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tv   BBC News  BBC News  December 20, 2016 2:00pm-2:31pm GMT

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an act of terrorism, treating it as an act of terrorism, but there hasn't been any claim of responsibility so far although they do have a man in custody. they are not sure whether that is the man who was responsible. he has denied that he was involved. we gather this was a pakistani man who was arrested and has been detained. but the authorities are saying they are not certain that he is the man they are looking for. so potentially, that attacker could still be on the loose. germany's security officials we re loose. germany's security officials were saying after the attack that the suspect arrested came from pakistan and had previously applied for asylum. the interior minister, mr macro, told reporters that the suspect had entered germany —— thomas de maiziere said suspect entered germany about a year ago and arrived in berlin in february. so
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far, the authorities have no knowledge of any claim of responsibility from so—called islamic state. but they are also saying at the same time that they have no doubt that the fatal ramming of that christmas market in berlin was an intentional terrorist attack. 12 dead and among the dead, a polish citizen found on the passenger seat of the truck with a gunshot wound. they believe the lorry had been hijacked. we canjust we can just see that federal government delegation, including the chancellor, angela merkel, during the scene that devastating and horrific attack. —— touring. just before christmas in berlin at that christmas market. and plenty of
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questions being asked now of the german authorities and being asked of angela merkel about whether security could be improved or increased, and indeed whether there might be more attacks that the authorities need to think about, whether they could increase security, as the prosecutor was saying, potentially an unlimited number of soft targets. that is the scene in germany. there are implications for security in other european cities, including britain, in fact. certainly, there will be a review of security in cities like london. in fact, the prime minister, theresa may, is talking this
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afternoon, as she is appearing in front of senior mps to answer questions on government policies including a brexit strategy at the liaison committee at westminster. there she is, waiting to answer questions. many mps have called for more information about her brexit strategy and her plans for leaving the european union is that is likely to be centre stage, but there may also be questions about security in the wake of that berlin attack we have been talking about. what she has already done, of course, on europe is to insist she will push ha rd europe is to insist she will push hard foran europe is to insist she will push hard for an early deal on the status of eu nationals in britain and of uk citizens abroad. she has also talked about waiting for the judgment of the supreme court, but insisting her timetable for brexit will continue. let us listen in. i am very
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grateful. i think parliament is also very grateful that you are agreeing to do these sessions. can ijust have confirmation that you will continue the practice of your predecessor? yes. bearing in mind there are big event likely to happen at the end of march, it might be useful to push scrutiny of the triggering of article 50 and any accompanying government documents after the spring recess, then we will have two meetings, one at the beginning and one towards the end of the summer session. that may well be sensible. i suggest that perhaps the clock in my office will be able to talk about possible dates and obviously the committee will have a few... it will be quite busy in the end of march. —— have a view.|j
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few... it will be quite busy in the end of march. -- have a view. i do not think will be realistic sol think that would be a more sensible arrangement. you indicated beforehand arrangement. you indicated before hand that you arrangement. you indicated beforehand that you have one or two remarks you wanted to make. thank you very much. i wanted to make a few remarks that i hope will be helpful to the committee. before i do that, i would like to take a moment to reflect on the appalling news that came in from berlin and ankara yesterday, and we have seen vivid images in our newspapers and television, and i think they have shocked us all. ijust wanted to express our condolences and i'm sure the condolences of all of us for all those who have been affected and we hold them in our thoughts today. i thought it would be helpful to set out a little of what we have been doing in the months since the referendum, preparing for negotiations on brexit, which is pestival putting the machinery of government in place, one of my first a cts government in place, one of my first acts was to establish two new
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departments, this is putting in place the mechanisms necessary to marshal the important work that needs to be done to make sure our departure is a smooth and orderly as possible. we are taking a whole of government approach and our experts working on policies that will be affected by our withdrawal. i would like to thank everyone involved for stepping up so quickly once the result was announced. we have also been engaged with other interested parties, including business and representatives from the devolved administrations. ministers have met with more than 130 companies from the british economy, they have hosted round tables with representatives from different sectors, met all the major business organisations from all parts of the uk to hear about particular concerns. i have also met a range of business leaders from a broad range of sectors. as we approach the negotiations, we want to have a
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trulyjoined up negotiations, we want to have a truly joined up approach. negotiations, we want to have a trulyjoined up approach. i have been able to meet or speak to the vast majority of european leaders on a bilateral basis and those discussions have been positive and constructive. throughout this process i have been clear that i will not give a running commentary on our approach to negotiations because it is not the way to get the right deal. except perhaps before the liaison committee. no, i think negotiations are negotiations and if one wants to get the right deal, one cannot give a running commentary. but i do expect some searching questions from the committee. seriously, the negotiations will be challenging, they will require some give and take. but where possible, i have sought to give reassurance to those with legitimate concerns about the process ahead. so we will get the process ahead. so we will get the best deal for those who want to trade with the european single market fast guaranteeing we make our
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own decisions over how we control immigration, our laws, and overthe way we spend the money of taxpayers. although we are leaving the eu we are not leaving europe and i want us to have the mature, cooperative relationship that close friends and allies enjoyed and i expect us to continue to work alongside each other on issues such as crime and security. as you know and as you have alluded to, the government will trigger article 50 before the end of march next year. we will meet that timetable and do not intend to extend the process. we will publish more information about our approach before article 50 is triggered. i will make a speech early in the new year setting out more about our approach and about the opportunity i think we have as a country to use this process to forge a truly global britain that embraces and trades with countries across the world. one last word, it is important that we understand the wider meaning of the referendum result and respond
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accordingly. it was notjust a vote to leave the eu but to change the way the country works and the people for whom it works, for ever. that is why my government has also embarked ona why my government has also embarked on a programme of economic and social reform to ensure the opportunities are spread across the country and that everyone can share in the success we make on leaving the eu. i think these reforms are an essential part of our plans proposed brexit britain and i look forward to going into more detail about these early in the new year. we will begin perhapsjust on early in the new year. we will begin perhaps just on one early in the new year. we will begin perhapsjust on one point early in the new year. we will begin perhaps just on one point you early in the new year. we will begin perhapsjust on one point you made, you said you do not intend to extend the article 50 process. do i take it from that that it is the intention of the government to have left the eu by april of 2019, and by that, we should take that to mean that the great repeal bill will have therefore come into effect and that by 2019 in april, the director of
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the ability of law and ecj rulings will no longer pertain in uk courts? obviously, the timetable had set out is that we will trigger article 50 by the end of march next year. the treaty gives under article 50 82—year process for that discussion. —— a two—year process. that will ta ke —— a two—year process. that will take us through, as you have indicated, to march of 2019. ifully expect us to be able to operate on the timetable that has been set out in the treaty. as we go into negotiation, that is a matter for the negotiations, but i expect us to be able to operate... i heard it may
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be able to operate... i heard it may be the case that eu law continues to apply in the uk. what have i misunderstood? if i may answer that specific point. the intention is to introduce the great repeal bill to parliament next year, next session. so it will be in place at the point at which we leave the eu. it will come into operation at the point at which we leave the eu. it will definitely do so? that is the nature of it, it is a matter for parliamentary bait. —— debate. the bill will come into effect at the point at which we leave the eu full. but at that point, eu law will be brought into domestic law in the uk. i think that is imported, because it gives people a certainty at that point at which we leave the eu, as to how eu law is operating, so the rights of workers remain protected. lam rights of workers remain protected. iamjust rights of workers remain protected. i am just trying to clarify one
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straightforward point. by leaving, do you mean what is commonly understood to be leaving, that is, that eu law will no longer apply directly in uk courts? when we are outside the european union, we will be determining our laws and it will be determining our laws and it will be british courts... and that will be british courts... and that will be completed by 2019? in april 2019? i fully expect to be able to meet the timetable that has been set out in terms of determination will stop one further point of clarification. article 50 provides for a country to leave more than two years after it is triggered as part of the withdrawal agreement. do i take it from the answers i have had that you are not seeking a withdrawal
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agreement that will lead you beyond the two—year period? agreement that will lead you beyond the two-year period? we are not seeking to extend the article 50 period beyond the two years. the european commission have indicated they consider that it may be that than the negotiations will be completed before two years. but we are not seeking to say, we want this to be extended, the negotiation process to be extended beyond two yea rs. process to be extended beyond two years. i expect to be able to undertake a deal within that time. but that deal will not contain anything that could leave eu law directly applicable in the uk? the intention is that when people voted they wanted us to be able to take control of our laws. when we are no longer a member of the eu, laws will be determined here in the uk and will be subject to british courts. be determined here in the uk and will be subject to british courtslj am trying to get clarity, that the
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pa rt of am trying to get clarity, that the part of article 50 that provides the scope for negotiation, flexibility on the operative part of leaving, is not going to be exercised, it is not the intention of the government to try and make use of that flexibility. what the article 50 allows for is, if there is an agreement that the period for negotiation of the withdrawal in relationship is extended, an agreement among the 27, but agreed with the member state concerned, in this case the uk, then the treaty allows for that period to be extended. we are not setting out to extended. we are not setting out to extend that period, we are setting out to negotiate this within the two—year time frame. out to negotiate this within the two-year time frame. hillary benn. good afternoon. this marks six
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months since the referendum. can you tell us when the government's plan is going to be published? you referred to your speech. but the public involvement of the plan, when will we see that? villa i will make a speech early in the new year which will set out more about our approach. we will, before we trigger article 50, besetting edge more details. —— be setting out more details. —— be setting out more details. i have not set a date for when the plan is good to be published. but you will hear more about our approach when i speak in the new year. can you give us assurance that the plan will be published in time for parliament to scrutinise it before article 50 is triggered and that there will be sufficient time for us to do ourjob looking at it? i have said, as i have on many occasions, parliament need have no concerns about its ability to have an opportunity to
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comment on all of these matters. i fully expect that parliament will have the proper opportunity to be able to look at these matters before we trigger article 50. what would be your view of a reasonable period of time for parliament to see that plan in advance of triggering article 50? ido in advance of triggering article 50? i do not have a date for when i am going to publish the plan and i think it is not for me to set out a period of time, we will ensure that parliament has an opportunity to look at these issues. we have, of course, to factor into this timetable the question of the supreme court judgment, we timetable the question of the supreme courtjudgment, we do not yet know what that will be. if they find in favour of the government, that leads us to one course of action, if they find against the government, there will be a need to respond to thatjudgment. is if your intention to ensure that parliament has a vote on the final deal when it is being negotiated? parliament will
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have every opportunity to vote through the repeal bill on the various aspects of the relationship that they will be having with the european union. that was not quite the question. when the final deal is negotiated, is it your intention to ensure parliament has a chance to vote on that deal, yes or no? villa it is my intention to make sure parliament has ample opportunity to comment on and discuss the aspects of the arrangements were putting in place. it is not clear at this point in time what... i have indicated what might expect it should the timetable is, it is not clear, obviously. it will take two parties, the eu and the uk, to go through that process negotiation. so, we will be ensuring that as we go through that, we are able to give clarity, and we will do so. through that, we are able to give clarity, and we will do solj through that, we are able to give clarity, and we will do so. i am not sure i understand why it is so
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difficult to answer questions whether parliament will have a vote or not given that we know the european parliament will have a vote on the deal. why can you not see the british parliament will also have a vote? there will be an opportunity for parliament to consider when more details become available how this is going to operate. there is a question about the timetable in relation to the agreement of the deal and the necessity, how the timetable will operate in relation to the european parliament as well. what i am also clear about is ensuring that when we come to the point were actually delivering on the vote of the british people, which is that we will leave the eu. talking about the timetable. the negotiations are expected to be completed by october 2018, indeed to provide scrutiny of what has been agreed. do you expect these
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negotiations to be done sequentially, or in parallel?” negotiations to be done sequentially, or in parallel? i am working on the basis that we've will look to negotiate those in parallel. i think that is what makes sense. it is also what is implied by article 50 in the treaty itself, which makes clear you have to know what the frame of the future relationship is before you can finalise the deal for withdrawal. at the point at which we exit the eu we will meet to know what our new relationship with the eu is. do i take it that you are wholly confident it will possible to negotiate both parts within the time thatis negotiate both parts within the time that is available, that could be as little as 18 months? it could be. you referred to it as being in relation to the need for the european parliament to have a process of ratification. the results
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ofa process of ratification. the results of a concern that european leaders have in relation to the european parliamentary elections which are taking place in 2019, and the concerned to ensure the arrangements about the uk's relationship are clear. are you confident that the 27 member states think it is possible to negotiate a new trade and access deal in 18 months, given simon rogers is reported to have advised ministers, not his view, that it could take up to ten years to agree a new trade deal? i have noted, when i have been talking to individual leaders, the willingness from everybody to ensure that we can undertake this as smoothly and as orderly as possible, and a recognition from everybody that we do want to make this arrangement, get it in place, so that people can move on, move on to the new relationship they will have with the
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united kingdom, and i think there is a willingness to undertake this on that basis. can you confirm that it is the intention of the government to seek transitional arrangements of some sort to cover the period from the negotiation of the final deal to its full implementation in order to give certainty to business and to avoid the cliff edge that you were asked about at the cbi?” avoid the cliff edge that you were asked about at the cbi? i think when people talk about transition, often different people mean different things. some people will talk about transition as a deliberate way of putting off leaving the eu. for others, transition is an expectation that you cannot get the deal in two yea rs, that you cannot get the deal in two years, therefore you have to have a further period. but if you think about what the process we are going to go through is, once we have got the new arrangements, there will be a necessity for an judge —— adjustment, for implementation of some practical changes that may need
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to ta ke some practical changes that may need to take place in relation to that. that is what business have been commenting on and arguing that when arguing for. they used the phrase about not having a cliff edge. they do not want to wake up one morning having a deal agreed the night for and discover we have to do everything in a different way. so there is a practical aspect of how you ensure people are able to adjust to the new relationship, which is not about trying to delay the point at which we leave and not about trying to extend the period of negotiation. can you confirm that a decision has not yet been taken by the government on whether we will remain in or leave the customs union, and if that is the case, do we not have to stay in a customs union in order to honour the commitments that were given to nissan about seeking a situation which they can continue to trade without tariffs and bureaucratic impediments? on the customs union, asi impediments? on the customs union, as i have said, this is not a binary
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decision. there are a number of disparate —— different aspects to the customs union, a number of different relationships that already has the word exist. it is more complex than silly saying, are you in orare you complex than silly saying, are you in or are you out. the way i approach this and the way the government had been approaching this and other issues is to say, what are the outcomes we want to achieve, and therefore how do you reach those outcomes? rather than assuming only one means to an end or only one process to an end. as regards the issue of the investment, the very welcome investment in sunderland, that was made by nissan, we have been clear we want to get the best possible dealfor been clear we want to get the best possible deal for trading with and operating within the single european market. that is what i have been saying publicly, it is what we have been sent to companies, and also that we want to ensure the competitiveness of the british economy. i think nissan's decision to invest and bring the new models
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to invest and bring the new models to be manufactured in sunderland is a huge vote of confidence in the sunderland workforce. this is the most productive car plant in europe. cani most productive car plant in europe. can ijust most productive car plant in europe. can i just take most productive car plant in europe. can ijust take you back to one answer you gave , can ijust take you back to one answer you gave, which sounded quite favourable to me, the proposals being put forward by the business and financial community for some kind of standstill? on the grounds that they do not want to be faced, as you put it yourself, with a cliff edge. do i take it that the government is going to try and negotiate a standstill or transitional arrangement of that time, to give time for business and the financial community to adjust?” would not use the word standstill. that is the word that many of them used. at the point at which we leave
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the european union, the point at which the relationship that is going to exist is clear, there may well be practical issues that have to be addressed. liver—mac i am asking you something slightly different. are you going to try and negotiate it?” was about to come onto that. if you just allow me to explain. ito make sure there is a full understanding of what i was saying in terms of the practicalities of this issue, that people who may need to adjust it systems and other simple, practical matters like that. of course, that will not just be matters like that. of course, that will notjust be for us here in the uk, it will also be for businesses and others operating within the european union. so as part of the negotiations that we will be entering, i think we will need to be have a discussion about how this practicalities can be dealt with. have a discussion about how this practicalities can be dealt withm that a priority for your negotiation, to try and seek an
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adjustment period after the date of application of brexit?” adjustment period after the date of application of brexit? i think it is application of brexit? i think it is a matter of practicality that we need to discuss with the european union. is it a priority for you? i have set at one priority area that we should be making early decisions on the negotiations, that is in relation to eu citizens living here and uk citizens living abroad. we will have to address this question of the practicalities of adjustment to the new relationship, once that new relationship has been agreed. when that takes place, of course, will depend on how the deal is agreed. that is where you can say immediately now... bigger—mac yes to priority, or no to priority? you have to sit down and start negotiating. when we start
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negotiating, we will consider what theissues negotiating, we will consider what the issues are, as the negotiations will be taking place. this will be one of the issues that will be on the table. i am well aware, chairman, of the views and concerns that business have make sure they have that ability to have a period of practical adjustment. you referred to a joined up approach. siradam sir adam rogers made some remarks the other day, but confirmatory to these activities across the board dost—mac there is also this question that the coordination with the cabinet office, which also has to do with my committee as well, do you
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have at numberten with my committee as well, do you have at number ten a specialised unit with specialists dealing equally with the negotiating instruments regarding political as well as economic and trade policies? do they meet with you personally in numberten, and do do they meet with you personally in number ten, and do they do sue on a regular footing? and if they do not, do you think that it ought to happen? i have set up a unit in number ten of people with expertise in european matters, who are both working with other departments on issues both related to brexit, but also issues, as we have to look at particular decisions of a member of the eu, they do see me, i work with them regularly. and what assessment have you made with regard to the trade—off between your red lines, no
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eu law primacy, no ecj adjudication, and those aspects of our relationship with the european union that you want to maintain? well, i don't look at these things in terms of trade—offs in the way that it in terms of trade—offs in the way thatitis in terms of trade—offs in the way that it is sometimes portrayed. i think what's important is that whether we look at this negotiation, we ta ke whether we look at this negotiation, we take the view not that we're currently members of the eu, we're going to leave, but how can we keep bits of membership. actually what we need to say is, we are currently members of the eu, we are going to leave the european union and we need to negotiate a new relationship with the european union. the question is, what do we wish that relationship with the eu to be? this is very important in terms of how we approach this. it isn't, as i say,
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about trying to replicate bits of membership. it's about saying, what is our new relationship? and i'm ambitious for what that new relationship can be. and during entirely satisfied —— and you are entirely satisfied —— and you are entirely satisfied —— and you are entirely satisfied that when we repeal this legislation, in addition to nap so much that, it will be clear that all legislation will be within the jurisdiction of westminster and not the eu? we will have appealed the european communities act, that is part of what the great repeal bill will be about. from the point at which we have left the european union, it will be the british parliament that decides and british courts that decides and british courts that decide our legislation. finally, as you will appreciate, the many people who want us move quickly in relation to all of these matters. i appreciate there is a timing issue.

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