Skip to main content

tv   Outside Source  BBC News  January 27, 2020 9:00pm-10:01pm GMT

9:00 pm
hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. pressure is growing on the former national security advisor john bolton to testify in president trump's impeachment trial. the number of people killed in china by the new coronavirus has risen to 81, with almost 3,000 now confirmed to have contracted it. a us prosecutor says prince andrew has provided zero co—operation in thejeffrey epstein sex trafficking inquiry. the world remembers the victims of the holocaust, 75 years after the liberation of the nazi death camp at auschwitz.
9:01 pm
and the many tributes pour in for kobe bryant. the defence team of donald trump in his impeachment trial has more to think about. the new york times has quoted an unpublished book written by the former national security advisor, john bolton. in it, he says president trump told him that he wanted to hold back military aid for ukraine until they announced an investigation into his political rival, joe biden. that's exactly what the president is accused off by the democrats, and is a direct contradiction of president trump.
9:02 pm
now, the big outstanding issue in this trial is whether witness can be called. that can only happen with a majority vote — and the republicans hold 53 of the 100 senate seats. but might republican unity be cracking? susan collins, the republican senatorfor maine, has released this statement... mitt romney also takes the same view. it would only take four republican senators to switch their vote and then witnesses could take the stand. here's mitt romney. i think it's increasingly likely that other republicans willjoin those of us who think we should hear from john bolton. and whether there are other witnesses and documents, well, that's another matter, but i thinkjohn bolton's relevance to our decision has become increasingly clear.
9:03 pm
well, here's more evidence of the pressue on republican unity. senator kelly loeffler tweeting... "after two weeks, it's clear that democrats have no case for impeachment. sadly, my colleague senator romney wants to appease the left by calling witnesses who will slander donald trump during their 15 minutes of fame. the circus is over. it's time to move on!" gary 0'donoghue. you will live with us from washington, dc, so they need four, susan collins and mitt romney, have they definitely come across or they arejust thinking they definitely come across or they are just thinking about it? mitt romney is a definite and he says he wa nts to romney is a definite and he says he wants to do it and he will vote for it. susan collins is still a may be commissioned is often a may be on all sorts of issues, so we will see weather that firms up. and there are others thinking about it. the alaskan senator has been thinking about it. and there are others. there are talks between each other if you listen to what mitt romney said, they are obviously talking to one another. and maybe urging one another on or holding one another
9:04 pm
back, who knows? but they are getting nearer and the bolton but has made a huge difference. gary, stay with us please. all of this gives donald trump's legal team plenty to think about. they are into a second day of setting out their defence at the trial. in the last couple of hours, we've been hearing from one of its key lawyers, ken starr. here at home, in the world's longest standing constitutional republic, instead of a once—in—a—century phenomenon — which it had been — presidential impeachment has become a weapon, to be wielded against one's political opponent. in her thoughtful wall street journal bit a week ago saturday, peggy noonan wrote this: "impeachment has now been normalised. it won't be a once—in—a—generation act, but an every—administration act.
9:05 pm
democrats will regret it when republicans are handing out the pens." the pens of the signing ceremony. it's certainly curious that ken starr would suggest that this impeachment is becoming too frequent. there have only been three in history — this one, one a long long time ago, and bill clinton in the late ‘90s. that impeachment was driven by a special prosecutor — ken starr, no less. here he is giving a press conference at the time. no concerns back then about the impeachment process being abused for political gain. but i guess his position on that has evolved. gary, you are keeping an eye on the statement of ken starr, what did you make of his line of attack or defence, i guess i should say? deeply academic, a kind of real dive into constitutional history. and as you say, the upshot of it really was, this is happening too much. that won't, i don't think,
9:06 pm
carry too much sway i think the democrats because it was clearly meant as a warning to democrats that this is going to happen to you when republicans are in power. but also commit to making the argument which the defence have relied on a lot in this case that there needs to be a crime in orderfor there this case that there needs to be a crime in order for there to this case that there needs to be a crime in orderfor there to be an impeachment or a conviction as a result of an impeachment. he says the founders made that very clear in the founders made that very clear in the constitution. a lot of other people dispute that, including a lot of other constitutional experts. but really, a pre—if you like from the former independent counsel ken starr to not do this sort of thing, even though it is set out as a provision in the constitution. so while ken starr is being academic, susan collins and mitt romney are considering what to do, when do we get to the crux of this and went do the senators vote on whether witnesses are going to be allowed?” am guessing friday. and the reason i say that is that the president's defence carries on today and it will
9:07 pm
do as well tomorrow. there is then a period of 16 hours of questions, written questions that senators can put to both sides. i think they may do that over the end of tomorrow, but certainly wednesday and thursday. and then that is when you get the business of votes on documents and witnesses, on friday. it could be those votes on friday and it could come in many ways, if they lose the votes, in terms of the democrats, if they lose the votes, you could see saturday a vote on the articles themselves even. the president could be cleared by monday. one more thing i want to ask you about, gary. as gary knows, in order president trump to be removed from office, two thirds of the senators have to vote to convict president trump and the likelihood of that happening given the republicans have a majority is very, very low. yet during the 2016 us election,
9:08 pm
a fifth of republican senators opposed donald trump becoming president, saying he wasn't fit for thejob. they were called the never trumpers. here's mitt romney. donald trump is a fraud. his premises are as useless as a degree from trump university. next, here's marco rubio, who ran against donald trump for the republican nomination, speaking during the campaign. there's no way the party of lincoln and reagan is going to be taken over by a con artist. senator lindsey graham is now a staunch supporter of president trump, but he wasn't in 2016. donald trump would be an absolute utter disaster for the republican party and destroy conservatism as we know it. we would get wiped out in generations to overcome a trump presidency. these men are now among the 100 senators who are sitting as jurors in the president's impeachment trial. and the outcome has long been a foregone conclusion. both republicans and democrats seem set to vote on party lines — and with republicans in the majority, that would mean donald trump staying in office. in a recent tv interview, linsey graham said... "the thing will come to the senate, and i will do everything i can
9:09 pm
to make it die quickly. i'm not trying to pretend to be a fairjuror here." bear in mind all 100 senators took an oath to be impartial during this trail. so, what's caused these men to change from wanting to stop doanld trump to standing by him? we're not the only ones asking this. here's an article in the new york times: "where's lindsey? graham emerges as a trump defender". this article highlights that mr graham is up for re—election this year in south carolina — that's a state that donald trump won convincingly, and where he's still popular. and this is a common pattern among republicans facing re—election. this may well be why. this recent gallup poll shows 88% of republicans approve of the job he's doing as president. at the moment, politically, it may well make sense for them to stick by the president. newsweek reports that 30 republican senators would vote to impeach the president if the vote was done
9:10 pm
in secret, according to a conservative strategist, who was told by a republican senator. though that report is impossible to verify. let's talk to gary 0'donoghue again. it is it -- it it is it —— it is tough for some of these men to explain, isn't it, gary? yes, it is, and those clips are very powerful and it was only three and a half years ago. they have all done a 180 degrees turn about on it, haven't they? and i think a lot of those in the senate will be frightened of coming out against the president and what that might, what impact that might have on their electoral prospects. also, a lot of them, funnily enough, are frightened of the sort of twitter tay raid that might come their way. that kind of level of opprobrium poured on your head doesn't feel very nice when you've got to 60 million of the president's followers piling in on you as well, so there are all sorts of reasons. but it
9:11 pm
just shows you the level and the depth of partisanship in this country that people will be prepared to stick by this president, even though it goes completely contrary to what they've said in the past. gary, a quick word about the chronology of american politics this year. this is playing out in washington, when did primaries kick infor washington, when did primaries kick in for the democrats and when do we have to look in two directions at the same time? you've got a week to wait for that, this time next week, monday next week, the caucasus, the first of the votes for the democratic nomination, that will ta ke democratic nomination, that will take place then. 0n democratic nomination, that will take place then. on tuesday, off next week, we have the state of the union address where the goes to the capital and stands in the house of representatives and sets out his priorities and his vision for his last year in office. and he would very much like to do that as a president who had been acquitted on articles of impeachment. gary, we a lwa ys articles of impeachment. gary, we always appreciate you coming on, thank you very much indeed. well, we will stay in the us.
9:12 pm
prosecutors in the united states say they have asked prince andrew to be interviewed as part of their investigation into jeffrey epstein, but have received no response. have a listen. now, ordinarily, our office doesn't comment on whether an individual cooperates, or doesn't cooperate, with our investigation. however, in prince andrew's case, he publicly offered — indeed, in a press release offered to cooperate with law enforcement investigating the crimes committed byjeffrey epstein and his co—conspirators. so, i think in that context, it's fair for people to know whether prince andrew has followed through with that public commitment. so, let me say that the southern district of new york and the fbi have contacted prince andrew's attorneys and requested to interview prince andrew and, to date, prince andrew has provided zero cooperation.
9:13 pm
the prince announced in november that he was stepping back from royal duties because the epstein scandal had become a major disruption to the royal family. he also said at the time, he was... "willing to help any appropriate law enforcement agency". that statement followed the now infamous bbc interview with emily maitlis, after which he was widely criticised for lacking empathy for epstein‘s victims, and failing to show regret over his friendship with epstein. now, jeffrey epstein took his own life in a usjail in august last year, while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges. among his many alleged victims is virginia giuffre. she claims epstein trafficked her to the uk and says she's horrified and ashamed by an alleged sexual encounter with prince andrew in 2001. iam sure i am sure you have seen this photograph. it shows the pair of them together. prince andrew emphatically denies any form of sexual contact
9:14 pm
or relationship with virginia giuffre. we've received this update from our royal correspondent, daniela relph — a comment from buckingham palace. "this issue is being dealt with by the duke of york's legal team. buckingham palace will not be commenting further on this particular matter." so that update from london. nick bryant is in new york. us attorney geoffrey berman is heading up the criminal investigation intojeffrey epstein and people who possibly were co—conspirators in his sex trafficking operation. it is a guy called geoffrey berman he was doing a press c0 nfe re nce called geoffrey berman he was doing a press conference today in new york outside the mansion of the late billionaire. it is a mansionjust off fifth ave, just close to central park. and he was asked whether prince andrew had cooperated with us authorities, as he promised he would do when he stepped back from royal duties. and geoffrey berman was very explicit and used very strong words
9:15 pm
when he said, no, there has been zero cooperation from prince so far. and do we know what he was asking a prince andrew? well, the us prosecutors and the fbi have been in touch repeatedly, we have been in touch repeatedly, we have been in touch repeatedly, we have been told, to try and organise an interview with prince andrew. they want to speak to him. now, you remember when prince andrew stepped back from royal duties late last year, he made a statement saying, of course i am willing to help any appropriate law enforcement agency with their investigations, if required. well, rust, they are required. well, rust, they are required. yet prince andrew's legal tea m required. yet prince andrew's legal team is still not cooperating. according to us prosecutors. just finally, can you give us an idea of the scale of the investigating that is still ongoing, despite the fact the man at the centre of it took his life last year? yes, that is the crucial thing, even though life last year? yes, that is the crucial thing, even thoutheffrey epstein did take his life last
9:16 pm
summer, the investigation into jeffrey epstein and the allegations of sex trafficking continued. it has been an investigation that has a vc attracted a good deal of attention here and a good deal of headlines —— obviously. it has been conducted by the most aggressive prosecution outfit in the united states of america. it is the southern district of new york, they are based in lower manhattan and they are famed for their aggressiveness and for pursuing high—profile cases, and it is them that want to talk to prince andrew in connection with the ongoing criminal investigation. we started with two stories from the us and ina started with two stories from the us and in a minute, we will turn to afghanistan. officials have acknowledged that a plane which crashed in afghanistan in a taliban—controlled area was a us military aircraft. the organisations involved in refurbishing grenfell tower have
9:17 pm
been accused of failing to admit any responsibility for the fire, which killed 72 people. the comments were made at the opening of the second part of the public inquiry. more from our correspondent, danjohnson. this afternoon, we started hearing the opening statements from first, the opening statements from first, the lead barrister on behalf of the inquiry, and then representatives of some of the companies and organisations that were involved in that refit of the tower. now, other than the london borough of kensington and chelsea, the barrister on behalf of the inquiry said that there had been no organisation prepared to accept any fault for causing the grenfell tower, for the faults that meant that that fire spread so quickly and came so many that that fire spread so quickly and came so many lives. and he suggested that what we were going to seat was a merry—go—round of passing the buck, where companies tried to blame each other for what went wrong. and it seems just from the start of the evidence this afternoon that that is what is happening.
9:18 pm
this is 0utside source, live from the bbc newsroom. 0ur lead story is... pressure is growing on the republicans on whether to call the former national security advisor john bolton to testify in donald trump's impeachment trial. some in donald trump's impeachment trial. of the main world some of the main stories from bbc world service. italy's far—right leader matteo salvini has suffered a major setback, after his league party failed to unseat the left in a key election in the north of the country. mr salvini had campaigned extensively in emilia—romagna, hoping to force a snap election. peru's conservative popular force party has suffered a crushing defeat in congressional elections. the party is led by the daughter of the disgraced former president, alberto fujimori. the new balance of power will give president martin vizcarra a chance to enact anti—corruption reforms. a plane in iran has skidded onto a motorway, after a botched landing.
9:19 pm
none of the passengers on board were hurt in the incident in the south—western city of mar—shah. a reporter who was on board said the back wheel of the plane broke off and the plane skidded, without its wheels. now, the us military hasjoined an investigation into one of its planes that crashed in eastern afghanistan. the aircraft that came down in ghazni province, in a mountainous area controlled by the taliban. this video was published by a taliban—affiliated account on social media showing the remains of a crashed aircraft. these pictures have not independently verified yet. they appear to show a e—11a jet, you can see us air force markings on it — it's the type of plane the us military uses for electronic surveillance over afghanistan. more on this from... anbarasan ethirajan, world service south east asia editor.
9:20 pm
it took a long time for the americans and the international forces to give any kind of confirmation about what really happened in ghazni province because initially, the report said it was a passenger plane and then the state airline denied the report. then some report started emerging on the radio of that particular crash when it appeared on social media and it indicated it could be a us military plane. and after several hours, the us officials informally confirmed to the media, acknowledge that it was a us military plane, it was a surveillance plane and the pentagon came up with more detail short time ago saying it was an electronic surveillance aircraft over afghanistan, ghazni province. they have also ruled out the plane could have also ruled out the plane could have been shut down by the taliban insurgents. they said the main reason could be the crash and they are investigating the reports. however, we still do not know how many people are exactly on board this aircraft. the taliban issued a statement saying all those on board the aircraft were killed in a crash. so if the americans are saying the
9:21 pm
taliban was not involved, while it isa taliban was not involved, while it is a tragedy for those involved, perhaps this isn't particularly significant in the context of the peace talks that are happening. as the peace talks are going on in the qatari capital, they have several rounds of talks, but the initial suspicion is it could be the crash and not really the taliban shut down the aircraft. but there have been attacks on american forces in the past few weeks, the past few months, even as the talks were progressing. that is a sticking point in these peace talks between us representatives and the taliban because the us insists filing should because the us insists filing should be reduced before any meaningful peace agreement can be signed and then they can progress with the talks with the afghan leadership. 0n the other hand, the taliban have been assisting complete ceasefire will happen when the international forces withdraw. they need a firm commitment from the international forces. but this could be a normal accident because they were listening to the conversations between various forces on the ground. it is also
9:22 pm
described as an extended wi—fi because even the planes flying around, they needed some sort of better radio signals because afghanistan is a difficult terrain, it isa afghanistan is a difficult terrain, it is a mountainous terrain. forces on the ground cannot communicate properly with forces on the other side. so this plane was used at many pains like this used by the american forces on the ground. so if it is a normal accident, it is a very tragic thing and they will recover from it. but if it is not confirmed they were shut down by the taliban, that can escalate, but it looks like it crashed into ghazni province. we will have a full update in about 15 minutes under coronavirus in china. it's been a bumpy ride in the us — where the dowjones index — which follows 30 big american companies — closed down, along with the s&p and nasdaq. a similar story too in europe — with the ftse100 taking a dive at the open,
9:23 pm
along with markets in frankfurt and in paris. samira hussain. where would concern about coronavirus translate to a shift in the markets? a lot of companies out there do a lot of business with china, or they depend on a lot of revenue coming from china. 0r china, or they depend on a lot of revenue coming from china. or even travel companies that are worried about the kind of global effect it is going to have when it comes to travel, that people may be less inclined to go and do any visiting, go to hotels, because theyjust want to be as safe as possible. some companies really being impacted by this, you can look at the athletic company la key, 70% this, you can look at the athletic company lakey, 70% of its revenue comes from mainland china, said that company is under a lot of pressure. and even restaurants are also feeling the heat. if you look at starbucks or mcdonald's, both of those restaurants have closed locations in china, specifically in
9:24 pm
the province where the virus originated. and those are also killing a lot —— feeling a lot of pressure from investors. but to be clear, this is primarily about investors concerned, rather than any real change that has occurred at this stage? absolutely, we saw something similar happening last week, where we saw markets losing some ground because of all of these concerns about what kind of an impact the coronavirus is going to have globally. and once we heard from the world health organization, a lot of that really sort of a lie to the fee as we were hearing being translated onto financial markets. but because now we are seeing more incidences of this virus erupting, i think that is getting people a more worried. thank you very much, samira. from new york, to egypt. africa's biggest solar park is now up and running. based in southern egypt — it produces enough electricity to power one million homes. it cost billions to build —
9:25 pm
and has been partly funded by the european bank for reconstruction and development. here's its president. this is an investment in what is now the largest solar park in africa, one of the largest in the world, we are putting in $500 million into that facility, building about 16 pints of the 41 that have been built there and it gives an opportunity for egypt to hit this extremely ambitious target they have got of trying to get 20% of their energy from renewable sources by 2022. on top of it, of course, it gives electricity to 1 million top of it, of course, it gives electricity to1 million homes top of it, of course, it gives electricity to 1 million homes who we re electricity to 1 million homes who were without before. one of the great things about the renewable industry is that if one country does so, it isn't just industry is that if one country does so, it isn'tjust doing it for itself, it is a first mover push that others often emulate, we see this and other countries we working, not just egypt, but this and other countries we working, notjust egypt, but central asia and kazakhstan, once they started going down that route, other countries bordering wanted to do the same.
9:26 pm
and we will talk in a few minutes about the big decision coming from the uk government about huawei and from borisjohnson. the uk government about huawei and from boris johnson. i the uk government about huawei and from borisjohnson. iwill see the uk government about huawei and from borisjohnson. i will see you inafew from borisjohnson. i will see you in a few minutes to discuss that. extreme heat and extreme flooding coming up in this world weather round—up. starting with australia, where you can see clearly show a cloud across the northern territory and queensland at the moment, heavy rain here. this is a weatherfront that will move down towards the south island of new zealand. and behind it, high pressure builds. now, that will allow a change of wind direction and we will see heat coming in off the interior and that means temperatures across the south east once again are going to soar. so the darker russet tones developing through the middle part of the week so temperatures on wednesday in adelaide at a0 degrees. now, that heat gradually pushes east
9:27 pm
towards melbourne. that is optically great news, as we still have the australian open taking place and have an impact on friday. at least the temperatures ease down can i rain potential again on sunday. from extreme heat to extreme rainfall, and flooding across madagascar, as you can see. 0ver and flooding across madagascar, as you can see. over a week has met with heavy rain across the island. the flooding was so severe, it cut off several towns and villages. now, stones have used off into the indian 0cean stones have used off into the indian ocean and the satellite picture is not picking up shower cloud. there will be showers, but more extensive rain is really across kenya, uganda and northern parts of tanzania. still showers across the far north of madagascar. from heavy flooding rain in madagascar to heavy flooding rain in madagascar to heavy flooding rain across east brazil, as you can see. swollen rivers, severe flooding here. this is across eastern brazil. aim to stand 17,000 people have been
9:28 pm
displaced across 58 different towns and villages —— i understand. the rains should ease from sunday and they are still there, but nowhere near as severe as they have been and thatis near as severe as they have been and that is the story for the remainder of this week. moving to something a little quieter, but still with weather to talk about across north america, heavy snow moving out of the rockies and as the system pumps into milder air, wetter weather into parts of texas that will bring heavy rain. at the same time, pretty and settled across the pacific northwest into british colombia. what is interesting is it will be a bit milder as well. with heavy rain and the potential for snowmelt, milder as well. with heavy rain and the potentialfor snowmelt, there is a possibility of some localised flooding, so keep an eye on that. 0ver flooding, so keep an eye on that. over to europe, it is a breezy if not windy affair into the north. plenty of isobars on the charts and potential for snow, pretty well, plenty of isobars on the charts and potentialfor snow, pretty well, the alps. behind it, wetter weather into portugal northern spain. pretty u nsettled portugal northern spain. pretty unsettled across much of europe.
9:29 pm
similar story for the uk over the next few days, getting a little bit milder. all the details of that coming up in half an hour.
9:30 pm
hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. let me run you through some of our main stories will pressure grows on the republicans to decide on whether to call the former national security adviser john bolton to testify in donald trump's impeachment trial. the us warns that any deal with huawei could jeapordise a future trade agreement between the us and uk. i think it would make it very difficult, if not impossible, for us to achieve that gold standard trade agreement, which we all want. the number of people killed in china by the new coronavirus has risen to 81 — with almost 3,000 now confirmed to have contracted it. the world remembers the victims of the holocaust 75 years after the liberation of the nazi death camp at auschwitz. and tributes pour
9:31 pm
in for the basketball star kobe bryant after his death in a helicopter crash in california. on tuesday, boris johnson will announce whether he'll let the chinese tech firm huawei build parts of the uk's future 5g network. the us considers the company a threat to national security — and it's warning that any deal with huawei could jeapordise a future trade agreement between the us and uk. here's republican congressman mark gallagher. regardless of who wins the white housein regardless of who wins the white house in 2020, i think it would make it very difficult, if not impossible, for us to achieve that gold standard trade agreement, which we all want, and i think the
9:32 pm
conservative mp you have, tom tugendhat, said it best when he said ata time tugendhat, said it best when he said at a time when you have gone through this brutal effort in order to claw back some 70 from brussels, why then surrender it to beijing? so we want nothing more than to work ever closer with our british counterparts, whether on intelligence sharing or our economic elation ship, so hopefully we can avoid that and hopefully the decision will be made not to go with allowing huawei onto your networks in britain. the uk is due to leave the eu in four days and borisjohnson getting a trade deal with the us has always been part of his strategy. so it's a balancing act for the prime minister — here he is speaking earlier today. i think there is a very, very important strategic win for the uk. the way forward for us clearly is to have a system that delivers for people in this country the kind of consumer benefits that they want through five 6 technology or whatever, but does not in any way
9:33 pm
compromise our critical national infra structure, our security, or jeopardise our ability to work together with other intelligence powers around the world. so the five i security relationships we have, we have to keep them strong and safe. huawei has repeatedly denied that its equipment could be used to spy on people — but that hasn't stopped some of borisjohnson's own mps putting pressure on him to not go with huawei. i hope the minister will see the concern that this whole house feels towards huawei, and the idea that we should be nesting that dragon, the idea that we should be allowing the fox hunt of a hen house when really we should be guarding the wire, is one of those moments where i hope the minister will see his responsibility very clearly. let's get some analysis. iain watson is at westminster. plenty of people saying this is definitely going the way of huawei. is that true? all indications, all the mood music seems to be suggesting that is the case, not
9:34 pm
just what boris johnson was suggesting that is the case, not just what borisjohnson was saying, but also some other government ministers over the past 2a hours, and certainly they seem to be saying that we will protect national security but we will make the decision based on the evidence, and thatis decision based on the evidence, and that is a strong hint that if the security agencies say the risk involving huawei can in fact be managed, then they could go ahead. they will openly say that huawei will have no role in the core provision of the 5g network, but perhaps get involved in provision of antennas and so on full stop there has been some suggestion further restrictions on the company on its market share. so they won't be u nfettered market share. so they won't be unfettered access to the entire project on offer, but it sounds as though boris johnson and project on offer, but it sounds as though borisjohnson and senior ministers are prepared to do this kind of balancing act, by saying there will be some limited involvement with the national security council discussing this and likely to make the decision tomorrow. given the political calculations with the americans, the fa ct calculations with the americans, the fact that boris johnson is calculations with the americans, the fact that borisjohnson is go ahead with this to some degree, is that
9:35 pm
just evidence that there aren't very many other options here? it could be a defining moment for borisjohnson, it is the biggest decision he has had to take since december‘s general election here and the pressure has been pretty intense from the americans. mike pompeo, the secretary of state, is meeting boris johnson on wednesday but again saying last letters will be momentous decision, you could be sacrificing your sovereignty, and as you mentioned, the prospect of the us trade deal once brexit takes place at the end of this week, so there will be a lot of things on boris johnson's there will be a lot of things on borisjohnson's mind, there will be a lot of things on boris johnson's mind, but there will be a lot of things on borisjohnson's mind, but he does seem to be prepared to go along with the decision that has effectively been bequeathed by his predecessor, theresa may, and i think in that senseit theresa may, and i think in that sense it is a defining moment, but i think the other risk that he runs, though, is not so much even, big as it is, annoying a very powerful ally, it is as we had a little bit of flavour from the conservative mp tom tugendhat, also annoying some of his mps, including newly elected ones. lots of warnings, including
9:36 pm
from a former conservative leader iain duncan smith in the house of commons today that we should not be trusting a company so closely linked to the chinese government, and indeed iain duncan smith said he wa nted indeed iain duncan smith said he wanted the decision to involve huawei stopped immediately. thank you very much indeed. fascinating story, we will have to see how that plays out tomorrow. now to china. the coronavirus death toll in china is above 80. thousands of others are infected. this is a hospital in wuhan — it's under pressure because of dwindling supplies and rising patients numbers. this is the centre of wuhan. it's home to 11 million people — but now appears deserted. people can't leave — and are being told to stay indoors. and everyone else in china is being told to stay away. next to beijing — public transport has been unusually quiet because people are reluctant to go out.
9:37 pm
lots of people wearing face masks. this is much quieter than public transport would normally be because people are simply reluctant to go out. this is really interesting. and this is a factory in fujian province in eastern china. it's trying to meet spiralling demand for face masks across the country. half a million medical staff have been deployed to hubei province in wuhan where the outbreak began. also, the new year holiday has been extended to help reduce the number of people travelling in the next few days. here you can see how much the coronavirus has spread within china. the darker the red, the more cases there are. there are more than 1,a00 cases in hubei province alone. the darker areas in red have the most number of cases. many of the fatalities have been elderly people or those with pre—existing respiratory problems. according to the world health organization, there have been at least aa cases outside china — and most involve people who've
9:38 pm
recently been to wuhan. almost everyone of those cases are somebody who had recently been in hand. there have been no fatalities outside china. next let's hear from the mayor of wuhan on state tv. translation: facing a seven virus outbreak, our continuous work wasn't performed well enough. i feel —— sudden virus outbreak, i feel our capability of dealing with the crisis needs to be improved. for more on how the mayor has been handling this epidemic, here's celia hatton. he has offered to resign if it has found his efforts weren't good enough. he also admitted they could have done more to slow down the spread of the virus faster, but he is also kind of at the same time blamed beijing, named the authorities right at the central
9:39 pm
government because he said, look, we wanted to spread the news faster but we had to get the permission of beijing first before we could report that there was an outbreak. hospitals in wuhan are under severe pressure. one solution to this has been to build a new one. this is china's premier visting the construction site ofa new1,000—bed hospital in wuhan. and they are in rush. these pictures show diggers racing to build the hosptal in just a few days. engineers have been brought in from across china to help. the plan is to build this in days. in beijing, the authorities have closed the forbidden city to tourists and also a section of the great wall of china, and many locals are either choosing not to go out at all or reducing going out to as low as possible. here is one resident in beijing. translation: we were very scared, today if it was not for my wife who had to come to the hospital for a prenatal exam, we would not come out. next — let's hear from kerry allen. she's a china media analyst
9:40 pm
with bbc monitoring — and has been speaking to some of those affected. it seems at least 30 provinces have implemented what is known as a level one kind of emergency, so to speak, and soa one kind of emergency, so to speak, and so a lot of schools for example across the country, they are now delaying opening their classes. i was speaking to friends this morning who have teachers in shanghai, —— who have teachers in shanghai, —— who are teachers in shanghai and they were told if they go out to where a mask. they were told term times are suspended for three weeks and companies have to wait two weeks. a lot of people are very much on hold, they don't know whether they're going to work or school, they're going to work or school, they are frightened to go out. the world health organisation has meanwhile apologised for miscategorising the global risk posed by the virus. last week it said the risk was "moderate", now it says that should have been high. for more on how the who has coordinated its response with the chinese authorities, here's jao—yin fung, from bbc chinese in washington.
9:41 pm
speaking to some public health experts who say actually the chinese government has done a betterjob in communicating with the international community regarding the outbreak. still many from china criticised the chinese government for delaying information released regarding the case count and regarding how contagious the virus could be. some people lashed out at of the governor, who at a press conference yesterday but only once but twice over the number of facemasks produced in his province. many chinese see that as a sign of incompetence, and demanding his resignation. the criticism often targets the local authorities rather than central government and that is probably why those messages can
9:42 pm
still survive on chinese internet. to what degree are the holidays around the new year complicating the authorities‘s response? around the new year complicating the authorities's response? yes, so the lunar new year started on saturday, but it is worth pointing out the chinese celebrate the festival over the course of roughly two weeks. it is not only one day. of course, this is not only one day. of course, this is the time when chinese travel a lot, and also many business, even some governments suspend their operation, and that becomes a very complicating factor in delaying the effo rts complicating factor in delaying the efforts of combating the virus. but we can see that beijing has mobilised the whole country to fight the outbreak right now. on the new year day, the chinese leadership had a meeting. it has two major guidelines for propaganda, or let's say information released. the first is to be as transparent as possible, to release the case count on a timely manner. the second one is to
9:43 pm
send out a unified message to the whole country that we can do this if we unify together. there is no obstacle that we can't overcome. in a few minutes on the programme we will continue to hear some of the tributes pouring in for kobe bryant, who died in a helicopter crash at the weekend. the uk government insists a trade deal is possible by the end of the year, after britain leaves the european union on friday. but eu officials are more cautious. ireleand's taiseoch, leo varadkar, has told the bbc the eu will be the ‘stronger team' when the talks begin. he's been speaking to our political editor, laura kuenssberg. of course, looking down at you. this is michael collins, one of the founding fathers of the country. and the founding father of my party. the past and the present have been part of brexit‘s haggling, with one of the leaders in the fight for irish independence supervising
9:44 pm
him from the office wall, leo varadkar has held many of the cards. i don't think the uk has yet come to terms with the fact it is is now a small country. he might claim that, but as one phase of brexit closes, another opens. so does the eu or the uk hold the power in round two? we have a population and a market of a50 million people, the uk is about 60. if these were two teams against each other playing football, who do you think has the stronger team ? so long as we are united. do you think at any point it was fairto do you think at any point it was fair to say that ireland was being stubborn? what would you say to them? a lot of people in westminster don't understand ireland, yes, britain has a very powerful, colonial history and i think there we re colonial history and i think there were people who thought that france,
9:45 pm
britain and germany would get together at a big summit and tell the small countries what is what. that is not the way the 21st century works and certainly not the way the european union works. boris johnson says he disagrees with his irish friend. leo varadkar faces an election and his influence may fade away, but ireland will have a voice, and when it comes to brexit, friends and when it comes to brexit, friends and opponent can be won in the same. laura kuenssberg, bbc news, dublin. our lead story comes from washington. pressure grows on the republicans on whether to call the former national security adviser john bolton to testify in donald trump's impeachment trial. president trump says his administration's long—delayed middle east peace plan will be released on tuesday. mr trump made the announcement at the white house as he greeted the israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu — who was invited, along with his political rival,
9:46 pm
benny gantz, to be briefed on the plan. italy's far—right leader matteo salvini has suffered a major setback, after his league party failed to unseat the left in a key election in the north of the country. mr salvini had campaigned extensively in emilia—romagna, hoping to force a snap election. and an endurance swimmer has finished his first swim under the antarctic ice to raise awareness of the climate change crisis. 75 years ago, soviet troops moved in to the auschwitz concentration and extermination camp in poland to liberate the remaining prisoners there. more than a million people, most of them jews, were killed at auschwitz, victims of either execution, suffocation in the camps gas chambers, orfrom starvation, cold and disease. today, on international holocaust memorial day, survivors and world leaders gathered at auschwitz for memorial events. the bbc‘s world affairs editor
9:47 pm
john simpson was there. each anniversary, there are fewer survivors, yet even after 75 years, there are still thousands of them left. soon after dawn today, igor, prisoner number 188005, took part in a ceremony at the wall where tens of thousands were shot. mewadags, auschwitz is protected ., and restored, so the world won't forget the terrible things that happened here. the infamous gateway to auschwitz was covered over with a vast awning to protect the guests from the bitter cold of southern poland. royalty, world politicians, though
9:48 pm
no british ministers among them. which the auschwitz inmates were forced to wear. rows upon rows of seemingly unremarkable elderly people, who are among the last living witnesses of unimaginable cruelty, the worst crime in human history. here, in this great factory of death. translation: in auschwitz-birkenau, i remember naked women driven in trucks from the barracks to the gas chamber. i can hear them screaming, i can hear it in my subconscious when i remember those events. as another speaker noted, nothing was done to stop the slaughter. translation: maybe i would like to cry, because only with tears, i can tell you about this past. i hope you will all try to preserve
9:49 pm
the memory of this place, and other sites where innocent people died. i hope you will bear this responsibility, so that this terrible thing will never happen again. there were thousands of nazi concentration camps, but auschwitz was by far the worst.
9:50 pm
9:51 pm
9:52 pm
9:53 pm
9:54 pm
9:55 pm
9:56 pm
9:57 pm
9:58 pm
9:59 pm
10:00 pm
10:01 pm

42 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on