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tv   BBC World News  BBC America  March 18, 2015 10:00am-11:01am EDT

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♪ hello. i'm with bbc world news. our top stories -- benjamin netanyahu is heading for a fourth term as israeli prime minister as his likud party wins a resounding election victory. police in frank further clash with anti-capitalist protesters trying to disrupt the opening of the european central bank's new headquarters. police in serbia arrest seven people suspected of direct involvement in the massacre of bosnian muslims in srebrenica. 20 years ago. the highly addictive drug devastating the lives of young
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people in south african township. hello and welcome to the program. israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu's right wing likud party has won a surprise victory in the country's elections. with almost all of the votes counted, results give likud a clear lead over its rival the center left zionist union. whose leader yitzhak herzog has conceded victory. mr. netanyahu now has to build a coalition government. while there are 120 seats in parliament which is known as the knesset, the majority of 61 is needed to form a government. the center left zionist union which initially appeared to be a strong contender gained only 24 seats. and while prime minister
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netanyahu's lickkud party won 30 seats. the alliance of israeli arab dominated parties came third with 14 seats. let's cross over to jerusalem, the bbc's mark lowen has been following the election and mark he's denied not only the opinion polls but also the exit polls. . >> reporter: yes against all the odds there. remarkable victory for benjamin netanyahu. the opinion polls suggest he was trailing his opposition in the exit polls late last night showed it was a neck and necktie, and israel awoke on this beautifully sunny day to find they would have a fourth term of benjamin netanyahu as prime minister. what won it for him at the end? possibly because he taxed quite hard to the right towards the end to steal some of the votes from the other right wing party to take them from them and to persuade undecided voters to back him on the palestinian
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issues. no independent palestine under his watch and vowed to continue building settlements in east jerusalem which play very much to his right wing support. perhaps there was a level of complacency in the center left because they were ahead so many weeks. not so motivated to come out and vote. either way benjamin netanyahu says he will be able to form a right wing nationalist coalition government within the next two to three weeks and he has already begun that process reaching out it to the other parties that will form part of that coalition. let's get all the latest now from the events and this morning's coalition building with our correspondent johnny diamond. >> reporter: does this look like a loser? just a day ago, the election was saiden to slipping through his fingers. as his supporters chanted his nickname, bibi benjamin netanyahu saviored victory. >> translator: against all odds
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we have achieved victory for the likud party. >> reporter: it didn't look quite so clearcut. early on tuesday night, exit polls showed netanyahu's likud party in a dead heat with the left wing opposition, but the polls were wrong. likud has 30 seats in the knesset, a strong foundation for a right wing coalition. at the opposition zionist union, the night was long and low key. they thought they might topple netanyahu, they were wrong. >> translator: on the morning their leader yitzhak herzog conceded defeat. i would like to make it clear, said herzog, to the israeli people, the challenges are the same challenges, the problems are the same problems, nothing has changed. as the results came out, mixed reaction but one early morning stroller summed up the defiance of benjamin netanyahu and his supporters.
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>> the world was against him and the country was against him, much of the country, but he did it and i think that it -- i think it's great. >> reporter: in the course of the campaign, netanyahu tore up his own policy on the right of palestinians to a state of their own. he has won yet another victory, but today, israel looks as isolated as ever. johnny diamond, bbc news. >> let's pick up on what johnny was talking about. the two-state solution. benjamin netanyahu going back on that, what happens next for the peace process, where does it go from here? >> well bear in mind the peace process has been since last april when the two sides stopped talking. there were hopes from the left wing certainly and probably from the white house as well that
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had the center left coalition managed to unseat benjamin netanyahu, yitzhak herzog become prime minister the peace process could have been reignited. there are big issues that stand in the way the status of jerusalem, borders of israel the settlements, for example, but there were hopes that with the herzog victory could have come some progress in the peace process. with netanyahu's re-election, very little optimism is going to move forward. one of the parties he will bring into coalition probably the jewish home party, the far right party, says there will never be a palestinian state while in power here. very little optimism at all. reaction from the plo senior official theres saying israel chose the path of racism occupation and settlement building and did not choose the path of negotiation and partnership between us. potentially mr. netanyahu could have his rhetoric temperred slightly by centrist party part of the coalition, potentially he
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will begin to stop and go into his fourth term. but very unlikely going to be real movement on the palestinian issue any time soon. >> okay. yes, reaction no doubt coming in. for the time being, mark low en thank you very much. mark lowen in jerusalem there for us. like i said we will monitor reaction that is coming in but let's move to europe because in germany, violent clashes have broken out in the city of frankfurt from anti-capitalist protesters from across europe have converged ahead of the inauguration of the headquarters of the european central bank. police cars have been burned and firefighters attacked. 80 officers said to have been injured and demonstrations have in part descended into rioting. police have used water cannons to disperse crowds and arrested more than 300 protesters. let's cross over live now to our correspondent in berlin jenny hill she's monitoring
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events and jenny, just remind us because, of course the ecb this new headquarters was a long time in the planning, many years before the actual troubled financial situation for much of europe? >> yes, of course. but one can imagine what people in countries like greece make of this brand new building that's cost a reportedly something like 1.3 billion euros. the protesters in the streets of frankfurt today say they're angry not so much with the building but more with the attitude of the ecb towards countries like greece. the ecb, of course is part of the so-called troika with the european commission and the imf. it sets the conditions monitors the conditions for compliance with bailout loans to countries like greece. as such these protesters say in effect, they are aif fixating countries like greece. it's an accusation which was leveled at the ecb by the greek finance minister yan nis last
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week. this has happened ahead of a planned demonstration to coincide with the official opening of the building later on today. it's organized by a left wing alliance called blockupy. they estimate something up to 10,000 people could descend on the streets of frankfurt not just from germany but other european countries too. to demonstrate against what they say is the austerity which is plunging many europeans into poverty. all this, of course, is happening at a time when relations between germany and greece are really very strained indeed. greece seeing germany as perhaps being the leading country leading attitudes towards greece and assisting greece pays its loops. a real war of words break out between the finance ministers between greece and germany. it's getting worse and everyone here is simply looking ahead to
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monday when prime minister of greece alexis sip pris will visit the chancellor of germany angela merkel in berlin. >> as always, thank you very much. our correspondent in berlin jenny hill monitoring those protests in frankfurt for us. that's something that i know business has been monitoring alice baxter here with the business news. a alex frankfurt putting that to one side but focus on what the united states is going to do because i know a lot of people are very concerned about that. >> the key question is looming, is an interest rate rise on the way over in the states? a two-day meeting of america's central bank ends today and the fed faces a tough choice. keep rates low longer but risk rising inflation or raise rates soon but risk tipping the largest economy into recession. well markets will be waiting to hear if the word patient is removed from the chair's statement. experts say that if this one word is dropped, it signals that
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the fed will raise rates in june. however, such a move isn't supported by everyone. our employment rate of 5.5% is near the fed's target level but wage growth is still feeble and inflation remains well below the fed's target. staying with the economy in the uk finance minister begins to unveil his in an hour or so 50 days before the german election. he's pledged no gimmicks but newspaper reports suggest he is considering tax cuts and could have as much as $9 billion for preelection give away. in january, uk inflation hit a record low of 0.3% helped by oil prices but low inflation means lower debt payments by the government. quick, let's see how european markets are reacting to all that's going on all that central bank activity over in the states and, of course the protests outside of the european central bank and its budget day here in the uk with the ftse in
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london fairly cautious ahead of the budget. currently up over 38 points. the dax in germany currently down over 1.5% and the cac in france down just under 1% keeping a close eye on the euro/dollar exchange rate as a key factor on the main equities and bond markets. that is the business for this hour. back to you. >> alice as always thank you very much. alice baxter for us. now let's turn to singapore because authorities there say that the condition of the country's founding father 91-year-old has deteriorated further. mr. lee has been in hospital with pneumonia since early last month and the latest health update says that he remains critically ill in intensive care. now the regular updates on the health of lee have become increasingly grave. the prime minister's office says in a statement that mr. lee remains critically ill in an icu and has deteriorated further. let's cross over to singapore,
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my colleague has been following this story. ali, bring us up to date with mr. lee's condition now. >> the very latest we have is indeed that statement that you just read out he remains critically ill and his condition has de ter rated. he entered on the 5th of february with pneumonia and regular updates since he's been on mechanical ventlation and sedated. the latest developments seen the grandson of lee yew, the son of lee kwan yew's the current prime minister now at the hospital as well. as well the current prime minister has changed his facebook photograph to one that is one more significantly more somber looking. it does seem that singapore is definitely preparing for the inevitable. lee yew is an amazing figure in singapore's history. it cannot be overstated the role he has played. he is the founding father and
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many would say the nation builder of this small island state. he took over he retired in 1990 and he had been the prime minister for 31 years. in fact, he was the longest serving prime minister around the world when he retired, but he it continues to this day to remain an influential figure and he took singapore from a third world country to a first world country. >> ali the authorities there, they very much want to keep the public aware of what is happening? >> indeed. as say there have been regular updates since he entered hospital. i should also add that there have been relatively regular health scares. he is 91. he has become increasingly frail and so people are genuinely interested in what progress he is making but as we've said the updates have become increasingly grave and it does seem that preparations are being made for the end. 91 and really significant figure in this country's history, as i
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said the significance of his place in this society cannot be overstated. >> indeed. ali moore from singapore, thank you very much. lots more still to come on bbc world news. stay with us. the question why many young people in south africa's township are getting hooked on a new cheap and very highly adibtive drug called my owepy.
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. you're watching "bbc world news." my name is casha. israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu has declared a resounding victory in the general election with his likud party winning 30 seats. opposition leader yitzhak herzog has called mr. netanyahu to congratulate him. there have been violent clashes between police and protesters in frankfurt where anti-capitalist campaigners have been trying to disrupts the
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inauguration of the european central bank's new headquarters. to serbia where prosecutors have arrested seven men they suspected of carrying out the 1995 srebrenica massacre of bosnian muslims. the worst mass murder since world war ii. the investigation by a joint team of prosecutors from the war time enemy. it is the first time that serbian prosecutors have dealt with the mass killings of civilians and prisoners of war in srebrenica. we have more on this significance of this arrest. >> reporter: the 20th anniversary of the terrible event the worst atrocity in europe since the end of the second world war and all the thousands of deaths people still looking for justice. there has been some high-level justice if you like the hague tribunal has found people guilty of genocide going back to 2001. and the radovan karadzic the two
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senior leaders of the bosnian serbs is still on trying at the hague at the moment. the people charged today are the ones that did have blood on their hands the people who were accused at any rate of directly killing some of those 8,000 people in srebrenica. >> what do we know about these seven people who have been arrested? >> officially we've only got the initials of them. unofficially, we do know that one of them is somebody who was charged with genocide in bosnia a couple years ago, nedeljko milidragovic. he was a commander of the bosnian serb police unit and he stands accused of rounding up around 1,000 boss knee yak muslim men and boys putting them into a warehouse and arranging for them to be shot. the survivors were brought out and they were murdered as well. so these are the crimes which he is suspected of and he will now face charges in serbia rather than bosnia after this
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extraordinary cooperation and between the war crimes court of bosnia and serbia. >> bringing us up to date on the seven arrests. research conducted in brazil suggests that babies who are breast-fed for longer become more intelligent, educated and successful adults. it's thought longer exposure to fatties acids in breast milk necessary for brain developments might be boosting intelligent. jane draper reports. >> reporter: breastfeeding can prove challenging. new mom sarah has needed support. breastfeeding is recommended because of health benefits in the crucial early months. this research suggests there could be a link to other advantages later in life. the study involved almost 3,500 babies in brazil. the researchers followed them up at the age of 30 and found those who were breast-fed the longest, had higher intelligence scores and were earning more. >> it's pretty clear, the number
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one advantage is the more you breastfeed your baby, the baby it is for that baby. we now know that it will make that child better in educational assessment and more likely to do well in life because of that in the long term. >> reporter: some experts fear the messages from these studies put extra pressure on women after birth. >> what i hear when they do their prenatal classes the vast majority of the class, at least 90%, is spent telling them why they should breastfeed and the benefits of breastfeeding and the evils of formula and hardly any is explaining how to do it. >> reporter: official guidelines recommend babies are given breast milk for the first six months of life but the nhs also recognizes that not all women choose to breastfeed or are able to. jane draper, bbc news. in south africa the government says it is concerned about the popularity of a drug nope as nyaope which is ravaging
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the country's impoverished townships. reports fears more and more young people are getting hooked. >> reporter: on street corners, youth smoke a drug in full view of their community and police. the drug is called nyaope. a crude concoction of heroin cannabis and anything from rat poison anti-viral medication to chlorine and vinegar. it's cheap, highly addictive and ravaging impoverished townships pushing up crime and destroying falies. >> causes and take the men and come here and smoke that. >> the thing is coming to my mind is to think because i don't. >> reporter: the consequences of long-term use can be
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devastating. many are desperate to quit. >> we are begging, please this is not like we enjoy. yes, we are here just like here but then i can do something with my life. i've been smoking this for ten years. >> reporter: patrick's family watched helplessly as his body gave in to nyaope. >> translator: my son died in my arms. there was nothing more i could do to help him. i held him as he took his last breath. i told him i loved him. i begged him to go to rehab. but he just didn't listen to me. >> reporter: communities are taking the problem into their own hands. licensed rehabilitation centers are becoming inns creasingly popular. despite all the disillusionment in the township one man decided that there actually is hope for all the young people after
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having seen his own son waste his life away. >> i moved them away from the township where it's happening and take them about 27 kilometers away from the township and take them here. >> reporter: nyaope uses farmers and group therapies for those desperate for his help. it's a new beginning but what is ultimately needed in south africa is tee sissive action to tackle dangerous social problem. bbc news. >> lots more on our website from the report there. but now, the northern lights or the aurora bore ral his have been creating a fabulous show across large parts of the northern hemisphere. a strong geomagnetic storm has hit the earth's atmosphere
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lighting up the sky much further from the poles than usual. have a look at this. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ serenitity of the northern
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"bbc world news." our top stories -- >> benjamin netanyahu is heading for a fourth term as israeli prime minister as his likud party wins a resounding election victory. police in frank if further clash with anti-capitalist protesters trying to disrupt the opening of the european central bank's new headquarters. police in serbia arrest seven suspected in direct involvement of massacre of muslims in srebrenica. we ask how russians are coping with the impact of the
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economic sanctions imposed on them by the eu and the u.s. . hello and welcome. israel's prime minister benjamin netanyahu right wing likud party has won a surprise victory in the country's election with almost all the votes counted now results give likud a clear lead over the zionist union. his leader yitzhak herzog has conceded victory. mr. netanyahu has to build a coalition government. while there are 120 seats in parliament, known as the knesset a majority of 61 is needed to form a government. the left zionist union which had appeared to be a strong contender gained only 24 seats while prime minister netanyahu's
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likud party won 30 seats the largest number and significantly the joint arab list and allowance of israeli arab dominated parties came third with 14 seats while the bbc's johnny diamond has this report. does this look like a loser? just a day ago, the election was said to be slipping through his fingers. as his supporters chanted his nickname bibi benjamin netanyahu saviored victory. >> translator: against all odds we have achieved victory for the likud party. >> reporter: it didn't look quite so clearcut. early on tuesday night, exit polls showed netanyahu's likud party in a dead heat with the left wing opposition, but the polls were wrong. likud has 30 seats in the knesset, a strong foundation for a right wing coalition. at the opposition zionist union, the night was long and low key.
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they thought they might topple netanyahu, they were wrong. >> translator: on the morning their leader yitzhak herzog conceded defeat. i would like to make it clear, said herzog, to the israeli people, the challenges are the same challenges, the problems are the same problems, nothing has changed. as the results came out, mixed reaction but one early morning stroller summed up the defiance of benjamin netanyahu and his supporters. >> the world was against him and the country was against him, much of the country, but he did it and i think that it -- i think it's great. >> reporter: in the course of the campaign, netanyahu tore up his own policy on the right of palestinians to a state of their own. he has won yet another victory, but today, israel looks as isolated as ever.
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johnny diamond, bbc news. let's discuss the result further joined by daniel levy director of the middle east and north africa program at the think tank on foreign relations. thank you for coming in. he's done it again, defied the opinion and exit polls and gone back to the very hawkish nature his core roots. >> he's being called the magician and comeback kid again in israel this morning. prime minister netanyahu made a gamble in the closing days of this election. the gamble was that he would go after the votes of his natural right wing ally. he basically cannibalized his own camp. you saw the other right wing parties drop and he got the votes. the risk is that he has unmasked himself. they used to say that arafat was unmasked in the peace talks as a peace rejectionist. netanyahu has unmasked himself.
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the retorlcle embrace of two states never followed up in practice allowed the world to have make believe peace process has been abandoned which leaves one wondering how will that relationship with the palestinians and the international community where in the consensus is for two states how will that be managed in his new government. >> what must washington be thinking right now then in that case? how do -- how does he take israel forward? how does he rekindle the relationship with the united states? >> i think the question is it's one thing being the election candidate who is standing up to the american president and having this ongoing fisticuffs, another thing from the prime minister's office doing that. so far netanyahu has not done the latter. there have been disagreements but he's tried to triangulate on that relationship. i imagine he'll try to return to
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that. what you have is an israeli prime minister in defiance of his allies and world opinion on both the iran nuclear talks and on the palestinian issue. if he doubles down on both of those, these will be tough times for israel. >> and what does this show that the israeli people are thinking about? initially we have the center leftist talking about the price of food, economics of the country, whereas here we have voters really saying that they care about the bigger geopolitical picture, the security of the country, feeling very much isolated then? >> well let me put it like this. i would be careful in saying israeli voters. netanyahu has clearly not won the majority of voters. he's got a quarter of the seats in the knesset. this is coalition politics. he will be able to put together a coalition. what you see is two things. first of all the opposition tried to say it's the economy stupid and in israel it is not. you have to have a national
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security alternative. you can't just try to pivot away it from that question. they tried, they failed. the other question israel doesn't feel the isolation. actually, israel's economy, they may be growing in inequality and working poor but israel is not feeling the pressure. israel doesn't have consequences for its policies. if that changes the israeli public may ultimately change. >> daniel absolute pleasure to speak to you as always. i love that phrase the magician. fantastic stuff. from the european council on foreign relations thank you very much. lots more on our website as to the nature and what happens next for israel given that election result. but now let's turn to europe because in germany there have been violent clashes in the city of frank furpts where anti-capitalist protesters have converged ahead of the inauguration of the headquarters of the european central bank. police cars have been burnt and police and firefighters have been attacked.
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80 officers are said to have been injured. authorities said the demonstrations have descended into rioting. the inauguration ceremony did take place with the ecb president mario draghi thanking guests for coming in spite of the difficult situation outside. he said the new headquarters is a symbol of what europe can achieve together. so serbia where prosecutors have arrested seven men suspected of carrying out the 1995 srebrenica massacre of bosnian muslims. it was europe's worst civilian mass murder since world war ii. the arrests follow investigations by a joint team of prosecutors from the war time enemy serbia and bosnia. it is the first time that serbian prosecutors have dealt with the mass killings of civilians and prisoners of war in srebrenica. its air defenses have
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brought down an american drone over the western profb vis. state television showed what was said to be the debris from the aircraft. this update from our correspondent who's in erbil. >> reporter: the official media are reporting that the drone was shot down north of latkia up on the northwest coast of syria yesterday evening, that's tuesday. the americans are being coy about it admitting they have a drone down. this is an unmanned aircraft, of course, but it's a predator so it is armed and can strike. admitted they lost one, but they're not confirming that it was shot down. now this comes at an interesting moment, of course, because the american secretary of state john kerry is saying pretty much explicit president bashar al assad must be engaged in a physical protest which negotiating for a settlement and so has the special international envoy for syria.
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so for the time when it comes at a time when the syrian government was looking forward or at least hopeful of being rehabilitated and the whole configuration militarily with the americans hitting if at odds with the syrian regime puts them on the same side. it's a slightly bizarre moment for the syrians to be shooting down american drones. why they would do it you may ask at this particular it time. this is over a government held area may be a simple signal saying keep out of our air space, go and hit the rebels. >> jim muir on those claims reporting from erbil for us. some of the other news. the u.s. secret service it is conducting further tests on an envelope which was posted to the white house which may contain cyanide. preliminary tests at a mail screening facility suggest it did contain the poison. the secret service responsible for president obama's security said an investigation was under
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way and would make no further comments. a lawyer who had acted for the pakistani doctor who helped the cry track down osama bin laden has been shot dead in pakistan. unidentified government in person warr wilds samiullah afridi as he was driving home. in abbottbad four years ago. the giant ikea banned people from playing hide and seek in its massive show rooms. ikea sent out a message on social media after 60,000 people signed up to play the children's gym in three shops in the netherlands. ikea said it would be impossible to ensure safety. people should go and play somewhere else. in france an internet dating site for married people is being taken to court accused of promoting adultery.
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the website began in france five years ago and now has branches around the world. conservative groups are arguing its business model of specifically targeting married women is a breach of french civil law. >> reporter: margo, in her 40s married, and wants to stay married. but margo also wants something else in her life why she chose the dating agency gloweden. >> i chose because it it's for married people. the other person understands my private life and i understand his. we're at a similar place in our lives and both have too much to lose by making things complicated. mutual respect. >> reporter: but gloweden has angered a lot of people in france because of the way it deliberately targets people who are married. it's provocative advertising, urges married couples to be unfaithful, so say conservatives and church groups who want the ads stopped. >> translator: what gleeden is doing is dangerous because it
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undermines an institution that the french public and the french parliament have chosen to uphold, which is the idea of marriage based on fidelity. >> reporter: french catholics don't like gleeden promoting adultery. no surprise there. what if they want to bring gleeden to the court what's their point in law. it's this, the french civil code. the foundation of french civil law and states explicitly article 212 husband and wife owe each other a duty of respect and fidelity. in other words, say the catholics, promoting infidelity they are if in breach of french civil law. to which gleeden retorts it's a question of basic free speech let people make up their own minds. >> people can think by themselves. they are very intelligent and they can know what they want. it's not encouraging infidelity. >> reporter: the french are said
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to be open minded about matters of love but are there limits to the permissive society. can you sell adultery. that's what this case is about. bbc news paris. >> stay with us on bbc world news. lots more still to come including the question why did the uk ban turnup trousers during the second world war. all the goodness of milk all the deliciousness of hershey's syrup.
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the european central bank's new headquarters. two children have been reunited with their mother in australia after being abducted and take top afghanistan. their father is in jail for claiming that their mother was dead. the two were found by an american lawyer. that specializes in such cases. david loyn has this exclusive report. >> reporter: two children, a girl aged 9 and a boy aged 5, who can't be named for legal reasons, play by a cage of pigeons. they were born in australia but their parents, both originally from afghanistan, took them to iran three years ago. the lawyer found them in hiding in afghanistan after their father handed them to his brother and returned to australia where he claimed his wife was dead. >> i feel very good about it. i mean, they've been missing since october 2012, so this is a huge victory. it's just been some really great investigative work that's been involved that has involved a lot of people to make this happen.
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>> reporter: the two spent a few days in a children's shelter in kabul while their papers were put in order and then they left to pick up their old life in australia and speak english again. two children, two very different worlds, now being reunited with their mother. they've not seen for three years. ♪ >> reporter: the children in the shelter sing a song, their new friends were with them for only a few days before flying back to australia, a place the others can only imagine. ♪ >> reporter: david loyn bbc news kabul. indonesia ended the search for the airasia place that crashed in december. all 162 people on board were killed. rescuers found large parts of the plane and its black boxes. but more than 50 bodies are stills missing. alex has been speaking to relatives of the passengers.
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>> reporter: this is what's left of end fee shah's deadliest aviation disaster in over a decade. the plane's tail was it fished out of the java sea. no one survived. among the passengers heading to singapore for the holidays. this is the last selfie the group of four friends took just before takeoff. his friends' bodies have been found but not his. his brother frankie says he understands that the search has to end. he went on a military plane that spotted the first debris two days after the crash. in that instance he knew his brother was gone. still, he's holding out hope. >> translator: if we can find and bury his body psychologically we can have a starting point to move on with our lives. if we never find him we'll always think about what it's like in the sea and what happens to his body. there is no end. >> reporter: the family has also been waiting for news of their
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son. his father says he's resigned to god's will but still prays for a miracle. >> translator: maybe since they've looked for my son in the sea and couldn't find him he survived the crash and has been taken care of by local people somewhere. i know it's relatively impossible but what if god wants him to be a live. >> reporter: just hours after the announcement the plane had crashed into the java sea the indonesian president came to this airport to meet with the grieving relatives who were gathered here and promised to find all of the bodies of those on board. despite dozens still missing search and rescue officials are convinced it's now time to stop. >> translator: certainly i tried my best but we have to understand hopes versus reality. the latest bodies that we found were already in very bad condition. they're no longer intact. only body parts and badly damaged. >> reporter: the reality for the
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families of these victims still feels unreal. no one could expect entire families or friends getting on a short flight on a reputable airline to never come back. bbc news indonesia. celebrations are due to take place in russia to mark the first anniversary of moscow's annexation of crimea. it was condemned as an act of aggression against ukraine but the russian people widely supported the move. from moss cour our world affairs correspondent reports. >> reporter: another big show of force now under way by the russian military. these troops amongst almost 40,000 taking part in combat readiness exercises on the orders of president putin. dozens of warships from the northern fleet are also involved and a all this because the russian government says it now
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faces new threats to its security. including from the americans who are deploying tanks and hundreds of other military vehicles in the baltic state which lie along russia's border. this to defend countries nato feels are vulnerable to russian military action in the region following the annexation of crimea. more than ever the russians feel they're being encircled by nato. >> translator: the russian federation must objectively acknowledge their military activity of nato around her borders has increased by several times. naturally russia must answer this by increasing military readiness. >> the kremlin ace choice to use force, sanctions imposed on key sanctions of the russian economy by the european union and united states.
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and its ordinary people feeling the pain. the sanctions adding to an economic downturn in which prices have shot up and the currency the rubles has fallen dramatically against the dollar. to pay for the apartments he bought several years ago, max is one of thousands of people who took out bank loans in dollars and is now facing a real crisis. >> translator: at the moment my monthly repayments have doubled and it is very difficult because the repayments are more than my salary. >> reporter: so for russia this anniversary of the annexation of crimea may also be a chance to reflect on the cost. richard galpin bbc news, moscow. fashion was not at the forefront of people's minds during the second world car, but a new exhibition at london's
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imperial war museum explain how clothes played a role in keeping up morale. jim went to have a look. >> reporter: britain is at war. suddenly a quarter of the population is entitled to wear a uniform. the war effort must convert. -- come first. so does fashion lay down and die? not at all. it triumphs but this is fashion on the ration, as vogue reports, what if the shrinking ladies the smaller they get the more perfect they have to be. >> there is a genuine concern if people do not care about their appearance that sense is an indicator of low morale and that they may lose the war. it's as serious as that. >> it was a lady's duty to look her best, but not spend too
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much. >> no. >> reporter: and if you couldn't afford it there was one answer. >> why not get together with your friends and form a make do and mend group. >> my wedding dress. >> i would like to be a night dress. >> reporter: as did these raf issue maps. >> this map was intended to help people who had fallen behind enemy lines. >> to find -- work where they were. eventually there was a surplus of those items and sold out for things like underwear sets and dressing gowns even. >> reporter: in 1945, 24 coupons had to last you all year. a dress would cost almost half of those. no wonder, this wedding dress was shared by 15 brides. even the queen had to save coupons. people famously tried to donate their own to her majesty. all were politely returned. >> i love these pictures your mom and dad's wedding. >> so evocative of the period. >> reporter: his mother opted for a utilitarian approach for
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the day. >> if it had been peace time she would have liked a white wedding but they were not really the done thing during the second world war. >> reporter: it's terry's father's trousers that are the giveaway, recycled wedding day outfit in support of the war effort. >> he's got turnups and turnups were banned by the government in 1942. >> because they were as waste. >> you can't imagine the fury this caused. it is amazing, here we are fighting for our lives and some say -- >> and they ban turnups. >> how dare they. >> reporter: everyone sacrificed but everyone expected to look good even when it came to carrying a gas mask. bbc news at the imperial war museum in london. getting breaking news from tunisia. we are getting unconfirmed reports of a hostage situation. apparently three terrorists wearing military uniforms have
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taken tourists hostage from insides the museum which is in the center of the tunisian capital located near the parliament of the country. those reports just coming in. we'll, of course, continue to monitor all of that for you, but for the time being, as always thank you very much for watching "bbc world news." for me and the team, bye-bye. ready been. where's the fun in that? it's time to find someplace new. book the hotel you want with the flight you want and we'll find the savings to get you there. you want an advanced degree, but sometimes work can get in the way. now capella university offers flexpath, a revolutionary new program that allows you to earn a degree at your pace and graduate at the speed of you. flexpath from capella university. it's the candy bar that's too hot for tv in all its naked glory; stripped of chocolate, with nothing but salty roasted peanuts on soft sweet caramel. a payday bar will get you through your day.
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picard: captain's log, stardate 45854.2. the enterprise is charting six star systems that make up the argolis cluster, an area being considered for colonization.

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