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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  February 11, 2017 6:00am-7:01am GMT

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it's hoped they'll become the experts of the future and protect britain from online attacks. good morning it's saturday, 11th february. president trump says he may issue a new order authorising a travel ban after his old one was blocked by the courts. parks under threat — a new report says funding has reached a tipping point and new ways of paying for them need to be found. the latest on the battle to save hundreds of whales stranded on a new zealand beach. and in sport.... one of the biggest test yet for england, the first trip to cardiff for eddiejones. england, the first trip to cardiff for eddie jones. wales england, the first trip to cardiff for eddiejones. wales are banking on the home advantage to take them to the top of the six nations. and find out how i survived the stairway to heaven, even if it did turn my legs to jelly. good morning to match who has the weather. a cold feeling day for all of us, snow giving a limited coaching in some areas. but for
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many, that is no will turn back to rain. see you soon. —— matt. good morning. first, our main story. schoolchildren are to be offered lessons in cyber—security to encourage more younger people to pursue a career in defending britain from online attacks. it's hoped that thousands of teenagers in england will spend up to four hours a week on the subject, over the next five years. here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. daniel kelly is a convicted teenage hacker facing daniel kelly is a convicted teenage hackerfacing a jail daniel kelly is a convicted teenage hacker facing a jail sentence. daniel kelly is a convicted teenage hackerfacing a jail sentence. he took part in a massive digital break—in of talktalk. what if his potential had been realised at an earlier age? he may have ended up joining a new breed of apprentices learning to cyber security trade, like these. with that in mind, the government is putting up £20 million for nearly 6000 schoolchildren aged 14 for nearly 6000 schoolchildren aged 1a and over to take four hours of cyber security lessons after school each week. we think that will help
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seriously with the shortage of cyber skills that we've got. we will a lwa ys skills that we've got. we will always keep it under review, in case this needs to get bigger. but getting it going at that scale shows serious ambition to make sure that we can have a pipeline of talent we are going to need. police are stepping up the fight, but this is not a threat that can be defeated on the ground. the cyber—crime battlefield will be online, and britain's gchq will be it's command centre. 50,000 people are employed in the anti— hacking industry. more will be needed, and the government knows it has to start finding them when they are young. and after 7:00, we'll be joined by brian lord, who spent over 20 years as a deputy director of cyber operations at gchq. donald trump has said he may rewrite the presidential order imposing restrictions on travel to the us to overcome the legal obstacles that have frustrated his
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efforts so far. his first order, stopping travel from seven mainly—muslim countries, has been blocked by the courts. our washington correspondent david willis has more. after a federal appeals court backed a stay of his executive order, donald trump vowed he would see his opponents in court. with the supreme court currently split along ideological lines, pending the confirmation of neil gorsuch, taking the matter to the highest court in the matter to the highest court in the land would be a protracted process that might prove u nsuccessful. process that might prove unsuccessful. speaking en route to his weekend retreat in florida, the president revealed he was waiting other alternatives. we will win the battle, but we also have a lot of other options, including filing a brand—new order. i like to keep you, i'd like to surprise you. it is for
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reasons of security. it could well be that we do. unveiled at the end ofa be that we do. unveiled at the end of a frantic first week in office, the original order suspended america's refugee programme and banned travellers from seven majority muslim nations from entering the us. it caused chaos at airports and sparked protest across the country. just how the white house might rewrite the order is not clear. lawyers almost certainly have to address the claim that in its existing form, the order is unconstitutional and blocks entry to the united states on the grounds of religion. mr trump has continued to insist that tough immigration policies are essential for the country's security. the funding of parks has reached a tipping point and new ways of paying for them may have to be found. that's according to the commons communities and local government committee which says parks are suffering because of cuts in council funding. it warns there's a danger
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of a return to the neglect of the 1980s. instead of regarding parks as only a sort of leisure and recreation area of service, we should be thinking about them as big contributors to public health and environmental policy, and community cohesion. and maybe they can be re— prioritise. there is fundamentally a problem about the number of cuts that local authorities have been experiencing and the distribution across the country, and the difficult decisions that most local authorities are having to make. labour has issued formal warnings to members of its front—bench team who disobeyed jeremy corbyn‘s order to vote for brexit. but they're not being sacked. among those who ignored mr corbyn were eleven shadowjunior ministers and three of the labour whips. a 16—year—old boy has died after he was stabbed in a busy street in leeds. the wounded teenager was taken from the harehills area to hospital for treatment, but died a short time later. a 15—year—old boy has been arrested
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on suspicion of murder. the decision to end a scheme to let unaccompanied refugee children into the uk is shameful according to the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon. she's urged the prime minister to change her mind saying there is a moral duty to help those in need. the scheme's due to end in march with 350 children being admitted far fewer than some campaigners had hoped for. some distressing pictures from new zealand where volunteers are trying to save around 100 whales that have become trapped on a beach. hundreds more have already died in one of the biggest ever mass strandings in the country's history. it's hoped the pilot whales may be able to swim to safety during the next high tide. simon clemison reports. as they wait for high tide, volunteers do everything they can to cool the whales, pouring water and covering them with cloth to help regulate body temperature — temporary measures until the whales can be released into the ocean.
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some hope that singing will prove soothing. and then, the sound of success, but it is early days. we had a group of volunteers camped out over night. we had a little bit of time where the whales were on the dry sand. but very quickly, this tide has come racing in, and we are all up to our knees, some up to their waists in water, and we are seeing some floating happening. we are assisting them with their breathing until the water gets deep enough for them to swim out. it is a devastating image, one of the worst whale strandings in the country's history. it is unclear what brings them en masse into farewell spit. one theory is that when a whale is distressed, it sends out a signal that attracts the others. once they are on the beach, it is hard to get them both into the ocean.
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they try to use the rising waters to guide them into the sea, but some swam straight back to the beach and most were stranded again. today, volunteers are hopeful that the whales will make it out into deeper water. a 30—foot hole has appeared in a section of the tallest dam in the united states. large amounts of water can be seen spilling out at the lake oroville dam in northern california. officials say there's no immediate threat that it will fail. water levels in the reservoir had risen due to heavy rain and snow. a dramatic crash has been caught on camera in county armagh in northern ireland. cctv footage shows the moment a slurry tank crashes through the garden wall of a house in glenavy. the homeowner, who was in the property at the time, said he was just glad
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no—one had been hurt. let's take a look at this morning's papers. shall i start us off? the guardian this morning, a story about boris johnson. pressing liam fox to continue exporting weapons to saudi arabia after the bombing of a funeral in yemen last october which killed 140 people and was condemned by un monitors. the front page includes some famous faces at the calvin klein show. emily blunt, ahead of the bafta is happening tomorrow. and their top story, they
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can use. tomorrow. and their top story, they can use. tim cook, one of the bosses of apple, calling on governments to launch a of apple, calling on governments to launcha campaign of apple, calling on governments to launch a campaign to fight the scourge launch a campaign to fight the scourge of fake news which he says is killing people ‘s minds —— bafta's. the times has a picture of a steward from the hms mercy, it was a steward from the hms mercy, it was a13 a steward from the hms mercy, it was a 13 month mission tackling people smuggling and drug smuggling. the times is also saying that standing. as are ripping off cash—strapped hospitals by demanding fees of up to £4000 per day. the daily mail, we will be talking about this led this morning as well. it is the end of the iraqi historic allegations team, that has been called off. one of the
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human rights lawyers who was struck off over his tack dicks, you can see the headline, at last an end to the witch—hunt —— tactics. we will also be speaking to the government about what happened. coming up to 12 minutes past six, you're watching brea kfast minutes past six, you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the top stories: schoolchildren in england are going to be offered lessons in cyber—security. it's hoped that more than five thousand teenagers will spend up to four hours a week on the subject, over the next five years. president trump is said to be considering a new executive order on immigration. it follows reports he might not take his case to reinstate his travel ban to the supreme court. the team from click will take a look at the 500 year history of humanity's attempts to create robots that resemble people. here's matt with a look
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at this morning's weather. good morning. we start the weekend ona good morning. we start the weekend on a raw note, some snow around in places and into the afternoon. for many, any snow that you do see will gradually turn back to rain. do not be fooled, it is very cold. a raw wind. this is a picture of how things are shaping up at the moment. a mixture of rain and snow on the chart. so in the hills of northern england and eastern wales, also in suffolk and into south—east kent and surrey. looking further north and west, cold but frosty to start. the best of the brightness across the northern highlands of scotland and across northern ireland. sleet and snow across ireland and northern england. snow on the hills and quite a bit of snow at the moment across eastern wales. elsewhere, it is a
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cold start. rain and a slight wind across the south and east. stronger winds to the south—east. closer to gale force later. the light colours in the chart starting to diminish, snow retreating to the hills. temperatures will be up to between three and six degrees this afternoon. but the layers on, because it will feel cold as you head through the day. if you are lucky enough to have tickets for the england— wales match, you will definitely need to pack something warm. through the day and tonight, scotla nd warm. through the day and tonight, scotland and northern ireland staying dry. the best chance of some frost overnight. any cloud breaks could turn a touch i see. rain, sleet and hillslope will take us into sunday morning. sunday will be in other predominantly cloudy day for england and wales. patchy rain, sleet and snow. rain for many, staying fairly grey. many places
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will stay dry. the best and brightest skies will be to the north. with wind tomorrow, feeling that bit colder. if you aren't enjoying the chill, bear with it. it does look like things will turn left cold into next week. as a little bit of sunshine comes out and temperatures get into double figures next tuesday and wednesday, it will feel quite a bit better. quite a jump feel quite a bit better. quite a jump in the figures, three degrees to 10 degrees. you will really notice that jump as to 10 degrees. you will really notice thatjump as well. a team of volunteers have been attempting to refloat 100 pilot whales stranded on a new zealand beach. they were the lucky few that survived after more than 400 were found beached on farewell spit on the south island. we can get the latest now from andrew lamason of the department of conservation, who has been leading the efforts. we must warn you of some distressing
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pictures during this interview. good morning to you in new zealand. it is early evening there. bring us up it is early evening there. bring us up to date if you would, andrew, as to what is happening and what the situation is now. you're right, it's early evening now and we have asked all our volunteers to leave the beach and they are coming off as the tide comes in. you're right, we have worked hard and got the 100 whales off that survived overnight and we lost some of them, but the bad part of the story is a separate pod of 240 whales are stranded, we've been fighting to keep those ones happy but it's pretty grim out here. overnight you said that many of the whales had died, theyjust didn't survive? no, that's not the case. overnight most of them survived but
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what happens is those ones got refloated we believe successfully and while that happened, another pod of 240 pilot whales came in and are stranded further south from where we we re stranded further south from where we were initially doing our work. people have been trying to care for them all afternoon and now we are pulling people of the beach because it's getting dangerous. you say the tide is coming in, is this a time where they may be able to work themselves free again? that's possible. it's not something that usually happens. we could have kept people out there a bit longer but we've had a few people getting hypothermia and we've got large schools of stingrays coming in around the volunteers, so it's too dangerous to leave people out there. there's a lot of speculation about why it is that more of the whales are there than usual and this is the biggest stranding there's been in living memory in new zealand. are you clear about why so many are
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there at this particular time? there's always a lot of marine animal activity around this area and there are a lot of these pilot whales in the southern ocean. these ones, golden bay is a classic stranding spot. a beautiful location but if you're a whale it is lethal. a big sweep of sea that curves around. the water is very shallow for a long way. as the whales come m, for a long way. as the whales come in, they get disorientated and trapped and it's all downhill from there. looking ahead now, andrew, it's going to be dark in a few hours time, you said the tide is coming m, time, you said the tide is coming in, whatare time, you said the tide is coming in, what are your hopes for the next 12 hours or so? my hope for the next few hours is that all the people we have taken off the beach and manage to get somewhere warm and have a good meal and prepare themselves for another big push tomorrow morning. like i said, it's way too risky to
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have anything going on now. we are trying to keep everyone refreshed and ready to go again for another push in the morning to work with whatever whales we have to work with. andrew, thanks for your time. andrew lamason from the department of conservation, looking after the volu nteers of conservation, looking after the volunteers and the whales involved in the effort to try and free them and we will keep you up to date with that as things develop. we'll be back with a summary of the news at 6:30am. now it's time for the film review with mark kermode and jane hill. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so mark, what do we have this week? we have the 20th century women, a new film starring annette bening. we have the lego batman movie,
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which does what it says on the tin. and fences, a major awards contender. let's start with 20th century women from mike mills. it is an interesting film, set in california at the end of the ‘70s. young boy facing an uncertain adulthood, surrounded by strong women of different ages, who both inspire and also confound, not least his free—spirited mother, brilliantly played by annette bening. here's a clip. stop. what? thinking that you know everything that's going on. no, ijust think that, you know, having your heart broken is a tremendous way to learn about the world. 0k. do you think you're happy?
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like... ..as happy as you thought you'd be when you were my age? seriously? you don't ask people questions like that. you're my mum. especially your mum. wondering if you're happy is a great short cut tojust being depressed. give me that. i already love it, just from that. i haven't seen it yet. you are right to do so. it is a great film. it has terrific performances, partly because they had time to rehearse and get to know the characters. these are characters you want to spend time in their company. we want to know about their lives and how they work out. terrific performances.
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the film has texture, you feel like at any point the camera could go out of the car, out of the house and into the street and the world would be complete around it. it evokes a world that is in many ways lost. it's back to time that now seems so distant, but the issues it deals with feel contemporary. it is not plot driven, it is to do with moments, conversations and relationships. the narrative flips back and forward to some extent. i thought it was terrific. when i first started watching it, i knew nothing of what to expect, other than it had a great cast. i like ilike mike i like mike mills‘s work. i was drawn into their world and their characters. i loved it, i can't wait to see it again, you will love it. will it be disparagingly called a women's film? i don't know what that means. it used to be a term that was used for popular movies. because females were the majority of the audiences. what they meant was something would be successful and a blockbuster. i hope that was the case.
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anybody could see 20th—century women and get something out of it, it is great. same is true of the lego batman movie. which is such a surprise. did you see the lego movie? it was really great. i am afraid i didn't. it was great. it sounded like a stupid idea but it turned out to be very smart and inventive. for what age group? all age groups, i am in my 50s and i laughed all the way through. lego batman is a spin—off. it is about lego batman, a narcissist, and he has to learn to have relationships with people, with robin, his butler, and thejoker, who is desperate for him to admit he is a special villan and they have a special relationship. and what is great, the visuals are terrific, it is incredibly kinetic. i kept wanting to hold the frame and say stop, there are so manyjokes in this one frame, they're going by too
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fast, i can't keep up with the speed of these jokes. it is smart, it is cine literate. it is great for all ages, it is funny. loads of exciting stuff happening on the screen. there are jokes about the ‘60s batman and the christopher nolan batman. you need to see the lego movie, because that is terrific and better than this. i have a busy weekend ahead of me. the lego batman movie is tiptop stuff and doesn't let the side down. i am already feeling overwhelmed by those two. let's talk about fences. i haven't seen the film and now i feel i want to see the play. i have seen the film and now i want to see the play. denzel washington stars in and directs it. troy is a blue—collar worker. he works in the sanitation department. he brings home his frustrations
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from his work, from his life. they all come out in the home encounters. the film has got four oscar nominations including best supporting actress and here's why. i'm not talking about no baseball. you're not listening to me, i'm trying to explain it to you the best way i know how. it's not easy for me to admit i've been standing in the same place for 18 years. well, i've been standing with you! i've been right here with you, troy. i've had a life too. i've given 18 years of my life to standing in the same spot as you. don't you think i've ever wanted other things? don't you think i had dreams and hopes? what about my life, what about me? great performances. you've seen the play. that scene is so powerful in the play. the only problem is the film feels very stagey. there are plays that have been adapted for the screen and they feel cinematic.
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this feels like something that has taken the stage play and filmed it. there are slight differences, but it never felt like a cinematic endeavour. it felt like great writing, relevant issues. terrific committed performances that you could absolutely get behind. but it didn't take flight as a piece of film—making. that is a problem because if you take a stage play away from the stage and put it somewhere else, you have to do something to it. you really feel you wish you were seeing it live on stage, particularly with the larger speeches. that's what it felt like. it felt like a theatrical production as opposed to a cinematic production. the screenplay was written by august wilson before he died, a great playwright. it is different writing for the screen and it is a craft? it is different directing that work for the screen. the classic screen adaptation of plays, they understand the language of cinema. this is clearly a huge reverence from the stage play, and understandably so. ijust don't think it is as cinematic as it needs to be.
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despite the fact it is great writing, solid performances and great individual moments, but as a piece of cinema it doesn't fly. coming up to the baftas on sunday, it is something that might win awards for the acting rather than anything else. my feeling is that is where its heart resides, they are terrific performances. it feels theatrical to me. the best thing out in the cinema at the moment is toni erdman. you need to see this. it is terrific, it sounds so unlikely, a three—hour black comedy, a standout performance about father, daughter estrangement. a father turns up at his daughter's place of work pretending to be a life coach, and she cannot get rid of him. it is really edgy and really funny and really painful and really poignant. it is about to be remade starring jack nicholson. why?
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it is perfect as it is, it doesn't need remaking, you will love the original. you tell me it's perfect. i have seen the trailer and the trailer itself is interminable. does it need to be three hours? i am somebody who believes in cutting to the bone, less is more, but in the case of toni erdman, iwould not take anything out. it is that good. it isa it is a really fantastic movie. don't be put off by the trailer. i was. i know loads of people who have seen the trailer and not been put off it. it is not a great trailer. ok, only because you have told me. tell us about the dvd. the unknown girl. it isa it is a story about a young doctor who fails to open the door to a potential patient who is then found dead. no one knows who he was. he has a crisis of conscience and tries to find out who she is. it was a film, when it
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was in the cinema, that got lukewarm reviews. the best thing about dvds, you can reassess things that was overlooked the first time. it isa it is a better film than critics gaveit it is a better film than critics gave it credit for first—time around. it is a thriller, but it has a humanist heart and is well worth seeing. i don't know it, so that is a good recommendation. mark, thank you very much indeed. thank you. a quick reminder should you need it. you'll find more film news and reviews from across the bbc online at bbc.co.uk/markkermode. and you can catch up with our previous programmes on the bbc iplayer. and we mentioned the baftas, let's find out who wins what on sunday. it's going to be very cold. full coverage from bbc news on the red carpet. that's it for this week though. goodbye. coming up before 7:00, matt will have the weather for you. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. schoolchildren are to be offered lessons in cyber—security to encourage more younger people to pursue a career in defending britain from online attacks.
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it's hoped that thousands of teenagers in england will spend up to four hours a week on the subject, over the next five years. here's our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. daniel kelly is a convicted teenage hacker facing a jail sentence. in 2015, he took part in a massive digital break—in of talktalk. what if his potential had been harnessed at an earlier age? he may have ended upjoining a new breed of apprentices learning the cyber security trade, like these at bt‘s headquarters. with that in mind, the government is putting up £20 million for nearly 6000 schoolchildren aged 14 and over to take four hours of cyber security lessons after school each week. we think that will help seriously with the shortage of cyber skills that we've got. we will always keep it under review, in case this needs to get bigger. but getting it going at that scale shows serious ambition to make sure that we can have the pipeline
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of talent we are going to need in the years ahead. police are stepping up the fight, but this is not a threat that can be defeated on the ground by raiding the hackers. the cyber—crime battlefield will be online, and britain's gchq will be it's command centre. 58,000 people are employed in the anti—hacking industry. more will be needed, and the government knows it has to start finding them when they're young. and after 7:00, we'll be joined by brian lord, who spent over 20 years as a deputy director of cyber operations at gchq. donald trump has said he may rewrite the presidential order imposing restrictions on travel to the us in a bid overcome legal obstacles which have frustrated his efforts so far. the president unveiled the ban at the end of his first week in office, barring entry to travellers from seven majority—muslim countries.
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earlier this week, an appeals court upheld the suspension of the immigration rule. the case may now proceed to the supreme court. the funding of parks has reached a tipping point and new ways of paying for them may have to be found. that's according to the commons communities and local government committee, which says parks are suffering because of cuts in council funding. it warns there's a danger of a return to the neglect of the 1980s. instead of regarding parks as only a sort of leisure and recreation area of service, we should be thinking about them as big contributors to public health and environmental policy and community cohesion. and maybe they can be re—prioritised. there is fundamentally a problem about the number of cuts that local authorities have been experiencing and the distribution across the country, and the difficult decisions that most local authorities are having to make. labour has issued formal warnings
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to members of its front—bench team who disobeyed jeremy corbyn's order to vote for brexit. but they're not being sacked. among those who ignored mr corbyn were 11 shadow junior ministers and three of the labour whips. a 16—year—old boy has died after he was stabbed in a busy street in leeds. the wounded teenager was taken from the harehills area to hospital for treatment, but died a short time later. a 15—year—old boy has been arrested on suspicion of murder. a team of volunteers are trying to save around 100 whales that have become trapped on a beach in new zealand. a warning, you may find some of these pictures distressing. hundreds more have already died in one of the biggest ever mass strandings in the country's history. we worked hard and got a 100 wales of the survived overnight. we have lost sight of them, but the remaining pot of 240 wales have come
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and re— stranded just to the south of that. we are fighting to keep them happy, but it is pretty grim out here. the tide is now coming in, we will keep an eye on that story for you. time now for sport. the roof will be open for this one, and history tells us that favours england. they've won 4 of the 5 matches played with the roof open in cardiff. wales wanted it shut, to intensify the atmosphere. nevertheless, it's still sure to be a spine—tingler, in the principality stadium, with both teams winning their opening games, and both camps have been telling us, how they've prepared. lots of people named jones. it is quite amazing. we've played a bit of tom jones, he
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is from my era. they weren't too happy about hearing delilah in the gym, they are not too familiar with that hit. in all seriousness, we have looked at the fact is that we can control and that's all we can do. slamming the doors, the doorway gets a bit small. we have got them be 5000 fans —— we have got 75,000 fans. we are renowned unfortunate place, hopefully we can put some smiles on faces —— place. ireland will be hoping to bounce back from their surprise defeat to scotland last week. they face italy in rome in the early game, while scotland are in paris to play france on sunday.
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away from the six nations and history was made in the premiership last night, as bristol's tom varndell, became the league's all—time, top try scorer. the division's bottom side were thrashed by harlequins, but varndell scored his 91st premiership try, to take him beyond mark cueto's record. a last gasp penalty from, rhys priestland, gave third place bath, a one point victory over northampton. elsewhere sale sharks beat newcastle. scarlets moved into the top four, of the pro 12, after an important win over glasgow. tom williams scored one of their two tries. the top two of munster, and ospreys, both won, and so did ulster. there's confusion over the future of the rangers manager mark warburton this morning. rangers said in a statement that he had resigned from his position but warburton says he wasn't aware of that and is consulting his legal team. rangers are third in the scottish premiership but 27 points behind celtic.
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under—20 coach graeme murty is set to lead the side in topmorrow‘s scottish cup tie with greenock morton. the early kick off in the premier league is at the emirates where arsenal take on a rejuvenated hull city side. arsenal are currently in fourth but have lost their last two matches, which has led to renewed speculation over manager arsene wenger‘s future. former arsenal and england striker ian wright thinks this will be wenger‘s last season in charge. i was with the boss last night, and to be totally honest, i got the impression that that's it. i genuinely believe, i was with him for a few hours, ijust get the impression looking at him that... that's it. i think that's it. it actually mentioned when we were talking that it's coming to the end.
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i've never heard him say that. in the rest of the days matches, manchester united take on watford, middlesbrough face everton, crystal palace are at stoke. at the stadium of light sunderland play southampton whilst west ham take on west brom. and there's a big one in the late kick off with second place spurs at liverpool. sheffield wednesday are still on course to reach the at least the play offs in the championship after a 3—nil win over birmingham city. their opening goal was scored by new signing jordan rhodes afterjust nine minutes of his home debut. great britain will play croatia later in a promotion play—off in the fedex cup. that's the equivalent of the davis cup in women's tennis. the british team won all three of their group games. in their latest tie against turkey a singles victory forjohanna konta put great britain on their way to a 3—0 win. tiger woods has withdrawn from the next two events on the pga tour with "ongoing back spasms".
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the 14 time major winner pulled out of this month's dubai desert classic before the second round with the injury. he only returned to action in december after two back operations. for years now, snowdonia in north wales has been establishing itself as a centre for extreme adventure sports, with europe's longest and fastest zipwire — and a unique surfing lake. now, former slate mines have been brought back to life, to add a huge adrenalin rush to history lessons. ijoined a school party in one of the vast caverns at blynow festiniog. beneath this sci—fi landscape, there is an industrial world waiting to be discovered again. a labyrinth of over 300 tunnels and caverns, 24 stories deep. former slate mines, now to be explored using climbing skills and declines, giving you an insight into the life of a minor.
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this is a horrible dream! all that supports you are staples humbled into the rock. you are say thank you toa into the rock. you are say thank you to a harness. but your mind paralysed as you with fear —— miner. what is so incredible is when you look down and around, this is where people work. some working here were as young as six years old.|j people work. some working here were as young as six years old. i learned about what the miners had to do. we have a great safety system now, but they just had chains have a great safety system now, but theyjust had chains around their legs. it is crazy to think they did that for 12 hours a day. she legs. it is crazy to think they did that for12 hours a day. she -- legs. it is crazy to think they did that for 12 hours a day. she -- this man worked in the mines, but is now
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a safety inspector. you have to bring people in. there is a side, we are very proud of the culture, we have embraced that culture. after the training, it's up to you to get around the three—hour long course. you cold your fears in the head, around the three—hour long course. you cold yourfears in the head, and thenit you cold yourfears in the head, and then it starts to get a bit more enjoyable —— you conquer. then it starts to get a bit more enjoyable -- you conquer. you learn more about yourself going around there than you can looking at your iphone. the school pupils took it all in their stride. having seen one might fall of the monkey bars 200 feet up... it was really scary. i thought i was just going to fall.|j gave this is, taking a different route to the final challenge. i don't want to look down. this is the
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stairway to heaven. they saved the steepest zip wire to last. i felt like i was ifelt like i was in i felt like i was in a ifelt like i was in a different dimension, everyone else didn't seem scared at all. i was absolutely terrified. i think maybe as you get older... the stairway thing, you have a cable thing to hold on to an end... 200 feet of nothing. you are on these little staples, that is all you are treading on. it's your mind, isn't it? wants uk net, it is a
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great feeling. 20 of opportunities to get involved. —— plenty of opportunities —— once you get it. very good. we will see you later on. the main stories this morning: schoolchildren in england are going to be offered lessons in cyber—security. it's hoped that more than five thousand teenagers will spend up to four hours a week on the subject, over the next five years. president trump is said to be considering a new executive order on immigration. it follows reports he might not take his case to reinstate his travel ban to the supreme court. also coming up in the programme, the dangers of getting on your bike. three cyclists have been killed on london's roads over the past four days. we'll be in trafalgar square where campaigners are calling on ministers to make cycling safer. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather.
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what's with all the snow, matt? it's cold out there, charlie and steph. cold and wintry for some this morning. not a great morning for emerging from under the duvet but as temperatures rise, a lot of the snow will turn back to rain with not much disruption around. a slight covering here and over the hills. to show you where it's been over the last few hours, parts of eastern scotland and the pennines and eastern parts of wales. the odd flurry elsewhere in england and wales and especially to the south and east. not cloudy and raining and snowing everywhere because western scotland and northern ireland have sunshine this morning but a frost sees temperatures down to —10 in parts of the highlands. eastern scotland above freezing just about but rain on the coast, a bit of sleet and snow inland, the same in northern
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england and to eastern parts of wales, mainly light snow falling at the moment. some in the south—west and wales will see some sunshine but for most in england and wales, a great start, some snow possible in kent, sussex and southwark. a lot of places that sees no first thing will get rain and drizzle later in the day —— suffolk. the best of the dry and sunny weather west of scotland, northern ireland but even though temperatures are up on yesterday, the wind will make it feel colder so bear that in the wind will make it feel colder so bearthat in mind the wind will make it feel colder so bear that in mind if you're going to the six nations match in wales later. quite a bit of cloud coming your way and it will feel cold in the wind. that wind gets even stronger through tonight, near gale force wind parts of eastern england. were further rain, drizzle, hill sleet and snow. some breaks in the cloud and in northern ireland and scotla nd cloud and in northern ireland and scotland we will have temperatures close to freezing on sunday morning but even colder tomorrow, the wind
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strongerfor england but even colder tomorrow, the wind stronger for england and wales, lots of cloud around, rain and drizzle, sleet and snow in the hills are especially in northern england. a few breaks possible in the south and in northern ireland and scotland we will continue to see the driest and brightest whether. still feeling cold wherever you are. if it is too cold wherever you are. if it is too cold for you at the moment, stay waiting because things turn warmer next week. 10 degrees, not exactly tropical but when you hit double figures after this weekend, a bit of sunshine, probably feeling a bit like spring. thanks very much. see you later on. we'll be back with the headlines at 7am. now it's time for click. few things say the future better than robots.
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we seem to be in an era of massive advances at the moment. this week, a leaked video from boston dynamics shows off its latest machine, called handle, something its founder described as "nightmare—inducing". rolling on with the wheel theme, piaggio, known for its vespa motorcycles, has revealed a new robot servant called gita. this robo—suitcase follows its owner's every move, using cameras in its body and in the user's belt. but sometimes it's good to look at where we've come from. the robots exhibition at the london science musician is an attempt to
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resemble behaviours. there are more than 100 robots here, including some old friends that we've met before. there are more than 100 robots here, including some old friends that we've met before. and this amazing swan, made from silver, is all the more incredible because it was made over 200 years ago, in 1773. it was these mechanical marvels that made the industrial revolution possible, mobilising hundreds of workers to be at the same place at the same time, enabling goods to be transported, trains to run accurately, and allowing industry to become an efficient machine. the industrial revolution was also the catalyst for massive social change across the world, bringing about the rise of the working class, and sparking ideas like capitalism and marxism. now, in the west, cuba found itself
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at the epicentre of this shift. it was the poster child for communism in the west, right in the back garden of the us, the heart of capitalism. richard taylor has been to cuba to see how the island is now moving with the times. the iconic images are strikingly familiar. cuba today still feels in some ways otherworldly, stuck in a ‘50s time warp. life for most of its 11 million citizens is simple. they've been living in a state—enforced digital wilderness. a decade ago, you needed a permitjust to buy a pc. today, if you're lucky enough to own a smartphone, chances are it's offline. there's no mobile data, so cuban apps are designed to work without a connection. until recently, even basic internet access could only be found at desktop computers inside state communication centres.
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long queues persist but now people are coming to buy internet scratchcards which can finally get them online elsewhere. in this havana park, small gatherings of cubans are all enjoying the internet. but getting online is slow, unreliable and, perhaps unsurprisingly, censored. luis rondon paz is a self—proclaimed hack—tivist, and as a former government it administrator, knows the system well. everything in cuba is restricted, filtered, as the rest of the world. basically, they censor everything that might threaten government power. it might be porn, gay, or political things. basically, most political things. but the biggest barrier for locals — the price. a single hour of full web access costs $2, three days' salary. they don't have the time to see what's the internet, the government says expanding the internet is a priority
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and central havana is now conducting trials of in—home net access for 2,000 properties. and it boasts of a growing number of public wifi hotspots, too, around 300 in total, and growing. still, not exactly blanket coverage for a country 700 miles wide. cuba blames its ageing communications network on the six—decade—old trade embargo with the us. critics say that's a convenient excuse for a communist state that fears losing control over information. relations with america are now at best uncertain in the post—obama era. in the aftermath of the president's historic visit here two years ago, prospects for american companies doing digital business on the island have improved. amongst them, google. company boss eric schmidt inking a deal in december that gives cubans fast access to content from services like youtube and gmail. the thing is, when you're running an internet—based business, the last thing you want to do is traipse across town to find a connection.
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so some cubans who are fed up with the government strategy on access have come up with their own rather inventive solutions. the results are found on rooftops in towns and cities across the nation in the form of pole—mounted antennaes which are pointed towards the local communications centre, giving them internet access and even wifi. the practice isn't exactly legal but as i discovered that minor detail doesn't deter cubans from getting their information fix. this is the paquete semanal, literally the weekly packet. it refers to a highly organised service in back streets and front rooms across the country, giving locals content downloaded often only hours earlier via satellite. there's pirated movies, news shows, documentaries, dramas, magazines and mobile apps. it's hugely popular with customers who can fill their usb drives with an entire terabyte, hundreds of hours, for the price of a single hour online. and the rise of the paquete is the price the cuban regime itself is paying, a reaction to the state dogma of keeping
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its people restricted. cuban authorities should be less afraid of the free flow of information because the need for information functions as a hunger. people need information and people will get information, no matter if you are going to provide it or not. there's a political need to understand differently what internet means. progress is undoubtedly too slow for many cubans. but recent overtures do at least give some people here cause for hope. ever wondered what cats get up to when no one's there? meet roxy and zara, who seemed agreeable to taking part in some gadget testing. if you've ever wanted to watch,
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talk to or even play with your cats when you're not with them, then this could help. once the device is connected to your home wifi, you can login anywhere you can get your phone online. there's a laser game to play, snacks at the tap of an icon, and a function to proudly make and share videos and cat snaps. this smart collar has been around a little while now and is available for cats and dogs. it allows owners to keep an eye on temperature, pulse, breathing rate, heart rate variability and even the positions a pet is in, so could be particularly beneficial if there are health concerns or an injury to keep an eye on. don't worry, it's ok. meanwhile, there seems to be a game
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of cat and mouse going on here, the latter played by a remote control rodent. although it actually consists of the mouse chasing the cat, which probably says it all about my day's filming. that was lara, and this is maria, the first blockbuster robot from the ground—breaking 1927 film metropolis. the visual effects in that movie were absolutely stunning, given that it is actually 90 years old. next, we're going to continue our look at some of the visual effects behind the latest blockbuster movies. we have adam valdes, bafta and oscar nominee, to tell us more about the visual effects he used to bring back to life thejungle book. every time you see the world injungle book, someone has fabricated plants, trees, the dead twigs and dead leaves
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on the floor, all of it. and it's only really when the surround around mowgli makes him feel present within it that the magic trick comes off, that you believe that this is just a photograph, that we went somewhere and shot it. so we take a shot like mowgli saying goodbye to his mother and we say, john really wants some sort of physical contact. it needs to be an intimate moment, their eyes need to be locked onto each other. we can't have a feeling that he's acting to a tennis ball, a stick or some marker. we really need to feel the scene emotionally. we can locate the positions of his hands, the puppet for the mother wolf. and we can track it really carefully in three dimensions with our computer software. that way we make sure the contact is correct, and then we simulate the fur on the mother's neck. and we actually replace the better part of his hand with the digital double of his hand, so that the cg
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hand and the cg fur of the mother wolf are actually in the computer together, and when we put our lighting on that and create the final images, they really look connected. the magic trick is blending the hand into his arm. the render power required to generate a movie like this, i think it was 240 million renderer hours, or something like that. which means if it was one computer it would have taken 3000 years, some number like that. these individual frames that you see can be 40, 50, 60 hours on a computerjust rendering one frame. i think we'll see more and more imagery where we really start to not be able to tell the difference between something that's computer—generated and real. that was adam valdes on the magic behind the jungle book.
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that's it for the shortcut of click at robots at the london science museum. i'll put a load of photos up on twitter for you to browse through @bbcclick. thanks for watching and, yeah... we'll be back. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the latest weapon in the war against hackers, the government funds lessons in cyber security for teenagers. it's hoped they'll become the experts of the future and protect britain from online attacks. good morning, it's saturday, 11th february.
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