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tv   News  Al Jazeera  October 5, 2013 7:00am-9:01am EDT

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a series of tornados touched down in the midwest injuring more than a dozen people, causing significant property damage. several states along the gulf coast are bracing for impact as tropical storm karen is set to bring heavy rains and flooding. shutdown stalemate the government closure moves into its fifth day with neither side appearing to budge. >> why was my sister shot and killed with her 1-year-old daughter in the car and she was unarmed. >> the family of a woman shot and killed at the capitol speaks out saying she was troubled, but didn't deserve to die.
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>> a good morning to you. this is al jazeera america. i'm here from new york. good to have you with us. we'll talk about the extreme weather conditions. they are having an impact on much of the country. a series of tornadoses touched down in the midwest. a blizzard causes problems. and tropical storm karen is moving in on the gulf coast. more wild weather is expected throughout the weekend. >> now for more. >> at least six tornados touched down in the midwest friday as high-powered winds rolled through parts of nebraska, south dakota and iowa. >> it was two miles wide in nebraska. causing damage, ripping up trees. >> what in the world. come down. the next thing i know the yard
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looks like a bomb went off. >> more than a dozen people were injured during the twisters. nebraska's governor issued an emergency declaration, making it eligible for federal assistance. in neighbouring iowa a mile-wide torn tornados cut through. blizzards were in south dakota, wyonging - making a foot of snow. heavy wet snow is expected saturday. down south florida, mississippi, alabama, and louisiana are bracing for severe conditions. a weakened tropical storm karen is on the move, expected to dump rains and cause major flooding. the tropical storm is expected to strengthen, forcing state of emergencies in the gulf states and evacuation orders in parts of louisiana. >> all citizens, be vigilant,
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careful, prepared. >> we have a lot of water, food. >> fina teams were recalled after being furlowed, are watching and working around the clock. the red cross is delivering essentials. crews are packing up and locking down all they can. many in the strike zone are stacking sandbags to keep the water out. >> for more on the tornados and the storms tracking our way - it has been a busy 24 hours. . >> it has. we saw 14 tornados touch down in iowa, one reported in south dakota. the catastrophic tornados took place in nebraska, in wayne, nebraska. continuing to look at the map, we see numerous things going on. snow is falling across the black hills between wyoming and into south dakota.
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much of that is rain currently. as we make our way into the east, across the midwest from chicago all the way down, we'll have the threat for severe storms. the primary threat being winds and hail. out in the west it looks quiet. high pressure is in control. it's dry with low relative humidity. it's a problem given we have an increased fire threat. the winds behind the system will be pushing in from the east. for southern california there's an increased fire risk, low relative humidity and with the sun shining we may see a few fires ignite. to the north - you see the rain coming down along i-90, across north dakota, the south dakota and the snow falls across the black hills. if you travel along i-80 or 25, you need to use precautions.
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this is the line of storms causing the tornados. when you see a line of storms, it's indicative of the fact you'll see damaging winds and embedded in that tornados, when you have the circulation in the atmosphere. we'll monitor that. remember yesterday i told you how warm it was in oma he. this is a potent cold front pushing through. in the gulf of mexico tropical storm karen has weakened, and is at 40 miles per hour, the minimum speed it can be at before we consider it an area of low pressure. we expect it to make it onshore later tonight. i'll bring you the latest later in the show. >> day five and counting of the government's shutdown. both sides spa over who is to blame for the stalemate. how's speaker john boehner says
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they are willing to open the government. but they will not let go of a hard line stance in relation to obamacare. >> they say barack obama is holding up a resolution. >> the american people don't get to demand ransom to do their job. neither do congress. they don't get to hold the economy hostage over a law. they don't get to kick a child out of a healthy start by taking health care away. >> randall pinkston joins us live from washington with details. good morning. >> lawmakers, as you know are heading back to washington, but not to resolve the shutdown. you have to wonder is it political grandstanding or is there substance? >> far be it from me to accuse the nation's law makers of grandstanding. others may do that. here is what republicans are saying - they are doing something substantive.
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they are coming into session to vote on the federal employees retro active pay fairness act. this is another of what the democrats describe as paes meal legislation. it is significant because it will guarantee that federal workers furloughed from their jobs because of the shutdown will get backpay. the republicans passed piecemeal legislation, among them to restate - return the funding to the national institutes of health. veterans' affairs, and bringing funding back for head start. these are programs - some of them, of course, democrats, and the republicans are hoping they'll get support. the white house and democratic leaders are saying that what they want is a return of all of the government programs and the shutdown, then they'll talk about other issues. so far the republicans are not
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budging on that. >> so as we deal with the shutdown here, the debt ceiling, as you know, is taking center stage, even though we are only five days into the partial shutdown. let's listen to president obama from his weekly address, talking about his position. >> pay a ransom in exchange for reopening the government or raising the debt. for as recless as a government shutdown is, an economic shutdown becomes with default, with america not paying bills would be dramatically worse. >> how's speaker or leader boner came out of the meeting say he'd not raise debt limits without republicans support. is it possible we are heading for default? >> the statement by speaker boehner is of significance. it's at variance from earlier in the day, what he reportedly said to his leadership in a closed
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luncheon on thursday. in that luncheon speaker boehner allegedly said he would not allow a shutdown to take place. that led many to believe he was ready to put aside the rule requiring a majority of the republicans to go along with it, set aside the rule, allowing democrats to get a minority of republican votes and pass a clean bill. yesterday the speaker said he will not do it without republican support. by that does he mean he wants the majority of republicans in the house to go along with it. that's the question. >> if he's willing to do the latter we won't have a default, because there's enough democrats and republicans to pass a clean bill. he needs 218 votes. if, in fact, he insists of getting a majority of the minority it is uncertainty. the president is saying he will not negotiate. speaker boehner is saying he will not change with respect to
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budgets. we'll see. >> there's a lot on the table. we'll see how this plays out. randall pinkston in washington. >> secretary of state john kerry is playing down the government's shutdown effect on america's ability to attend to international matters. john kerry is in indonesia to attend the asia pacific economic cooperation in president obama's absence. united states commitment to asia and the global community is still strong. >> all of our friends and foes watching around the world, let me be crystal clear - do not mistake this momentary episode in american politics as anything less than a moment of politics, or anything more than a moment of politics. >> john kerry says the shutdown is an example of the robustness of the u.s. democracy and people's ability to have their voices heard. the shutdown is the second big hit for colorado.
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first, the flood hurt the tourism industry. and the closing of the rocky mountain national park. we have that story. >> 1700 miles from washington herds of elk come down from the high meadows, stroll through the front yards and stop traffic. it's a majestic and moving photo op. 3 million tourists come through the parks to interer rocky mountain national park. streams of sight seers from years past is down to a trickle. around the corner the gates to the park are locked. this is what the government shutdown looks like 8,000 feet above sea level. >> i don't think i'll be back to colorado, to tell the truth. it's my one chance to be here. this is what i'll see. >> thanks to gridlock in washington, thousands of tourists are making a u-turn out of town. >> tina owns mount pain shadowos
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resort and this time of year she'd be full. 16 guests. >> how many are here now? >> three. >> this has the makings of a manmade economic disaster because it comes hard on the heels of a natural disaster. this park was just recovering after the crippling floods. >> we had 2-4 feet of water running down the main street. we thought we had lost the infrastructure under our main street. >> >> in the weeks since the flood this town has scrambled to clean up. the town looks great, but signs of the devastation lingers. what is harder to see is the economic damage. >> it's about 15 feet higher. you can see all the way across. >> gary and his son sandbagged the family's fishing shop. keeping the thompson river out. the timing of the shutdown could not be worse. >> we are 75% down from normal at this time of year. the fall is our profit time. it paid for everything with the
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summer. >> the fluds washed out the two main roads into esther's park from the east. there's a windy way in from the south. with winter coming esther's park is feeling cut off. time is running out to recoup lossesism. >> no park, no people. >> if the people in washington don't find a way to work together, i don't know what will become of this country. >> that's the defence on everyone's mind. will washington get its act together before it's too late? >> the website where americans can enrol for president obama's health care exchanges is undergoing repairs. millions of consumers complained because of technical glitches and delays.
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officials blamed the problems on high volumes of request. call centres will remain open to register americans in the health insurance exchanges. >> a top leader has been crit siffed some aspects of hassan rouhani's trip to new york, saying they were not appropriate. in its first public comments, the ayatollah supports the outreach to the west, but says the u.s. were not trustworthy. hardliners criticise hassan rouhani's 15 minute phone call to president obama. >> questions are being raised by the family of miriam carey over the use of force in thursday's incident in washington. the family is speaking outlet in response to dc police shooting and killing the 34-year-old conneticut woman. miriam carey's family said she didn't deserve to die, and there should have been an alternative solution. >> i don't know why miriam carey
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ended up going to dc. we don't know at the time if her depression contributed to her going and taking that ride. we don't know what was in her mind at that time. i do feel that law enforcement could have handled the situation differently. how do you note the state of mind of the individual in the car. only after the fact they understood and delved into her life and understood that she was a person that was going through depression at one point with psychosis. how does that give us the answers as to why they did what they did. they felt there was a particular threat. miriam carey was not firing shots, there was no weapons. we are confused, as a family, as to why she's not alive. >> why was my sister shot and killed where her 1-year-old daughter was in the car, and she was unarmed. why? my mother deserves to know why. we deserve to know why.
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and we deserve a proper notification. the cary sisters ask and demand for it. my mother demand it and respects that. my sister could have been any woman or person travelling in our capital. deadly physical force was not the ultimate recourse. it didn't have to be. >> the sisters confirmed that miriam carey suffered post-part um depression and was prescribed medication. >> an internal investigation into the washington navy yard shooter reveal his supervisors knew about the issues. aaron alexis's mother told his bosses that her son had a history of episodes and needed therapy. he was able to keep his job. he was killed in a shoot out with police, after killing 12 in a shooting ram page last month.
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>> the new york city police department is at the center of a road rage incident, sparking national outrage. >> according to officials undercover officers were on the scene when a group of angry bikers confronted and beat the driver of an suv. the road rage incident was caughts on video tape. the offduty officers watched the driver be dragged from his car and beaten, but did not intervene. >> negligence or a terrible accident? charges could be charged against a firefighter in the death of a teenage girl aboard an asiana airline that crashed in san francisco. bringing jobs back to the u.s. several companies are bucking the trend of sending positions overseas. >> a monumental sculpture hits the auction block. the priceless piccaso expected
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to fetch millions.
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welcome back. italian divers hope to resume a
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search for more victims of a mediterranean shipp wreck. 111 african asylum seekers have been confirmed dead, more are missing. rough seas have hampered rescue efforts. >> a challenging day for the search and rescue operators facing adverse weather conditions, as they try to get more bodies that are trapped in the boat. as far as they are concerned the search for survivors is looking slim now. they are focussing on trying to get the remainder of the bodies, which are trapped on the boat, as well as the seabed. the situation looks quite bad for the chance of finding survivors, that an appeal from assistance, the health assistance program here on the island, is requesting more coffins for the dead has been answered. on friday morning a boat carrying two lorry-loads of coffins arrived, to be taken to the hangar where the bodies are
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awaiting. they'll be taken over to sicily. so far the rescue operators are waiting for better weather conditions to resume full rescue operations. as far as the people in lampedusa are concerned, there is a feeling, a sense that this is really yet another time where they've had to step in and help out people who arrive here on the island after a traumatic journey, tired, hungry, fleeing conflict in africa, the middle east. it's not a case where they don't want to offer help. they are too happy to offer help. the islanders are used to this now. they have a sense where they'll go out and help people who are caught in dangerous situations on the sea, but what they want and are asking for is for europe, the e.u. to provide a better resource, better resources for them here, better ways for them to deal with the situation. they say they cannot deal with
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it themselves. the people that come to lampedusa - they don't come to stay on the island, but to stay in the e.u., so it's a european problem, rather than just an it attian problem. >> a firefighter that rushed to the scene of a plane crash could face charges for a passenger's death. a girl on board the flight that crashed at san francisco airport survived the accident, but was later killed when a fire truck responding to the crash ran over her. investigators completed a probe into the incident and turned over their findings to prosecutors. they'll determine if the firefighter broke laws or if it was an accident. >> israeli army shut down a landfill citing environmental concerns. as peter sharp reports, the move has palestinians debating the reasons behind the closure. >> it's not a place of beauty. the municipal dump outside baw
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has been completing a function, disposing of tonnes of garbage. the israeli army closed it down, and said the site was a health risk. >> as for the palestinians, the unexpected concern by the israeli authorities over the health of the people on the west bank masks a different motive. it's to do with this illegal jewish settlement on the hill. >> this is an illegal settlement built on palestine land in 1981 - home to 1600 jewish settlers. it's a small settlement. here at the palestine municipality local officials believe it has big territorial ambitions, and that's the reason the army cloed down the barawe facility. >> i think they closed it down to expand the settlement. we have an environmental report
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saying that the dump site doesn't impose an environmental hazard. >> the garbage trucks rumble through barawe. in the absence of a disposal site waste is dumped on private land, which the palestinians say raises environmental and health concerns. >> translation: it was horrible. the city was on the verge of an environmental catastrophe. people would burn the waste. it was not bearable to walk in the city. >> the israeli civil authorities issued this statement... >> with the municipal dump closed many palestinians fear the expansion of the little settlement on the hill will begin, taking over more of their
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land. >> we should note that the landfill was designated to serve a population of over 100,000 in barawe and other palestine communities. >> immigration activists are taking to the street to voice support for comprehensive reforms. rallies are expected in 160 cities nationwide. immigrants and allies want to show they haven't forgotten about reform immigration. immigration reform is something house republicans are unwilling to consider. >> made in america - for decades it was the gold standard for products around the world, until american jobs were shipped overseas for cheaper labour. several major u.s. companies are rethinking tactics with the idea of putting americans back to work. >> reporter: lost lively hoods, shattered communities, images of u.s. manufacturing jobs
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migrating overseas. that picture is changing. according to a recent survey by boston consulting group, more than half executives polled at u.s. manufacturers are planning to bring production back to the u.s. from china or are actively considering it. a nearly 50% increase in the last 18 months. >> what we have seen over 10 years is the costs in china which is low, has been rising at 15-20% per year. >> reporter: it's not just labour costs, proximity to customers and product quality is making it more attractive. since 2010 more than 200 u.s. manufacturers returned 80,000 jobs to u.s. shores. as the jobs come home, services spring up around them - creating more jobs. >> we believe it will have a significant impact on job growth. by 2020, 2,500 and more jobs will be created. it's significant. it could move the unemployment
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rate down by 1.5 to 2 points. >> >> reporter: no one knows how many u.s. manufacturing jobs are moving overseas. many of the jobs that have gone to china are unlikely to return. some argue. >> the chinese have real capabilities in manufacturing and are good at getting products to market rapidly is it >> reporter: a study has been created and said jobs created here will drive growth. >> company after company people are making - not only making goods, but are attaching valuable services to them. >> reporter: u.s. manufacturers need more programs to train workers and capital to ramp up production. with foreign showers looking less appealing images like these will hopefully become less common. >> a dangerous deadline draws
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near. why hitting the debt ceiling could spell disaster for the global economy. we'll speak to an analyst. good morning, ross. >> in sport the baseball play-offs are underway. detrait's matt was scherzer was king of the hills for the as, and more on his performance in a bit.
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. good morning. welcome back. these are the top stories we are following. extreme weather conditions are having an impact on much of the country. a series of tornados touched down in the midwest. an early winter blizzard caused havoc in the north of the country and tropical storm karen is moving in on the gulf coast. forecasters say more wild weather is expected throughout the weekend. >> why was my sister shot and killed, with her 1-year-old daughter in the car, and she was unarmed? >> the family of the woman shot and killed at the capital said
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she was troubled but didn't deserve to die. >> shutdown stalemate - the shutdown moves into ith fifth day with neither side appearing to budge. >> there's only one way to stop the shutdown, pass a budget. >> president obama uses a weekly address to urge congress to reach a deal. this is the house and senate holding a saturday session - day 5 of a stalemate that could last into next week. >> a series of unfortunate events for the yosimete national park. the rim fire last month hit owners hard. now with the government shutdown - that's affecting them. >> douglas shaw runs a small resort and told al jazeera how the shutdown is impacting him directly. >> let's face it, i mean this is a great place. i love this place. my guests love this place. but they really come here to see
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yosemite. i make it easy and i make them happy. without yosemite i don't have a business. this is built upon the park. we did the letter to the editor, we asked people to call our house rep, mc-clyntock and asked people online to sign and asked the country to put out messages to dc to tell them what is happening here. we are going to a demonstration on parkline. it's not just me, it's - i think there's a lot of people in this community that is upset. >> because of the government shutdown it's estimated that the national park service is losing about $30 million a day in entrance fees and other revenues across the country. >> a u.s. default has the potential to be catastrophic for economies around the world. global leaders warn that a failure to reach a deal on the debt ceiling could be disastrous
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for markets recovering from the 2008 financial crisis. i want to bring in kevin kerr, president and ceo of kerr trading. and he joins us from chicago. >> before we get to the debt ceiling, what impact does the u.s. government shutdown have on the global markets? >> this is a ripple effect. we are in a true global economy on a personnel and business level. credit markets are seizing, and the dollar will plummet. interest rates could sore. a lot of repercussions around the world as the u.s. dollar is the reserve currency. we could see a downgrade. the potential for catastrophic damage is there. we are five days into the government shutdown as we head towards the debt limit and we'll see more seizing up. we have 800,000 nonessential workers laid off. that is affecting other businesses - retail, it will affect spending.
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a lot of these services are not nonessential. us da reports are seized up. the unemployment report did not come out on friday. we don't have meaningful numbers from the government. this has a ripple down effect on the market and personal lives. >> what would happen to the markets if, let's say, the u.s. defaulted on the deadline on october 17th? >> nobody can say for sure. i think secretary of state kerry played it down a little too much. the potential is there. we could see the dollar plummet in value, credit markets seizing around the world. in asia and europe. and we could see the dollar being taken down a peg again - something it doesn't need. so the potential is there. we don't know how fast it will go. once we reach that day it could seize up. >> is the u.s. a stable investment if it can't get its
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house in order? >> we are the most liquid and safe markets. we have to question that with what is going on. on the world stage president obama cancelled a trip to asia, creating uncertainty. again, you know, how the rest of the world reacts to this, and how severely really is unknown. it could be significantly. >> the biggest holder of u.s. government debt - how do they respond if the u.s. defaults? >> a true default - i think that will happen. how they'll respond - i don't know, i don't think they know. we'll have to wait and see. it looks like we are heading that way. >> the president cancelled his trip to asia to do with the shutdown. how is the rest of the world dealing with this? >> uncertainly. i have interests in europe and asia, and all the markets are very cautious. all the fundamental data has been pushed aside. the fundamental data we are
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getting on a personal level - people are nervous facing a dollar fall. there is a lot of uncertainty, and certainly mr obama not travelling to the asia summit adds to that. >> for individual tied to the market, what would advice would you give them, moving forward, looking at the october deadline. >> i think we have to remain cautious. there's no actions to take. investors should look at opportunities to hedge themselves. in other words, being able to protect themselves a little bit. on a business level, taking precautions and heading into this - this will be a protracted event. >> do you do anything on a personal letters for people with a 401k. a lot of people are panicking that they'll lose money. >> they could look for safer investments. there's little action to take before we get to that point, unfortunately.
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>> a lot is uncertainly. you mentioned the ripple effect. looking down the road long term - how does this have an impact, on the global and u.s. market. >> it takes us down a peg. we are the reserve currency. whether they take the credit rating down a notch again. this could have a long-lasting knack on the dollar, as the image of the united states being a safe haven. how much is hard to say. it's having a negative knack. >> is there anything we can do to regain the credibility - our final question. >> pay our bills and not print money. try to get the house of united states back in order. >> if it were only that easy. kevin kerr, president and ceo of kerr trading international. >> thank you for joining us. >> a storm system is hitting the great plains. the national weather service says the storm dumped 33 inches of know in part of south
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dakota's black hills. three were killed in a traffic accident because of snow in nebraska. the cold front will combine with other storms to make for a wild, wet weekend for much of the central u.s. and south-east. >> in new york - the red cross stepped in to help hundreds of superstorm sandy victims after the city stopped paying to put them up in hotels. until today nearly 300 people were staying in 27 hotels on the city's dime. the rooms cost an average of $266 a night and the officials ended the program after the funding from the federal emergency management agency dried up. the red cross said it will pend $1 million to expend the stay in hotels. >> severe weather, as we mentioned is posing problems for multiple states in the u.s. i'll bring back our metrologist. >> we are going to talk about the gulf of mexico and tropical storm karen. it is a weak, low-level tropical
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storm. we have strong winds pushing in from the west. the central area of low pressure, thunder storms are several miles away from the actual essential area of low pressure. that is not good news for karen, because we do not expect the system to develop further. yesterday 65 miles per hour maximum stained winds. today they are at 40. we are less than 200 miles away interest the coast. the system will make its way onshore. in the morning we expect heavy rain to be the primary threat - early, early sunday morn is when karen will make its way on to the coast. >> areas east of mobile and to florida, and new orleans, you could de 2.5-3-4 inches of rain. to the north - we have a cold front which will cool down
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portions of texas. temperatures in the 90s yesterday in dallas. this cold brought severe weather across the plains and nebraska, and iowa. yesterday and today i think it will have a similar effect in terms of damaging winds and hail across portions of chicago, all the way down into st louis. we'll continue to monitor the system. you can see cold air in place across oklahoma city, and alber curbingy. snow is pulling to the north. across the black hills between wyoming and south dakota. throughout the course of the day the snow winds down as it makes its way into warmer air and rain expects across portioners of the dakotas, and iowa. severe whether will be a threat across many areas. we'll monitor the threat for winds and hail and isolated tornados. across the south-west - high
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pressure is in control. sun shine across southern portions of california. because of the winds pushing in from the east, we could see strong santa ana winds. that's the reason why the national weather service issued red-flag warnings. we'll have to monitor that situation. we have low-level humidity. those are the ingredients needed to see wildfires and we may see some of those ignite. >> the heaviest of the snow coming from the eastern portion of south dakota. we could see 4-5 inches. there was a couple of accidents on the road ways yesterday and snow will fall in the morning. a colder air masticing over from rapid city to omaha. where you see the difference in temperatures from indianapolis and omaha - they are the areas with the severe weather. >> ross is here with sport.
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baseball is off to a great start. >> you have to love it. drama is underway. this is the time to shine. in the play-offs everything is magnified and everyone is looking for the next mr october. >> a superstar taking out a tigers player. tigers off to a great start. alex got into the act as detroit jumped out to a 3-0 lead. that's more than enough for sherz , because he -- matt shezer he's king of the hill. he has one blue eye and one brown eye. they won 3-2 in the best of five series. . >> i looked inside, 18-26. it's a good percentage. i thought i had a great
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change-up. we were able to keep them off balance. >> i took a deep breath. they asked if i was good and i said i was. i needed to get back into the zone with the fast ball and pitches. i was able to do that. quite a few change ups in the curve balls. it was a great move. obviously smiling. we shut them down, a great win. >> the rays had their issues. david orteze, routine fly ball, "i got it", "i don't have it." >> i hate it when it happens. fans were over the kid. the rookie playing in a first post-season - it opened up the floodgates as boston exploded. johnny gomes banging it up. the red spanking the rays 12-1.
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>> the atlanta bays doing the chop against the dodgers. 4-1 to the dodgers. they made things interesting. ram ear es - two shot. la down 4-3. the boys in blue - they were feeling blue. craig kimbrell coming in the 9th, sealing the deal. >> the braves with one apiece, came through on sunday. >> today red socks looking to take a 2-0 series lead over the ray, who were sloppy. the open as have to man up tonight. justin berlander playing tonight. >> jim hughes is a baseball star you probably have never heard of. darren has more on his journey
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on and off the field. >> what if someone told you to achieve a goal you have to visualise it. what if i told you there's an athlete who achieved everything, seeing nothing? >> i would be lying if i said i'm happy. no, the reality is i do have, you know, those moments, "i wish i could see." >> jim hughes lives with congen toll glaucoma, a condition causing damage to the optic nerve in the eye. a 22-year captain, jim has not let what he can't see stop him from what he can be. >> getting dirty, going after a ball, you know, if it hit me in the face - that means i'm going to put them out. i was ready to sacrifices my body from the get-go. i fell in love with the sport. >> before 13 of the long island bombers were blind or visually
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impaired they had a chance to see and remember the simple things in baseball such as when a baseball diamond or glove looks like, except for jim hughes who is too young to remember the things we see every day. >> moving my vision at the age of 3 made the road easier, to be honest with you. >> jim's mother lost her vision, and four of her five children also lost their sight to this disease. joseph, the oldest kept the family solid. when jim was 16, joseph lost his life. >> being blind, and a predominantly sighted world, it can be challenging. he said, "be strong, never let people say you can't do. you are able. so go for it." i think he gave me the approach to life. >> while jim continued to play baseball with his brother in his
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heart, he found love. >> we met on a blind date. i went on a blind date with a blind guy i joked. i got to know jim and new we were going to get married. >> january 2004 they tide the not. they had three children. there was a problem. >> i think the moment where it was the most difficult for me was when my daughter was diagnosed with glaucoma. that no longer is in your control. when it affects your children, that's when you are - that's when you ask the question, "what the hell?" >> thankfully through surgeries sara can still watch daddy. >> she's proud of him. she writes stories about him at school, about, you know, a hero and how she loves him and is impressed by him.
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she loves her dad. he is the most amazing person i have met, the most amazing husband i have seen and a phenomenal father. as an athlete, you know, he's impressive. >> what do you see? an athlete, a husband or a father? maybe jim hughes wants us to see how he plays the game. the game we call life. . thank you very much to darren haynes for bringing us that wonderful story, jim hughes a superstar father, husband and super star in the game called life. >> it is touching. reminds us that we need to forge ahead despite whatever we are faced with. over in alaska small school is cultivating big-time talent. alaska has one sports team, but its cross-country ski program is home to the country's elite.
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>> in the hills above anchorage in the mud and mist there is some suffering going on. >> relax. remember when the suffering is coming in, come on. >> this is ski training on dirt, a workout designed to hurt and help. >> as soon as we tip it uphill we put stress on the heart, then you put a pair of polls in the hand. >> every painful step is closer to next year's winter olympics. >> it's not just any ski race, it's the ski race. >> these mornings when it's tough training, when there's bears in the wood and you are squared or it's raining, you -- scared or it's raining you think what am ill going to do that makes me stand on the line. >> this is the home base, alaska university, a tiny college with 500 students and one sports team - cross-country skiers. >> nice job.
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>> the coach estimates six to eight members of his squad could make the u.s. olympic team. >> the right people, athletes, coaches, time - it's all coming together. >> they can train at ski level and roller skate when they don't have know or fly to the snow on the eagle glacier nearby - a short helicopter ride from campus. snow conditions here mimic those in soechy. the coach built republicas of the olympic courses. it's a clubsport, a nonprofit organization supported by the school, membership fees and private fund raisers. it's not bound by ncaa rules, meaning world sprint champion, rand olph can get help from respond source. >> this is not all about wins and olympic glory. the people that run this are
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determined that commitment to sport should not interfere with education. >> they are allowing us to achieve both goals at one time. education is incredible. it's something you can finish, put in your pocket and you have it. >> the misery of year-round mud running, roller training, glacier skiing. these athletes claim they are having fun. >> you have an amazing body that you can do everything with. cool people, travel around the world and we have a chance to go to the olympics and make history. >> history will have to make while the suffering continues. >> by the way, cross country skiing has been an olympic event since 1924. and in 21 winter olympics. the u.s. won a single medal - silver, 1976. the women have never medaled. >> priceless works of art hitting the auction block. a large collection by piccaso goes up for sale, including a
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piece held by one of america's largest cities.
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conversation
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. welcome back. he is considered one of the most prolific modern artists of the 20th century, soon one of pablo piccaso's mysterious works will go on the auction block. we'll look at what is expected to be a record-shattering price for one of chicago's most recognised sculptures. >> andy war hole said if you look at a thing long enough it loses meaning. >> i see an eye, nose, ant eater or elephant. >> piccaso's work on the daily plaza kept the cure yois guessing. >> it's a human representation. >> when it was unveiled reportedly no one applauded. one columnist wrote that the sculpture had cold, mean eyes. years later, models going up for auction are being eyed.
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>> you don't see these sculptures, so it's a rare opportunity to acquire a great work. >> this work is something that we hope to achieve a record price for. >> the m ajs -- maket is part of a collection owned by jan krugier. this could fetch between $170-$244 million according to christie's own estimates. the second maket lives here. it's hoped what piccaso set or for himself would call the windy city home. >> it touched off respect from modern art people around the city. >> if they were going for a sfi sculpture, they went to a challenging artist and said, "make us something". >> janine from the arts club of
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chicago said piccaso never visited chicago or explained what the sculpture was. >> the problem in reading it was what he was trying to make. it is difficult to read. it's not an accident. that's what he was making. >> a mystery and a master piece surely making for a monumental sale. >> piccaso was originally paid $350,000 for the statue. >> at the end of our first hour here is what we are following. severe weather hit several regions of the united states and the mid-west coast. several tornados touched down. parts of the gulf coast are bracing for tropical storm karen. >> it is day five of the government shutdown. congress is working, but no agreement is expected to be reached. >> the family of the woman shot dead on capitol hill is saying their sister, 34-year-old miriam carey was a troubled sole but didn't deserve to die. >> the baseball play offs are
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under way. we'll have more on scherzer's sparkling performance. >> tropical storm karen has weakened tremendously in the last 24 hours. it will still pack a punch. all the details soon. >> that will do it for this hour. al jazeera america continues in 2.5 minutes.
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under way. 2.5 minutes conversation a series of tornados touched down in the midwest injuring more than a dozen people, causing property damage. several states along the gulf coast are bracing for impact as tropical storm karen will bring heavily rains. >> there's only one way out - pass a budget. >> president obama uses an internet address to urge congress to reach a deal. glitches to the health care exchange website due for an overhaul this weekend.
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>> welcome to al jazeera america. extreme weather conditions are having an impact on much of the country this morning. a series of tornados touched down in the mid west. an early winter blizzard caused havoc, and tropical storm karen is moving in on the gulf coast. more wild weather is expected throughout the weekend. >> at least six tornadoes touched down in the midwest friday, as high-powered winds rolled through nebraska, south dakota and iowa. the torned are in dakota was 2 -- tornado in dakota was 2 miles wide. >> what in the world. the next thing i know the yard looks like a bomb went off. >> more than a dozen people were injured during the twisters. nebraska's governor issued an emergency declaration, making it eligible for federal assistance.
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>> in neighbouring nebraska a mile-wide tornado cut through farm land, avoiding populated areas. to the north - blizzards brank eted parts of nebraska. two feet of heavy wet snow is it expected saturday. down south, florida, mississippi, alabama and louisiana is bracing for severe weather conditions. a weakened tropical storm karen is on the move and is expected to dump heavy rains and cause major flooding. the tropical storm karen is expected to strengthen and has forced state of emergencies in the gulf states and evacuation orders in parts of louisiana. >> all citizens will be vigilant, careful, be prepared. >> we have a lot of water and food. >> fima teams recalled by the white house after being furloughed are watching and waiting around the clock,
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preparing for any storm. the red cross is delivering essential, and crews are packing up and locking down what they can. mean in the strike zone are packing sandbags to keep the water out. >> more more on the tornados, the touchdown and storms tracking our way. let's bring in our meteorologist. >> we continue to eye off the gulf of mexico, there's relatively good news. tropical storm karen really is a weak low-level tropical storm with maximum sustained winds of 40 miles per hour. yesterday it was 60. it has weakened. the center of circulation, strong westerly winds, helping to create - it's disconjoined, the anatomy. it's not an organised system. we'll continue to deal with that through the day. the winds pushed through the west. dry air creating difficult
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conditions for the system to gain strength. i think as it pushes offshore it will be a tropical storm karen, a week tropical storm. the impact will be felt. the hurricane force means we'll have to deal with gust which winds around 39 miles per hour. we could see 6 inches of rain from mobile to pennsa cola. parts of louisiana, and further inland across portions of mississippi, and alabama. we could see around 2 inches of rain falling. we have other severe weather, all because of a cold front pushing towards the east. there were reports of tornados across nebraska, iowa and south dakota. today - damaging winds and hail from detroit all the way to chicago, into st louis, and a little further south in arkansas. in the south-west, high pressure
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is in control across los angeles. it will be a warm day at 92 degrees, and low relative humidity, increasing the fire danger. that's the reason why the national weather services issued a red flag warning in southern california. we could see gusts in the hills around los angeles, up to 60 miles per hour. there's a blizzard warning in effect across the black hills in south dakota. the snow wound down across wyoming, but rain is coming down across north dakota. look at the difference in the temperatures from rapid city to indianapolis. stark differences in temperatures because the cold front is potent. as the storms push to the east, the threat for damaging winds, hail and possibly a few more isolated tornados from chicago, down to st louis. >> it is a recipe for disaster a tropical storm in the middle of a government shutdown.
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the furloughed staff at the government center, fima, were brought back to help. rick naas, the director of the national hurricane center is in mim -- miami. he's here joining us. are you fully staffed? >> the vast majority of staff have been on board. we do all the things we normally do with a landfall threat to the u.s., making sure that we can engage with emergency management partners, federal, state and local as fully as possible, and reach out to the media. we ramp up a lot of capabilities with regard to forecasting storm surge, when there's a land falling tropical storm potential. we have done everything we would do, any land fall situation. all the planes running all the models. all systems go. >> it is good to hear. are the people working without pay? >> it's a complicated situation in terms of how working and pay
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eventually gets played out when a shutdown is over. i'll let the folks who know how it works explain it to you. we are providing a critical public service. we believe in the mission, and we are going to continue to do our job. >> we appreciate the service you provide. >> tell us about what we can expect with the storm system. >> tropical storm karen has been struggling in an environment that has prevented it from strengthening. it's a good bit weaker by the wind speeds as compared to yesterday. that is good news, but it is closer to the northern gulf coast and we saw the tropical storm warning for some areas. those areas could see tropical storm conditions in a while, later today. the system is not too far offshore, but is lopsided. we have a tropical storm watch points east of there. it will make landfall finally on the northern gulf coast once and for all some time on saturday -
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sunday into sunday night. >> how would you characterise this hurricane season? >> over all it's below average. we've had a below average number of hurricanes and major hur -- hurricanes, zero is below average. there has been a number of impacts in mexico. they are not thinking it's been an easy seen. our seen is not over yet, and look at last year when we had sandy occur near the end of october, we never declare a season over until it's over, and it takes one where you live to make it a year that you'll remember. >> exactly, if it happens when you are, it's been a bad hurricane season. rick naas with the national hurricane center. thank you for joining us from miami. >> it is day five of the government shutdown. both sides are sparring over who is to blame. >> how's speaker says the
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republicans want to reopen the government. president obama said in his weekly address that the republican agenda is holding up a resolution. >> congress don't get to hold our democracy or economy hostage over a settled law. they don't get to kick a child out of head start if they don't agree to take her parent's halth care away. it's not how a democracy is supposed to work. randall pinkston joins us live from washington d.c. with more details. lawmakers - coming back to washington today. are we supposed to be encouraged by that? are they going to resolve anything? is this a political stunt? what is it? >> well, we always are happy to see our lawmakers working,
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especially since they have not been affected by the shutdown and some are adamant saying they'll take their checks, others will put them aside and donate it to furloughed workers. the house - speaker john boehner is bringing the house of representatives back. they'll vote on a bill today to provide backpay for furloughed federal workers once the shutdown is over. democrats are holding a news conference. we expect them to talk about the open the government resolution. this is a very complicated way to try to bring a clean bill to the floor of the house of representatives through something called a discharge petition, and that would require them to get support from republicans. so if you get 218 votes you can force the speaker to bring the petition up to the floor. the speaker could change the rules and bring it up this afternoon, but he's not going to do that because the republicans don't want to do that unless it's tied to obamacare.
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the democrats are using this procedural motion to try to bring it up, but if they are successful, it won't happen until october 14th, 15th - just before the debt ceiling. things right now are not looking too promising for a resolution of the budget shutdown, let alone what is going to be done about the debt ceiling. >> randall - speaker john boehner seems to hold the key to debating this. on one hand he seems willing to work with democrats over the shutdown. at the same time his hands are tied to support from truly conservative republicans. it's a difficult position. >> yes. and the rhetoric that is flying back and forth between democrats and reppians, between senate leaders and house leaders isn't particularly helpful either. let's listen to what president obama said about what needs to
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be done. >> that's why i won't pay a ron some in exchange for reopening the government. i certainly will not pay a ransom in exchange for the raising of the debt ceiling. an economic shutdown coming with default, with america not paying its bills would be dramatically worse. >> the republicans say what they want the president to do is to sit and talk about a deal. democrats say they'll talk about a deal once the shutdown is over. we'll see. >> yes, we will. randall pinkston, list in washington. it will be a -- live in washington. it will be a busy weekend. >> secretary of state john kerry is playing down the government shutdown effect an america's ability to deal with other matters. john kerry is in indonesia to attend apec summit. he says the united states commitment to the summit and international affairs has not
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wavered. >> friends and foes watching around the world let me be crystal clear - do not mistake this momentary episode in american politician as anything less than a moment of politics, or anything more than a moment of politics. >> john kerry says the shutdown is an example of the robustness - that's a quote - of the u.s. democracy and people's ability to have their voices heard. the government shut down is a second blow to colorado in the past few weeks. first a flood heard the tourist industry, now the closing of the rocky mountain national park. >> 1700 miles from washington, herds of elk come down from the high meadows, stroll through front yards and stop traffic. it's a majestic and moving photo op. 3 million tourists come through esther's park, colorado to enter the rocky mountains national
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park. now it's deserted. streams of sightseers from years passed down to a trickle around the corner the gates to the national park are locked. this is what the government shutdown looks like 8,000 felt above sea level. >> i don't think i'll be back to colorado, to tell the truth. it's my one clans to be here, this is what -- chance to ber here, this is what i see. >> thousands of tourists are making a u-turn out of town. >> tina owns mountain shadows resort. usually she'd be full. how many are here now? >> three. >> this has the makings of a manmade economic das disas -- disaster hard on the heels of another disaster. it is recovering from the floods. >> we had 2-3 feet of water down the main street. we thought we lost the infrastructure under the main street. >> in the week since since the
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floods people have been struggling to clean up. the town looks great, but signs of the devastation lingers. it's harder to see the economic damage. >> it's 15 feet higher, you can see across there. >> gary and his son sandbacked the family's -- sandbagged the family's fishing shop, keeping the thompson river out. the timing could not be worse. >> we are 75% down from normal. the fall is our profit time. it copied of paid for everything with the -- kind of paid for everything with the summer. >> the floods washed out the two main roads from the east. now the park is closed to the west, there's a long winding way in from the south. with winter coming and no signs of progress in washington, es e esther's park is feeling cut off. >> no park, no people. >> yes. the people in washington - if they don't find a way to work
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together, i don't know what will become of this country. >> that's the question on everyone's mind - will washington get its act together, before it's too late? >> if you are trying to enrol for a federal health care exchange you may have to wait until next week. the website is undergoing repair. millions of consumers complained because of delays. it happened because of the high volumes of hits. it will be available during offpeak hours. call center will be open to register for the health and insurance changes. >> questions are being raised over the shooting of miriam carey. the family is speaking out in response to dc police shooting and killing a 34-year-old conneticut woman. miriam carey's family said she didn't deserve to die. and there should have been an alternative solution.
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>> we don't know why miriam carey went to dc. we don't know at the time if her depression contributed to her going to taking that ride. we don't know what was in hor mind at that time. i felt law enforcement could have handled the situation differently. you know what was in the - how do you know what was in the mind of the individual in the car. only after did they understood that she was a person undergoing depression at one point with psychosis. give us the answers as to why they did what they did. they felt that there was some particular threat - miriam was not firing shots, there was no weapons. we are confused as a family as to why she is not alived. >> why was my sister shot and killed with my one-year-old daughter in the car, and she was unarmed? why. my mother deserves to know why?
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we deserve to know why. we deserve a proper notization. the carey sisters calls for it. my mother demands it. my sister could vice-president anyone person travelling in the capital. deadly physical force was not the ultimate recourse, it didn't have to be. >> the sisters confirmed miriam carey had post part um detregs. >> a company investigation into the washington navy yard shooting reveals that supervisors knew about the issue a month before the incident. aaron alexis's mother told his bosses that her son had a history require of paranoid episodes and he likely needed therapy. he was still kept on the job. aaron alexis killed 12 people. the former navy reservists was killed in a shoot out with
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police. >> yes, we can give you the rallying cry in more than 160 cities. why people are calling a national day for dignity and respect. snoop supporters of mohamed morsi call for protests on the anniversary of a bloody war. more on that turmoil when we come back.
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welcome back. italian divers hope to resume a search for victims of a mediterranean shipp wreck. hundreds are missing and many are death. rough seas delayed the efforts. sonia gallego has more from italy. >> a challenging day for the search and rescue operators, who faced adverse weather conditions, as they tried to get more bodies trapped in the boat. the search for survivors is looking slim now. they are focussing on trying to get the remainder of the bodies, which are trapped on the boat,
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as well as the seabed. in fact, the situation looks quite bad for the chance of finding survivors, that an appeal from the health assistance program here on the island requesting more coffins for the dead has now been answered. on friday morning a boat carrying two lorry-load of coffins arrived. they'll be taken to the hangar where bodies are awaiting and they'll be taken over to cystly. so far -- sicily. rescue operators are awaiting better conditions to resume full rescue operation. there is a feeling here at lampedusa, where this is another time where the people had to step in and help out those that arrived on the island after a traumatic journey - a desperately tired, hungry, fleeing conflict situations in africa and the middle east. it's not a case where they don't
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want to offer help, they are too happy. the islanders are used to this. they center a sense where they'll go out and help people caught in dangerous situations on the sea. what they want and what they are asking for is europe, the e.u. to provide a better resource, better resources for them here, better ways for them to deal with the situation. they cannot deal with it themselves. the people that come here to lampedusa - they don't come to stay on the island, but to stay in the e.u. therefore it's a european problem, rather than an italian problem. >> supporters of mohamed morsi are calling for more protest and will try again to reach tahir sqa sqare. four are killed. protests were reported in alexandria. >> the children affected by syria's war lost a lot.
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they are often losing what people take for granted. we have a report on a generation that risks being exploited because they have no schools to go to. omar is seven. he never went to school. when he was supposed to enrol fighting forced his family to flee from holmes to lebanon. a year later the boy is without an education, and he clearly feels that he doesn't belong in his new home. >> translation: it's because we are syrian. the lebanese are not letting us go to school. i want to study. >> there are many others here like omar. almost 2 million syrians dropped out of school because of the fighting and displacement in their country. >> zahra shehade was hoping to secure a future for her children in lebanon ux. >> i can't do anything, my children are prisoners. they should be going to school. i have asked organizations for help. no one helpless. >> the united nations says
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there's about 400,000 syrians of school age in lebanon and was hoping to provide educational assistance to half of them. it was unable to do so because the organization lacked funds. public schools don't have space to accommodate the refugees. many end up on the streets. ak med and omar shine shows. on a good day they coulderb up to $20. there's no numbers of syrian children who joined the workforce. international organizations say they are helping their parents survive. >> they are traumatised after being subject to violence and abuse. now they are becoming the breadwinner of the family due to the economic hardship. >> these children are at risk of exploitation and abuse. the united nations warned that millions of them will become a lost generation. the boys have survived the violence. undoubtedly they are casualties of syria's continuing war.
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>> uniself estimates more than 3,000 schools in syria have been damaged and 900 turned into shelters. >> a firefighter who rushed to the scene of a plane crash could face charges for a passengers desk. the as yarna airlines flight crashing at san francisco's international airport. a girl survived the accident. she was killed when a firetruck responding to the crash ran over her. investigators turned over their findings last week, and they need to determine if the firefighter broke laws or it was an accident. >> activists are taking to the streets voicing concern for reform. >> immigrants and their allies want to show that they haven't forgotten about reform legislation. an immigration bill will be
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introduced this week. most house republicans are unwilling to consider. >> imagine if you couldn't watch the baseball play-offs because you lost your vision. we'll have a story of an athlete who per cent veered and is playing baseball. >> wanted dead or alive. i'm in kuala lumpur, and i'll tell you why malaysia launched a nation-wide rat hunt.
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>> imagine if you couldn't watch
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welcome back. these are the top stories at this hour. extreme weather conditions are having an impact on much of the country, a series of tornados touched down in the midwest. a blizzard caused havoc in the north. and tropical storm karen is moving in on the south coast. more wild weather is expected on the weekend. >> shutdown stalemate. the government shutdown moves into the fifth side.
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>> healthcare.gov is being relaunched this weekend. there has been delays. >> for the most vulnerable in the society the shutdown is hitting hard. tens of thousands of people who demand on federal programs to five have been hit. with us to discuss the shut-down is olivia, she joins us from washington d.c. thank you for joining us. we appreciate t. >> it's great to be here. >> can you tell us about how the government shutdown is affecting low-number families? >> sure. it's having an effect, and it gets worse over the coming days, or if the days turn into weeks. i know you have covered the effect on headstart, which is a federally funded program for kids, providing early childhood education and nutrition.
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about 23 programs serving 19,000 children were supposed to get checks and didn't. some of those are coddling money to stay open as long as they can. others have closed. a lot of other programs, like hep paying for child -- help paying for childcare, or programs to monitor and licence childcare - the federal government does it together with the state. the states can keep them going for a little while. they are mostly doing that in the early days. it gets tougher as time goes on. >> you make a good point where you say in the early days there's ways to cobble together money here and there to keep the programs going. the longer the shutdown goes, and last time it was three weeks - can some of the programs last that long. >> i remember i was in the federal government, i was commissioner for children, youth and family during the 1995/1996 shutdown. i remember being in a big empty
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room in a federal building talking on the phone to head start directors who were making agonising choices - how far do i push my line of credit with the bank to stay open. people depend on them, the kids for their education, nutrition. i think a hidden cost of the shutdown is what it does for people who run the programs, or people in states or cities who could be working on making the quality of the government services better for everyone, but instead are trying to peace it together. yes, it gets harder so if it does go on for longer, that makes it hard to predict. >> what are your biggest concerns now? that's probably a difficult question to answer. there are children not getting food. there's children who can't get to daycare.
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what is the pressing concern? >> i would say there are worries on both sides. worries about the people hurt by the shutdown. i feel as they we can't solve it in a piecemeal way or caving in on one thing. a camly whose -- family whose kids are in head start, they need the program, but they need the rest of the federal government to work, that the usca and inspecting their food and it's safe, that house research is going on in case someone gets cancer, and they need to know if the country is safe. we can't do business fixing it piece by piece. we have to operate like the democracy we are and carry out the way the government works. >> are not some of these programs, programs that are suffering cuts recently, in the first place? >> yes, i think that that is one of the particular ways that it's
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damaging right now, the sequester, which has been shaving money off of programs has had an impact - i'm going to use head start as an example. it's one where it matters so much not just that we keep programs open, but we do a terrific job of high-quality early education so kids can succeed. programs have been, you know, having already low paid staff take cuts. they've been laying off staff, closing programs and consolidating so kids have to travel. then when you add to that the additional impact of uncertainty and crisis and loss of money, you have more article problems, a difficulty, you have difficulty moving forward on underlining goals. it makes it way harder when you have had chipping away and you add to that the loss of money and the turmoil and uncertainty and distraction for everybody.
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>> let's hope this gets solved very soon for the families who need it. >> olivia golden, director for the center for law and social policy. thank you for joining us. >> thank you for having me. >> military spokesperson in kenya named the four men he says are responsible for the attack on the westgate malin nairobi, an attack carried out from al-shabab. troops from the african union were on the front line in somali. peter greste has more on this difficulty matter. >> this is what a roadside does to an armoured troop carrier. al-shabab laid the charge, punching a hole in the engine bay as it carried troops through mogadishu. after six years of constant grinding work their equipment is wearing out. >> inside a briefing room a group of senior officers explained the problem. >> we will go from mogadishu on
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the main supply route... >> if the african union decides to advance against al-shabab, these men will have to work out how to do it. the commanders have just over 17,000 troops to cover almost half a million square kilo metres of scrubland. they can defend a handful of towns, but the countryside be longs to al-shabab. >> if we had more tools to enable us to continue operations on the ground, that would be better. that's what we are asking the international committee for. >> this is the sharp end of that problem. >> we still on the way. >> bravo company from sierra leone is on a foot patrol beyond
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their base in kiss mow. >> the sierra leone's have experience but can barely maintain security around the up to. moving deeper into the countryside is impossible. >> the patrols are designed to maintain security around the basin. they don't have the men or resources to take the fight to al-shabab. so the battles are very much happening at the time and place al-shabab chooses. >> we find a cave that al-shabab uses to launch attacks against the sierra leonie's base. it's empty, but there's nothing the soldiers can do to stop the rebels returning. >> we don't see them, except when we are on the defense. they attack us. >> they attack on their terms? >> yes. >> if the african union decides it's time to strike al-shabab in
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response to the westgate attack in nairobi, they couldn't do it without extra men or equipment. >> they don't have a single helicopter. >> just this morning foreign military forces carried out a predawn strike. there's no word on whether the fighters were killed. >> we now have sport. the baseball season is off to an impressive start. >> you have to love it. the drama is underway. in the playoffs everything is magnified the nth degree and everyone is looking for the next mr october. your stars can become superstoors. miguel is a big star. he got off to a great start in game 1 of the series. alex getting into the act with detroit, jumping out to a 3-0
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lead, nor man enough for matt scherzer, king of the mountain, that's a superstar in the making. he has one blue eye, and one brown eye. singer david bowe and meana kunas has that conditions. tigers won 3-2. >> boston strong. the rays had issues against the red socks in the fourth. david artiz hits a fly ball, "i got it" i don't got it. meyers forgot to catch the ball and the fans were over the 22-year-old kid. he's a rookie, and the floodgates opened as boston exploded for five runs. johnny gomes bangs it off. the red socks taking game one 12-1. myers took responsibility saying he blew it. he has a chance tonight.
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the okay land as, they have to man up. they are facing justin ber lander. >> jim hughes is a baseball superstar this you probably haven't heard of darren hames has more on his incredible journey on and off the field. >> what if someone told you to achieve a goal you have to visualise it. what if i told you there's an athlete that achievement everything, seeing nothing? >> the reality is i do have those moments where i go, "man, i wish i could see much" >> jim hughes lives with congen glaucoma, a disease causing damage to the nerve in the eye. a 22-year captain for the bombers, jim has not let what he can't see stop him from what he can be. >> getting dirty, going after a
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ball. you know, if it hit me in the face - that means i'll put them out. i was ready to sacrifices my body from the get-go and fell in love with the sport. >> before 13 of the long island bombers were legally blind or visually impaired, they had the chance to see and remember the simple things in baseball. such as what a baseball diamond or glove looks like. except for jim hughes, who is too young to remember what we see every day. >> lozing my vision at 3 made the road a little easier. >> but there were challenges. jim's mother lost her vision, and four of her five children, including jim, lost their sight to this disease. joseph, the oldest, kept the family solid. when jim was 16, joseph lost his life. >> being blind in a
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predominantly sighted world can be challenging. he said be strong, never let people say you can't do. you are able. go for it. he gave me - i think he gave me that approach to life. jim continued to play baseball with his brother, and he found love. >> we met on a blind date. i joked i went on a blind date with a blind guy. then i got to know jim. i knew snantly we were going to -- instantly we were going to get married. >> diana and jim tied the knot in 2004. they had three children. but there was a problem. . >> i think the moment where it was the most difficult for me was when my daughter was diagnosed with glaucoma. that no longer is in your control. when it affects your children, that's when you are like - that's when you ask the questions like, "what the hell?
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". >> thankfully through multiple surgeries sara can still watch daddy. >> she's just proud of him. she writes stories about him at school. about a hero, and how she loves him, and is impressed by him. she loves her dad. he's the most amazing person i have met, the most amazing husband i have seen. he's a phenomenal father. as an athlete he is impressive. >> what do you see? an athlete, a husband or a father. maybe jim hughes wants us to see how he plays the game, the game we call life. >> thank you to darren haynes for bringing us that story. jim hughes, a husband, father and superstar in the game of life. >> tropical storm karen is heading towards the gulf coast
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and tornados hit the plains in the midwest. let's check in with our metrologist. >> tropical storm karen weakened immensely, packing sustained winds of 40 miles per hour, a low-level tropical storm by the time it makes its way onshore. it will pack a bunch, put look at the satellite imagery. strong westerly winds, and dry air breaking up the storm. it will continue on a north-west track. once it pushing on sure, it will continue to track across the gulf and make its way between pennsy cola and mobile. it will bring a bit of rain fall. six inches of rain where it will make landfall. weekly dissipating into a tropical depression. we could see 4 inches of rain across south and eastern portions of louisiana, into
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southern portions of alabama and mississippi. 2 inches of rain to the north. we have a cool air mass take over across the plains and into the midwest. a strong line of thunder storms creating a bit of commotion across portions of nebraska into iowa and into south dakota yesterday, and also across the south-west. well, we have some severe weather to worry about today in terms of wind. we have high pressure in control, winds pushing in out of the east. los angeles climbing to a high of 92. low-levels of relative humidity. we'll see an increased fire danger and threat. which is why the national weather service in los angeles issued a red-flag warning. we'll have to be careful out there today. you can see the winds turning to the north, around shoamp where we should snow on the backside
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of the winter storm. there's a blizzard warning across south dakota, and an additional 4-5 inches of snow akumualate switching over the rain as it pushes to the east. one thing it is doing is cooling it down tremendously. look at rapid city. it's expected to be the high in the kansas city. further on into the east is where we could see severe weather, i think from chicago all the way down to indianapolis, cincinnati and into portions of arkansas. damaging winds, hail and isolated tornados. we'll keep you updated on that throughout the day. >> thank you. >> malaysia has been overrun - sorry - by rats. there's an estimated eight rats for every human in that country. now the country is fighting back. we have this report from kuala lumpur. >> setting a trap to catch a
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rat. it's a thankless task in one of malaysia's wholesale markets where the rat population lives with impugnity. this man worked as a rat catcher for 15 years. growing up in a rural village, rodents hold no fear. he would rather do this than rid the city of other pests. his team sets traps around the market and leaves them overnight to see if they can catch anything. >> translation: i have probably caught 30,000 rats in the past 15 years of my job. i am helping to reduce a number of rats and the amount of disease. >> that's a good thing too as malaysia launched a campaign to reduce the country's rat population. they'll pay 60 us cents for a rat brought to government disposal centres. there has been a spike in the number of cases of a bacterial disease found in rat urine,
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which can be fatal. almost 3,000 people have fallen ill with the disease this year, causing a farty of symptoms, including fever and muscle aches and pains. infections can cause organ failure. part of the problem lies in poor street hygiene. left-over food debris and trash not disposed of makes the perfect larder for the vermin. >> food waste down the drain, on the floor. it attracts the rats. >> if you keep the place clean, we'll get rid of the rats. they'll only go to a place where there's food. >> the next morning we returned to the market to check if the traps scored any rats. >> we are in luck. the bait snared three rodents. they'll be taken away and disposed of humanely. it's a small victory.
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the rat catches say they'll snare 20 rats each week from this market alone. it has little impact on 7 million-strong rat population. the catchers themselves say they could never erat kate every animal. -- eradicate every animal. >> rats carry a number of viruses. >> solutions for a global energiry problem. a warehouseworking to make renewable energy affordable and accessible. >> a large collection of art by piccaso goes up for sale, including a piece held by one of america's largest cities.
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when we talk about energy we talk big, power plants, nooub leer energy, energy on a geopolitical scale. a resource can start small. as part of our series the u.s. power surge, we have this story.
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>> it started as a flash of an idea. what happens if you let people rather than companies take power into their own hands - power that is electricity needed for everything and every day. it doesn't look like the most elegant solution, and the technology is not knew. the gasifier may be one answer. >> access to affordable renewable energy is a massive crisis and a massive opportunity. if the developing world doesn't find an alternative to carbon-based fuel sources we'll cook the planet. >> the idea is to hand power to the people. you need to build it and run it. to power this up you need biomass, and that is something as simple as wood chips and corn cobs or as exotic as palm nut
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shells. we'll use walnut shells. it takes about 30 minutes to put the power pallet together. it can fit in your backyard, run two tore three households or support a village of 40 families in indonesia, at $19,000, it's not cheap, but daily use makes up for the coast after a few years. >> a man, a machine and moments later a flip of switch. most clean energy developments looks at large-scale solutions - harnessing the power of the wind and the sun. the top-down approach. few considered the bottom-up solution. from a warehouse in california, there's a potential to go global. >> we'll install the machine in a wilderness area, new york. >> finally they realise they have to run with the rest of the
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world with renewable energies. >> witness the place where industrial meets innovation. the team here comes from diverse backgrounds. >> this space attracted an interesting group of people. there were mit scientists, stanford ph.d. physicists. junkyard fabricators, artists, engineers. the power pallet is manufactured and built by hand in the united states. for export and impact all around the world. >> al jazeera will bridge you more stories as part of our series on part of the u.s. power surge. here is something for you to senior when you eat breakfast. those looking at social media sites can lose their appetite. 60 photos of food were shown, and pae nuts from fed afterwards. those that looked at salty foods
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were less likely to enjoy the snacks. it's an example of sensory board 'em. >> soon one of pablo piccaso's mysterious work will go on the auction block. we take a look. >> andy warhol said if you look at a thing long enough it loses meaning. >> i see eyes, a knows, ant ler, an elephant. >> pablo piccaso's monumental work on the chicago daily plaza kept the curious guessing for years. >> it's a human representation from a different perspective. into when unveiled in 1967 reportedly almost no one applauded. one columnist wrote the sculpture had cold, mean eyes. years later, two models were going up for auction. >> these sculptures you don't see, it's a rare opportunity to acquire a great work by the
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master. this is estimated at $25 million-$35 million is something we hope to achieve a record price for. >> it is part of the collection belonging to jan krugier, an influential art dealer. this selection of jan krugier's art collection could fetch between $170-$244 million. the second miket lives at the art institute. many hope the model pablo piccaso kept for himself will call the windy city home. it was that work that touched off admiration and respect. >> they could have picked a figure commemorating a war. they went to a challenging artist and said, "make us something." >> he did. >> pk never visit ( -- pablo piccaso never visited chicago and never explained what the
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sculpture was. >> the precise problem in reading it is what he was trying to make. it is difficult to read. that's what he was making. a mystery and master piece making for a monumental sale. >> pablo piccaso was originally paid $350,000 for the statue. thank you so much for your time. condition to follow us on the website. there's more news at the top of the hour. do keep it here. [[voiceover]] from al jazeera media network comes a new voice of journalism in the u.s. >>the delta is a microcosm of america. [[voiceover]] we tell the human story, from around the block, across the country, with more points of view.
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>>if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a motel to living in their car. [[voiceover]] connected, inspired, bold. >>about a thousand protestors have occupied ...
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[[voiceover]] no doubt about it, innovation changes our lives. opening doors ... opening possibilities. taking the impossible from lab ... to life. on techknow, our scientists bring you a sneak-peak of the future, and take you behind the scenes at our evolving world. techknow - ideas, invention, life.
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>> that is aljazeera. ♪ theme >> hello, welcome to the news hour. the world's top news stairs, beginning with patrol on african union troops fighting al shabab. >> al shabab has said that one of their soldiers has been killed in a nighttime raid. >> helicopters and planes search for bodies off the italian la

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