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tv   Monday in Parliament  BBC News  April 20, 2021 2:30am-3:01am BST

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jufy jury in the trial of derek chauvin has retired to consider its verdict. the former police officer is charged with murdering george floyd in minneapolis last may. in his summing up, thejudge urge the jurors to avoid any bias and rely on the evidence. plans by 12 football clubs to join a planned european super league have been met with outrage from several quarters. the british government says it will do whatever it takes to prevent the move. meanwhile, the president hope european foot�*s governing body has threatened to ban players. and nasa has made history with the first helicopter flight on another planet. the small drone called ingenuity took off from mars and was airborne for 44 seconds. it was carrying a scientific robot.
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now on bbc news — monday in parliament. hello and welcome to monday in parliament. the commons united, mps show football's breakaway clubs the red card. we will not stand by and watch football be cravenly stripped of the things that make millions across the country love it. we're in a global pandemic and the owners of the six clubs behind this proposal think that now is the time? now is the time to ride roughshod over their fans. also in this programme — borisjohnson cancels his visit to india as the country is added to the uk's red list. can he explain contrary to his previous answer why india wasn't put on a red list ten days ago when other
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countries were? but first... the culture secretary has said the government will do "whatever it takes" to prevent english football clubs joining a breakaway european super league. oliver dowden said ministers were reviewing everything the government does to support clubs to play and examining every option from governance reform to competition law. six english clubs, including manchester united, arsenal, and liverpool, have signed up to the new league despite opposition from the game's governing bodies. oliver dowden, who said he'd already talked to football authorities, announced that a long promised review of football would now begin. he told mps he was appalled by the plans which went against "the very spirit of the game". this is a sport where a team like leicester city can ascend from league i to the premier league title in under a decade, earning the right to go toe
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to toe against european heavyweights in the champions league. instead, a small handful of owners want to create a closed shop of elite clubs at the top of the game, a league based on wealth and brand recognition rather than upon merit. we will not stand by and watch football be cravenly stripped of the things that make millions across the country love it. he said the football authorities had the government's full backing in the sanctions they take to stop the breakaway. but, madam deputy speaker, be in no doubt if they can't act, we will. we will put everything on the table to prevent this from happening. we are examining every option from governance reform to competition law and mechanisms that allow football to take place. put simply, we will be reviewing everything the government does to support these clubs to play. labour said the move was a watershed moment and welcomed the review.
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we know that there are members across this house who have it for the past 11 years of conservative—led governments supported reform. so it's time, madam deputy speaker, for the government to get off the subs bench and show some leadership on the pitch because we need reform of football. we're in a global pandemic and the owners of the six clubs behind this proposal think that now is the time? now is the time to ride roughshod over their fans and endanger the future of football on the back of a year when fans have been at the heart of supporting communities up and down the country. what a contrast. and it's been carved out behind closed doors without consultation with fans or players, and these proposals have at their heart a plan which is so anti—football — a super league from which you can never be relegated, in which you are are always guaranteed a place because of your wealth, it represents a fundamental attack on the integrity of sporting competitions.
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it must be made clear to clubs and owners involved that there will be — and owners involved that there will be no _ and owners involved that there will be no quarter given, no concessions whatsoever in permanent arrangements. it is well— permanent arrangements. it is well past — permanent arrangements. it is well past time a line in this sand — well past time a line in this sand is_ well past time a line in this sand is drawn. it well past time a line in this sand is drawn.— well past time a line in this sand is drawn. it wasn't that lona sand is drawn. it wasn't that long ago _ sand is drawn. it wasn't that long ago madam _ sand is drawn. it wasn't that long ago madam deputy - sand is drawn. it wasn't that - long ago madam deputy speaker that long ago madam deputy speaker lhal i_ long ago madam deputy speaker that i watched _ long ago madam deputy speaker that i watched my _ long ago madam deputy speaker that i watched my club _ long ago madam deputy speaker that i watched my club which - long ago madam deputy speaker that i watched my club which i i that i watched my club which i now _ that i watched my club which i now represent, _ that i watched my club which i now represent, manchester. that i watched my club which i i now represent, manchester city, beating — now represent, manchester city, beating dillingham _ now represent, manchester city, beating dillingham in— now represent, manchester city, beating dillingham in the - beating dillingham in the second _ beating dillingham in the second division— beating dillingham in the second division play—off. second division play—off finals _ second division play—off finals. we _ second division play—off finals. we are - second division play—off finals. we are now- second division play—off finals. we are now in. second division play—off. finals. we are now in what second division play—off- finals. we are now in what you might— finals. we are now in what you might call— finals. we are now in what you might call our— finals. we are now in what you might call our glory— finals. we are now in what you might call our glory days - finals. we are now in what you might call our glory days but . might call our glory days but those — might call our glory days but those of— might call our glory days but those of us _ might call our glory days but those of us who remember. might call our glory days but . those of us who remember the gillingham _ those of us who remember the gillingham game _ those of us who remember the gillingham game know- those of us who remember the gillingham game know that - those of us who remember the| gillingham game know that the glory— gillingham game know that the glory days _ gillingham game know that the glory days don't _ gillingham game know that the glory days don't always - gillingham game know that the glory days don't always last, i glory days don't always last, so does _ so does the secretary of state agree with me _ so does the secretary of state agree with me that _ so does the secretary of state agree with me that a - so does the secretary of state agree with me that a closed . agree with me that a closed shop — agree with me that a closed shop leaguer _ agree with me that a closed shop leaguer where - agree with me that a closed shop leaguer where there . agree with me that a closed i shop leaguer where there are agree with me that a closed - shop leaguer where there are no bad days— shop leaguer where there are no bad days and _ shop leaguer where there are no bad days and no _ shop leaguer where there are no bad days and no glory _ shop leaguer where there are no bad days and no glory days - shop leaguer where there are no bad days and no glory days is - bad days and no glory days is no leak— bad days and no glory days is no leak at— bad days and no glory days is no leak at all— bad days and no glory days is no leak at all and _ bad days and no glory days is no leak at all and has - bad days and no glory days is no leak at all and has no - bad days and no glory days isi no leak at all and has no place in the — no leak at all and has no place in the national— no leak at all and has no place in the national game? - no leak at all and has no place in the national game? and - no leak at all and has no placel in the national game? and that it is full— in the national game? and that it is full all— in the national game? and that it is full all fans _ in the national game? and that it is full all fans are _ in the national game? and that it is full all fans are rightly- it is full all fans are rightly outraged _ it is full all fans are rightly outraged by— it is full all fans are rightly outraged by this _ it is full all fans are rightly outraged by this notion . it is full all fans are rightly. outraged by this notion that goes — outraged by this notion that goes against _ outraged by this notion that goes against a _ outraged by this notion that goes against a deeply- outraged by this notion that goes against a deeply held i goes against a deeply held culture _ goes against a deeply held culture of— goes against a deeply held culture of fair— goes against a deeply held culture of fair and - goes against a deeply held culture of fair and open - culture of fair and open competition— culture of fair and open competition —— - culture of fair and open competition —— british, j culture of fair and open - competition —— british, and backing _ competition —— british, and backing the _ competition —— british, and backing the underdog? -
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competition —— british, andj backing the underdog? and competition —— british, and i backing the underdog? and as competition —— british, and - backing the underdog? and as is really— backing the underdog? and as is really an— backing the underdog? and as is really an american _ backing the underdog? and as is really an american expert - backing the underdog? and as is really an american expert we - really an american expert we 'ust really an american expert we just don't— really an american expert we just don't want. _ really an american expert we just don't want.— just don't want. yes, i completely _ just don't want. yes, i completely agree - just don't want. yes, i completely agree with j just don't want. yes, i - completely agree with the honourable lady. we cannot have money and brand triumphing and trumping the colour and the joy of the game. trumping the colour and the 'oy of the gamed of the game. does my right honourable _ of the game. does my right honourable friend - of the game. does my right honourable friend agree - of the game. does my right| honourable friend agree this proposal is motivated by greed and shows contempt for fans and footballing period? does he also — footballing period? does he also find it sad that while the boards — also find it sad that while the boards are meant united manchester city were negotiating these proposals to make — negotiating these proposals to make millions of pounds for their— make millions of pounds for their owners, they together with— their owners, they together with their owners, didn't think to save — with their owners, didn't think to save berry fc with fans also betrayed — to save berry fc with fans also betrayed by an owner who sought to profit _ betrayed by an owner who sought to profit from his heritage and history? — to profit from his heritage and histo ? �* to profit from his heritage and histo ?�* _ . ., history? i'm sympathetic to the concerns raised _ history? i'm sympathetic to the concerns raised by _ history? i'm sympathetic to the concerns raised by the - concerns raised by the honourable gentleman and i will also note that many clubs, including some of those clubs that are seeking to break away in the announcement last night have benefited enormously from
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government and taxpayer support. and i think they should think carefully about the duty that they owe to taxpayers in return and whether they are discharging it with these proposals.— they are discharging it with these proposals. oliver dowd and with what _ these proposals. oliver dowd and with what sounded - these proposals. oliver dowd and with what sounded like i these proposals. oliver dowd and with what sounded like a | and with what sounded like a warning to the big six clubs. now there is to be added to the from there to england will be banned. india has been reporting 200,000 cases daily. a new variant of coronavirus is spreading across the country. the prime minister announced he was cancelling a trip to delhi planned next monday. 0ver was cancelling a trip to delhi planned next monday. over a hundred cases of the indian variants have been discovered here in the uk. the health secretary made the announcement in the commons.— in the commons. after studying the data and — in the commons. after studying the data and on _ in the commons. after studying the data and on a _ in the commons. after studying the data and on a precautionaryj the data and on a precautionary basis, we may be difficult but vital decision to add india to the red list. that means anyone who is not an indian, uk or irish resident or british
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citizen cannot enter the uk if they have been in india the previous 10 days. uk and irish residents and british citizens who have been in india for the past 10 days before their arrival will need to complete hotel quarantine for 10 days from the time of arrival. these rules will come into force at 4am on friday. but a labour mp wanted to know why he hadn't acted sooner. we have still 60 more direct flights— we have still 60 more direct flights and many were in direct flights— flights and many were in direct flights from india here before friday— flights from india here before friday alone. so can he exrtlain, _ friday alone. so can he explain, contrary to his previous— explain, contrary to his previous answer, why india wasn't _ previous answer, why india wasn't put on a red list 10 days— wasn't put on a red list 10 days ago— wasn't put on a red list 10 days ago when other countries were? — matt hancock said all countries were kept under review. 0n the whole mps welcomed the move, but some wanted the government to go further. will he not now consider extending _ will he not now consider extending hotel- will he not now consider. extending hotel quarantine will he not now consider- extending hotel quarantine to all arrivals _ extending hotel quarantine to all arrivals as _ extending hotel quarantine to all arrivals as travellers - extending hotel quarantine to all arrivals as travellers from i all arrivals as travellers from red list — all arrivals as travellers from red list countries _ all arrivals as travellers from red list countries can - red list countries can currently _ red list countries can
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currently avoid - red list countries can currently avoid it - red list countries can currently avoid it byl red list countries can - currently avoid it by coming via a — currently avoid it by coming via a third _ currently avoid it by coming via a third country? - currently avoid it by coming via a third country? we - currently avoid it by coming l via a third country? we have already— via a third country? we have already seen _ via a third country? we have already seen and _ already seen and increased numbers of the _ already seen and increased numbers of the south - already seen and increased . numbers of the south african and brazilian _ numbers of the south african and brazilian variants - numbers of the south african and brazilian variants in - and brazilian variants in european _ and brazilian variants in european countries - and brazilian variants ini european countries from and brazilian variants in - european countries from where travellers — european countries from where travellers are _ european countries from where travellers are not _ european countries from where travellers are not placed - european countries from where travellers are not placed in - travellers are not placed in hotel— travellers are not placed in hotel quarantine. - a conservative urged the health secretary to follow the example of australia and close the borders. they've only had 910 deaths and 29,000 infections. what i want to hearfrom 29,000 infections. what i want to hear from the secretary of state is he going to resist those very powerful lobbyists from the travel industry and the airline industry and from airport, and is going to be absolutely determined in following the evidence. we don't know what other variants are out there in the world, not allowing unnecessary travel and really being tough with this red list? ., ., really being tough with this red list? ., ,, , ., , . red list? thank you very much, mr speaker- — red list? thank you very much, mr speaker. that _ red list? thank you very much, mr speaker. that is _ red list? thank you very much, mr speaker. that is the - mr speaker. that is the approach that we have taken so far since — approach that we have taken so far since the introduction of the red _ far since the introduction of the red list and the hotel quarantine. we are seeing through— quarantine. we are seeing through the testing of every single — through the testing of every single passenger who comes here, _ single passenger who comes here, we _ single passenger who comes
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here, we now have essentially a survey— here, we now have essentially a survey of— here, we now have essentially a survey of the world so we can see where _ survey of the world so we can see where the cases are where the new— see where the cases are where the new variants are from people _ the new variants are from people who are coming through that testing regime. but i am grateful— that testing regime. but i am grateful for his wise counsel. the latest figures show that the number of deaths within 28 days of a positive coronavirus test has fallen to four. given in normal times, the daily cancer death toll averages over 450, a figure sadly to rise due to the delay treatment and disruption of the pandemic, what is the government doing to catch up with cancer screening and operations backlog and get the health service back towards other medical condition so that the death toll from non— covid—safe is does not become the worst legacy of this emergency? i am pleased to say that over the second peak this . that over the second peak this winter. — that over the second peak this winter, the amount of cancer work, _ winter, the amount of cancer work, cancer surgery, cancer treatment, continued much, much
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more _ treatment, continued much, much more closer— treatment, continued much, much more closer to normal. but he is quite — more closer to normal. but he is quite right that in the first— is quite right that in the first peak, it was reduced significantly. we are very focused _ significantly. we are very focused on this backlog that is being — focused on this backlog that is being created by the pandemic. labour's shadow health secretary pressed matt hancock on reports that greensill capital lobbied senior nhs bosses to pay health service workers on a daily basis via an app it had developed. nhs staff deserve a pay rise and support, _ nhs staff deserve a pay rise and support, not— nhs staff deserve a pay rise and support, not these - nhs staff deserve a pay rise and support, not these payl nhs staff deserve a pay rise - and support, not these pay date loan _ and support, not these pay date loan apps. — and support, not these pay date loan apps, forced _ and support, not these pay date loan apps, forced on the - and support, not these pay date loan apps, forced on the nhs i and support, not these pay datej loan apps, forced on the nhs by speculative _ loan apps, forced on the nhs by speculative trying _ loan apps, forced on the nhs by speculative trying to _ loan apps, forced on the nhs by speculative trying to make - speculative trying to make money _ speculative trying to make money out _ speculative trying to make money out of _ speculative trying to make money out of the - speculative trying to make l money out of the pandemic. speculative trying to make - money out of the pandemic. how can he _ money out of the pandemic. how can he possibly— money out of the pandemic. how can he possibly defend _ money out of the pandemic. how can he possibly defend that? - can he possibly defend that? thank you very _ can he possibly defend that? thank you very much, - can he possibly defend that? thank you very much, mr- thank you very much, mr speaker _ thank you very much, mr speaker. if ijust address the final— speaker. if ijust address the final point first, as i said to the — final point first, as i said to the house _ final point first, as i said to the house last week, my approach was and is that local nhs _ approach was and is that local nhs employers are best placed to decide whether to take up offers— to decide whether to take up offers a _ to decide whether to take up offers a pay flex ability. when it comes — offers a pay flex ability. when it comes to an anxious shed is
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in services, _ it comes to an anxious shed is in services, ministers are not involved _ in services, ministers are not involved in— in services, ministers are not involved in decision taking. matt hancock. you're watching monday in parliament with me, david cornock. senior whitehall officials have been pressed over calls by the government's spending watchdog for urgent changes to adult social care in england. in a recent report, the national audit office said levels of unpaid care remained too high and short term funding had hampered councils who oversee the care system. the government has said it will bring forward proposals for a shake up of the nhs and social care in england this year. but mps on the public accounts committee challenged the officials over the impact of cuts to local government spending. what impact do you consider there has been on care providers particularly in not having a long—term funding settlement? having a long-term funding settlement?— having a long-term funding settlement? ., settlement? the length of time ou have settlement? the length of time you have a _ settlement? the length of time you have a funding _ settlement? the length of time you have a funding settlementl
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you have a funding settlement or clearly— you have a funding settlement or clearly it hampers your ability— or clearly it hampers your ability to plan and i think everyone would want a longer term — everyone would want a longer term funding settlement for social— term funding settlement for social care of the type we have for the — social care of the type we have for the nhs stop the nhs has benefited from that. that is not proved possible. but he warned against overstating the impact of longer term funding. the vast majority of funding both — the vast majority of funding both in _ the vast majority of funding both in public and private sector— both in public and private sector doesn't have multi—year funding — sector doesn't have multi—year funding plans and yet is able to make _ funding plans and yet is able to make long—term decisions. while — to make long—term decisions. while it— to make long—term decisions. while it clearly limits the ability _ while it clearly limits the ability for long—term planning compared to those sectors that do have — compared to those sectors that do have long—term planning commitments. he agreed, however, that change was needed. do we want better long—term planning? does they need to be more _ planning? does they need to be more innovation in the sector and _ more innovation in the sector and do — more innovation in the sector and do we _ more innovation in the sector and do we want to see it develop _ and do we want to see it develop and do we wish to deal with the — develop and do we wish to deal with the well—known develop and do we wish to deal with the well— known challenges of the _ with the well— known challenges of the ecosystem? none of which
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we deny — of the ecosystem? none of which we deny. the answer would be yes to — we deny. the answer would be yes to all— we deny. the answer would be yes to all of those. i we deny. the answer would be yes to all of those.— yes to all of those. i think local government - yes to all of those. i think local government would l yes to all of those. i thinkl local government would be yes to all of those. i think - local government would be keen to have a longer term settlement as well so perhaps if the report talks about 29% real—time reductions in local government spending power since 2010, are they being set up to fail here?— fail here? the governing legislation _ fail here? the governing legislation in _ fail here? the governing legislation in the - fail here? the governing legislation in the 2014 l fail here? the governing i legislation in the 2014 care act sets— legislation in the 2014 care act sets a standard for what we expect — act sets a standard for what we expect local law authorities to be able — expect local law authorities to be able to provide and it is time — be able to provide and it is time that make it this time we are not— time that make it this time we are not aware of any local authority— are not aware of any local authority failing in their statutory duty under that act. but as— statutory duty under that act. but as i— statutory duty under that act. but as i say, we don't deny and i but as i say, we don't deny and i don't — but as i say, we don't deny and i don't think anyone does that it idon't think anyone does that it has— i don't think anyone does that it has been a challenging period _ it has been a challenging period for all local government, even before the pandemic. government, even before the pandemic-— pandemic. local councils will have to find _ pandemic. local councils will have to find their— pandemic. local councils will have to find their way - pandemic. local councils willl have to find their way through this — have to find their way through this we — have to find their way through this. we think— have to find their way through this. we think they _ have to find their way through this. we think they are - this. we think they are adequately— this. we think they are adequately funded - this. we think they are adequately funded but| this. we think they are - adequately funded but they will need _ adequately funded but they will need to— adequately funded but they will need to make _ adequately funded but they will need to make their— adequately funded but they will need to make their own - need to make their own decisions, _ need to make their own decisions, as— need to make their own decisions, as chris - need to make their own decisions, as chris hasl need to make their own - decisions, as chris has said, to make _
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decisions, as chris has said, to make sure _ decisions, as chris has said, to make sure they— decisions, as chris has said, to make sure they are - decisions, as chris has said, i to make sure they are meeting their— to make sure they are meeting their commitments _ to make sure they are meeting their commitments under the i their commitments under the care — their commitments under the care act— their commitments under the care act and _ their commitments under the care act and it _ their commitments under the care act and it is _ their commitments under the care act and it is their- care act and it is their responsibility- care act and it is their responsibility to - responsibility to do that. we responsibility to do that. had years and years of discussion about investment and discussion about investment and discussion in social care about better quality assurance but today we had many of the same more problems. the today we had many of the same more problems.— today we had many of the same more problems. a whole range of the thin t s more problems. a whole range of the things we _ more problems. a whole range of the things we ought _ more problems. a whole range of the things we ought to _ more problems. a whole range of the things we ought to see - more problems. a whole range of the things we ought to see have l the things we ought to see have been _ the things we ought to see have been happening over the last year — been happening over the last year the _ been happening over the last year. the point is that those things— year. the point is that those things have been happening for a mixture — things have been happening for a mixture of direct money, more powers— a mixture of direct money, more powers and — a mixture of direct money, more powers and ideas recently. that is what — powers and ideas recently. that is what we _ powers and ideas recently. that is what we have been doing over the last— is what we have been doing over the last year. we are now formalising those into a set of proposals to put those on a full-time _ proposals to put those on a full—time basis going forward. a labour mp has described a plan to change the law on trespass as a "rather nasty racist little attempt to attack minority ethnic communities". the new offence is contained in the police, crime, sentencing and courts bill, currently going through parliament. but more than 130,000 people
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signed a petition urging the government to think again. that demand was debated by mps with the first speaker explaining that many of them feared the change would put people off going into the countryside. discouraging rambling should not be a consequence of this information. this got discouraging ramblings should not be a consequence of this. urban dwellers, include higher levels of minorities and the economically disadvantaged who already have less access to outdoor spaces in england. they could be disproportionately affected even through reality or the perception that they are going to be criminalised through accessing the countryside. but she'd also heard from farmers and landowners on the other side of the argument. in their view, instances of trespass with residency have
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become a larger problem with the use of intimidation, environs and environmental destruction being reported to them. they felt current legislation was not a useful tool to prevent these issues in order to best prevent and discourage intentional and destructive trespassed. it seems logical to them to make this a criminal but a labour mp was scathing about the bill's impact on the gypsy, roma and traveller communities. this is a rather nasty racist little attempt to attack minority ethnic communities ready suffering severe discrimination and other socially marginalised groups. no family willingly stops somewhere they are not welcomed, that has no running water, waste disposal or electricity and where they will be harassed. if the lack of authorised sites exist, whether they be permanent or not, and
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they be permanent or not, and the number of permanent sites on aggregate have gone down over the past ten years by several hundred and over 8% in total. how is this 8% in total. andrew slaughter said the bill set up confrontation so that the home secretary could "engage in a bit of dog whistle politics. but a conservative outer london mp saw things differently. david simmonds lives opposite a green space where there'd been an illegal encampment. unlike many people across the country, i am the residents were treated to the site of people defecating publicly opposite our homes, sing rubbish strewn around, extensive vandalism, and normal activities, children's hall, outdoor exercise, dog walking, all had to stop while the legal process was followed. the minister said ramblers and other countryside users would be unaffected and insisted the law was not anti—traveller.
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the government wants to ensure fair and equal treatment for all travelling communities and believe that settled in travelling communities should be able to live side—by—side, harmoniously and indeed integrated and we hope the clear rules and boundaries put in place will facilitate that. ministers have come under more pressure to impose sanctions on chinese officials who led a crackdown on hong kong pro democracy campaigners. last week, 100 mps and peers signed a letter calling for so called magnitsky sanctions to be imposed. a foreign office minister told the house of lords the government was keeping the situation under review. my my lords, we are clear that the hong kong authority decision to target leading pro—democracy figures for prosecution is on accept bull and must stop. the right to peaceful protest is fundamental to hong kong's way of life, protected in both the joint declaration on the basic law that it should be upheld. we shall continue to raise
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concerns with the chinese and hong kong governments and bring together our international partners to stand up the people of hong kong stop the human rights lawyer lady kennedy was one of the one the 100 mps and peers who called for sanctions to be introduced. we are asking to introduce the sanctions in beijing and hong kong for breaches of the joint british declaration and the serious human rights violations committed in hong kong. in light of the sentencing of some of the most prominent mainstream and internationally respected senior democracy campaigners, isn't it time to impose magnitsky sanctions? firstly, i agree with the honourable lady with increasing number — honourable lady with increasing number of convictions and at the end _ number of convictions and at the end of last week, we sought further— the end of last week, we sought further action taken by the hong — further action taken by the hong kong authorities against people — hong kong authorities against people were simply calling out the right to both protest and
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indeed, the rights for democracy. 0n the issue of the magnitsky 's actions, the noble lady will know what i'm about to say— lady will know what i'm about to say in _ lady will know what i'm about to say in terms of speculation as to — to say in terms of speculation as to future sanctions but i would _ as to future sanctions but i would say to the noble lady that — would say to the noble lady that we _ would say to the noble lady that we have, as with demonstrated in the case of xinjiang _ demonstrated in the case of xinjiang and when we have, we've — xinjiang and when we have, we've done so in co—ordination with— we've done so in co—ordination with our— we've done so in co—ordination with our partners. we've done so in co-ordination with our partners.— with our partners. these are friends and _ with our partners. these are friends and allies _ with our partners. these are friends and allies that - with our partners. these are friends and allies that have l friends and allies that have been — friends and allies that have been locked _ friends and allies that have been locked up. _ friends and allies that have been locked up. people - friends and allies that have been locked up. people we friends and allies that have i been locked up. people we all know — been locked up. people we all know the _ been locked up. people we all know. the foreign— been locked up. people we all know. the foreign secretary. know. the foreign secretary stated — know. the foreign secretary stated that _ know. the foreign secretary stated that ageing _ know. the foreign secretary stated that ageing is - know. the foreign secretary stated that ageing is now i know. the foreign secretary stated that ageing is now in| stated that ageing is now in permanent— stated that ageing is now in permanent breach - stated that ageing is now in permanent breach of - stated that ageing is now in permanent breach of the i stated that ageing is now in l permanent breach of the sino british— permanent breach of the sino britishjoint_ permanent breach of the sino british joint declaration, - permanent breach of the sino british joint declaration, so i permanent breach of the sino britishjoint declaration, so ii britishjoint declaration, so i would — britishjoint declaration, so i would urge _ britishjoint declaration, so i would urge the _ britishjoint declaration, so i would urge the governmentl britishjoint declaration, so i i would urge the government to stop— would urge the government to stop holding _ would urge the government to stop holding back— would urge the government to stop holding back on - would urge the government to stop holding back on imposing sanctions _ stop holding back on imposing sanctions and _ stop holding back on imposing sanctions and will— stop holding back on imposing sanctions and will he - stop holding back on imposing sanctions and will he assure . stop holding back on imposingl sanctions and will he assure us that— sanctions and will he assure us that the — sanctions and will he assure us that the human _ sanctions and will he assure us that the human rights - sanctions and will he assure us that the human rights crisis - sanctions and will he assure us that the human rights crisis inl that the human rights crisis in hong — that the human rights crisis in hong kong _ that the human rights crisis in hong kong will— that the human rights crisis in hong kong will be _ that the human rights crisis in hong kong will be on - that the human rights crisis in hong kong will be on the - that the human rights crisis in hong kong will be on the 67 l hong kong will be on the g7 agenda _ hong kong will be on the g7 agenda so _ hong kong will be on the g7 agenda so that _ hong kong will be on the g7 agenda so that collective . agenda so that collective action— agenda so that collective action can _ agenda so that collective action can be _ agenda so that collective action can be taken? - agenda so that collective action can be taken? mm agenda so that collective action can be taken? my lords, firstl on action can be taken? my lords, firstly on the noble _ action can be taken? my lords, firstly on the noble lady's - firstly on the noble lady's second question, the noble lady would have already noted the co—ordination we've shown g7
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partners and the support indeed that we've gained from our g7 partners on the situation in hong kong and while the agenda is still being finalised the leaders meeting, i'm sure the situation in both china and hong kong will be very much part of those considerations. 0n the issue of the specific actions against those in hong kong, as i said, we keep the situation under review but i can't go further than that. fit, can't go further than that. a crossbench peer highlighted the case ofjimmy lai who has been in prison. fits case ofjimmy lai who has been in trison. �* , case ofjimmy lai who has been in prison-— in prison. as the noble lord atree in prison. as the noble lord agree they _ in prison. as the noble lord agree they deserve - in prison. as the noble lord agree they deserve better. in prison. as the noble lord - agree they deserve better than agree they deserve better than a mediaeval star chamber and a stalinist show trial. isn't that a basement of law by puppets and quislings best done by calling out the chinese communist party of the next meeting of the united nations human rights council, focusing on, as the noble barrenness lady northover said, focusing on the ccp�*s law in treating
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breaking and imprisonment in psychiatric institutions of women and men whose values we share. , , ., share. firstly, i agree with the noble _ share. firstly, i agree with the noble lord _ share. firstly, i agree with the noble lord about - share. firstly, i agree with the noble lord about the l share. firstly, i agree with - the noble lord about the values and he — the noble lord about the values and he would agree that we have been _ and he would agree that we have been consolidating and increasing support human rights council — increasing support human rights council. we have been engaged and will— council. we have been engaged and will continue to campaign and will continue to campaign and make note. he raises the cases— and make note. he raises the cases of— and make note. he raises the cases of various individuals. speaking _ cases of various individuals. speaking personally, i saw the final— speaking personally, i saw the final interview that jimmy lai gave — final interview that jimmy lai gave just before his arrest, and — gave just before his arrest, and it— gave just before his arrest, and it was quite chilling to see — and it was quite chilling to see how— and it was quite chilling to see how someone who stood up for media — see how someone who stood up for media freedom and indeed the conduct which happen thereafter, and of course what has been — thereafter, and of course what has been arrested for? illegal assembly so we need to put this into context as well. the prime minister has launched a new scheme to help more people get on the housing ladder. borisjohnson donned the obligatory hard hat and
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hi—vis jacket to promote the plan to help those with only a 5% deposit. the government will offer lenders the guarantee they usually need to provide a mortgage to cover the other 95%. but at westminster, labour raised concerns that the government is "selling out communities" by handing "too much control" to developers who've donated money to the conservative party. the housing secretary robertjenrick retorted that the conservatives were supporting brickies, electricians and people trying to get on the housing ladder. there's been a 400% increase in donations— there's been a 400% increase in donations to the conservative party — donations to the conservative party from developers under the current— party from developers under the current prime minister. in the interests _ current prime minister. in the interests of transparency and allay — interests of transparency and allay growing concerns about sleaze — allay growing concerns about sleaze at the heart of government, will the secretary of state — government, will the secretary of state publish all those meetings that he and his advisers or representatives of number— advisers or representatives of number 10 have held with any of the develop things about changing the planning system and what they asked for? well,
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mr speaker. — and what they asked for? well, mr speaker, all— and what they asked for? well, mr speaker, all ministerial- mr speaker, all ministerial engagements are already published through our regular official engagement notifications and all donations to political parties, whether that be the labour party or the conservative party, over the statutory amount, also published. 0f statutory amount, also published. of course, planning decisions in the production of government policy has nothing to do with donations that i need to political parties and there is a complete separation of the two. there is a complete separation of the two-— of the two. the council for the protection _ of the two. the council for the protection of _ of the two. the council for the protection of rural— of the two. the council for the protection of rural england, i protection of rural england, the national trust, the country planning — the national trust, the country planning association, udicial architects institute, town planning institutes and other civil condemned his planning reforms _ civil condemned his planning reforms by having too much control— reforms by having too much control to developers and blocking communities from object _ blocking communities from object in two individual applications in areas zoned growth _ applications in areas zoned growth for renewal. given the increased _ growth for renewal. given the increased donations to the conservative party, is he paying _ conservative party, is he paying back developers by selling _ paying back developers by
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selling out communities? well, once again. _ selling out communities? well, once again, the _ selling out communities? well, once again, the honourable - once again, the honourable gentleman makes a low point. what we are doing is getting people onto the housing ladder. 0nce, people onto the housing ladder. once, the labor party cared about young people, people on low incomes, people in social housing waiting lists, but those days are long gone. this is the party of homeownership, this is the party standing up for the millions of people whose jobs depend for the millions of people whosejobs depend on housing and construction. this is the party that is supporting the brickies and the electricians, the people out there trying to earn a good days living. robertjenrick. and that was monday in parliament. thank you for watching. i do hope you canjoin me at the same time tomorrow. until then, from me, david cornock, bye for now. hello there. april showers have
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been in short supply. it's been a very dry month so far. that's not going to change all that month over the next few days of the northern parts of the uk will see a little patchy rain through tuesday, courtesy of a weather front pushing in from the north—west. you of a weather front pushing in from the north-west. you can see the outbreaks _ from the north-west. you can see the outbreaks of - from the north-west. you can see the outbreaks of rain - from the north-west. you can see the outbreaks of rain as l from the north-west. you can. see the outbreaks of rain as we go through the day will weaken as they sink further southwards and eastwards. for england and wales, quite steer murky for some of these eastern coasts, some of these eastern coasts, some sunny spells, patchy cloud into the afternoon and a small chance of catching a shower. temperatures across england and wales, 15, 16 degrees, turning julia across northern parts of the uk as the wind picks up through the afternoon. tuesday night and wednesday, that weakening weather front gets down into england and wales, extra cloud, spots of rain, clear skies of northern ireland and scotland, a cold start to wednesday morning but the rest of the week, it stays predominantly dry, spells of sunshine and the potential for frost night.
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welcome to bbc news — i'm lewis vaughanjones. our top stories: thejury retires to consider its verdict — in the trial of the former police officer charged with killing george floyd. the case is seen as a key moment in us policing and race relations. 0utrage as europe's richest clubs announce plans to join a new breakaway football super league. and, mission accomplished. nasa flies a drone over the surface of mars, in yet another first for human—kind's efforts in space. and walter mondale, who served as us vice president under jimmy carter has died at the
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age of 93.

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