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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 4, 2021 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines... two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira leader in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a court hears that a police officer accused of murdering the former footballer dalian atkinsion had tasered him for six times longer than standard — before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city promise a full investigation after a bridge collapse resulted in a train plunging onto a busy road — at least 23 people were killed. a call to light candles this evening to remember the murdered police community officerjulia james,
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one week after the discovery of her body in woods in kent. we're in edinburgh in the run up to the scottish parliamentary elections this thursday. can the snp get the majority they say would pave the way for a second independence vote? reflections without distractions — hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project, which aims to give people time to look back on their lives. hello, good evening. the trial of two former paratroopers accused of murdering a man
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in belfast in 1972 has collapsed — after interviews they'd given the police were ruled inadmissible. the former soldiers, known only as a and c, insist they acted lawfully when they shotjoe mccann — who led a group called "the official ira". ajudge has now formally acquitted the two men. the ministry of defence has welcomed the decision. our ireland correspondent, chris page has been following the case. the whole issue of the persecution of veterans who were in northern ireland during the troubles has been one of the most controversial ones, both here in belfast and in other parts of the uk. this trial had been going on for a number of days, it was the trial of two former paratroopers known as soldier a and soldier c, they were granted anonymity and they were charged with the killing of a senior member of
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the killing of a senior member of the republican group, known as the official ira. he was a commander in that group and he was shot dead in the markets in belfast in 1972. soldier a and soldier c, who has since died, were asked at the time asked by the police to help arrest the suspect and at the time, he was trying to run away and the soldiers admitted that they fired the shots and he wasn't armed at the time, but had been involved in the deaths of up had been involved in the deaths of up to 15 british soldiers by that point. soldiera up to 15 british soldiers by that point. soldier a and soldier see both said they acted lawfully and agreed that the foresaid used had been reasonable. the prosecution based a lot of their case on interviews given in the 1970s and again in 2010 two detectives who are
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tasked with investigating killings during this period. thejudge ruled they were formally acquitted because that material was inadmissible and can be used in court. there's been a angry reaction from the family outside the court. an angry reaction from the family outside the court. an arrangement today between _ outside the court. an arrangement today between the _ outside the court. an arrangement today between the attorney - outside the court. an arrangement. today between the attorney general and the _ today between the attorney general and the goc assured that no british soldier_ and the goc assured that no british soldier would ever be interviewed about _ soldier would ever be interviewed about shooting. this interview has been _ about shooting. this interview has been relied upon by soldiers anc in the application to exclude their confessions because they have confessed to shooting him in the back _ confessed to shooting him in the back let — confessed to shooting him in the back. let there be no doubt that they did — back. let there be no doubt that they did shoot him in the back. they were not— they did shoot him in the back. they were not arrested by the htc as has happened _ were not arrested by the htc as has happened to many here, but were
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permitted — happened to many here, but were permitted to attend by arrangement at their— permitted to attend by arrangement at their solicitors office. it has ironically— at their solicitors office. it has ironically been relied upon them to exclude _ ironically been relied upon them to exclude their interviews. they benefited from an exceptional arrangement for their entire experience in ireland. a arrangement for their entire experience in ireland. a number of eo - le experience in ireland. a number of peeple who — experience in ireland. a number of people who felt — experience in ireland. a number of people who felt that _ experience in ireland. a number of people who felt that the _ experience in ireland. a number of people who felt that the soldiers . people who felt that the soldiers shouldn't have been brought to court in the first place, unionist politicians for example have welcomed what happened today. the former defence minister who was belfast for the trial said that the soldiers should never have been prosecuted and they have been dragged through the courts. whenever it comes to the questions that people are asking about the decision to bring the case against the soldiers, the public prosecution service area northern ireland has been defending itself. they say that the pps remain satisfied that this case was properly brought to the court and the case overcame a number of legal challenges before reaching
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trial. prosecution lawyers took the view that there remained reasonable... it was for the court to determine this. this afternoon there was a reaction for the ministry of defence in london. this is an issue that goes beyond northern ireland. we have had a former ulster unionist mp also saying that he believes that the prosecution should never have been brought. the arguments over the legalities of all this is one thing the prosecution feels essentially, the prosecution feels essentially, the procedural issue and the much wider issue in how you deal with unsolved killings from the northern ireland conflict, 2000 of them are most carried out by paramilitaries and whether soldiers should be offered the same protections that soldiers who serve on other overseas operations, for example the iraq and afghanistan wars received. so far,
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there are other cases of soldiers being prosecuted during the troubles here that are making the way through the courts. a court has heard that the former aston villa footballer dalian atkinson died after a taser was used on him for 33 seconds and he was kicked in the head by a police officer. benjamin monk, a constable with the west mercia force, denies murder and manslaughter. 0ur correspondent phil mackie is following the case at birmingham crown court. yes, and his colleague is also on trial here at birmingham crown court. she denies a charge of assault. today we hear the prosecution outline case against them, it said that in august of 2016, dalian atkinsion was an excellent professional footballer
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and was suffering from severe health problems 15 years after he retired from the professional game, he had been on dialysis, had heart problems and high blood pressure. he became agitated and was driven in the early hours of the morning to his father's house in telford. there, there was a disturbance which neighbours heard and reported to the police. when those officers arrived, there was a confrontation between dalian atkinsion and the two officers. he was described... his behaviour was described as being erratic and bizarre. he was claiming to be the messiah. mr monk deployed his taser twice. 0n the third occasion he fired is taser and it completely incapacitated dalian atkinsion. the prosecution said that he fired the taserfor prosecution said that he fired the taser for too long. prosecution said that he fired the taserfor too long. it prosecution said that he fired the taser for too long. it was 33 seconds rather than the standard
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five seconds that was deployed and subsequently once dalian atkinsion was on the ground, pc monk is alleged to have kicked him and had a number of times and pc smith was also supposed to have beaten him weather button when he was on the ground. we have heard that several witnesses saw this confrontation and other officers that arrived on scene very soon this happened describe saying pc monk standing with his foot on mr atkinson's had and he was making a low growling noise. he was taken to hospital and sadly, he died. this happened five years ago today we had the beginning of the prosecution case which will be continued tomorrow morning. before, we hear the opening statements from the defence, the trial itself is due to last between six weeks and eight weeks. 0ur correspondent phil mackie is at birmingham crown court. the mayor of mexico city has promised an urgent investigation
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into a disaster on the metro system, when a bridge collapsed as a train was travelling on it. several carriages plunged onto a busy road below, at 10pm local time. at least 23 people are known to have died, and dozens more have been injured. we will be at the scene shortly. but first we'll be seeing this report. a warning that you may find some of the images in the report upsetting. residents of mexico city are all too accustomed to these scenes. emergency services working through the night, attempting to reach injured victims, trapped beneath the rubble. but this was not another earthquake in the mexican capital, rather it was an overpass in the city's busy subway system. it collapsed as a train travelled over it, bringing a tangle of wreckage, concrete and metal crashing onto the cars below. at that hour, the train will most likely have been taking workers home after a late shift, a quiet night turning into tragedy in an instant.
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it was a desperate, agonising situation for theirfamilies. translation: my daughter-in-law called us, she was with my son - and she told us that the structure fell down on top of them. translation: my brother came with his wife and they managedl to get her out, but he was crushed in there, and we don't know anything. they do not give us reports. now they have to get him out, but who knows how long it will take? also on the scene was the city's mayor, claudia sheinbaum, addressing the public as the picture got steadily grimmer. "i urge any family who fears they had relatives on the train to contact the emergency response team here, orat one of the hospitals," she said. this was the newest, most modern line in mexico's subway, line 12, unveiled less than a decade ago. an incident like this might have been expected on one of the older lines built in the 1960s, but supposedly not on line 12.
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he speaks spanish. yet many have said there were issues with its construction from the start. among them, local residents who complained about the endless expansion of the subway across this sprawling city. many of the tough questions ahead will be directed at the city's former mayor, marcelo ebrard, now mexico's foreign minister. he championed line 12, and on twitter he said he would fully comply with the investigation into what happened. but such investigations will have to wait. for now, the city is solely concerned with rescuing those trapped, attending to the injured, and comforting the bereaved. will grant, bbc news, mexico city. let's speak to the journalist ana gabriela rojas who is at the scene. thank you so much for speaking to us. we can see some of the wreckage
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right behind you. first of all, is there any prospect of finding anyone else inside the wreckage? yes. there any prospect of finding anyone else inside the wreckage?— else inside the wreckage? yes, that is the latest — else inside the wreckage? yes, that is the latest news. _ else inside the wreckage? yes, that is the latest news. everybody, - is the latest news. everybody, including the emergency system, they are saying there might be a car trapped in there and the people of course inside. the latest air force are to take those people trapped in those car out as soon as possible. it has been over 12 hours since the incident. there is hope, but they want to rescue the last people that may be trapped inside. {th want to rescue the last people that may be trapped inside.— may be trapped inside. of course, that is one — may be trapped inside. of course, that is one of _ may be trapped inside. of course, that is one of the _ may be trapped inside. of course, that is one of the cars _ may be trapped inside. of course, that is one of the cars that - may be trapped inside. of course, that is one of the cars that the - that is one of the cars that the carriage landed on. it is so distressing to even look at that scene. what are people saying to you? what is the mood there? everyone is in shock here. as a remember, this is the biggest the
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stats since the earthquake in 2017. it is very shocking and it is horrible and very difficult to reach the scene. people here are very shocked and angry. they were accusing the mayor of corruption and the construction of this line and they said they were constantly reporting that this line has problems, especially after the earthquake of 2017. they said the line was not really in shape to continue running.— line was not really in shape to continue running. and after the earthquake. — continue running. and after the earthquake, would _ continue running. and after the i earthquake, would investigations continue running. and after the - earthquake, would investigations not have been done? what they authority is not have done any work to check that the structure was saved? i mean, we don't what happened yet, but the fact that 70 people are talking about it, that is clearly an issue for debate. —— are so many people. issue for debate. -- are so many --eole. , ., , issue for debate. -- are so many --eole. , ., people. yes, there was an investigation _ people. yes, there was an investigation of _ people. yes, there was an investigation of the - people. yes, there was an i investigation of the structure
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people. yes, there was an - investigation of the structure and the authority supposedly came and checked it, but people are still reporting it. some people were actually scared to take this line, but it was the only way to reach the houses. talking to people, it was mainly filled with working people who were coming back to their houses and the metro was the only way to commute for them. find and the metro was the only way to commute for them.— and the metro was the only way to commute for them. and this accident ha--ened commute for them. and this accident happened at — commute for them. and this accident happened at mpm — commute for them. and this accident happened at mpm local _ commute for them. and this accident happened at mpm local time. -- - commute for them. and this accident i happened at mpm local time. -- 10pm. happened at mpm local time. —— 10pm. i'm assuming it would have been busy. i'm assuming it would have been bus . ., , ., busy. there are reports of even children and _ busy. there are reports of even children and babies _ busy. there are reports of even children and babies going - busy. there are reports of even | children and babies going there. busy. there are reports of even i children and babies going there. it was very busy. i have to say that maybe they are family members and they are still very scared. people are going from one hospital to another looking for them. so there are still people _ another looking for them. so there are still people who _ another looking for them. so there are still people who are _ another looking for them. so there are still people who are worried . are still people who are worried that someone they love was on the train or was in a car and i still
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don't know what has happened? exactly. and i have to say something. the first thing, the first people to rescue where the neighbours from the area who heard the crash and came running and help people to get out from the cars and from the train itself. it was really horrible and people were screaming from inside, asking them to help them to get out.— from inside, asking them to help them to get out. thank you so much for our them to get out. thank you so much for yourtime- _ them to get out. thank you so much for your time. thank _ them to get out. thank you so much for your time. thank you _ them to get out. thank you so much for your time. thank you for - them to get out. thank you so much for your time. thank you forjoiningl for your time. thank you forjoining us the from the very, very distressing scene there in mexico city. 23 people we know have been killed in the accident. scores of people injures two injured and as annual saying, still emergency services at the scene trying to extricate at least one car that they know is there under the train that fell on the road below. the headlines on bbc news...
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two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a court hears a police officer accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion had tasered him for six times longer than standard, before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. voters go to the polls across scotland, wales and england on thursday, in the biggest test of opinion outside the general election. more than 100 councils are being contested in england, and the members of the welsh and scottish parliaments will be elected. my colleague clive myrie
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is at holyrood for us. good evening. yes, hi there, jane. arguably the vote here to the parliament could be the most consequential of the night on thursday. a critical moment, perhaps, for the union between scotland and the rest of the uk. nicola sturgeon and the snp believe a majority of seats, 65, in the parliament would be a mandate for a second independence referendum. our political correspondent nick eardley is here. let's talk about that drive for a second referendum first. is the snp confident has the votes to do that? i think there are a lot of nerves in the party about that. a summary the chance to put a bet on this, don't take it. it really is on a knife edge. the system here is complicated, nobody can be sure exactly how it will play out. tactical voting plays a big part in
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scottish elections, i've spoken to a lot of candidates today who are talking about lots of different places and things playing into it. there are some in the snp who think it is within reach, there are some in the opposition parties who say it is 5050, but it really is too close to call the moment. it really matters. because if the snp get that majority in their own, nicola sturgeon will say that there is a cast—iron mandate for a second independence referendum. i don't get is the first thing she will focus on in the coming weeks assuming she is still first minister, but it will absolutely be there and it will shape scottish and to an extent, uk politics for the next two years. the meaning of the uk unionist parties is not to this, but it is about to stop the snp majority and the race for the conservatives and labour the
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second place. for the conservatives and labour the second place-— second place. beyond all the chatter about independence _ second place. beyond all the chatter about independence and _ second place. beyond all the chatter about independence and hanging - second place. beyond all the chatter. about independence and hanging over the election of course has been covid—19 and coronavirus, campaigning has been affected by it, so on and so forth. how much will be in the minds of voters as regards to nicola sturgeon's handling of the crisis here. . nicola sturgeon's handling of the crisis here-— nicola sturgeon's handling of the crisis here. ., ., ., crisis here. that was a backdrop to the whole election. _ crisis here. that was a backdrop to the whole election. it _ crisis here. that was a backdrop to the whole election. it is _ crisis here. that was a backdrop to the whole election. it is the - the whole election. it is the backdrop to the rise in support of independents that we have seen in the last two months. nicola sturgeon will argue she has done a betterjob than borisjohnson in the polls over the last few months suggest that scots agree with that. we have not seen borisjohnson here at all during the campaign backing the scottish tories. the pandemic, if you are to take a walk up to the royal mile behind us in chat to voters about what is on their mind, people care about their pandemic and they care about when life is back to normal. when they will be able to go to their friends and family pass houses and a couple of weeks. this
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is the plan with the scottish road map. it is absolutely the most important thing for many people. i think it will be high on voters minds. independence or to bleed since that question because when it comes to how scotland recovers from the pandemic, there are two schools of thought. if you are... let's get the health emergency out of the way, but when we get to the economic recovery, we can only do it the way that we won in scotland has the powers that come with independence. if you are unionist, you would say, imagine talking about a referendum when we are going to go through some economical people than we need to rebuild. we are better off in the uk because that gives us more backing. there are other things and people's mind. the parliament has a lot of power in education, health, justice, income tax and there is a lot of state in this election. the reason
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we come back to independence often is because as a big impact on how people vote and it is the back drop to everything in scottish politics. our political correspondent there. let's speak to pamela nash — a former scottish labour mp and chief executive of scotland in union, a cross party campaign making the case against scottish independence. hello to you. thank you very much indeed forjoining us on bbc news. i just wonder, if the union is so important to labour, why has the call from douglas ross of the conservatives for prounion parties to get together to defeat the pro—referendum, independence. but why that was that dismissed by labour? i why that was that dismissed by labour? ~ . why that was that dismissed by labour? ,, ., ., , ., ., labour? i think all of us who are interested _ labour? i think all of us who are interested in _ labour? i think all of us who are interested in politics _ labour? i think all of us who are interested in politics or- labour? i think all of us who are interested in politics or report . labour? i think all of us who are | interested in politics or report on politics. — interested in politics or report on politics, we know that in reality, if politics, we know that in reality, it there — politics, we know that in reality, it there is — politics, we know that in reality, if there is an offer on the table, it doesn't— if there is an offer on the table, it doesn't come via twitter. that was not — it doesn't come via twitter. that
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was not a — it doesn't come via twitter. that was not a genuine offer from the scottish— was not a genuine offer from the scottish conservative leader, it was a publicity— scottish conservative leader, it was a publicity stunt and there was no private _ a publicity stunt and there was no private communications made, as far as i private communications made, as far as i was— private communications made, as far as i was aware. if private communications made, as far as l was aware-— as i was aware. if proper communications - as i was aware. if proper communications had - as i was aware. if proper. communications had been as i was aware. if proper- communications had been made, as i was aware. if proper— communications had been made, would labour have taken the offer? ithink labour have taken the offer? i think it is unlikely- _ labour have taken the offer? i think it is unlikely. labourlabour have taken the offer? i think it is unlikely. labour did _ labour have taken the offer? i think it is unlikely. labour did suffer- it is unlikely. labour did suffer from _ it is unlikely. labour did suffer from the — it is unlikely. labour did suffer from the association with the conservative party in 2014 through better— conservative party in 2014 through better together, and rightly or wrongly. — better together, and rightly or wrongly, i don't see any labour wrongly, idon't see any labour leadership— wrongly, i don't see any labour leadership in the near future contemplating a coalition or any joint _ contemplating a coalition or any joint working formally with the conservative party of the liberal democrats. but, what i would say is that we _ democrats. but, what i would say is that we have this in common that we want scotland to stay in the uk and we should — want scotland to stay in the uk and we should be working well on that. we haven't— we should be working well on that. we haven't seen that at all in this election — we haven't seen that at all in this election. ~ ., �* , , ., election. wouldn't it be better to sa to election. wouldn't it be better to say to nicola _ election. wouldn't it be better to say to nicola sturgeon _ election. wouldn't it be better to
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say to nicola sturgeon and - election. wouldn't it be better to say to nicola sturgeon and the l election. wouldn't it be better to . say to nicola sturgeon and the snp, to alex salmond and alba and the scottish greens, 0k, have your referendum. the prounion parties make their case and win and then shut this debate down for the next 100 years. why not do that? brute shut this debate down for the next 100 years. why not do that? we did back in 2014 — 100 years. why not do that? we did back in 2014 and _ 100 years. why not do that? we did back in 2014 and the _ 100 years. why not do that? we did back in 2014 and the debate - 100 years. why not do that? we did back in 2014 and the debate was - 100 years. why not do that? we did | back in 2014 and the debate was not shutdown — back in 2014 and the debate was not shut down. the fat is we saw the snp and other— shut down. the fat is we saw the snp and other pro—independence supporters carry on their campaign for scotland to leave the uk the very next — for scotland to leave the uk the very next day. we can't just for scotland to leave the uk the very next day. we can'tjust keep having _ very next day. we can'tjust keep having a — very next day. we can'tjust keep having a referendum every few years because _ having a referendum every few years because the snp want it. we have to listen _ because the snp want it. we have to listen to— because the snp want it. we have to listen to what people decided in 2014— listen to what people decided in 2014 and — listen to what people decided in 2014 and to be clear, that was to remain— 2014 and to be clear, that was to remain in— 2014 and to be clear, that was to remain in the united kingdom. the vast majority of polls since then have _ vast majority of polls since then have supported that scotland there was to _ have supported that scotland there was to stay in the uk.— was to stay in the uk. labour has been on a — was to stay in the uk. labour has been on a 20 _ was to stay in the uk. labour has been on a 20 year _ was to stay in the uk. labour has been on a 20 year decline, - was to stay in the uk. labour has been on a 20 year decline, it - was to stay in the uk. labour has been on a 20 year decline, it is l been on a 20 year decline, it is polling around 20% in the polls. it
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has been made clear that the party will not get a realistic majority in parliament behind me here, how does labour restore faith and trust? especially among voters and get them back onside. the especially among voters and get them back onside. ' . , back onside. the difference between anas sarwar— back onside. the difference between anas sarwar and _ back onside. the difference between anas sarwar and the _ back onside. the difference between anas sarwar and the team _ back onside. the difference between anas sarwar and the team around i back onside. the difference between. anas sarwar and the team around him is concentrating on the issues that really— is concentrating on the issues that really matter to the people. what are the _ really matter to the people. what are the priorities of the scottish people? — are the priorities of the scottish people? let's be clear, people vote for a range — people? let's be clear, people vote for a range of issues in the election. _ for a range of issues in the election, notjust a referendum. it is not _ election, notjust a referendum. it is not a _ election, notjust a referendum. it is not a referendum, no matter how the snp _ is not a referendum, no matter how the snp and — is not a referendum, no matter how the snp and the conservative see it. there _ the snp and the conservative see it. there are _ the snp and the conservative see it. there are a — the snp and the conservative see it. there are a range of issues on the table _ there are a range of issues on the table and — there are a range of issues on the table and what labour is done is tap into that _ table and what labour is done is tap into that and really concentrated on looking _ into that and really concentrated on looking at _ into that and really concentrated on looking at a national recovery plan for scotland and working with the rest of _ for scotland and working with the rest of the uk as we come out from these _ rest of the uk as we come out from these initial— rest of the uk as we come out from these initial stages of the covid crisis~ _ these initial stages of the covid crisis. ., ., ., , ,
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crisis. you are absolutely right. this is about _ crisis. you are absolutely right. this is about whole _ crisis. you are absolutely right. this is about whole host - crisis. you are absolutely right. this is about whole host of- crisis. you are absolutely right. i this is about whole host of issues, it is notjust about independence, but there is host of issues here that conservatives are talking about. money for teachers, free school meals, more social housing, and other such things. these are all traditional labour issues. they are parking their tanks on your loan, can you deal with that? if parking their tanks on your loan, can you deal with that?— can you deal with that? if other arties can you deal with that? if other parties take _ can you deal with that? if other parties take on _ can you deal with that? if other parties take on the _ can you deal with that? if other parties take on the issues - can you deal with that? if other parties take on the issues that l can you deal with that? if other i parties take on the issues that the labour— parties take on the issues that the labour party have been raising, then that is— labour party have been raising, then that is good — labour party have been raising, then that is good for the labour party. to be _ that is good for the labour party. to be clear. _ that is good for the labour party. to be clear, i now work as a chief executive — to be clear, i now work as a chief executive of— to be clear, i now work as a chief executive of scotland union and i work _ executive of scotland union and i work with — executive of scotland union and i work with all the main uk parties, liberal— work with all the main uk parties, liberal democrats, labour and conservatives. i'm notjust here to talk about— conservatives. i'm notjust here to talk about how labour should win the election— talk about how labour should win the election today. gk. talk about how labour should win the election today-— election today. ok. we will leave it there. it election today. ok. we will leave it there- it is — election today. ok. we will leave it there. it is good _ election today. ok. we will leave it there. it is good to _ election today. ok. we will leave it there. it is good to talk— election today. ok. we will leave it there. it is good to talk to - election today. ok. we will leave it there. it is good to talk to you - election today. ok. we will leave it there. it is good to talk to you and | there. it is good to talk to you and thank you very much indeed for joining us here on bbc news. before you go, we are expecting the fourth of the leaders debates here tonight. that will be taking place with full
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coverage on bbc news. for a round up of everything you need to know about the elections, there's a guide on our website with much more information about who is standing where. that's at bbc.co.uk/news or on the bbc news app. that is it from edinburgh for now. back to you. that is clive at the latest from hollywood and there is more coming up this evening on bbc news at 7pm. there will be all the latest from the campaign trail in scotland and at 7:30pm, will be back at hollywood and in scotland with the build—up to the leaders debate that clive mentioned. that kicks off just before apm. we will then bring you the reaction to the debate afterwards. that is offjust before apm. we will then bring you the reaction to the debate afterwards. that's four 9pm. —— from 9pm. the
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government has released the latest coronavirus figures for the uk. it shows that there have been 1946 people that have tested positive in last 24—hour is, and for debts with people of the positive coronavirus test. —— death. just one more story to bring you before we look at their weather prospects, the duchess is going to release a children's book about the special bond between a father and son as seen through mother because �*s eyes. it is heard debut children pass publication will go on salejune and it has been inspired by her husband harry and her son archie who celebrates his second birthday on sunday. it will be illustrated by the award—winning
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artist christian robinson and the audiobook narrated by the herself. as promised, we will catch up with the weather prospects. hello there. we have still got some cold winds today and some wet weather around, as well. the temperatures towards the end of the afternoon still perhaps no higher than 7 or 8 degrees across the northern half of the uk. still quite windy by this stage too, particularly around those north sea coasts, although the winds are beginning to ease off a bit elsewhere. we're seeing some sunshine and showers. there's a zone of wetter weather moving away from scotland, through northern ireland, northern england and heading towards the midlands, east anglia. that will work its way towards wales and the west country overnight. clearer skies following to the north, away from increasingly snowy showers in northern scotland, and it will be a colder night tonight, not as windy. where we've got clearer skies in scotland and northern england, we are more likely to have a frost. more wintry showers tomorrow coming into northern scotland. some showers stretching across northern ireland into wales, the west country. those will push their way towards the midlands, into the south—east of england. they could be heavy, as well. the odd shower around elsewhere but some spells of sunshine.
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it won't be as windy as it is today but it will still be cold for the time of year. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira leader in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed.
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a court hears that a police officer accused of murdering the former footballer dalian atkinsion had tasered him for six times longer than standard before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city promise a full investigation after a bridge collapse resulted in a train plunging onto a busy road. at least 23 people were killed. a call to light candles this evening to remember the murdered police community officerjulia james, one week after the discovery of her body in woods in kent. reflections without distractions — hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to look back on their lives.
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much more to come this half hour. right now, we'll catch up with the latest sports news. good afternoon. we'll begin with news onjose mourinho, who wasted no time getting back into employment. he's been appointed as the new manager of italian side roma from next season, just 15 days after being sacked by tottenham. his 17 month spell in north london ended before he had the chance to contest the league cup final and with it went the chance of preserving his record of winning trophies at every club he's managed. football reporterjohn bennet told me earlier his choice of destination was expected. the announcement came as a surprise but when you think about it, this is a very logical move. he is very respected in italian football for what he did at inter milan in two successful years between 2008 and 2010. he won two serie a titles, he won a treble of trophies in his second and final season, he won the champions league.
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so italy was always a likely destination. and this is a very interesting project. they've had new owners for the last year or so, very ambitious new owners and jose mourinho has talked about this and said he was really impressed by their winning project and what he called a winning mentality. and the owners have been talking about this appointment as well and say they were impressed by his winning mentality and his passion forfootball. so the announcement has come as a surprise but when you think about it this is a really interesting project forjose mourinho and a logical project for him. the next move was always going to come outside of english football. do you think that this spells the end now forjose mourinho in english football? do you think we will not see him back here again? you never say never because of course, he loves english football and for all the critics
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he's had over the last few years he has been very successful in english football, particularly at chelsea, of course. but it always seemed as though his likely destination would be outside of england. real madrid was talked about because the real madrid president is a big fan. but i think italy was always going to be the likely destination. it's going to be a very tough job for him because roma have not won a league title since 2001, they haven't won a trophy since 2008, they are seventh in serie a, so it's a big job for him to try and get them towards competing for trophies. but you get the impression from what he has said today about this newjob that he is really relishing the challenge. manchester city take a 2—1 lead into the second leg of tonight's champions league semi final against paris saint germain, who face a nervous wait on the fitness of key man kylian mbappe. it could all fall to neymar, who helped steer his side
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to the final last season, to overturn the deficit. manager maurizio pochettino was without mbappe for tehir league game on saturday and faces a late fitness test for the match at the etihad. pep guardiola — aiming to win the competition with city for the first time — is expecting another tough game. in the first half they were exceptional. they were always dangerous. in the second half we were better. we were better and they were worse. they lost and they play bad if they win, they play good. but if you ask my opinion, they play good. they are going to play good, i know. the ipl face a race against time to rearrange the postponed tournamnet after calling a halt to the competition today. organisers said they had to prioritise the health and wellbeing of those involved in light of the pandemic. eleven english players competing will now return home. india are meant to tour england
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this summer and then stage the 2020 world cup there later this year, limiting the window to conclude the competition. that's all from the bbc sport centre for now. plenty more to come in sports day at 6:30pm, for now, back to you. care home residents are being allowed to go on some trips outside from today in england without having to isolate for two weeks on their return. campaigners have welcomed the new guidance, which means residents can go for a walk or visit a loved one's garden. those leaving for medical appointments will still have to self—isolate when they get back. but some relatives are concerned that some care homes are ignoring this new guidance on visits and limiting their chances to see their loved ones. the government says care homes themselves are best—placed to decide
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on how to enable safe visits. i'm joined now by nadra ahmed, chair of the national care association, which represents small and medium—sized care providers. good evening. good evening. what do ou make good evening. good evening. what do you make of — good evening. good evening. what do you make of those _ good evening. good evening. what do you make of those relatives _ good evening. good evening. what do you make of those relatives who - good evening. good evening. what do you make of those relatives who feel. you make of those relatives who feel this is a post covid —— a postcode lottery? this is a post covid -- a postcode lotte ? ,., ., , this is a post covid -- a postcode lotte ? ., , lottery? the government has said it is u- to lottery? the government has said it is up to the — lottery? the government has said it is up to the provider— lottery? the government has said it is up to the provider to _ lottery? the government has said it is up to the provider to make - lottery? the government has said it is up to the provider to make sure l is up to the provider to make sure they have all safeguarding that is required in order to enable this, so paramount in all of this is within the providerfeels paramount in all of this is within the provider feels they can safely enable it. —— with the provider feels. part of that will be around individual risk assessments they have to do for every person, not
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just the resident, also the nominated person or essential caregiver, and the nature of the visit. so that is what they will have to do. and over and above all of that, we are doing all of this having been given that responsibility by government, without any insurance against these visits. so we have business insurance that covers our business and normal running of business, but sadly, covid is excluded from our insurance cover.— sadly, covid is excluded from our insurance cover. . ., ., , ., insurance cover. what would you need insurance cover. what would you need insurance for? — insurance cover. what would you need insurance for? why _ insurance cover. what would you need insurance for? why would _ insurance cover. what would you need insurance for? why would a _ insurance cover. what would you need insurance for? why would a care - insurance cover. what would you need| insurance for? why would a care home specifically need that in order to enable relatives to visit their loved ones? in enable relatives to visit their loved ones?— enable relatives to visit their loved ones? in the event that an hinu loved ones? in the event that anything happened _ loved ones? in the event that anything happened and - loved ones? in the event that anything happened and the i loved ones? in the event that . anything happened and the claim loved ones? in the event that - anything happened and the claim was made against the care home, which had covered related, so if somebody said they had contracted the illness from visiting the care home or had been out and came in and they had
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brought a covid back into the care home, because it is still out there, we know people are vaccinated so we are in a good place but it's about me asking, you know, would you drive a car without insurance, just in case? we need to be very, very safe because the people we are looking after our very vulnerable and if you bring it back in and there was a case, you know, you don't know what you don't know and it only matters when it matters. and i think oh providers are very, very mindful of their responsibilities. —— all providers are mindful. we are responsible people, we have worked very hard in this past year and we have now got another length, i suspect, to go whilst the viruses out there in communities, to to support the people that we support. we want people to go out. this is not about us trying to keep people in. but we need to have the support of everybody behind us to make sure we can do that safely. and enable it in a way that doesn't put anybody else at risk, either. 50.
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in a way that doesn't put anybody else at risk, either.— else at risk, either. so, as a sector. _ else at risk, either. so, as a sector. are _ else at risk, either. so, as a sector, are you _ else at risk, either. so, as a sector, are you relieved - else at risk, either. so, as a| sector, are you relieved that else at risk, either. so, as a - sector, are you relieved that this guidance today is just guidance, that it's not a legal obligation, because you're saying that some care homes for staffing reasons and other reasons, simply wouldn't be able to manage it? brute reasons, simply wouldn't be able to manaue it? ~ . reasons, simply wouldn't be able to manage it?— reasons, simply wouldn't be able to manaueit? . , ,, manage it? we are relieved the steps are auoin manage it? we are relieved the steps are going forward. — manage it? we are relieved the steps are going forward, we _ manage it? we are relieved the steps are going forward, we are _ manage it? we are relieved the steps are going forward, we are absolutelyl are going forward, we are absolutely relieved. we want to have what we had pre—covid, which was nobody having to make appointments, people being able to come into our services and visit their loved ones when they want to enjoy a cup of tea, take them out, sit them in the gardens, whatever they want to do, that's whatever they want to do, that's what we want to get back to and these are cautious steps forward, but we can't ignore this massive risk out there that exists and we have no support for it. isolation is not the answer for us because it actually takes up a lot of time for us to have to isolate three, four, five people who have been out during the week for days and days, so that certainly is a really good step
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forward, but we also need to make sure the other steps are in place, that we can do this safely. and we can enable people to feel safe and enjoy the visits, and we as a business can feel we have done that responsibly. br; business can feel we have done that responsibly-— responsibly. by the same token, do ou responsibly. by the same token, do you understand _ responsibly. by the same token, do you understand those _ responsibly. by the same token, do you understand those relatives - responsibly. by the same token, do you understand those relatives who j you understand those relatives who perhaps, for whatever reason, their loved one is in a care home that isn't able to facilitate everything they might like to, and that is their relationship with their mother or theirfather, their relationship with their mother ortheirfather, or their relationship with their mother or their father, or whoever that relation is, they are desperate, they are desperate to resume proper contact after more than a year? i contact after more than a year? i think it's absolutely imperative that every care provider does everything possible to build up that relationship, that trust and enable the visit, absolutely. and the ones that are not doing it must actually tell us why they are not doing it, you know, make sure they explain to the relatives why they are not doing it. one provider phoned us and said,
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we have spoken to every family member and they have all said they don't want the visits at this stage, they would much rather everybody had been vaccinated, had had those that would like both vaccines, and then they would like to do it was up so there are different views but i absolutely agree that if people want to have a visit and the care provider visit can be done safely and can enable it, they should enable it. there is no doubt about that. we're not trying to keep people away from their loved ones was a bit of a much better atmosphere, better relationship for us as providers, to keep this moving forward and make sure we can do this, because the problem is, if anything goes wrong, it will be the provider, it will always be the provider, it will always be the provider, last year at this time, the prime minister decided despite the prime minister decided despite the fact there was no ppe available to providers that he would play in the care home sector for what was going on. despite the fact that people were being discharged into hospitals, out of hospitals into our
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services, it was still our fault. hospitals, out of hospitals into our services, it was still ourfault. i think there's a real challenge for us and social care providers. we want to be doing what we can do, we have to do that safely. because we know, we know that if we get it wrong, it has an impact on individuals.— wrong, it has an impact on individuals. ., ,, , ., ., , ., individuals. thank you for your time this evening- _ individuals. thank you for your time this evening. chair— individuals. thank you for your time this evening. chair of— individuals. thank you for your time this evening. chair of the _ individuals. thank you for your time this evening. chair of the national. this evening. chair of the national care association, which represents small and medium—sized care providers. as covid restrictions across the uk continue to ease, mps are discussing whether vaccine certificates — which prove that someone has had a jab — would help life return to normal. obliging people to show they've been vaccinated before attending major events is controversial — but it's expected to be a feature of foreign travel this summer, with eu countries likely to require it. here's our health correspondent, anna collinson. millions of vaccination cards have now been handed out after a coronavirus jab. but it's likely
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soon there will be an even easier way to know someone's vaccination status or whether they have recently tested negative. while covid passports or certificates may not be needed for essential shops or public transport, the government in england believes it could help crowds return to large events, like the trial of 21,000 fans due to attend the fa cup final here in wembley later this month. but for many, it is a controversial idea. i think the problems come once covid passports, whatever form they take, begin to be perceived as compulsory, once people begin to think that, in effect, this means that we've got to get vaccinated. and the danger with that is it can actually undermine people's willingness to be vaccinated. professor reicher is one of those giving evidence to mps and peers about the use of covid passports, both here and for international travel. the european union is holding its own talks about lifting restrictions on nonessential travel.
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suggested proposals include allowing british people who have had both jabs to visit by the summer, with the option of applying restrictions quickly if required. a senior scientific adviser believes there should be no risk visiting countries like france or italy if infection rates fall to uk levels. the risk comes from going from a place like the uk with very low infection levels, and going to a place with much higher infection levels, and therefore having the risk of bringing infection back. if the two places are at comparable levels, and that is what the eu is saying, then there is no particular risk associated with travel. portugal is one country hoping to welcome back british tourists, but the government is urging people to be patient until they are satisfied it is safe and an official announcement is made. we don't want to reimport the virus, we have had a huge success in terms of our vaccination programme of bringing down the levels of covid here in the uk, so we need to be cautious. it is also a cautious message from the labour leader, who welcomes the prospect of foreign
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travel, but not if it would mean another lockdown. there is evidence across the world of the virus being out of control and increasing. we've got to be very, very careful. we won't be safe here until, broadly, the virus is under control across the world. but do i want to see things return to normality? of course i do. as we enjoy new freedoms, transmission rates are expected to rise, although not to the levels we saw over the winter. the main concern is vaccines possibly not working as well against new variants. but, for now, the data is promising and the hope is for a much more normal summer. anna collinson, bbc news. we heard a little there from professor neil ferguson, whose modelling led to the first lockdown in march 2020, he has told the bbc that it's �*highly unlikely�* there will be any further lockdown in the uk. he explained that a number of steps
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taken in the uk to slow the spread of the virus meant there was now a clear path out of the pandemic. i think it's unlikely. it can't be completely ruled out, in the worst case scenario, if we have a new variant crop up which does manage to evade the vaccines, let's say late summer, early autumn, there may be a need to roll back on some of these measures, at least temporarily until we can boost people's immunity. do i think it's likely to happen? no, i don't. i think that we are much more likely to be on a steady course now out of this pandemic, at least in this country. the headlines on bbc news... two former soldiers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 have been formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a court hears a police officer accused of murdering the ex—footballer dalian atkinsion had tasered him for six times longer than standard before kicking him twice in the head. authorities in mexico city say there will be a full investigation
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after a metro train and railway track collapsed onto a busy road in mexico city, killing at least 23 people. hundreds of people in hull are taking part in a year—long art project which aims to give people time to reflect on their lives without distractions. time to reflect on their lives volunteers will be invited to spend an hour alone in a glass—fronted box, perched hundreds of feet above the city. here's our arts correspondent, david sillito. it's been a really tough year for a lot of people. i'm really looking forward to it as being, really, a new beginning. we're in hull, or maybe more
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accurately, we're looking over hull. this is kate, one of the first visitors to a new arrival in the city. the hull vigil. wow. wow, it looks so blue. this is not how i expected it at all. i thought i was going to be terrified. she and more than 700 others will stand here for an hour at a time over the next 365 days, and gaze over the city. and think. this is an artwork about what's on our minds. my year has been very focused around two members of my family, really. my daughter, who is disabled, my elder daughter. and my dad, who's 83 and has a blood cancer. so it has been one of fear, really. you know, protecting them, shielding. each day, there will be a vigil at sunrise and another at sunset.
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there aren't many rules when you are up here, but there is one. no mobile phones, because they want you to, well, have a chance to enjoy the silence, the sky, the sun and the beauty of hull. fantastic, isn't it? i am off to hull straight after this programme! the tower of london is still in the end of its longest closure since the second world war by asking the public to name its latest arrival, raven check. the legend of the raven says if the birds leave the tower, the kingdom will full, which has a second thought to be the first one acted on the protection of the birds. the young bird will be named in a public vote that opens today and runs for two weeks. the bird will stay in the tower of london alongside her brother, edgar, taking
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the number of resident reasons to nine. —— the number of resident ravens. it's been just over a year since mick cullen, otherwise known as "speedo mick", walked from lands end tojohn o'groats injust a pair of swimming trunks — raising more than half a million pounds for disadvantaged children along the way. for mick, navigating life in lockdown has proved his most challenging journey yet. he's been speaking to jayne mccubbin about his struggles with his mental health — and the long road to recovery. i stopped connecting to people. i started throwing myself off whatsapp groups, my family, and disconnecting myself, just getting more and more isolated and more and more depressed. you will know michael cullen as speedo mick. you will know the pants, the smile, the laugh, but now, he wants to share his struggle. the last time i saw you in liverpool... yes. ..every car that went by beeped its horn, every person
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that passed by gave you a hug. oh, it was fantastic, it was amazing. i couldn't. .. honestly, i couldn't put it into words. in 2019, michael cullen started a 1000—mile journey from john o'groats to lands end as speedo mick. she's emptied her purse, thank you. i have emptied my purse! the whole world and its dog was coming up to say, you know, well done, congratulations, and to donate. cheering. it got me to the finish line. that was, that was my fuel. he finished his 78—dayjourney at the end of february last year, and then... ..lockdown hit. yes, and everybody was told to stay in. for someone who thrived on human contact, who had enjoyed the freedom of the open road, this was almost impossible to manage. and it got so bad that, um...
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it got so bad that i didn't want to be here any more, you know what i mean? i didn't want to be here any more. you want to be free from what you're going through because it's that bad, it's that dark. you start believing that, you know, you are better off not being here. i thought that i was going to figure this out myself, and this is the problem, you know, because you can't think your way out of mental health. you've got to ask for help. and eventually, eventually, i spoke to my brother. can i ask what you said to him? ijust told him, "i'm in trouble." the highest rate of suicide in england and wales is amongst middle—aged men. michael says he owes his life to his brother and that first plea for help.
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i'll tell you what you hear, you hear family members and friends turn around and go, "i've only seen him on tuesday, "and he was, he was fine." that's all you... that's all you ever hear. "he was fine." but he wasn't. he was laughing and he was smiling and he wasjoking but he wasn't fine, man. so if somebody says, "actually, i'm feeling a little bit down?" yeah, man. grasp it. yes. jump in with that chat, don't let it go. yeah, absolutely. you've got to hear that, when somebody asks for help, and, "is there anything i can do?" don't let it go. are you all right? yeah, iam, iam, iam. i am all right, actually. you know what i mean? i'm emotional, but i'm alive. 20 years ago, michael was addicted to drink and drugs and then he asked for help. his fundraising was a way to say thanks to those who saved him.
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so far, he's raised over £650,000 with the speedo mick foundation to help others. today, he is in therapy. he's just been assessed with adhd, and with help once again, he's fighting his way out of depression. open water swimming, i've been doing it for many years and there's many benefits from it. it relieves stress, which is a massive one. i'm getting a deeper understanding about how michael works, do you know what i mean? never mind speedo mick. i have asked for help and i'm now in therapy, and i'm doing my meditation, and i'm doing positive stuff to keep myself... so i can do another walk. cheering. so this man, in these pants, is about to start another adventure. he will walk through edinburgh, london, cardiff and belfast, notjust collecting donations this time, but giving them away, supporting other charities who have been hit hard by the pandemic. things are looking up,
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they are really looking up. i wish i could give you a hug, but we're not allowed. oh, no, we are not allowed to give hugs! he'll be spreading the love, if not the hugs, from the end of may, and his message to anyone struggling with the year gone by is this — talk, reach out, ask for help. don't suffer alone. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. if you have been affected by any of the issues raised in that interview with mick, you can find details of organisations offering help and support over on the bbc action line website. much more coming up on the six o'clock news. right now, it's whether time. hello there. there is still a cold wind today that's blowing in some showers and longer spells of rain. yesterday's area of low pressure that brought the wet and windy weather, and half a month's worth
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of rain in some cases, has swept away towards the east. but the wind direction has changed following that low pressure and we have a northerly wind which is maintaining this cold feel. these are the temperatures towards the end of the afternoon. only seven or eight degrees across northern parts of the uk. and it's still quite windy out there as well, especially down some of those north sea coasts. winds are gradually easing and we've got some sunshine and some showers and a zone of wetter weather moving away from scotland across northern ireland, northern england into the midlands and across east anglia. and that will work its way down towards wales and the west country overnight. with clearer skies following to the north away from some increasingly snowy showers in northernmost part of scotland. so it's going to be colder tonight, it won't be as windy as last night, and where we have the clearer skies in scotland and northern england we are more likely to have a frost in the morning. more wintry showers across northern scotland, probably not reaching the central belt. some showers across northern ireland heading into wales and the west country, those will work their way into the midlands and towards the south—east of england, some of them heavy.
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elsewhere, the odd shower around but some sunshine too. those temperatures still on the low side for the time of year. 11c or 12c at best. it probably won't be as windy tomorrow and the winds continue to ease down overnight into thursday. at the same time, this little runner comes in from the atlantic bringing more cloud for a while across southern parts of england. some rain mainly through the english channel. that should move through. elsewhere we will see some sunshine and some showers, lots more showers to come in scotland, moving down into northern england again. it could be a bit wintry over the hills, top temperatures not changing too much. 11c or 12c. still cold on thursday. we could start with a bit more frost more widely on friday with lighter winds and clear skies. where the cloud does bubble up there will be a few scattered showers around but many places will be having a dry day and those temperatures begin to lift across the board, around 14c or 15c. quickly into the start of the weekend, another area of low pressure is going to bring some rain to many parts of the
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country on saturday. some stronger winds too. the winds are going to be coming in from the south and that could bring some much—needed warm weather into the south—east of the uk.
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at six — life in the uk will start to feel normal again by this summer, says one of the main scientists behind lockdown. professor neil ferguson says the vaccination programme is the way out — and the possibility of more restrictions is fading. do i think it's likely to happen? no, i don't. i think we are much more likely to be on our steady course now out of this pandemic. at least in this country. his optimism comes as the government prepares to reveal where you can travel to safely this summer. also tonight... two former paratroopers accused of the murder of an official ira man in 1972 are formally acquitted after their trial collapsed. a murder trial is told that former aston villa star dalian atkinson died after being tasered three times
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and kicked in the head by a police officer.

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