex salmond manages to get— party, whether alex salmond manages to get into _ party, whether alex salmond manages to get into the scottish parliament. so far. _ to get into the scottish parliament. so far. it _ to get into the scottish parliament. so far, it does not look like it. he is only— so far, it does not look like it. he is only on— so far, it does not look like it. he is only on about 2%. they need to be on about— is only on about 2%. they need to be on about 5—6% to get a seat. there are exciting — on about 5—6% to get a seat. there are exciting things to come. it is very exciting. — are exciting things to come. it is very exciting, yes. _ the ballot papers from the various elections in england, wales and scotland are still being counted this morning — and we're "dipping" into each of those countries for some analysis.
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quite literally. our scotland correspondent, lorna gordon, is there. morning lorna. lam not i am not brave at all, i'm afraid. it is heating up and it will reach 28-29 it is heating up and it will reach 28—29 celsius when it is fully heated after being closed for covid. i'm told today it is about 25 and rising. it is not putting off these swimmers, is it? look at them go. so impressive. we are not down here to talk about the swimming, we are down here to talk about the election results. and we have got four voters down with us here today. thank you forjoining us. we will start with you, susanna. this was a campaign that was spot on post coronavirus recovery and the constitution. what was the big issue for you? i will
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was the big issue for you? i will admit that _ was the big issue for you? i will admit that l _ was the big issue for you? i will admit that i did _ was the big issue for you? i will admit that i did stumble - was the big issue for you? i will admit that i did stumble slightly. i am an— admit that i did stumble slightly. i am an snp reporter, but the way that childminding has been dealt with over the — childminding has been dealt with over the last year has been quite problematic for me. and i know that many— problematic for me. and i know that many of— problematic for me. and i know that many of my— problematic for me. and i know that many of my colleagues over scotland have really— many of my colleagues over scotland have really struggled. i had to think— have really struggled. i had to think of— have really struggled. i had to think of the bigger picture. you weren't sure — think of the bigger picture. gm, weren't sure about voting snp then? no, because of the way that childminders have been marginalised within— childminders have been marginalised within the _ childminders have been marginalised within the early years of sector, i did have — within the early years of sector, i did have second thoughts. but when i looked _ did have second thoughts. but when i looked at _ did have second thoughts. but when i looked at the wider picture for scotland — looked at the wider picture for scotland and what i want for my daughter— scotland and what i want for my daughter as she moves forward in her life, daughter as she moves forward in her life. i_ daughter as she moves forward in her life, i wanted to be a free and independent scotland. do life, i wanted to be a free and independent scotland. do you think ultimately a — independent scotland. do you think ultimately a vote _ independent scotland. do you think ultimately a vote for _ independent scotland. do you think ultimately a vote for the _ independent scotland. do you think ultimately a vote for the snp - independent scotland. do you think ultimately a vote for the snp was i independent scotland. do you think ultimately a vote for the snp was a | ultimately a vote for the snp was a vote for independence? i ultimately a vote for the snp was a vote for independence?— vote for independence? i think a vote for independence? i think a vote for independence? i think a vote for the _ vote for independence? i think a vote for the snp _ vote for independence? i think a vote for the snp really - vote for independence? i think a vote for the snp really was - vote for the snp really was validation in the way they have dealt _ validation in the way they have dealt with covid, on the whole. i do think— dealt with covid, on the whole. i do think that _ dealt with covid, on the whole. i do think that the referendum is a different— think that the referendum is a different issue. you will have a vote _ different issue. you will have a vote in — different issue. you will have a vote in the _ different issue. you will have a vote in the referendum and then you can decide, — vote in the referendum and then you can decide, and you can use your
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democratic— can decide, and you can use your democratic right to vote then. canl democratic right to vote then. can i ask ou, democratic right to vote then. can i ask you. how _ democratic right to vote then. can i ask you. how did — democratic right to vote then. can i ask you, how did you _ democratic right to vote then. can i ask you, how did you vote? - democratic right to vote then. can i ask you, how did you vote? a - ask you, how did you vote? a tactical voter? ask you, how did you vote? a tacticalvoter? in ask you, how did you vote? a tactical voter? in favour of independence?— tactical voter? in favour of indeendence? �* ., , , . independence? against independence. because i independence? against independence. because l don't— independence? against independence. because i don't want _ independence? against independence. because i don't want the _ independence? against independence. because i don't want the snp - independence? against independence. because i don't want the snp to - independence? against independence. because i don't want the snp to have i because i don't want the snp to have any power _ because i don't want the snp to have an ower. . , , . , ., . any power. there appears to have been a lot — any power. there appears to have been a lot of— any power. there appears to have been a lot of tactical _ any power. there appears to have been a lot of tactical voting - any power. there appears to have been a lot of tactical voting this . been a lot of tactical voting this time around. if you look at areas like dumbarton, there do seem to have been people that switched party because of this issue. is have been people that switched party because of this issue.— because of this issue. is that they sent ou because of this issue. is that they sent you get? _ because of this issue. is that they sent you get? yes. _ because of this issue. is that they sent you get? yes. the _ because of this issue. is that they sent you get? yes. the snp - because of this issue. is that they| sent you get? yes. the snp argue that a majority — sent you get? yes. the snp argue that a majority of— sent you get? yes. the snp argue i that a majority of pro-independence that a majority of pro—independence parties in the parliament is a mandate for another referendum. i mandate for another referendum. i think, if they have another referendum, _ think, if they have another referendum, they- think, if they have another referendum, they should i think, if they have another. referendum, they should be think, if they have another- referendum, they should be based think, if they have another— referendum, they should be based on a 60%_ referendum, they should be based on a 60% majority— referendum, they should be based on a 60% majority of— referendum, they should be based on a 60% majority of the _ referendum, they should be based on a 60% majority of the actual - referendum, they should be based on a 60% majority of the actual voting i a 60% majority of the actual voting public~ _ a 60% majority of the actual voting public~ it's — a 6096 ma'ority of the actual voting ublic. v ., ., a 6096 ma'ority of the actual voting ublic. �*, ., ., , , public. it's too divisive. is it urel public. it's too divisive. is it purely on — public. it's too divisive. is it purely on independence i public. it's too divisive. is it| purely on independence that public. it's too divisive. is it i purely on independence that you
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voted? i purely on independence that you voted? ., �* ~' purely on independence that you voted? ., �* ,, . ,, voted? i don't think that the snp has created _ voted? i don't think that the snp has created anything, _ voted? i don't think that the snp has created anything, done i voted? i don't think that the snp i has created anything, done anything for businesses _ has created anything, done anything for businesses throughout _ has created anything, done anything for businesses throughout scotland. j for businesses throughout scotland. anytime _ for businesses throughout scotland. anytime they — for businesses throughout scotland. anytime they have _ for businesses throughout scotland. anytime they have in _ for businesses throughout scotland. anytime they have in power? - for businesses throughout scotland. anytime they have in power? yes. i anytime they have in power? yes. that strong _ anytime they have in power? yes. that strong words, _ anytime they have in power? yes. that strong words, after— anytime they have in power? yes. that strong words, after 14 - anytime they have in power? yes. that strong words, after 14 years. that strong words, after 16 years. they haven't done anything. you that strong words, after 14 years. they haven't done anything. you seem ve fixed they haven't done anything. you seem very fixed in — they haven't done anything. you seem very fixed in your _ they haven't done anything. you seem very fixed in your views. _ they haven't done anything. you seem very fixed in your views. if _ they haven't done anything. you seem very fixed in your views. if you - very fixed in your views. if you look at inverclyde, _ very fixed in your views. if you look at inverclyde, there i very fixed in your views. if you look at inverclyde, there are i very fixed in your views. if you i look at inverclyde, there are two boats _ look at inverclyde, there are two boats up — look at inverclyde, there are two boats up there _ look at inverclyde, there are two boats up there at _ look at inverclyde, there are two boats up there at the _ look at inverclyde, there are two boats up there at the moment i look at inverclyde, there are two . boats up there at the moment that the snp _ boats up there at the moment that the snp supported _ boats up there at the moment that the snp supported to _ boats up there at the moment that the snp supported to their- boats up there at the moment that| the snp supported to their subsidy. they would — the snp supported to their subsidy. they would be — the snp supported to their subsidy. they would be better— the snp supported to their subsidy. they would be better taking - the snp supported to their subsidy. they would be better taking them i the snp supported to their subsidy. i they would be better taking them out there and _ they would be better taking them out there and sinking _ they would be better taking them out there and sinking them. _ they would be better taking them out there and sinking them. hater?- they would be better taking them out there and sinking them.— there and sinking them. very strong words. there and sinking them. very strong words- thank— there and sinking them. very strong words. thank you _ there and sinking them. very strong words. thank you for _ there and sinking them. very strong words. thank you for that. - there and sinking them. very strong words. thank you for that. i've i there and sinking them. very strong words. thank you for that. i've got i words. thank you for that. i've got a couple of first—time voters down here. you can vote from 16 in a scottish parliament election. i’m scottish parliament election. i'm 'ust over scottish parliament election. i'm just over 16- _ scottish parliament election. i'm just over 16. it _ scottish parliament election. i'm just over 16. it was my first time voting — just over16. it was my first time voting i— just over 16. it was my first time voting. i thought it was a real privilege _ voting. i thought it was a real privilege to be able to cast my vote for the _ privilege to be able to cast my vote for the first — privilege to be able to cast my vote for the first time. it was a really proud _ for the first time. it was a really proud moment to say and have an
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impact _ proud moment to say and have an impact on — proud moment to say and have an impact on the future of my country. did you _ impact on the future of my country. did you read — impact on the future of my country. did you read all of the manifestos? young people were encouraged to read through— young people were encouraged to read through different manifestos to make up through different manifestos to make up their— through different manifestos to make up their mind. that through different manifestos to make pp their mind-— up their mind. that is really encouraging _ up their mind. that is really encouraging that _ up their mind. that is really encouraging that you - up their mind. that is really encouraging that you think. up their mind. that is really - encouraging that you think younger voters are really engaged. i encouraging that you think younger voters are really engaged.- voters are really engaged. i think that is a real _ voters are really engaged. i think that is a real point _ voters are really engaged. i think that is a real point from - voters are really engaged. i think that is a real point from nicola i that is a real point from nicola sturgeon _ that is a real point from nicola sturueon. ~ ., that is a real point from nicola sturgeon-— that is a real point from nicola sturteon, . ., , ,, ., sturgeon. what was the big issue for ou? i sturgeon. what was the big issue for you? i think — sturgeon. what was the big issue for you? i think the _ sturgeon. what was the big issue for you? i think the biggest _ sturgeon. what was the big issue for you? i think the biggest issue - sturgeon. what was the big issue for you? i think the biggest issue is i you? i think the biggest issue is the independence _ you? i think the biggest issue is the independence referendum. | you? i think the biggest issue is| the independence referendum. it you? i think the biggest issue is i the independence referendum. it is clear that _ the independence referendum. it is clear that there's been a big divide between _ clear that there's been a big divide between different parties and i think— between different parties and i think that parties that supported the independence referendum have had more support, especially for the younger— more support, especially for the younger people. you more support, especially for the younger people-— more support, especially for the younger people. you supported the referendum? _ younger people. you supported the referendum? i— younger people. you supported the referendum? i think _ younger people. you supported the referendum? i think that _ younger people. you supported the referendum? i think that it - younger people. you supported the referendum? i think that it is i referendum? i think that it is important — referendum? i think that it is important that _ referendum? i think that it is important that the _ referendum? i think that it is important that the future i referendum? i think that it is important that the future of i important that the future of scotland is in scotland's hands. you are scotland is in scotland's hands. ti’f7l. are pro—independence, then. do you think there will be another referendum?— think there will be another referendum? thank think there will be another referendum? �* u, referendum? i'm confident. thank you ve much referendum? i'm confident. thank you very much for— referendum? i'm confident. thank you very much for that. _ referendum? i'm confident. thank you very much for that. how— referendum? i'm confident. thank you very much for that. how did _ referendum? i'm confident. thank you very much for that. how did you i referendum? i'm confident. thank you very much for that. how did you find i very much for that. how did you find voting for the first time? it
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very much for that. how did you find voting for the first time?— voting for the first time? it was such a good _ voting for the first time? it was such a good experience. - voting for the first time? it was such a good experience. i i voting for the first time? it was such a good experience. i love | voting for the first time? it was i such a good experience. i love the fact i_ such a good experience. i love the fact i got— such a good experience. i love the fact i got to — such a good experience. i love the fact i got to exercise _ such a good experience. i love the fact i got to exercise my— such a good experience. i love the fact i got to exercise my right i such a good experience. i love the fact i got to exercise my right to l fact i got to exercise my right to vote _ fact i got to exercise my right to vote for— fact i got to exercise my right to vote for the _ fact i got to exercise my right to vote for the first _ fact i got to exercise my right to vote for the first time. - fact i got to exercise my right to vote for the first time. the - fact i got to exercise my right to vote for the first time. the facti vote for the first time. the fact that— vote for the first time. the fact that my— vote for the first time. the fact that my note _ vote for the first time. the fact that my note was _ vote for the first time. the fact that my note was a _ vote for the first time. the fact that my note was a part - vote for the first time. the fact that my note was a part of i vote for the first time. the fact that my note was a part of the i that my note was a part of the number— that my note was a part of the number was _ that my note was a part of the number wasjust_ that my note was a part of the number wasjust great. - that my note was a part of the number wasjust great. ti.- that my note was a part of the number was just great. number was 'ust great. a couple of the parties — number wasjust great. a couple of the parties had _ number wasjust great. a couple of the parties had a _ number wasjust great. a couple of the parties had a new— number wasjust great. a couple of the parties had a new leader i number wasjust great. a couple of the parties had a new leader at - number wasjust great. a couple of| the parties had a new leader at this time around. can i ask you how you voted? i time around. can i ask you how you voted? ., ., , , ., voted? i voted labour this year. i really like — voted? i voted labour this year. i really like their _ voted? i voted labour this year. i really like their stance _ voted? i voted labour this year. i really like their stance on - really like their stance on education _ really like their stance on education and _ really like their stance on education and how- really like their stance on education and how they l really like their stance on - education and how they were prioritising _ education and how they were prioritising vaccinations - education and how they were prioritising vaccinations for l prioritising vaccinations for teachers _ prioritising vaccinations for teachers. so— prioritising vaccinations for teachers. , . �* teachers. so independence wasn't the issue? i am — teachers. so independence wasn't the issue? i am pro _ teachers. so independence wasn't the issue? i am pro independence. - teachers. so independence wasn't the issue? i am pro independence. that l issue? i am pro independence. that was one thing. _ issue? i am pro independence. that was one thing, the _ issue? i am pro independence. that was one thing, the divide _ issue? i am pro independence. that was one thing, the divide between l was one thing, the divide between labour— was one thing, the divide between labour and — was one thing, the divide between labourand snp. _ was one thing, the divide between labour and snp. but— was one thing, the divide between labour and snp. but the - was one thing, the divide between labour and snp. but the labour. labour and snp. but the labour policies — labour and snp. but the labour policies kind _ labour and snp. but the labour policies kind of— labour and snp. but the labour policies kind of put _ labour and snp. but the labour policies kind of put it _ labour and snp. but the labour policies kind of put it over- labour and snp. but the labour policies kind of put it over the l labour and snp. but the labour. policies kind of put it over the top for nre _ policies kind of put it over the top for me. ., , , policies kind of put it over the top for me. , . for me. people seem so entrenched in their views- — for me. people seem so entrenched in their views. are _ for me. people seem so entrenched in their views. are you _ for me. people seem so entrenched in their views. are you fixed _ for me. people seem so entrenched in their views. are you fixed and - for me. people seem so entrenched in their views. are you fixed and firm, i their views. are you fixed and firm, or do you... 7 i their views. are you fixed and firm, or do you--- ?_ or do you... ? i think the labour oli or do you... ? i think the labour policy were _ or do you... ? i think the labour policy were the _ or do you... ? i think the labour policy were the things _ or do you... ? i think the labour policy were the things that - or do you... ? i think the labour l policy were the things that swayed me towards— policy were the things that swayed me towards voting _ policy were the things that swayed me towards voting for _ policy were the things that swayed me towards voting for them, - policy were the things that swayed me towards voting for them, but l policy were the things that swayed me towards voting for them, but i | me towards voting for them, but i think— me towards voting for them, but i think nicola — me towards voting for them, but i think nicola sturgeon _ me towards voting for them, but i think nicola sturgeon is _ me towards voting for them, but i think nicola sturgeon is such- me towards voting for them, but i think nicola sturgeon is such a - think nicola sturgeon is such a strong — think nicola sturgeon is such a strong women _ think nicola sturgeon is such a strong women and _ think nicola sturgeon is such a strong women and such - think nicola sturgeon is such a strong women and such a - think nicola sturgeon is such a i strong women and such a strong influence — strong women and such a strong influence it _
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strong women and such a strong influence. it wasn't _ strong women and such a strong influence. it wasn't a _ strong women and such a strong influence. it wasn't a fact - strong women and such a strong influence. it wasn't a fact of- strong women and such a strong influence. it wasn't a fact of not| influence. it wasn't a fact of not agreeing — influence. it wasn't a fact of not agreeing with _ influence. it wasn't a fact of not agreeing with the _ influence. it wasn't a fact of not agreeing with the snp's - influence. it wasn't a fact of not| agreeing with the snp's policies, influence. it wasn't a fact of not. agreeing with the snp's policies, i 'ust agreeing with the snp's policies, i just liked — agreeing with the snp's policies, i just liked labour's _ agreeing with the snp's policies, i just liked labour's more. - agreeing with the snp's policies, i just liked labour's more.— agreeing with the snp's policies, i just liked labour's more. thank you all for that really _ just liked labour's more. thank you all for that really interesting - all for that really interesting views there. it gives you a sense of the wide range of opinions here in scotland and how strongly i think some people here feel about that debate over independence or the union, which is going to continue with nicola sturgeon promising a post—pandemic referendum once the covid crisis is over and boris johnson saying he doesn't feel that now is the time. and of course, the power to hold the referendum lies with the westminster government. certainly a mixed range of opinions there. thank you for going through that with everybody. we will be back with you in ten minutes to see you diving into the water.— diving into the water. lorna does not diving into the water. lorna does rrot appreciate — diving into the water. lorna does not appreciate that. _ in england, the first big result came in hartlepool
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when a conservative mp was elected for the first time in more than 60 years. labour also lost control of several councils, and the tories made gains. so what's behind the shift? our political correspondent chris mason is in hartlepool for us this morning. he is off the ship now. he has gone searchin: he is off the ship now. he has gone searching for _ he is off the ship now. he has gone searching for political _ he is off the ship now. he has gone searching for political metaphors, l he is off the ship now. he has gone searching for political metaphors, i | searching for political metaphors, i think. i searching for political metaphors, i think. ., , ., searching for political metaphors, i think. ., ., ., ~ ~ think. i was told to walk the plank. i made the — think. i was told to walk the plank. i made the cardinal— think. i was told to walk the plank. i made the cardinal sin _ think. i was told to walk the plank. i made the cardinal sin of - think. i was told to walk the plank. i made the cardinal sin of calling i i made the cardinal sin of calling this magnificent ship a boat. never call it— this magnificent ship a boat. never call it a _ this magnificent ship a boat. never call it a boat. it is a ship. the oldest — call it a boat. it is a ship. the oldest still— call it a boat. it is a ship. the oldest still afloat worship in europe, _ oldest still afloat worship in europe, docked here in hartlepool as we reflect— europe, docked here in hartlepool as we reflect on all things elections.
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it also _ we reflect on all things elections. it also reflecting on attractions, reopening, touch wood, fingers crossed, — reopening, touch wood, fingers crossed, made a 17th. the national museum _ crossed, made a 17th. the national museum of— crossed, made a 17th. the national museum of the royal navy had a tough year. _ museum of the royal navy had a tough year. but _ museum of the royal navy had a tough year, but hoping to be back open as so many— year, but hoping to be back open as so many places are in ten days or so time _ so many places are in ten days or so time we _ so many places are in ten days or so time we can — so many places are in ten days or so time. we can talk to the manager here _ time. we can talk to the manager here thank— time. we can talk to the manager here. thank you for having us. tell us about— here. thank you for having us. tell us about this — here. thank you for having us. tell us about this ship. it�*s here. thank you for having us. tell us about this ship.— us about this ship. it's definitely a shi -. us about this ship. it's definitely a ship- the _ us about this ship. it's definitely a ship. the oldest _ us about this ship. it's definitely a ship. the oldest worship - us about this ship. it's definitely a ship. the oldest worship still. a ship. the oldest worship still afloat in europe. despite her impressive display of guns, she actually didn't serve in active combat. although she gave very dedicated service and travelled over 100,000 miles over the world. you think, 100,000 miles over the world. you think. “what _ 100,000 miles over the world. you think, "what has _ 100,000 miles over the world. you think, "what has she seen? where has she been?" _ think, "what has she seen? where has she been?" find think, "what has she seen? where has she been?" �* ., .,
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she been?" and through that time rotectin: she been?" and through that time protecting british _ she been?" and through that time protecting british interests. - she been?" and through that time protecting british interests. she i protecting british interests. she spent most of her days as a training ship. in the 80s, she fell into disrepair and was brought to hartlepool in 1994 a very impressive restoration, which we see the result of now. 15 years, £10.5 million. tell us about your reopening? it has been a really _ tell us about your reopening? it has been a really tough _ tell us about your reopening? it has been a really tough year _ tell us about your reopening? it has been a really tough year for - been a really tough year for everyone, hasn't it? visitor attractions have really felt the damage. and being closed for a whole year, i think we only managed to open for about six weeks last year. it was tough for the museum, tough for the staff, and really sad to not have those visitors come through the door. really pleased to be open on the 17th. hate door. really pleased to be open on the 17th. ~ , door. really pleased to be open on the 17th. . , i. door. really pleased to be open on the 17th. . , ., the 17th. we wish you luck, and thank you _ the 17th. we wish you luck, and thank you so — the 17th. we wish you luck, and thank you so much _ the 17th. we wish you luck, and thank you so much for- the 17th. we wish you luck, and thank you so much for having . the 17th. we wish you luck, and | thank you so much for having us the 17th. we wish you luck, and - thank you so much for having us this morning _ thank you so much for having us this morning let— thank you so much for having us this morning. let us switch from talking to history— morning. let us switch from talking to history to— morning. let us switch from talking to history to talking politics.
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let's — to history to talking politics. let's talk _ to history to talking politics. let's talk to you first, mohammed. i think— let's talk to you first, mohammed. i think you _ let's talk to you first, mohammed. i think you described yourself as a floating — think you described yourself as a floating voter. you are the very personification that politicians love to — personification that politicians love to charm. it personification that politicians love to charm.— personification that politicians love to charm. , ., , love to charm. it has been a shock. this is a big — love to charm. it has been a shock. this is a big victory _ love to charm. it has been a shock. this is a big victory for _ love to charm. it has been a shock. this is a big victory for the - this is a big victory for the conservative party. really pleased thatjill has been elected. it is good to have a lady mp on board as well. it's the first time for a lady mp in hartlepool. so really looking forward to seeing her fulfil her promises and bring the underprivileged to the good status. bring some jobs to hartlepool, education and training to youngsters so they don't have to move out of town. i work in newcastle. i have to go out of town to work. more people working in hartlepool and prospering
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in hartlepool. working in hartlepool and prospering in hartlepool-— in hartlepool. thank you. that is such a focus _ in hartlepool. thank you. that is such a focus for _ in hartlepool. thank you. that is such a focus for so _ in hartlepool. thank you. that is such a focus for so many - in hartlepool. thank you. that isj such a focus for so many people. in hartlepool. thank you. that is - such a focus for so many people. you are a long—standing labour supporter from a long—standing labour supporting family. which has been very normal in the north—east of england for so long and suddenly isn't. what do you make of it? i think it boils down to the issue that there _ think it boils down to the issue that there is a level of disenfranchisement with both local and national politics and leaders. and i_ and national politics and leaders. and i think, for labour unfortunately, they have had quite a to mulch _ unfortunately, they have had quite a to mulch was few years. so they have lost support~ — to mulch was few years. so they have lost support. and i think they need to have _ lost support. and i think they need to have a _ lost support. and i think they need to have a stronger opposition. thank ou for to have a stronger opposition. thank you for that- — to have a stronger opposition. thank you for that- we _ to have a stronger opposition. thank you for that. we will— to have a stronger opposition. thank you for that. we will bring _ to have a stronger opposition. thank you for that. we will bring in - you for that. we will bring in slasher as well. we are all maintaining social distancing in the rain this morning. sasha, is that the crux of it? there has been a disillusionment here for many people
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with labour? people drifting away from labour. with labour? people drifting away from labour-— from labour. yes. i think you can see at the _ from labour. yes. i think you can see at the result _ from labour. yes. i think you can see at the result yesterday. - from labour. yes. i think you can see at the result yesterday. it - see at the result yesterday. it wasn't — see at the result yesterday. it wasn't so _ see at the result yesterday. it wasn't so much _ see at the result yesterday. it wasn't so much that - see at the result yesterday. it wasn't so much that the - see at the result yesterday. iti wasn't so much that the tories increased _ wasn't so much that the tories increased their— wasn't so much that the tories increased their votes, - wasn't so much that the tories increased their votes, but - wasn't so much that the tories increased their votes, but the| increased their votes, but the labour— increased their votes, but the labour vote _ increased their votes, but the labour vote collapsed. - increased their votes, but the labour vote collapsed. i - increased their votes, but the labour vote collapsed. i think increased their votes, but the - labour vote collapsed. i think that is to do— labour vote collapsed. i think that is to do with — labour vote collapsed. i think that is to do with what _ labour vote collapsed. i think that is to do with what we _ labour vote collapsed. i think that is to do with what we just - labour vote collapsed. i think that is to do with what we just heard. i is to do with what we just heard. internat— is to do with what we just heard. internal fighting _ is to do with what we just heard. internal fighting locally, - is to do with what we just heard. internal fighting locally, internalj internal fighting locally, internal fighting — internal fighting locally, internal fighting nationally. _ internal fighting locally, internal fighting nationally. a _ internal fighting locally, internal fighting nationally. a feeling - internal fighting locally, internall fighting nationally. a feeling that the labour— fighting nationally. a feeling that the labour party— fighting nationally. a feeling that the labour party policies - fighting nationally. a feeling that the labour party policies don't i the labour party policies don't engage — the labour party policies don't engage with _ the labour party policies don't engage with their— the labour party policies don't engage with their heritage - engage with their heritage supporters— engage with their heritage supporters in— engage with their heritage supporters in this - engage with their heritage supporters in this part - engage with their heritage supporters in this part of. engage with their heritage . supporters in this part of the world — supporters in this part of the world they— supporters in this part of the world. they are _ supporters in this part of the world. they are leaning - supporters in this part of the i world. they are leaning towards supporters in this part of the - world. they are leaning towards the metropolitan — world. they are leaning towards the metropolitan areas, _ world. they are leaning towards the metropolitan areas, and _ world. they are leaning towards the metropolitan areas, and it - world. they are leaning towards the metropolitan areas, and it doesn't i metropolitan areas, and it doesn't sit well— metropolitan areas, and it doesn't sit well in — metropolitan areas, and it doesn't sit well in areas _ metropolitan areas, and it doesn't sit well in areas like _ metropolitan areas, and it doesn't sit well in areas like ours. - metropolitan areas, and it doesn't sit well in areas like ours.- sit well in areas like ours. thank ou all sit well in areas like ours. thank you all for— sit well in areas like ours. thank you all for your _ sit well in areas like ours. thank you all for your time _ sit well in areas like ours. thank you all for your time and - sit well in areas like ours. thank. you all for your time and standing out in the rain. final thought, imagine being on that fantastic ship in 1817 when it was built. the heavens open, it's getting a bit choppy. heavens open, it's getting a bit choppy, and you are out on the ocean. it is quite a thought, isn't it? ~ , ,
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ocean. it is quite a thought, isn't it? . , ., , it? we were 'ust looking up actually what the it? we were just looking up actually what the difference _ it? we were just looking up actually what the difference between - it? we were just looking up actually what the difference between a - it? we were just looking up actually what the difference between a ship| what the difference between a ship and a boat is, and it seems a little bit... ., , , ., bit... having spent the morning in the museum _ bit... having spent the morning in the museum of— bit... having spent the morning in the museum of the _ bit... having spent the morning in the museum of the royal - bit... having spent the morning in the museum of the royal navy - bit... having spent the morning in the museum of the royal navy i l bit... having spent the morning in i the museum of the royal navy i have been taught this fact. boats can get onto a _ been taught this fact. boats can get onto a ship, — been taught this fact. boats can get onto a ship, but not the other way around _ onto a ship, but not the other way around and — onto a ship, but not the other way around. and this is definitely a ship _ around. and this is definitely a ship be— around. and this is definitely a shi -. �* .., around. and this is definitely a shi -. �* .. ., around. and this is definitely a shi.�* ., around. and this is definitely a shi,�* ., ., ship. be careful how you say that. thank you — ship. be careful how you say that. thank you very — ship. be careful how you say that. thank you very much. _ ship. be careful how you say that. thank you very much. mike - ship. be careful how you say that. thank you very much. mike would j ship. be careful how you say that. - thank you very much. mike would have known all of that. itlat thank you very much. mike would have known all of that.— known all of that. not wearing a coat this morning? _ known all of that. not wearing a coat this morning? he - known all of that. not wearing a coat this morning? he is - known all of that. not wearing a coat this morning? he is a - known all of that. not wearing a coat this morning? he is a hard | known all of that. not wearing a - coat this morning? he is a hard man. it might make sense to move the all english _ it might make sense to move the all english champions league final to england _ english champions league final to england now that turkey has been put on the _ england now that turkey has been put on the uk _ england now that turkey has been put on the uk government's read travel list, on the uk government's read travel list. but _ on the uk government's read travel list. but the — on the uk government's read travel list, but the matches in three weeks and it— list, but the matches in three weeks and it is— list, but the matches in three weeks and it is due — list, but the matches in three weeks and it is due to be held in istanbul as it stands —
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uefa had hoped, to give each club at least 4,000 tickets, for the game but chelsea and manchester city fans have been told, not to go there for the final — with the country now placed last night, liverpool won four nil at leicester. it is now a huge retief— at leicester. it is now a huge relief for— at leicester. it is now a huge relief for steve bruce's side because _ relief for steve bruce's side because they are now certain to avoid _ because they are now certain to avoid a — because they are now certain to avoid a draw. two big clubs will slug _ avoid a draw. two big clubs will slug it — avoid a draw. two big clubs will slug it out _ avoid a draw. two big clubs will slug it out this lunchtime to avoid dropping — slug it out this lunchtime to avoid dropping down to the third tier of english _ dropping down to the third tier of english football. here is a look at wayne _ english football. here is a look at
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wayne rooney. ourselves and sheffield wednesday are fighting to stay in the division. as i said before, it is a cup final and if you can't get yourself up for a cup final... i've asked the players, if you can't get yourself up for this game then you can leave the building now. you maybe reporting next week that the champions league final is somewhere else stop thank you. i tell you what is in rotterdam in two weeks' time. james newman is going to be looking to win the eurovision song contest. the to be looking to win the eurovision song contest-— to be looking to win the eurovision song contest. the track you record for the uk is _ song contest. the track you record for the uk is not _ song contest. the track you record for the uk is not great. _ song contest. the track you record for the uk is not great. the - song contest. the track you record| for the uk is not great. the current title holder knows that it is not impossible. in 2019, duncan laurence took home the top prize for the netherlands after a 44—year wait, as peter ruddick reports. look at this. the current and next eurovision winner together. yes! how are you doing, man? nice to meet you, finally.
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duncan lawrence delivered the netherlands a first eurovision win for 44 years. # loving you is a losing game. james newman is hoping to repeat the feat and change the uk's fortunes. they've got one other thing in common. they both wrote their own entries. last time we met, you said to me, if the uk wants to do better at eurovision, we should start by sending an act with an actual connection to the song they're singing. and you listened! thank god! i would love to see a uk artist that is just himself and his own thing and not get bothered too much by, "0h,
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this is going to work because it's a eurovision sound," or whatever. i am so allergic for eurovision sounds. so i'm happy you guys chose james. james, i'm so happy. thank you, i really appreciate it. it's really nice of you to say. james, you've been living this contest now for, like, well over a year. have your opinions on the contest changed during that time? i think i've really learned a lot about eurovision, and the community, and the fans, and how amazing they are and how supportive they are. and i think, for me, it's just the opportunity to come back and have another go, and maybe come with a different kind of song and kind of connect with people more. it's an amazing opportunity, i think. i mean, it's a bit of a silver lining, you know? ronan keating is i bringing katrina on. leather trousers are it. nearly a quarter of a century has now passed since
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katrina and the waves last brought the trophy... who doesn't love the eurovision? ilove birmingham. ..and of course the inevitable hosting duties, too, back to the uk. the reality is the show, held here in 1998, bears only a passing resemblance to the modern contest. the number of countries taking part has increased massively. there's now semifinals, no orchestra, and the winning song has to impress both the jury of music experts as well as viewers at home. how many of you were born when the uk won in 1997 with katrina and the waves? fans have changed, too. oh, just me! that is '97. that's three of us. the show now attracts a larger share of the younger tv audience, who are engaging with the contest in their millions on social media. the past couple of years has been ballad, ballad, ballad, and as much as we do like ballads, do the uk really do ballads as well as we think they do? you have to want to compete,
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and when you are going to compete, you kind of lay yourself bear with the possibility that you might lose. we need more artists- like james newman going into the contest, treating it with the utmost - professionalism and, ultimately, - going in believing they can win. the uk just need to let go of all of their rules and formulas and just have more fun with it and maybe tell more personal stories as well. the one thing about eurovision that has not changed is the songs that win, and the songs people are playing years later are ones that people feel that they can sing along to and be part of. well, now it's kind of in 50—something languages that people sing along to! it's crazy. like, i have heard so many different covers and all sorts of languages and in different scales. it's incredible, so it never gets boring or old. i wanted a section in my song where you do not have to know the lyrics to sing along and to be part of the song to enjoy it, you know? so the brass drop for me is, like, a moment where anybody can be getting in and is listening to it and can sing along and dance. # out of the embers # you and i are going to light up
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the room...# i think that's in the right key. was that in the right key? # out of the embers...# eurovision success isn't easy, but victory will need the fans and the act the uk sends to be singing the same song. that is definitely true this year. peter ruddick, bbc news. two weeks today. good luck to them. holiday firms have criticised the government's "green list" of 12 destinations for being overly cautious. the list — which includes portugal and israel — means travellers returning to england from those countries from the 17th may what do you make of this list of countries? i
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what do you make of this list of countries?— what do you make of this list of countries? ~ . . countries? i think the challenge we have is, countries? i think the challenge we have is. for— countries? i think the challenge we have is. for an _ countries? i think the challenge we have is, for an industry _ countries? i think the challenge we have is, for an industry that - countries? i think the challenge we have is, for an industry that really. have is, for an industry that really has been — have is, for an industry that really has been shut down for 14 months now, _ has been shut down for 14 months now, absolutely we need to open cautiously — now, absolutely we need to open cautiously. none of us want a resurgence of the virus. we have all worked _ resurgence of the virus. we have all worked so _ resurgence of the virus. we have all worked so hard to maintain that. actually. — worked so hard to maintain that. actually. if— worked so hard to maintain that. actually, if you look at the 12 countries, _ actually, if you look at the 12 countries, apart from not knowing where _ countries, apart from not knowing where most of those are, they are very limited — where most of those are, they are very limited for the ability for peopte — very limited for the ability for people from the uk to travel out to those _ people from the uk to travel out to those countries. it is not even a four— those countries. it is not even a four nation— those countries. it is not even a four nation approach. i was looking at some _ four nation approach. i was looking at some of— four nation approach. i was looking at some of those countries. as it stands _ at some of those countries. as it stands today, there are restrictions in place _ stands today, there are restrictions in place for— stands today, there are restrictions in place for when we restart on the 17th of— in place for when we restart on the 17th of may — in place for when we restart on the 17th of may. even portugal has restrictions. so we really don't know. — restrictions. so we really don't know. as — restrictions. so we really don't know. as it— restrictions. so we really don't know, as it stands, what restrictions will be eased in those countries — restrictions will be eased in those countries as and when we can travel in ten _ countries as and when we can travel in ten days' — countries as and when we can travel in ten days' time. do countries as and when we can travel in ten days' time.— in ten days' time. do you think that --eole in ten days' time. do you think that people need _ in ten days' time. do you think that people need to _ in ten days' time. do you think that people need to prepare _ in ten days' time. do you think that people need to prepare it _ in ten days' time. do you think that people need to prepare it as - in ten days' time. do you think that people need to prepare it as well, | people need to prepare it as well, in terms of being the consumer,
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first there is the issue of lights and costs. but we have had the warning from the border for as cheap as well about extra time being spent at airports. there is a lot more thanjust a quick at airports. there is a lot more than just a quick break. at airports. there is a lot more thanjust a quick break. it is not going to be a quick, stress—free break at the moment, isn't it? the reali is break at the moment, isn't it? the reality is that _ break at the moment, isn't it? the reality is that travel is now very compte>
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not only— going to be such a complex process. not only leaving the uk and restrictions on us, but also those in destination restrictions that will continue.— in destination restrictions that will continue. , , , ., . will continue. despite the drawbacks and the ? will continue. despite the drawbacks and they? that _ will continue. despite the drawbacks and they? that you _ will continue. despite the drawbacks and they? that you have _ will continue. despite the drawbacks and they? that you have been - will continue. despite the drawbacks| and they? that you have been talking about, are you expecting those travel agents to be busy today? we are hearing overnight, lots of people now trying to book for portugal this summer. i people now trying to book for portugal this summer.- people now trying to book for portugal this summer. i have to be really honest- _ portugal this summer. i have to be really honest. it's _ portugal this summer. i have to be really honest. it's great _ portugal this summer. i have to be really honest. it's great news - portugal this summer. i have to be really honest. it's great news in . really honest. it's great news in one respect, that we now have no ban one respect, that we now have no ban on international travel. we can look forward _ on international travel. we can look forward to— on international travel. we can look forward to not being fined for travelling. but the reality is it is still really — travelling. but the reality is it is still really tough and challenging. our agents will this morning also be dealing _ our agents will this morning also be dealing with lots of customers who will be _ dealing with lots of customers who will be very anxious after hearing that list. — will be very anxious after hearing that list, who possibly had plans to travel _ that list, who possibly had plans to travel to _ that list, who possibly had plans to travel to some destinations where there _ travel to some destinations where there was— travel to some destinations where there was a lot of speculation before — there was a lot of speculation before the list yesterday and booked based _ before the list yesterday and booked based on _ before the list yesterday and booked based on that. there are two camps. consumers _ based on that. there are two camps. consumers who cannot wait, really excited _ consumers who cannot wait, really excited. but also have friends and families— excited. but also have friends and families in— excited. but also have friends and families in some of those
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destinations and possibly want to travet _ destinations and possibly want to travel. but you can also travel to the amber— travel. but you can also travel to the amber list destinations. some of the amber list destinations. some of the reporting may be has not made it clear that _ the reporting may be has not made it clear that you can still travel to those _ clear that you can still travel to those destinations. we clear that you can still travel to those destinations.— clear that you can still travel to those destinations. we need to leave it there. thank _ those destinations. we need to leave it there. thank you _ those destinations. we need to leave it there. thank you very _ those destinations. we need to leave it there. thank you very much - it there. thank you very much indeed. that's all we have time for this morning. breakfast will be back tomorrow from six. stay dry.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: counting continues as results come in from elections held across england, scotland and wales. the snp gains seats in scotland, but its hopes of securing an overall majority remain on a knife edge. the deputy first minister says they will push for another referendum. there will be a majority of members elected to the scottish parliament who will be committed to the hosting of an independence referendum. that is a fundamental democratic point. that is what the people of scotland will have voted for. labour performs strongly in wales, matching its best ever senedd election result. the conservatives continue to make significant gains in england after their by—election win in hartlepool. results of regional mayor contests are expected today.

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