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tv   BBC News with Katty and Christian  BBC News  October 12, 2020 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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if donald trump is going to win a second term in office — he really needs to win florida. that's why he's there today. but older floridians there aren't sure they want four more years of him. also in the programme.... england is told to brace
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itself as a new three level alert system to fight coronavirus comes in. but will it work? we will get an exclusive verdict from one of the sport's biggest legends. hello, i'm katty kay in washington, james reynolds is in london. amy coney barrett promises to apply the law as it is written, not as she wishes it were. which sounds entirely reasonable and ought to reassure democrats that the judge does not intend to use a seat on the supreme court to further her own, conservative philosophy. except, they clearly don't really believe her. democratic senators — who are in the minority in the senate — think coney barrett will tilt the highest court in the land to the right, potentially for decades to come. but, there's little they can do about it. republicans control the senate and have the numbers to confirm her. aleem maqbool reports.
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if confirmed, amy tony barrett will play a huge role... the stakes are that high. the republican chair of the senate committee making the decision once promised not to try and confirm a supreme courtjustice in the last year of a presidential term. but he has reneged on that. this is going to be a long, contentious week. i would just ask one thing of the committee. to the extent possible, let's make it respectful. in their opening statements, democrats focused on what they called extremist views held by amy coney barrett. they said these would threaten the health care provision for millions of americans, and many other aspects of american life. with this nomination, equal justice under law is at stake. our voting rights. at stake. workers
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rights are at stake. the right to a safe and legal abortion is at stake. one man is dead set on making sure that amy coney barrett is appointed before the election, heavily tilting the supreme court conservative. gathering he had to announce her nomination just gathering he had to announce her nominationjust over two gathering he had to announce her nomination just over two weeks ago is now thought to have been a coronavirus super spreader event. co ntroversially, coronavirus super spreader event. controversially, some of those who tested positive there participated in the hearing today. thank you, mr chairman. some said that the process had been postponed but kept returning to the way in which amy coney barrett would shape policies, something that she said would not be herjob. our courts are not designed to solve every problem or right every wrong in oui’ to solve every problem or right every wrong in our public life. the policy decisions and value judgments of government must be made by the
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political branches, elected by and accountable to the people. her nomination comes after the death of ruth brady ginsberg, the iconic and pioneering justice. ruth brady ginsberg, the iconic and pioneeringjustice. some ruth brady ginsberg, the iconic and pioneering justice. some of those protesting the new nomination feel strongly that the american people who had only voted in their millions should be the ones to decide whether the next justice is should be the ones to decide whether the nextjustice is conservative or liberal. republicans say the public already recorded their view and they voted for donald trump four years ago. the bbc‘s laura trevelyan has been watching today's events and joins us live now. there are lots of reasons democrats don't like this appointment. they don't like this appointment. they don't like this appointment. they don't like it because they feel it is politically unfair because they feel that they were robbed by republicans at the chance to put a supreme courtjustice republicans at the chance to put a supreme court justice in republicans at the chance to put a supreme courtjustice in the end of president obama's term, they don't like policies. it's all irrelevant
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because she is going to be nominated and she is going to be confirmed and she will become a supreme justice. absolutely, also, this is a moment for republicans to try and flip the script of the race, to stop talking about coronavirus and instead say, here is president trump, re—elect him because he will get a third conservative justice him because he will get a third conservativejustice confirmed to the supreme court. what's more, as there is this incredible gender gap opening up in the polling, this is a chance the republicans to showcase an accomplished, successful mother of seven, first in her class in law school, brilliant legal scholar from the midwest and say the democrats, why are you opposing this example of the american dream? so it's a welcome chance for republicans to change the subject and, as you say, there isn't a thing the democrats can do about it apart from trying to slow it down. james? i was doing my
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listening face the. i wonder if that's what a successful nominee has to do. do they really good listening face for the first few hours of the hearing and then say nothing particularly controversial. all of the senate is on thejudiciary committee will have 30 mitts to question her. that begins tomorrow. the republicans will talk about her resume, democrats will say, you are going to kill the affordable care act when it comes up in front of the supreme court on november the 10th because you've already been critical of the chiefjustice john because you've already been critical of the chiefjusticejohn roberts for upholding obama care in a vote a few years ago so they will hammer that, and they will say that the affordable care act is on the ballot, with the confirmation of amy coney barrett. also, they will say that she has twice signed petitions ina that she has twice signed petitions in a personal capacity when she was a professor at law school saying that she doesn't like the federal
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abortion law. so those are the two things that you can expect the democrats to go on and also she is confirmed to the court, president trump will see her as someone who will take her side if there is any question about counting ballots.|j wonder how the democrats are considering her religion, she's a catholic, it says in the constitution that they can't be any religious tests for office. well, amy coney barrett is a charismatic catholic, joe biden is also a catholic, he warned democratic senators not to go down the route of her faith today. when she was confirmed to a lower court in 2017, there was an exchange in which she was told by another leading democrat that the dogma lived within her. so, this was clearly seen as imposing some kind of religious liberty test, so some kind of religious liberty test, so republicans have been talking about that all day, i think democrats can't avoid her fate and instead just hammer home this idea
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that in the middle of a pandemic she will be the vote that kills the affordable health care act, so they claim. thank you. it was interesting in hearing how she had all of her children, they were all behind her in the hearing, she made a big point in saying that i will be a first mother of young children to be a supreme courtjustice, mother of young children to be a supreme court justice, i mother of young children to be a supreme courtjustice, i will be the first known ivy league candidate, very much presenting herself as the kind of woman that republicans would like to have vote for them, those suburban mums and i think it was an effective betrayal of somebody who came across as reasonable, soft—spoken, very much a mother, as an attractive candidate. all credit to the kids are being on the front i’ow to the kids are being on the front row and listening to hours and hours. hours and hours of bloviating senators. very well behaved kids. south carolina democrat jamie harrison has broken records bringing
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in an eye—popping $57 million in three months for his campaign against lindsay graham. before that, the biggest quarterly hole 38 million. that was beto o'rourke during his challenge to ted cruz in 2018. those are incredible numbers. in last year's uk general election, let's have a look. all political parties received a total of $40 million in donations. that is in total. what did they spend it on both here and what it is spent on over there? well, here they spent it ona over there? well, here they spent it on a lot of television advertising. but, remember, it doesn't guarantee you a victory. we all know what happened to be too o'rourke. he won all of that money he was the darling for the moment and he didn't win because it's very difficult for a democrat to win in texas. well, guess what? it's also very average democrat to win in south carolina. i was speaking with jamie harrison
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earlier today on a programme and he was saying that he is going to try and win this by focusing on issues, things that people from south carolina care about. lindsey graham has become a very big figure, we saw him in the confirmation hearing today, he has been in washington a long time and according to jamie harrison, he has forgotten about people from south carolina. he has left them, gone to washington, and he will try and win them back. i still think even with that amount of money will be hard. south carolina is not a state that is friendly for democrats. you or the democrats have to win south carolina to win back the senate? no. if they win south carolina, we are looking at not a blue wave, a blue tsunami that is taking over this country because if they win south carolina. north carolina, they would like. but south carolina, they would like. but south carolina hasn't been on the battlefield. ifjoe carolina hasn't been on the battlefield. if joe biden carolina hasn't been on the battlefield. ifjoe biden wins florida ifjoe biden wins florida then he wins the white house, florida e, or at least, that's what democrats
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are saying with remarkable confidence. the hitch is he has to win it and the polls show a very tight race. donald trump won the state in 2016 and republicans did well there again in the mid term elections of 2018. but those tightening polls are why the president is heading south today, for his first rally since being diagnosed with covid. nomia iqbal is in the sunshine state, in sanford, where president trump is expected later. the president has a mansion in florida. do floridians see him as one of their own? i think they do. i wasjust talking to one of their own? i think they do. i was just talking to a few of, well, as you can see, many of his supporters are here. there was one man from new york who now lives in florida and he completely identifies the donald trump. he says that he is his hero. it's really interesting because here at the rally, we are
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getting our temperature is checked, face masks, and lots of the supporters that are coming here are also... quite ironic because the main event himself, donald trump, is recovering from coronavirus, but when you stop and ask people how they feel about that, they say that they feel about that, they say that they are not concerned about it, they are not concerned about it, they are not concerned about it, they are full of admiration for the fa ct they are full of admiration for the fact that he's coming here, that is the first state that he will be doing as rally ins the virus and they feel it makes him look presidential. you saw donald trump junior? what was that like? what voters is he after? yes, so he was doing a bus tour through florida and he concluded it yesterday. this was aimed at the latino vote, it was a much smaller rally, but he had lots of people from all different backgrounds there, venezuelans, cubans, vietnamese people as well,
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and they are really throwing everything at florida. mike pence was here earlier in the week. donald trump junior was introduced on was here earlier in the week. donald trumpjunior was introduced on stage bya trumpjunior was introduced on stage by a very famous cuban—american cage fighter here and he talked about how his parents had fled cuba when they we re young his parents had fled cuba when they were young and they're hoping that sort of message resonates, with the older voters, because they want to paint the democrats as socialist, communists, who are hell—bent on destroying america. thank you for joining us. the white house hopes it has a number of groups in florida in its favour. the state has conservative leaning cuban americans, an increasing number of similarly anti—left wing venezuelan americans and a lot of retirees. it's those older voters who gave mr trump a big boost in 2016. but this year, polls suggest, they may be leaning towards joe biden.
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so have florida's senior citizens soured on mr trump? let's check in with florida voter dave davidson — he's 68 years old and has lived in the state for five years. he joins us now from the villages — the world's largest retirement community. you voted for donald trump in 2016. how do you feel about today?” you voted for donald trump in 2016. how do you feel about today? i have found myself recently deciding that ican no found myself recently deciding that i can no longer place my trust in donald trump. i think that's the greatest thing that i've lost over the past three and a half years. i have lost trust, we talk about the campaign trailand have lost trust, we talk about the campaign trail and looking at it, that the trail would lead somewhere and we would have somebody be a leader and bring us to that place. i don't see donald trump as being able to do that any longer and unless something drastic happens, i will not be able to vote for him. dave,
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is there anything in particular that made you move away from mr trump? looking at the way people live here in america, i need someone who will more united than dividers. i don't see donald trump doing that. i don't see donald trump doing that. i don't see him being an individual with a plan he was able to go and reach out to all americans. we talk about republicans and democrats, people who lean left and people who lean right. i would like to think we go ahead and look at us all as americans. we need a plan, we need a specific plan. not just americans. we need a plan, we need a specific plan. notjust ideas and then actually have a plan, we have to have the ability to exercise a plan, no matter how frightening it might be, we have to exercise it. i don't see donald trump as having that, i don't have the trust and faith in him. it almost sounds like
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you are more anti—drug than pro—biden. has joe you are more anti—drug than pro—biden. hasjoe biden said anything that makes you think, i like the sound of that.|j anything that makes you think, i like the sound of that. i don't think i am against trump, i am pro—american. i'm an individual who would like to see this country restored to some level of sanity. when i look at mr biden, i see a man that i believe i could trust. he may eventually go ahead and prove me wrong, and i were livid that decision but i don't see myself as being against trump, i see myself as being against trump, i see myself as being pro—american, looking for someone being pro—american, looking for someone who will lead this country and represent me to my fellow americans and bring ideas that will go and unify us. that's what i'm looking for. when you meet up with others in the community of friends, do you talk about politics is that simply too rude the moment?” do you talk about politics is that simply too rude the moment? i don't know if it's rude, but i prefer to
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talk about issues rather than politics. issues are what's important. politics are passion, politics and how you feel. issues are what is important to me and this is where i see a lack of communication on mr trump's part. my partner, she is a democrat and we do not discuss politics. however, we do discuss issues and see some common grounds between the two others as faras grounds between the two others as far as how we can go and promote what we have seen to be important issues, how we can go and make happen. dave, when you talk about issues and plans, is there anything in particular that you are thinking about? is there any one area where you feel the president has not had a plan? i would love for someone to tell me what his plan is for anything. i work very hard in trying to understand his plans and it seems that what planning might have now will change rapidly. the time it
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takes me to go ahead and put my teacup down and find that he has retweeted something completely different from what he originally suggested. i don't really appreciate that. especially with what i consider to be our leader. our great nation. dave, thank you. very interesting. super interesting to hear that perspective from down in florida. for those watching on bbc world news — we'll be right back. boris johnson has defended the introduction of a new three—tier system of restrictions in england. at a news conference, the prime minister explained that the number of people being treated in hospitalfor covid was now higher than it had been before lockdown in march. these figures are flashing at us like dashboard warning is in a passenger jet like dashboard warning is in a passengerjet and like dashboard warning is in a passenger jet and we like dashboard warning is in a passengerjet and we must act now. so, we are giving local authorities
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across england £1 billion so that they can protect vital services as they can protect vital services as they fight the virus. nightingale hospitals across the north of england are being prepared for service and, so we can squash this virus wherever it appears, we are today simplifying, standardising and in some places toughening local rules in england by introducing three levels. borisjohnson appearing at this evening's press conference alongside chancellor rishi sunak and england's chief medical officer chris whitty. and those three tier restrictions come into force across england from wednesday. the la lakers and the basketball league's biggest star lebron james are basking in success today after winning the nba championship last night. for the nba it has been a year of political tension, grief and covid isolation bubbles. the season started last october in a pre—pandemic world — remember that. but it was quickly mired in controversy after an nba
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manager tweeted his support for the hong kong protestors. china began blocking coverage of games. the nba said the tweet was regrettable. lebronjames said that the manager in question wasn't educated about the situation. then at the beginning of this year, former star kobe bryant died in a helicopter crash alongside his daughter gianna. on march 11th — the nba became the first major league to suspend games because of coronavirus. later in the year players formed a social bubble at disney world, so that the season could continue. after george floyd died on may 25th the league addressed the social justice movement that was consuming america. kneeling at games became common place. and now the season has ended just weeks before the election, and the players are turning their attention back to politics. kareem abdul—jabbar is one of the most famous basketball players in the world and a civil rights activist and joins us for his first interview since the la lakers won the nba trophy.
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in some years in america, sport comes to express the country's turmoil. what role have they played in the story of america in 2020? the nba has exemplified america's struggle with the covid—19 virus. they did everything they could to set up disease control guidelines and were able to have a term where nobody got ill. they show their concern for social issues but also their concern for self issues. and their concern for self issues. and their families. they did a remarkable job of exemplifying a common—sense approach to all of the issues and problems that we've had to face this year. as you said, it has been a very tough year. the pressure on lebrun james
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has been a very tough year. the pressure on lebrunjames in particular must have been immense. the death of his friend kobe bryant injanuary, the death of his friend kobe bryant in january, the the death of his friend kobe bryant injanuary, the death of george floyd, and yet he was able to concentrate on playing. you have all people must understand how hard that must have been. i only have a small idea of it. i never had to go and isolate for, what? three months. not seeing their families. having to train every day, just you and your hotel room. that's a bird and i didn't have to bear. i was able to have some type of normalcy away from the game. that helps you cope. there's a whole lot in addition to the normal stresses and strains that happen this year and the lakers come out on top, it's a remarkable outcome and they should be very proud of what they achieved. i'm
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going to be completely honest and say that i'm not a big sports watch but i have watched this year as this country and the uk and countries all across europe have really missed watching sports. my sons have really missed watching the soccer teams. when i think of the sacrifice that their nba players went through, it's almost like they did a service. there is something about watching sport that people need in this moment, that they really crave in this time of pandemic and those players gave it to us, didn't they? yes, they did. both on the court and away from the court. away from the court, lebrun james has away from the court. away from the court, lebrunjames has taken up the burden of being a sports person for the people who don't have any strong voice. it's been very effective.
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again, that's away from the game so they're showing us a really great example in so many different areas. it's remarkable. do you think sports players can now help in the quest for racial and social justice players can now help in the quest for racial and socialjustice in this country? i know they can. i know that so many young people, they gravitate towards their sports heroes. they have taken polls that show that sports heroes are the people that young people look up to the most after their parents. that's a significant platform and i think so many of the professional athletes have made great use of their platform to try and affect change in a positive way. we have seen a lot of positive examples of that. i
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mentioned lebron james earlier. of positive examples of that. i mentioned lebronjames earlier. he is sending all school district to college. all the kids in that school district are people who have the opportunity to go to college if they get in. he is going to fund that. that's remarkable. he could be doing a numberof other that's remarkable. he could be doing a number of other things with his money, even if he just counted it, but this is how he makes his efforts. i have to speak about that remarkable sense of leadership. when the lakers won, just briefly, how do you celebrate? i was really happy for them. it you celebrate? i was really happy forthem. it reminds you celebrate? i was really happy for them. it reminds me of something that happened in my career where i got to play with the younger player that enabled me to... when ijoined forces with magicjohnson.
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that enabled me to... when ijoined forces with magic johnson. we will also happy. kareem abdul—jabbar, thank you forjoining us. hello there, good evening. it wasn't the brightest start to the new week for most of us. today brought cloud and outbreaks of rain and a rather chilly feel as well, but it did brighten up for some western parts of the uk. that was the scene from a weather watcher in county down earlier today. and through the rest of this week, we will see more in the way of dry and fairly bright weather, but it will stay on the chilly side. this is the satellite picture from earlier on, and you can see this band of cloud which brought the outbreaks of rain pushing eastwards. behind it, speckled shower clouds with some decent clear spells in between, and it's that mix of clear spells and showers that will affect the western half of the uk as we go through tonight. rain struggling to clear away from the far southeast, it'll take a while to do so, and at the same time, pushing back into parts of eastern scotland and northeast england. temperatures for most around five,
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six or 7 degrees, a bit colder than that for parts of southwest scotland and the far north of england. so, low pressure still in charge of the scene as we head into tomorrow. this frontal system hooked around the low will continue to bring some outbreaks of rain. rain to start off across southern and southeastern scotland, parts of northern england. that rain will eventually through the day push down towards wales. through south wales, the southwest of england, a mix of sunny spells and heavy showers. rain always close to the far east coast of east anglia and the far southeast of england, but for scotland and northern ireland, things will be drying up from the north, writing up as well. a key northeasterly breeze particularly across the north of the uk, that's going to make it feel rather cool out there to say the least, 11, 12, 13 degrees your maximum temperatures. as we head through tuesday evening, we'll continue to see some outbreaks of showery rain here and there. it stays fairly breezy, that breeze coming down from the north, never a
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warm wind direction. and as we head into wednesday, we keep this northeasterly wind. the wind as we go through the day on wednesday will become strongest in the south, but slightly lighter further north, and actually, not too many showers around across northern ireland and scotland. there will be some for england and wales. temperatures though still struggling at 12—15. for the end of the week, it looks as if high pressure is going to try to take control of our weather. you can see various frontal systems around the edges of the chart. this area of high pressure is likely to fend them off for the most part, so dry weather for the end of the week and indeed the weekend. it will often be quite cloudy, and it will stay rather chilly.
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you're watching bbc news with me katty kay in washington. james reynolds is in london. our top stories... judge amy coney barrett begins her supreme court confirmation hearings. we'll ask a colleague what kind ofjustice would she be. england begins a new three—tier coronavirus restriction system. we'll look at what it means in practice. also in the programme.... british airways loses its chief exec as it navigates the worst crisis facing its industry. we'll be asking if a return to a sky full of planes is — well — pie in the sky? and no, it's not a fake tan booth, or a laundry basket, but the perfect solution for those concerned about the perils of social distancing. this is a real thing, by the way.
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amy coney barrett has only been a judge for three years but she's already developed a robust record on politically divisive issues. if she is confirmed she will have to deal with several highly charged topics. here's some of what we know about her views. she's been critical of president obama's affordable care act. concerning a previous ruling, she wrote, "chiefjustice roberts pushed the affordable care act beyond its plausible meaning to save the statute." on gun rights, judge barrett gave a dissenting ruling in 2019, saying the law that forbids people with a criminal conviction from owning guns should not apply if their crimes were not violent. on the death penalty, she has stated that she would recuse herself and that all catholic judges should recuse themselves in cases that conflicted with their religious beliefs. before she became a judge, she was on record as being against abortion.
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since then, she has sided with states trying to impose restrictions on the procedure. we're joined now by professor carter snead, law professor at notre dame university and friend and colleague of amy coney barrett for more than 15 years. i hope i haven'tjust pronounce your name wrong. you got it right. that would be even better. you have known amy coney barrett for a long time. today the american public got their first introduction to her when she spoke at her confirmation hearings. are the person use saw up there on capitol hill speaking before senators and the person you know the same person? very much so. judge barrett is an extraordinary human being. she's poised, she composed, but she's also deeply humane and empathetic. i think we saw that in her remarks today. she began by talking about the role of a judge and the limited role of the judge to
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simply interpret the law rather than impose preferred public policy outcomes on the public. but also, she said something that i think your viewers will find especially interesting. she said when she reaches the conclusion in her work asa reaches the conclusion in her work as a judge, she always rereads her opinion from the perspective as if her children were on the losing side of the opinion she had written and she wants to make sure that a, she had the question right but then be, she also wants to make sure —— write it in she also wants to make sure —— write itina she also wants to make sure —— write it in a way that even the losing side will understand they were treated fairly and decisions were made on the basis of the law and nothing else. we heard republican senators in that hearing today very keen to say, as she did herself that she will follow the law and not her political or personal or religious views. but she has been appointed by donald trump to satisfy religious conservative it is in this country. he would not have appointed her if she were a liberaljudge. as an it a
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bit unrealistic to think that she's not going to bring her conservative perspective to the job? no, i think american presidents are frequently disappointed by the justices they appoint. the left on the right, they frequently make decisions they are disappointed with. i think president trump was disappointed by some of the decisions neil gore 's hitch made. judges are independent minded and judges are committed to the law, as hopefullyjustice barrett is, follow the law regardless of personal preference. her mentor, appointed by ronald reagan and considered to be quite conservative, regularly reach conclusions that will or supportive of liberal activists and criminals —— or criminals, but when he read the law and the light of its plain meaning or its original understanding, he reach conclusions where that reasoning lead him. i have every
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expectation that my friend judge barrett will do exactly the same. she testified under oath in 2017 that she would not allow her personal preferences or views to interfere with the judging and over 600 cases, there's not a case that anyone can point you in which she is imposing her policy preferences. she found against activists who are seeking to protest abortion clinics, she found in favour of criminal defendants. these are not conservative outcomes and yet she has written opinions defending those outcomes. you've written she's not afraid to change her own mind in search of the truth, as i've seen several our faculty seminar. can you give us any examples of that? we've had probably hundreds of faculty seminars, and what i was thinking as there are moments in her own writing in herown papers there are moments in her own writing in her own papers and papers by other colleagues, have spirited discussions and i know immediate example comes to mind —— no immediate example comes to mind. but she would begin with a proposition,
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and if she felt a proposition still held in light of the conversation, she would persist. but like all of us, we have a very special community in notre dame, she like all of us when confronted with evidence that contradicts our own presuppositions or perhaps shown we've misunderstood something, we change our minds and she is no exception to that. can i ask you about roe v wade? we do know that in public i my opinion polls, six out of ten americans are in favour of keeping roe v wade, as the law of the land. judge barrett has said that when it comes to the death penalty, she would recuse herself because of her religious beliefs. while her religious beliefs also apply to her position on abortion. shouldn't you logically then recuse herself from cases concerning roe v wade? the premise of your question is mistaking. she wrote an article in 1998 talking about the role of
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trialjudges in in 1998 talking about the role of trial judges in imposing in 1998 talking about the role of trialjudges in imposing capital sentences. she made clear, and she was a law student, but she made clear in 2017 that she saw no conflict between the role of an appellate judge, not a trialjudge, imposing death penalty. in fact she sat on three cases as a court of appealjudge in which he affirmed the death penalty. so the same argument applies to an appellate judge as applied to abortion or any question, she's maintain and 600 cases that none of these conflict with her personal conscious, and therefore she's able to sit on those cases. i would also add that six in ten americans probably can tell you what the holding of roe v we ate is. some of them think it's brown versus board of education. large numbers of american people felt dull favoured the limiting of abortion after the first trimester, conflicting directing with roe v wade. i think those polls are of limited value. but in any event, justice barrett
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because my views on abortion, whatever they may be, she has never commented on roe v wade as a legal matter. professor, thank you very much forjoining us. thank you for having me. pennsylvania is one of the swing states that will decide who wins the white house in november, and president trump knows just how crucial it is. he'll be visiting the state tomorrow as one of his first stops since suspending his travels due to his coronavirus infection. but it's not just about swing states. it's also about swing counties, and luzerne county is one of only three out of 67 in pennsylvania to have flipped red in 2016, and by a bigger margin than any other after barack obama won among luzerne county voters in 2012. donald trump defeated hillary clinton there by close to 20 points four years ago. if trump is to have any chance of winning pennsylvania, it's crucial that his campaign racks up a huge majority in counties
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like luzerne to balance out more democratic leaning areas like philadelphia and its suburbs. let's speak now tojustin behrens, the chair of luzerne county's republican party. hejoins us from kingston, pennsylvania. thank you very much forjoining us, justin. do you think the amount of support for donald trump in luzerne cou nty support for donald trump in luzerne county has grown bigger or smaller since 2016? a lot bigger. in 2016, they said there was no chance at president trump would be elected. we prove the county and the state of pennsylvania that we actually pulled for donald trump and since then, we've been working on recruiting getting people out there, transferring over to republican. the enthusiasm is unbelievable. we hear there is something like two and a half million men, white men without couege half million men, white men without college degrees. this is how pollsters work. i apologise. we knew
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there were about two and half million people who might like to vote for donald trump who didn't back into 2016. are you managing to find those people? are you managing to register them? that the great question. we actually have worked very hard, really studying what donald trump has done for our nation and luzerne county. we are hard—working individuals that they represented 15 years ago by the democratic party, and here in the republican party, we are signing them up. we are trying to get in there and say listen, get out and vote, get your message is heard. justin, you're up against a candidate who was born, and i checked this, about 21 miles from where you are right now. the hometown guy, a roman catholic, blue—collar guy, joe biden is coming back for his vote. you're right,...
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he was born there. if you represent that pennsylvania, how come our city here, we have not seen any progress in the 47 years he's been in office? there's nothing that's been done in scranton to make it better. the president has... the present has done everything he said, promises made, promises kept. joe biden has not done that. he had 47 years to support scranton, and he has abandoned it. we can't ignore the pandemic. unemployment in your cou nty pandemic. unemployment in your county was about 12 points 4%. the president was in charge when this happens. correct, but here's the
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thing. the president proved in the first three years that he could build the economy, the most robust economy we've ever had. we have faith he can do it again. he's shown that he has proven he's built this economy, i can just that he has proven he's built this economy, i canjust tell you in our area, hiring more than over 500 to 600 jobs each, so there are jobs coming here. he's doing what he said and he's going to do it again, that's why this supports president trump. justin, thanks so much. thank you for having me. let's see if they can get more of those votes and the feelings democrats didn't do enough for them, that they had their shot and they didn't do it. i keep on hearing that phrase about joe didn't do it. i keep on hearing that phrase aboutjoe biden, he has 47 yea rs. phrase aboutjoe biden, he has 47 years. that something almost every republican says now. you know how, it is this notion that he had a chance, he didn't do it and still
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wa nt chance, he didn't do it and still want somebody who is fresh in a bit ofan want somebody who is fresh in a bit of an outsider, which donald trump appeals to, even though he's been president forfour appeals to, even though he's been president for four years. appeals to, even though he's been president forfouryears. i appeals to, even though he's been president for four years. i think pennsylvania, if i had a name two states were really tough forjoe biden, i think it's florida and pennsylvania. those two really tricky for him. partly because of the way they do ballots, but they have these big suburbs, very democrat, and big areas which are much, much more conservative leaning. we are going to have a change of running order now. there are now more people in uk hospitals with covid—19 than there were when the country went into lockdown in march, but the government has made it clear it does not want to go into a full scale national lockdown. instead, the government is walking a tightrope of the right combination of measures to try to drive down infection numbers as winter approaches. it's a bit complicated, but for england, a new tiered system of restrictions is coming into place starting wednesday. the medium level is the lowest risk and most of england is in this tier.
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at medium, you can meet six other people and there is a 10pm curfew for pubs, bars and restaurants. at high level, there can be no household mixing indoors, and the rule of six still applies outdoors. tier 3 is the top level of restrictions. it prohibits any mixing of households either indoors or outdoors and pubs and bars must close. so far, the liverpool city region is the only are in this tier. here is the prime minister on the necessity of these classifications. we could go for now for a national lockdown again. i think many people would think that was extreme. it would think that was extreme. it would do a great deal of extra harm to our economy, to our ability. it would do a lot of immediate harm. we don't want to go but down that extreme route right now. there are people on the other side of the
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argument to say, let's just learn to live with this, let's stop trying to fight this virus, let's stop trying any kind of measures at all to contain it. i can't support that approach, i'm afraid. allthe math says it would lead to too many fatalities. we're joined now by the labour mp for labour mp for wirral south, alison mcgovern. the numbers of infection are rising, including where you are. it surely follows that restrictions and closures have to follow. do you agree? i think unfortunately, that is the case. there are significant practical problems with what the government are doing, and today has beena very government are doing, and today has been a very difficult day. some combination, i am furious that the government has not given us an up support and absolutely devastated for businesses who are put under this pressure yet again. because of
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this pressure yet again. because of this virus. but unfortunately, because of the spread of this deadly virus, this does have to happen. you say the government hasn't given enough support, but they will spate " pay enough support, but they will spate —— pay two thirds of employee' wages for business that are locally required to close —— legally required to close —— legally required to close —— legally required to close. the problem with thatisif required to close. the problem with that is if businesses can't afford to continue to stay open, i worry that we will see lots ofjob losses coming at us and merseyside. 20% of our economy is hospitality, and that is before you get to those who supply the hospitality sector. our economy for the past 20 years has been built on the visitor economy. liverpool is incredibly —— an incredible place to visit in a normal times, though the people come to see us. that's a massive part of our economy, so the government has got to go further in understanding the economy of our city region and
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helping, because liverpool in the city region area was one of the fastest growing economies before covid, so we all stand to lose out if that growth is not protected for the future. we got to fight covid today. we can't lose sight of the potentialjob today. we can't lose sight of the potential job losses on today. we can't lose sight of the potentialjob losses on the road and the loss progress in the years to come. we know how not to have lockdowns. you have to have a comprehensive testing, you then have to have tracing and then you have to have effective isolation. if you can put those three things in place, you can avoid the lockdown that liverpool is not going into. could the government have done a better job going forward? could it still do a betterjob? job going forward? could it still do a better job? is job going forward? could it still do a betterjob? is it too late now to try and do those things? you're right, i think when you say they should have shown a betterjob over the summerto should have shown a betterjob over the summer to prepare for this, i think that's correct. directors of
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public health have been pretty much tearing their hairout public health have been pretty much tearing their hair out trying to get control over the system and notjust kinda mopping up the problems that the national test and trace system has created. today, we've been advocating and trying to get the government to agree to make those improvements now. unfortunately, the virus from the scientific offices and the data, the virus is now widespread. that means is notjust merseyside. we are all going to need to work together to deal with this. however, the work to get that system properly there has to continue, because that's the way to get the virus under control. there's one other thing that people have got to be properly supported, and that's notjust be properly supported, and that's not just financially. but also socially supported to make sure it's not an incredible damage and their mental health, which i also worry about. allison mcgovern, thanks very
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much. this isjust so tough. we know what works and it is so hard for governments to do and it and it's so ha rd governments to do and it and it's so hard for individuals to do it. but we have to find some way to get through this. and it's only october. and it's only october! the worst crisis facing our industry, that's how the boss of iag, the owner of british airways, has described the pandemic‘s effect on the aviation sector. and the man who's been ba's chief exec for the past four years is not who the company wants to steer it through this crisis. alex cruz will be clearing his desk immediately. he's faced months of criticism from staff and british mps who claim the airline had been following a "fire and rehire" policy which left some employees facing pay cuts of up to 50%. so what's next for ba? let's bring in travel expert gilbert ott. you heard me, what's next for ba?” think that's the million—dollar question. in many ways, i think he
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left the airline in a position which could study it for the future, but there's only so many storms you can weather. between it glitches in the regionjob cuts. so it's a big question. hopefully shawn doyle, the incoming ceo, has the answers. when i got off the plane, i can't member what that's like, i turn right and get the choice of the chicken and the beast. i know airlines really need people to turn left to get more legroom. is that something the airline industry is going to try to get? that's going to be the biggest struggle going forward. we've seen this summer surprisingly solid passenger number turning right. they wanted to connect with destinations, particularly short where they felt safe, but people are very reluctant
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to go farand safe, but people are very reluctant to go far and wide and businesses are very reluctant to send their executives who would fill those seats turning left. with everything going on. unfortunately for airlines, the highest marginal profit comes from those seats that corporate travellers by. british airways has been a perfect example of that, making more than a billion poundsjust on of that, making more than a billion pounds just on the new yorkjfk route. so you're talking about an incredibly substantial part of the business, which is now dead in the water and they have to revamp how things actually work. you're seeing more price conscious offering and the economy as well because corporate are just not travelling and there's no sign they will be anytime soon, unfortunately. gilbert, i would love to travel anywhere left or right. i don't really care, anywhere left or right. i don't really ca re, i anywhere left or right. i don't really care, i would just hop on a plane in europe anytime. but it's very ha rd to plane in europe anytime. but it's very hard to do because i live in america. so how are countries going
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to go around that and do they have to go around that and do they have to get round that with the propositions of the new york london travel corridor? is that viable? is that a way we can get people using you again? i think studies are showing it is viable, and if we can get the support of government, it could become a reality. i seen the potential thrown out that it could be by the december holidays which sounds optimistic, given that we are ending october. but studies are saying testing combined with a shorter quarantine period can be truly effective. there's a recent study in canada where they found 80% of infected travellers were caught with a first test and remaining 20% of infected travellers were detected bya of infected travellers were detected by a second test seven days later. i'm in america actually, and i'll have to isolate for 14 days. i think that's a better approach than the goodwill isolation that the government's been going with. they say only a for the people are roughly fully isolating for their
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requirement, so i'd rather had a test —based reproach to keep travellers off the plane and ensure they remain safe afterwards —— test —based approach. i don't know about you, but i don't have time typically to sit at home for 14 days after flight. to sit at home for 14 days after flight. thank you so much. 2020, bad year. gilbert, thank you very much for joining year. gilbert, thank you very much forjoining us. more covid stuff here. social distancing has thrown a hand grenade into the best laid plans to meet friends and family. in the summer months, it worked just fine as you could quite comfortably sit in a park, without ever needing to go into someone's house. much less so the case now as we approach the colder, darker winter months. i have a solution. here we go. take your path, the one on the left are the one on the right? if you have $80, you will be able to shield yourself from other human beings. yes, i know it looks like a pop up laundry basket.
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i probably wouldn't wear it anywhere, but there we go. here you 90, anywhere, but there we go. here you go, this is what happens. everybody says it is equally stylish. i don't know who wrote that line or whether it was somebody with a very weird sense of style, but there is absolutely nothing... i think stefan is responsible for the sacrament —— segment, and he would never, ever, ever wear that. can we see the first ones again? why did they look so happy? what happens if they get a puncture and will they... happy? what happens if they get a puncture and will they. .. if i talk to you through that, you can't hear me anyway. maybe that's why they're happy because you can see people but you can't hear them. so that is why they are so happy. maybe in the next programme, i'll be wearing the
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orange one and you'll be wearing the blue one. we may get desperate. we will be sitting here with paws on before we clear off. that's it. thanks for watching. hello. the week didn't exactly get off to the brightest of starts. many of us had some cloud, some rain to contend with, it felt rather chilly as well. but there is something drier on the way for the rest of this week, perhaps a little bit brighter, but it is going to stay on the chilly side. low pressure certainly in charge for the time being. this is tuesday's weather chart. the isobars up in the north, that's where our winds are coming from, so it is going to be rather cool out there through tuesday. we will continue to see some outbreaks of rain spiralling around that area of low pressure, rain pushing through southern scotla nd rain pushing through southern scotland into wales, some showers to the southwest. but it will be drying out and brightening up for scotland and northern ireland through the
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day. here though a keen north easterly breeze, so that is going to make you feel cool. let's take a look at what's going on way above our heads, with the jet stream. the winds drive weather systems around the world. you can see the jet strea m the world. you can see the jet stream is digging at the way southworth and then digging its way northward. instead it is meandering, and an inch of these dips in thejet strea m and an inch of these dips in thejet stream where we develop areas of low pressure with areas of high pressure in between. this powder of meandering tends to mean things don't move through quickly. that will continue to beat some showers in ourdirection, will continue to beat some showers in our direction, particularly across england and wales. something drierfor northern across england and wales. something drier for northern ireland across england and wales. something drierfor northern ireland and scotland. high pressure starts to draw his way in. it will still be rather cool. as we head out into
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thursday, and noticed things not moving very quickly but high pressure will start to take a little more control of the scene. the winds will be a little whiter by the state as well. so it might feel a little bit less in chilly on thursday. many planes will be dry with patchy cloud and sunny spells, temperature is between ten and 14 degrees. similar sort of day on friday. largely fine and dry, some sunny spells, large amounts of cloud and just the odd showers. temperatures to on the low side, 11—13. there is a weather system behind me. that is associated with a deadly area of low pressure, but it's not been driven through. —— with an area of low pressure. it looks as if high pressure will hold onjust enough looks as if high pressure will hold on just enough to give us a largely try weekend. i can't promise sunshine all the time. it will often be quite cloudy, temperature struggling, 10—13. but it will be much drier as we head into next
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week. remember ourjet much drier as we head into next week. remember our jet stream much drier as we head into next week. remember ourjet stream with his meandering pattern, and when you get the dips, that's where you get the areas of low pressure. it looks as if this dip is going to spin up quite a big and potentially deep area of low pressure and then maroon it close to the british isles during next week. fans of rain are likely to spiral around the slope. some brisk winds, particularly in the west, but a shift in the wind direction. the winds will be coming up direction. the winds will be coming up from the south, so that is going to bring quite a different feel to the weather, something much milder on the way. so, for next week, it's going to be wet at times, quite windy as well, but it will turn milder. plenty going on in the next ten days.
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tonight at 10:00 — the prime minister imposes a new three tier system of restrictions on england to try to slow the spread of coronavirus. the tighest measures — tier 3 — for very high risk areas — will come into effect in the liverpool city region from wednesday. bars, pubs, gyms, casinos must close — and no mixing households indoors. tier two — high risk areas — from manchester and newcastle down to south yorkshire and nottinghamshire — no socialising indoors with other households but pubs and bars can stay open. no one wants to impose these kinds — least of all me — wants to impose these kind of restrictions, erosions of our personal liberty. we report from a hospital on merseyside filling up with covid patients again, as england's chief medical officer

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